1980s Culture Analysis

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While the institutional changes took place as responses to the public’s fueled curiosity and fear towards anorexia, the cultural leaders in the 1980s began to ponder on the social effects of anorexia and their personal experiences related to the disease. They brought the experience and pain of anorexia to a larger audience through personal testimonials. After Carpenter’s death, the 1980s saw an increasing number of movies, autobiographies and novels about personal anorexic experiences. These cultural works on anorexia involved efforts from celebrities, writers, and cultural leaders whose target audience included adolescents and anorexic suffers. Both novels and autobiographies were intended to provide teenage girls with warnings against the

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