1984 Dystopian Society

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George Orwell’s book “1984” is a novel about a dystopian society that is constantly monitored. The society is systematically based on creating an efficient world where people are compelled to not rebel. Orwell creates a book that incorporates ideas from Marx, Foucault, and Weber. The Party is seen to overuse its authority by restraining people from exploring their individuality. It showcases how a society will end up being based on the desire of power. The Party is driven by power and control.
The dystopia society is composed of the three classes: inner party, outer Party, and the proles. The Proles are the proletariat, the outer party is the petit bourgeoisie (middle class), and the inner party is the Bourgeoisie. The proles are the working
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Our society contains surveillance all over the place. No matter where you go someone is always watching you. . The Government is shaping one’s behavior by embedding the idea of one is always being watched. Interesting enough, it’s almost as Orwell foreshadowed what society would end up like because the book was published in the late the 1940’s and showcases a society using surveillance. Like the book, people today self- police themselves because they fear the consequence of getting caught. Is it possible that our government too, is only doing this to control us for their self-gain of power? Perhaps not. But, the movie “Citizenfour” tells me otherwise. Within the beginning of the movie, the NSA was being accused of monitoring people through different forms: cell phone calls, internet searches, and laptop cameras. Not only was the NSA willingly watching people without their consent, but they were denying the charges. If the NSA was guilty of the crime, why hide it? Is it because they want to keep people under control for their own sake? Similarly, “1984” has a higher authority (the Party) controlling the rest of the people for power. The government too, wants aims to prevent people from rebelling, so they believe that monitoring everything is needed. In “1984” the Party monitors everything to ensure security of their power, but perhaps our government wants to increase security upon the people to make us feel safe. With different traumatic events like nine eleven, maybe it’s the governments way of dealing with

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