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1. Assess the validity: “Jacksonian Democracy was a myth”-
Thesis: Some argue that Jacksonian Democracy was a myth but examples such as the spoils system, the universal white male suffrage, and increase in voter turnout prove that it was in fact Democratic.
Paragraph 1: Spoils system- rewarded political supporters with public office, gave more “common” people a chance to be a part of the public office and lessened the amount of “literate” men.
Paragraph 2: Universal White male suffrage, increase in voter turnout- the universal male suffrage allowed more white men to vote which increased the voter turnout, more men that weren’t as literate or owned property could vote

2. The election of Thomas Jefferson is sometimes called the “Revolution of 1800.” To what extent is this description accurate?
Thesis: The election of Thomas Jefferson is sometimes or often called the “Revolution of 1800” and this statement is both accurate and non accurate. It is to some extent true because Jefferson, protected western farmers, nullified the federalist excise taxes and allowed both the Alien and Sedition Acts to elapse. Some may say that this is not true because he switched to loose confederation.
Paragraph 1: Nullified Alien and Sedition Acts- Alien 1798(pres. can deport dangerous foreigners, raised residency requirements for citizenship) Sedition 1798(interfering with gov. policies had to pay fine and imprisonment)
The Sedition acts were meant for Jeffersonian opposition, republicans let it expire on 1801.
Jefferson also made a peaceful transition of gov. power for the first time to another political party
Paragraph 2: Jefferson ended up giving federalist power through the Louisiana Purchase which he was unauthorized to do, caused him to switch to loose construction which meant that the federal gov. could use powers not granted in the constitution to carry out responsibilities.
Also, during his election, Jefferson and Burr tied in electoral

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