13th Amendment Significance

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SIGNIFICANCE OF 13TH, 14TH, 15TH AMENDMENTS

The 13th Amendment went through a number of significant constitutional processes and stages before finally gaining a place in the United States Constitution as it is today. For example Senate actually passed the Amendment on April 8, 1864 but it was not until January 31, 1865 that the House would also pass it (Wagner, 2006). Even with this, actual adoption of the 13th Amendment came to fruition on December 6, 1865. The 14th Amendment also went through similar roads of constitutional wrangling before it would finally be adopted on July 9, 1868. For instance there was the fierce contention of most parts of the Amendment, especially by states in the South, causing the rectification of the Amendment
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With the 13th Amendment for instance, its major backing power was for the abolition of slavery and all forms of involuntary servitude. This is because prior to the Civil War, United States was a country that was divided among itself and its people because of issues of slavery and involuntary servitude (Doniger, 1999). The Civil War was actually the very consequence of such disagreements as to whether or not slavery and human rights discrimination was a practice that needed to be continued in the country (Wagner, 2006). Having fought the Civil War as a human rights battle therefore, constitutional amendments that eliminated key human rights abuses in the country was therefore necessary and thus the Amendments that …show more content…
In the 15th Amendment for instance, right to vote is granted to all American male, irrespective of their color or race. Should such an amendment be deleted, there is every indication that the rights of Black people and other people in the minor group would be trampled upon, including that of the current president of the United States, who is of Black origin. Consequently, such magnificent levels of contributions that minority people of that caliber could make to the American economy and entire American existence would be deleted as

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