Accounts Receivable and Balance Debit Credit

Topics: Accounts receivable, Double-entry bookkeeping system, Liability Pages: 170 (5609 words) Published: November 24, 2013
Chapter 2
Recording Business Transactions

Review Questions

1. The three categories of the accounting equation are assets, liabilities, and equity. Assets include Cash, Accounts Receivable, Notes Receivable, Prepaid Expenses, Land, Building, Equipment, Furniture, and Fixtures. Liabilities include Accounts Payable, Notes Payable, Accrued Liability, and Unearned Revenue. Equity includes Owner’s Capital, Owner’s Withdrawals, Revenue, and Expenses.

2. Companies need a way to organize their accounts so they use a chart of accounts. Accounts starting with 1 are usually Assets, 2 – Liabilities, 3 – Equity, 4 – Revenues, and 5 – Expenses. The second and third digits in account number indicate where the account fits within the category.

3. A chart of accounts and a ledger are similar in that they both list the account names and account numbers of the business. A ledger, though, provides more detail. It includes the increases and decreases of each account for a specific period and the balance of each account at a specific point in time.

4. With a double-entry you need to record the dual effects of each transaction. Every transaction affects at least two accounts.

5. A T-account is a shortened form of each account in the ledger. The debit is on the left side, credit on the right side, and the account name is shown on top.

6. Debits are increases for assets, owner’s withdrawals, and expenses. Debits are decreases for liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue.

7. Credits are increases for liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue. Credits are decreases for assets, owner’s withdrawal, and expenses.

8. Assets, owner’s withdrawal, and expenses have a normal debit balance. Liabilities, owner’s capital, and revenue have a normal credit balance.

9. Source documents provide the evidence and data for accounting transactions. Examples of source documents a business would have are: bank deposit slips, purchase invoices, bank checks, and sales invoices

10. Transactions are first recorded in a journal, which is the record of transactions in date order.

11. Step 1: Identify the accounts and the account type. You need this information before you can complete the next step. Step 2: Decide if each account increases or decreases using the rules of debits and credits. Reviewing the rules of debits and credits, we use the accounting equation to help determine debits and credits for each account. Step 3: Record transactions in the journal using journal entries. Step 4: Post the journal entry to the ledger. When journal entries are posted from the journal to the ledger, the dollar amount is transferred from the debit and credit columns to the specific accounts in the ledger. The date on the journal entry should also be transferred to the accounts in the ledger. Step 5: Determine whether the accounting equation is in balance. After each entry the accounting equation should always be in balance.

12. Part 1: Date of the transaction. Part 2: Debit account name and dollar amount. Part 3: Credit account name and dollar amount. The credit account name is indented. Part 4: Brief explanation.

13. When transactions are posted from the journal to the ledger, the dollar amount is transferred from the debit and credit columns to the specific accounts in the ledger. The date of the journal entry is also transferred to the accounts in the ledger. The posting reference columns in the journal and ledger are also completed. In a computerized system, this step is completed automatically when the transaction is recorded in the journal.

14. The trial balance is used to prove the equality of total debits and total credits of all accounts in the ledger; it is also used to prepare the financial statements.

15. A trial balance verifies the equality of total debits and total credits of all accounts on the trial balance and is an internal document used only by employees of the company. The balance sheet, on the other hand, presents...
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