A Brave New World: A Dystopian Society

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Through the readings of, “Brave New World”, it states that a utopian society is to achieve a state of stability, loss of individuality, and even the undoing of Mother nature must occur. Accomplished engineers conditioned produces a world in which people are going to live a happily ever after life but at a great cost. As in for today there are many strong debates and questions about the extraordinary breakthroughs in science such as cloning, in communications through the Internet with its never ending pool of knowledge and the never ending movement to censor it, and the increasing level of immersion in entertainment. To many cloning, censoring, and total immersion entertainment are new, but those who have read Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, …show more content…
The people of Brave New World are not born to a mother or father. Instead a single fertilized egg is cloned repeatedly until ninety-six separate embryos are present. Identity was accomplished through the brainwash, and forcing information and beliefs onto young toddlers to guarantee that the certain individual would think and live a certain way. The book states, “They’ll grow up with what the psychologists used to call an instinctive hared of books and flowers” (Huxley 30). This is the key to stability that it shows there is no sign of individuality. Our identity is found in each individual and that is the key based on how they are able to find their own identity and conclusions on their beliefs. Learning, comparing, and child and error is how identity is …show more content…
The reason they have this is because it puts a person into a perpetual anastatic state to avoid any feeling in the body. Huxley is stating that when a citizen is in their wrongdoings or alone they tend to take tablets to avoid and escape the situations. Stability in the community plays a huge part in the novel for the reason being that people are content with their lives. In addition to that our society can relate by the drugs that are being legalized around the world. On how people used drugs to get around their issues and life

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