Addressing Linguistic Diversity in Tøyen School: a Case Study

Topics: Education, High school, Secondary education Pages: 21 (6430 words) Published: January 12, 2013
OSLO AND AKERSHUS UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF APPLIED SCIENCES FACULTY OF EDUCATION AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

JUSTINA URBIETYTE
1st year student of Our Shared European Cultures

ADDRESSING LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY IN TØYEN SCHOOL: A CASE STUDY THE FIELDWORK

Research adviser Hilde Tørnby

Oslo 2012

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ......................................................................................................................3 GLOSSARY OF TERMS............................................................................................................5 I. LANGUAGE AND LANGUAGE DIVERSITY IN SCHOOLS ...........................................6 1.1. 1.2. 1.3. Language and Language Diversity ................................................................................6 Diversity in Schools Today ...........................................................................................7 Theoretical Issues Regarding Provision of Teacher and Head-Teacher Training

regarding Inclusion and Diversity at Schools ...........................................................................9 1.4. 1.5. II. 2.1. 2.2. Factors Influencing the Achievement Linguistically Diverse Students at School ......... 10 An Overview of Primary and Lower Secondary Education in Norway ........................ 11 CASE ANALYSIS OF TØYEN SCHOOL IN OSLO ..................................................... 13 Learning a Language, a Pride for the Origin and Respect for the Peers ........................ 13 Methods applied and Teacher Selection....................................................................... 15

CONCLUSIONS....................................................................................................................... 17 REFERENCES ......................................................................................................................... 19 APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................. 21

2 Addressing Linguistic Diversity in Tøyen School: A Case Study by Justina Urbietyte

INTRODUCTION

Education is a significantly important human activity. It is an inevitable part of the human race which continous to the very end of one‘s life. In order to educate the future generations of our society effectively, the education system must be successful teaching all children to communicate and interact with people from different backgrounds and with different abilities. As Jagdish Gandhi states, “good education is an education that makes a good human being, a good member of a family, a good member of a community, a good citizen of a country, a good citizen of the world” (2010). But then the challenge arises how to assure and provide equal education for the children who talk different languages. Even UNESCO Language Policy states – “the challenge is for education systems to adapt to these complex realities and provide a quality education”. Diversity as such is a fundamental aspect of our world and is a defining characteristic of the field of education [12]. According to official UPUS (Linguistic Development in Urban Environments) website [12], linguistic diversity in Norway during the last 30-40 years has increased dramatically. In the capital more than one third of the pupils in primary and secondary schools speak are so-called minority languages. And according to Statistics Norway, immigrants are set to make up almost half of Oslo’s population by 2040 [9]. There are 120 different languages presented but those numbers do not really show the factual vitality of these languages and the question arises, how can all those languages interact together when it comes to teaching and learning because for linguistically diverse pupils and teachers, the issues of diversity can be quite complex and challenging. Alan Patten and Will Kymlicka notice that immigrant groups are unlikely to demand territorial self-government or...


References: 3. Gandhi, J., Education for Protection and Security, Lucknow: The Global Classroom,
2010;
4. Goldberg, D. T., Multiculturalism. A Critical Reader, Massachusetts: Blackwell, Oxford
UK & Cambridge USA, 1996;
5. Gollnick, D. M. & Chinn, P. C., Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society, 6. Grenfell, M., Bourdieu, Language and Linguistics, London: Continuum, 2011; 7. Hays, D. G & Singh, A. A., Qualitative Inquiry in Clinical and Educational Settings.
New York: The Guilford Press, 2012;
8
Lightning Source UK Ltd., 2007;
9
Oxford Uniersity Press, 2006;
10
Education of Poor and Minority Adolescents. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum, 2000;
11
and Education. The Education of Immigrant Students in a Globalized World. London: University Press of California, 2007;
12
Policy Evidence. Education Policy Analysis Archives, 8(1), 2000, retrieved from: http://epaa.asu.edu/epaa/v8n1/ [2012.11.10];
15
the Office of the Minister for Integration, 2012, retrieved from: http://www.into.ie/ROI/Publications/OtherPublications/OtherPublicationsDownloads/Inte rcultural_education_strategy.pdf [2012.11.11];
18
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