Addiction Consequences

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The Reasoning and Consequences of Addiction Addiction is defined as a “compulsive psychological need for and use of a habit-forming substance” (merriam-webster.com). It is a debilitating disease that spreads like an infection throughout the life of the addict. Persistent use then consumes every aspect of that life, damaging the physical, psychological and social well-being of anyone within its grip (merriam-webster.com). Addiction does not discriminate. People from every race, age, sex, religion, social standing, and background have their lives demolished by this vicious disorder every single day. Appeasing this irrepressible craving becomes the addicts’ highest, and often only, priority. As everything else in their life slowly loses its meaningfulness, …show more content…
Many traumatic events, such as sexual abuse, bullying, domestic violence or loss of a loved one have pivotal roles in the development of the psyche (dualdiagnosis.org). It is crucial to have a happy, healthy childhood to establish a good foundation for mental stability as an adult. When such scarring situations take place, the effects are typically lasting and, at times, permanently damaging to the brain. In fact, witnessing or experiencing a traumatic event early in life has many consequences, even when they do not appear initially (dualdiagnosis.org). These unfortunate circumstances may result in suffering from disorders such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety (dualdiagnosis.org). Such disorders make them increasingly susceptible to substance abuse. Children often lack the mental ability to overcome these occurrences without the help of a medical professional. Yet, many go without those services and support, leaving them unable to handle their emotions sufficiently. For example, if a child loses a parent and is never fully assisted through the grieving process, it is absolutely reasonable to assume that child is at a greater risk of being an …show more content…
According to DrugAbuse.gov, drug addictions often coexist in those already suffering from mental instabilities. Misusing the drug or behavior of choice can trigger or further exacerbate those disorders (drugabuse.gov). Consequently, this can further add to the addiction by beginning a process of substance abuse called self-medicating. In individuals effected by both mental diseases and drug problems, some form of self-medicating is likely already happening. For instance, a man effected by depression begins taking pills to feel happier. Shortly into this experiment, he becomes addicted to the way the pills make him feel, leading to an addiction to the pills itself. It becomes obvious that there is an “obsessive-compulsive dynamic” at play, resulting in a “breakdown in impulse control” in the user (psychologytoday.com). Accordingly, a powerful cycle is created. It is believed that there is nothing more difficult for a person confronted by both social and emotional challenges while attempting to live with a mental illness (psycologytoday.com). These disorders have unique pressures regarding the use of drugs or addictive behavior. Many people effected by mental illness just want to feel normal or sane, assuming that those feelings can only be obtained through substances or risky behavior. Ordinarily, this is only a temporary solution which makes

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