Accounts Receivable and Balance Debit Credit

Powerful Essays
Chapter 2
Recording Business Transactions

Review Questions

1. The three categories of the accounting equation are assets, liabilities, and equity. Assets include Cash, Accounts Receivable, Notes Receivable, Prepaid Expenses, Land, Building, Equipment, Furniture, and Fixtures. Liabilities include Accounts Payable, Notes Payable, Accrued Liability, and Unearned Revenue. Equity includes Owner’s Capital, Owner’s Withdrawals, Revenue, and Expenses.

2. Companies need a way to organize their accounts so they use a chart of accounts. Accounts starting with 1 are usually Assets, 2 – Liabilities, 3 – Equity, 4 – Revenues, and 5 – Expenses. The second and third digits in account number indicate where the account fits within the category.

3. A chart of accounts and a ledger are similar in that they both list the account names and account numbers of the business. A ledger, though, provides more detail. It includes the increases and decreases of each account for a specific period and the balance of each account at a specific point in time.

4. With a double-entry you need to record the dual effects of each transaction. Every transaction affects at least two accounts.

5. A T-account is a shortened form of each account in the ledger. The debit is on the left side, credit on the right side, and the account name is shown on top.

6. Debits are increases for assets, owner’s withdrawals, and expenses. Debits are decreases for liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue.

7. Credits are increases for liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue. Credits are decreases for assets, owner’s withdrawal, and expenses.

8. Assets, owner’s withdrawal, and expenses have a normal debit balance. Liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue have a normal credit balance.

9. Source documents provide the evidence and data for accounting transactions. Examples of source documents a business would have are: bank deposit slips, purchase invoices, bank checks, and sales invoices

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