Preview

13 Amendment Pros And Cons

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
830 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
13 Amendment Pros And Cons
The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified on July 9th, 1868. It helped grant citizenship to “all persons born or naturalized in the United States (Primary Documents in American History).” One of the reasons the amendment was made to help former slaves become citizens after the civil war. They were being denied the right to become citizens after slavery had been abolished. One of the main points in the Amendment was that states can not denounce land, freedom or life from any person or citizen in the United States without a trial. Birthright Citizenship was another major part, as it stated that any person born in the US, a US territory or a US military base or was born abroad to an American citizen who has lived at least 5 years in the US, automatically became a citizen. People who are under oath from another country cannot be in office for any position. The Fourteenth Amendment covers a diverse range of subjects, as it has been cited the most out of any …show more content…
They wanted to repeal the Amendment so that people who are not citizens of the US could not use their children to improve their legal status. These children are referred to as “anchor babies.” The point of controversy is whether or not people can be allowed to use their children to help themselves out. People come to the US to create a better life for themselves and feed and clothe their families. They are not “stealing our jobs” if they are working harder than all of the people that are citizens in the US. They are willing to do the dirty work that no one wants to do, but they only do it to support their family. They want their grandkids and every generation after that to be apart of our country and be able to go to college and get a great job. These “illegal” immigrants only come to the US to escape poverty or war, and to keep their family alive and

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    The thirteenth amendment states, “neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except under crime, where the subject will be convicted, shall exist within the United States, unless under punishment of crime.”. This means, the United States abolished slavery and people forcing a person to act against their will. Congress also has the power to enforce this amendment. After this amendment was passed slavery was made illegal and the constitution was changed.…

    • 925 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The authority of the Constitution, its ability to control our lives and enforce our laws, loses its legitimacy if we do not have principles that anchor it securely to reality. The Constitution was seen as a document that strikes a delicate balance between government power to accomplish the great ends of civil society and individual liberty. James Madison created the Federalist Papers, if men were angels, no government would be necessary. This was the beginning of the first amendments to the Constitution called the Bill of Rights. Madison opposed the inclusion of a Bill of Rights in the Constitution. Thomas Jefferson became convinced that judges enforced rights are among the necessary against tyranny.…

    • 493 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The amendment I chose is also most recent; the 27th amendment. I find it to be rather interesting because it was originally proposed in 1789 along with the Bill of Rights yet it was not ratified until just over 200 years later in 1992. The amendment states, “No law, varying the compensation for the services of the Senators and Representatives, shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened” (History, Arts, and Achieves, n.d.). Or, to paraphrase, any votes made by Congress to increase or decrease its own wages will not take place until the after the subsequent congressional election.…

    • 410 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Bill of rights, the constitution and the amendments of the constitution are the national foundation of freedom. The 14th amendment has become one of the most important parts of the constitution. The 14th amendment is divided into four sections. The 14th Amendment was designed in 1868 to stamp out lawless tyranny. Section one is to make former slaves citizens. The 14th amendment states, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States are citizens of the United States and of the state wherein they reside. Nor shall any state deprive any person of liberty or property without due process of law”. However, since the 14th…

    • 314 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The 14th Amendment

    • 286 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Another change in the 14th amendment described the only two ways that a person would have been able to lose their citizenship. This ament also provided the Due Process Clause. This stated substantive protection to private contracts. Other important clauses included Power of Enforcement, Validity of Public Debt, Appointment of Representatives and Incorporation.…

    • 286 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    As the bill later became the fourteenth amendment, it grants citizenship and protections from laws for all persons born in the United States, including former slaves who just got freed. (5) The fourteenth amendment has played a big role in the reconstruction as it protected African Americans’ rights in life and moved the society forward. The last amendment passed in the Reconstruction was the fifteenth amendment, permitting all citizens the right to vote despite of their race. (6) Nevertheless, it did not offer such right to…

    • 477 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Fourteenth Amendment addresses various aspects of citizenship in the United States as well as the rights citizens are afforded. The most profound clause used in this Amendment is the due process clause which addresses equal protection of the laws. Overall the goal of the 14th Amendment was to ensure the enactment of the Civil Rights Act (1866) remained valid to ensure that every person born in the United States were citizens and were entitled to full and equal benefit of all laws. Nonetheless, the Fourteenth Amendment has gone beyond the provisions of the Civil Rights Act (Snavely, 1968).…

    • 490 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    This topic has always been of interest to me. Even when I first began learning about slavery, civil rights and the 13th Amendment, I knew this topic is what changed America. We think of slavery just as something we learn about in school and take a test over, but it is so much more than that. We need to understand history so that it is not repeated.…

    • 209 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The 13th Amendment

    • 655 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The 13th Amendment, passed by Congress January 31, 1865, and ratified December 6, 1865, states: "Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction." The passing of this amendment freed slaves and made it illegal to have slaves, but the 13th Amendment did not give African-Americans the equal rights that they longed for. Consequently, slavery was a major setback for African-Americans leaving them deprived of education, which in the long run made it difficult for African-Americans to obtain any type of power in the United States. This shortfall of education hindered African-Americans from…

    • 655 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution happened after the War Reconstruction .It was meant to secure the rights of former slaves. It was proposed on June 13, 1866. It was made official on July 9, 1868. The amendment tells a broad definition of citizenship. For example the overruling of Dred Scott v. Sandford which had excluded slaves from possessing Constitutional rights. The amendment requires states to provide equal protection under law to all persons within their jurisdictions and was used in the 20th century to get rid of racial segregation in the…

    • 95 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    The genre of “Saving the Right to Organize” would be an article. This would be a secondary source because it is an article, and it refines the primary source. The topic of this source would be that it focuses on the 13th Amendment replacing the Wagner Act on labor movements in the U.S. Percentage of U.S. workers who were unionized in 1953. A good thesis from this source would be Mark Dudzic’s words, “Articulating [worker] right[s] solely as an…

    • 4769 Words
    • 20 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    America would be much different if the Bill of Rights was not in the Constitution to protect the rights of the citizens. Amendment nine gives a lot of rights to the citizens in the Bill of Rights. The ninth amendment protects the rights of the citizens that are not listed in the Constitution and in the Bill of Rights. The ninth amendment in the Bill of Rights says, "The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or disparage others retained by the people." This means that the Constitution mentions certain rights but not all and even rights not listed still belong to the people. In the video, the father has to vote for the already elected president or else he would get arrested. The father has the right…

    • 336 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Amendment 13 is the one that has made big impact on me. I don’t know where I would be if slavery were not abolished. I may be a slave or just horribly discriminated against because of the Civil Right Movement not taking place. Without this Amendment major accomplishment would have never happened. Just think Martin Luther King Jr. may have never happened or Obama may have never become president. Other things important to history because of it was The barrier an American sports all the Great African American Athletes brought in to shite sport leagues like Jackie Robinson, Jesse Owens etc. I believe people would be angrier and a lot less tolerant then how they are today. I think back then eventually African Americans eventually…

    • 367 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    reunite the North and South after the Civil War. African Americans were a major part of this…

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The fourteenth amendment was an effort to give everyone equal rights in the eyes of the law. Most southern states were in disagreement with the ratification of the fourteenth amendment, because it was intended to abolish slavery. Equality on paper didn’t translate equally into the real world because segregation wasn’t supported by all whites. Even though the fourteenth amendment stated that blacks were to be treated equal that was hardly ever the case. Blacks were still…

    • 591 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays