Abortion In Ernest Hemingway's Hills Like White Elephants

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Abortion, weather it is right or wrong, it is still an enormous issue that numerous people, including politicians, worldwide deem upon differently. Recently, in Texas, the Supreme Court justified abortion rights by eliminating abortion laws. Contrasting today’s society, abortion was intolerable and entirely prohibited not too long ago. In “Hills Like White Elephants,” Hemingway conveys a couple and a train station to symbolize the crossroads within their relationship due to an “operation” (abortion). The setting is significantly important in which the train station and its surroundings symbolize the restrain on time and the couple’s relationship as a whole.
In the story, Hemingway illustrates an American man and a girl waiting at a train station

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