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Addison's disease
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Jump to: navigation, search | It has been suggested that Autoimmune adrenalitis be merged into this article or section. (Discuss) Proposed since March 2009. |

Addison's disease | Classification and external resources | ICD-10 | E27.1-E27.2 | ICD-9 | 255.4 | DiseasesDB | 222 | MedlinePlus | 000378 | eMedicine | med/42 | MeSH | D000224 |
Addison’s disease (also chronic adrenal insufficiency, hypocortisolism, and hypocorticism) is a rare, chronic endocrine disorder where the adrenal glands do not produce sufficient steroid hormones (glucocorticoids and often mineralocorticoids).[1] Lifelong, continuous treatment with steroid replacement therapy is required, with regular follow-up treatment and monitoring for other health problems.[2]
It is generally diagnosed via blood tests and medical imaging.[2] Treatment involves replacing the absent hormones (oral hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone).
Addison’s disease is named after Dr. Thomas Addison, the British physician who first described the condition in On the Constitutional and Local Effects of Disease of the Suprarenal Capsules (1849).[3] The adjective "Addisonian" describes features of the condition, and patients suffering from Addison’s disease.[2] While Addison's six patients in 1855 all had adrenal tuberculosis,[4] the term "Addison's disease" does not imply an underlying disease process. Contents[hide] * 1 Signs and symptoms * 1.1 Symptoms * 1.2 Clinical signs * 1.3 Addisonian crisis * 2 Causes * 2.1 Adrenal dysgenesis * 2.2 Impaired steroidogenesis * 2.3 Adrenal destruction * 3 Diagnosis * 3.1 Suggestive features * 3.2 Testing * 4 Treatment * 4.1 Maintenance * 4.2 Crisis * 5 Epidemiology * 6 Prognosis * 7 Famous Addisonians * 8 In other animals * 9 See also * 10 References * 11 External links |
[edit] Signs and symptoms
[edit] Symptoms
The symptoms of

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