1984 A Dystopian Essay

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1984 The novel 1984 shows many characteristics of a dystopian society. In a dystopian society people often lead fearful and dehumanizing lives while also fearing technology. In 1984 the characters in the book are forced to follow unnecessary rules or else they risk the chance of getting vaporized. The fear of technology comes into play with the telescreen used in the book. The telescreen can monitor and citizen at any time if they are in view of the telescreen. The setting of 1984 also seems to take place in the future. You can kind of infer this with the use of the two way telescreen and the use of vaporization as a punishment. Oceana, the country were 1984 takes place is ran by a tyrannical government. The government keeps its citizens under close watch at all times, using the telescreen as …show more content…
Just like the language in the book, the setting and environment help create the dystopian feel in the book. The contrast between Winston’s vision of a perfect world and his reality is quite shocking. Orwell uses symbolism to depict the loss of privacy in the novel. He uses language to show loss and the loss of mental control. The thought police in the book strike fear into the citizens. The thought police could be anyone, they are meant to blend in with society. Like when Mr. Charrington offered the room to Winston and Julia as a hide out so they could be with each other. Then the thought police busted through the door and Winston found out that he had been a thought police the whole time. This shows the fear in the fact that you can’t trust anyone in this society. The inner party even recruited kids to spy on their parents, and there were many accounts of people getting vaporized because their kids turned them in. The party also disliked the idea of pleasure, for example you could only have sex for the purpose of reproduction. They made sure that people lived in misery all the time. They would lie about the rations they gave out to people to make them seem like it

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