10th Grade Julius Caesar

Topics: Roman Republic, Julius Caesar, Augustus Pages: 2 (548 words) Published: January 5, 2014

The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Stories generally have a hero and a villain, with people in between. What defines a hero or a villain is how we portray that character. For example, Adolf Hitler was thought to be a hero by the Germans when he saved the economy, but a villain to all the Jews. In The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, the main protagonist Brutus performs a series of unfortunate actions that deem him to be a villain, but is ultimately an honorable man who is mistaken as one. Brutus’ lack of doubt, his conflicting loyalty, and his honor create a terrible predicament for him.

Brutus unfortunately thinks no one is going to deceive him. Brutus joins the conspiracy to kill Caesar after Cassius convinces him to after Act I with fake letters, ”As if they came from several citizens, writings, all tending to the great opinion that Rome holds of his name…” (907). Brutus does not question the letters , and thinking it was for the greater good, kills Caesar. His lack of doubt for the letters and Cassius makes Brutus perform an irreversible mistake, which perceives him to be a villain. Another person Brutus should not trust is Antony, because after letting Antony live in Act III, he also lets him speak at the funeral, “You shall, Mark Antony” (949). Not only is letting Antony live a blunder, but letting him speak for the funeral of the man he is most loyal to causes the entire population of Rome to riot. Brutus’ inability to not trust people causes many chaotic events to erupt.

Brutus has conflicting loyalties; to Caesar and to Rome. He chooses to stay loyal to Rome, which means he has to disconnect bonds with Caesar, although later regrets it, “Caesar, now be still; I killed not thee with half so good a will” (998). Although Brutus’ intentions are good, killing Caesar only made things worse. Rome erupts into war, and hundreds of lives are lost due to Brutus choosing the worse path. Conflicts with Cassius occur before the war, arguing with Brutus...
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