Adaptation in Children's Literature

Topics: Translation, Children's literature, Fairy tale Pages: 20 (5949 words) Published: July 25, 2010
Translation Theory – Domestication in Children’s Literature

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 2 1.0 CHILDREN’S LITERATURE AND TRANSLATING FOR CHILDREN ......................................... 3 2.0 THE CHARACTERISTICS OF GRIMMS’ FAIRY TALES .......................................................... 6 3.0 DOMESTICATION IN THE TRANSLATION OF CHILDREN’S LITERATURE

.......................... 7

4.0 DOMESTICATION IN GRIMMS’ FAIRY TALES ...................................................................... 9 4.1 IDEOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS .......................................................................................... 9 4.2 IMAGE ADAPTATIONS - TRANSLATION OF ILLUSTRATIONS ........................................ 11 4.3 RHYTHM ADJUSTMENT .................................................................................................. 17 4.4 DOMESTICATION OF NAMES ......................................................................................... 19 CONCLUSIONS .......................................................................................................................... 21 REFERENCES ............................................................................................................................ 23

1

Translation Theory – Domestication in Children’s Literature

“Domestication accommodates itself to target cultural and linguistic values: through domestication, we adapt the text according to its future readers, culture, society, norms and power relations.” (Oittinen 2003:129). Discuss in relation to the translation of children‟s literature.

INTRODUCTION In the last forty years, children‟s literature, a domain traditionally associated with teachers and librarians, has been made a subject of extensive scholarly research (Tabbert 2002). In fact, research across various disciplines has contributed to better reception and understanding of the value of this genre. Simultaneously, the importance of the topic was brought to the fore and more and more studies have been dedicated to the translation of children‟s literature and the translation techniques involved.

One of the techniques used by translators, which has been also extensively applied to the children‟s literature, is the strategy of domestication, first introduced in the work of Venuti (1995). The aim of this essay is to demonstrate and discuss examples in which domestication process is visible. The examples are taken from the classic representatives of children‟s literature, i.e. the Kinder- und Hausmärchen fairy tales by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm. In the first part of the study, the main characteristics of children‟s literature, including the main features of Grimms‟ fairytales, are described. The primary research material has been narrowed to a few fairy tales by Grimm Brothers (Projekt Gutenberg-Spiegel Online 19942007) and their two Polish translations, by Marceli Tarnowski from 1956 and Aleksandra Michałowska from 2010. The above translations have been published in two different years by two different publishing houses. However, both perform the same function in the Polish system of children‟s literature and are aimed at the target reader of 7-12 year-old children.

2

Translation Theory – Domestication in Children’s Literature

The process of domestication and its application is discussed by reference to the examples taken from the above translations and compared with the contemporary English collection of Grimms‟ fairy tales from 2008, entitled My Treasury of Bedtime Tales. By referring to the two Polish translations from different periods and the contemporary English one, the aim is to show that the specific time and culture in which a translator works can influence the resulting text and the way it is domesticated. It is hoped that by applying such an approach a deeper understanding of the...

References: Baldick, C. (ed.) 2008. The Oxford Dictionary of Literary Terms. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. Bassnett, S. 1991. Translation Studies. London: Methuen. Blamires, D. 2006. The Early Reception of the Grimms‟ Kinder- und Hausmärchen in England IN: Lathey, G. (ed.) The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon, Buffalo, and Toronto: Multilingual Matters. Coulthard, L. (ed.) 2008. My Treasury of Bedtime Tales. Heatherton Victoria: Hinkler Books. Dollerup, C. 2003. Translation for Reading Aloud. Meta. 48(1-2), pp81-103. Fernández López, M. 2006. Translation Studies in Contemporary Children‟s Literature: A Comparison of Intercultural Ideological Factors IN: Lathey, G. (ed.) The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon, Buffalo, and Toronto: Multilingual Matters. Frank, H.T. 2005. Australian Specificity in Titles and Covers of Children‟s Books. Target. 17(1), pp111-143. Gumkowski, M. and Łątkowska, M. (eds.) 2010. Jakub i Wilhelm Grimm Baśnie. Wrocław: Siedmioróg. Hunt, P. 1991. Critisism, Theory, and Children’s Literature. Cambridge and Massachusetts: Basil Blackwell. Lathey, G. (ed.) 2006. The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon, Buffalo, and Toronto: Multilingual Matters. Lewis, D. 2001. Reading Contemporary Picturebooks. Picturing Text. London and New York: Routledge. Mazi-Leskovar, D. 2003. Domestication and Foreignization in Translating American Prose for Slovenian Children. Meta. 48(1-2), pp250-265. Munday, J. 2008. Introducing Translation Studies. London and New York: Routledge. Nord, C. 1991. Text Analysis in Translation: Theory, Methodology and Didactic Application. Amsterdam, Atlanta and GA: Rodopi. Nord, C. 2003. Proper Names in Translations for Children: Alice in Wonderland as a Case in Point. Meta. 48(1-2), pp182-196. O‟Connell, E. 2006. Translating for Children IN: Lathey. G. (ed.) The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon, Buffalo and Toronto: Multilingual Matters.
21
Translation Theory – Domestication in Children’s Literature
O‟Sullivan, E. 2006. Translating Pictures IN: Lathey, G. (ed.) The Translation of Children’s Literature. Clevedon, Buffalo, and Toronto: Multilingual Matters. Oittinen, R. 2000. Translating for Children. New York and London: Garland Publishing. Oittinen, R. 2003. Where the Wild Things Are: Translating Picture Books. Meta. 48(1-2), pp128-141. Pereira, N.M. 2007. Book Illustration as Intersemiotic Translation: The Case of Alice in Wonderland in Brazil IN: Kenny, D. and Ryou, K. (eds.) Across Boundaries: International Perspectives on Translation Studies. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars. Puurtinen, T. 1995. Linguistic Acceptability in Translated Children’s Literature. Joensuu: University of Joensuu. SpiegelOnline Kultur. Projekt Gutenberg-DE 1994-2007. [Online]. Available from: http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/?id=19&autorid=220&autor_vorname=+Br%FCder&autor_nachn ame=Grimm&cHash=b31bbae2c6 [Accessed 3 May 2010]. Tabbert, R. 2002. Approaches to the Translation of Children‟s Literature: a Review of Critical Studies Since 1960. Target. 14(2), pp303-351. Venuti, L. 1995/2008. The Translator’s Invisibility: A History of Translation. London and New York: Routledge. Venuti, L. 2004. The Translations Studies Reader. London: Routledge. Wall, B. 1991. The Narrator’s Voice: The Dilemma of Children’s Fiction. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire, and London: Macmillan Academic and Professional Ltd. Wortman, S. (ed.) 1956. Wilhelm i Jakub Grimm Baśnie. Warszawa: Nasza Księgarnia.
22
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay about Applying Theories to Children’s Literature
  • Adaptation Literature ans cinema essay
  • Children's Literature Essay
  • Literature and Adaptation Essay
  • Children's Literature Essay
  • Children's Literature Essay
  • Children's Literature in a Pluralistic society Essay
  • Childhood: Children's Literature Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free