Addiction and Society

Good Essays
Addiction and Society
Sociology
Professor Trembicki
February 22, 2013

Abstract Drug addiction is a disease that damages addicts, their families, communities, the economy, and society. Addiction has a widespread reach: from dealing with unpredictable and often dangerous addicts at home to the costs incurred by society as a whole. As the population of addicts rises and the average age of an addict is younger, society is forced to deal with a pressing matter. Addiction is no longer limited to the poor and underprivileged; society can no longer ignore this problem and simply look away.

Drug addiction is a disease that damages addicts, their families, communities, the economy, and society. Addiction has a widespread reach: from dealing with unpredictable and often dangerous addicts at home to the costs incurred by society as a whole. As the population of addicts rises and the average age of an addict decreases, society is forced to deal with a pressing matter. Addiction is no longer limited to the poor and underprivileged; society can no longer ignore this problem and simply look away.
“Drug addiction continues to be a major concern for society, and the concern grows with every passing year. As drug addiction ruins lives of those most closely affected, society at large suffers from addiction’s rippling effects...drug addiction’s debilitating effects range from financial, to functional, to emotional and should by no means be taken lightly” (Lei 2012).
The negative effects on society because of addiction are endless and most members of society are not even aware of them unless they, or someone they know, are currently in the grips of addiction. Addiction affects numerous aspects of society: public health, public welfare, crime, child abuse, disease, domestic violence, homelessness, lost wages…The negative effects are overwhelming. When a member of society is accused of drug use/abuse, and legal action is taken, many tax-payer provided services are

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