16th Century England Research Paper

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Topics: Europe, Spain
In the 16th century, many nations in Europe are changed and profit by the many economic growths and changes taken place throughout that period of time. In England, a variety of rulers such as King Henry VIII, Queen “Bloody” Mary Tudor, and Queen Elizabeth I ultimately result in the decline of England’s wealth. Thus, resulting in England’s economics to decline with each reign. From trade in the Mediterranean Sea between the Middle East and Europe, an exchanging of ideas and products take place such as Greco Roman ideals. Another flourishing movement is the Renaissance Humanism throughout Europe, which results in a reform of education, religion, and social classes. With this rebirth movement results in the competition for political power and …show more content…
Since King Henry the Navigator of Portugal had three objectives which was to trade in the Atlantic Ocean, get involved in the slave trade with the Ottoman Empire, and obtain African gold, Portugal began to take control of the Mediterranean trade routes, also called the Silk Road. By obtaining control over the Canary Islands, Portugal was able to initiate the establishments of forts along the African coastline. Therefore, Portugal was able to start producing export goods from the forts along the coastline that ultimately led to the empowerment over the slave trade. Thus, Portugal’s economics increased with the money made from the slave trade and the other exported goods. This was a gradual since Portugal had to first establish forts along the African coastline to gain power and land, which led to the overtaking of the Mediterranean trade routes. Since the nations were competing economically, Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand sent Christopher Columbus to explore the new land that he discovered, collect information and observe characteristics of the land, and return to Spain with what he discovered. The discoveries led to Spain settling in the New World and South America. Since Spain began to claim land, which increased their nation economically by sending products from the foreign land to their native country, Portugal, England, and France began to …show more content…
From Queen Elizabeth I’s rule remained the constant rivalry with Spain. When Elizabeth stopped a Catholic rebellion from continuing, which Spain supported, she was asserting her power over the English nation. This caused problems because while Spain and England are rivals, they also have different national religions. Thus, English sailors challenged Spain for the control of trade in the New World and Atlantic Ocean. By using the “protestant wind” as a form of power and unity of the English citizens, England was able to win. When the English defeated the Spanish Armada, this increased England’s power and nationalism. This was a gradual change because competitive nationalism between Spain and England gradually increased as more people took part in trade and began to settle in the New World. Two other nations that are examples of competitive nationalism are Spain and Portugal. Beginning with Portugal’s control over the Mediterranean trade routes, Spain took the initiative to start claiming land in the New World. By doing so, the Spanish sent aggressive conquistadors that claimed as much land that was available. Thus, Portugal sent explorers over to claim land. With the complications of the relationship between the two nations, the Treaty of Tordesillas was established. This was a rapid change because Spain and Portugal were aggressively trying to

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