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Topics: Philippines, Elpidio Quirino, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo Pages: 5 (1580 words) Published: October 13, 2014
Diosdado Macapagal
Early life
Diosdado Macapagal was born on September 28, 1910, in Lubao, Pampanga, the second of four children in a poor family.[1] His father, Urbano Macapagal, was a poet who wrote in the local Pampangan language, and his mother, Romana Pangan Macapagal, was a schoolteacher who taught catechism.[2] He is a distant descendant of Don Juan Macapagal, a prince of Tondo, who was a great-grandson of the last reigning Rajah of Selurong, Rajah Lakandula.[3] The family earned extra income by raising pigs and accommodating boarders in their home.[2] Due to his roots in poverty, Macapagal would later become affectionately known as the "Poor boy from Lubao".[4] Diosdado Macapagal was also a reputed poet in the Spanish language although his poet work was eclipsed by his political biography. Early education

Macapagal excelled in his studies at local public schools, graduating valedictorian at Lubao Elementary School, and salutatorian at Pampanga High School.[5] He finished his pre-law course at the University of the Philippines, then enrolled at Philippine Law School in 1932, studying on a scholarship and supporting himself with a part-time job as an accountant.[2][5] While in law school, he gained prominence as an orator and debater.[5] However, he was forced to quit schooling after two years due to poor health and a lack of money.[2] Returning to Pampanga, he joined boyhood friend Rogelio de la Rosa in producing and starring in Tagalog operettas patterned after classic Spanish zarzuelas.[2] It was during this period that he married his friend's sister, Purita de la Rosa in 1938.[2] He had two children with de la Rosa, Cielo and Arturo.[4] Macapagal raised enough money to continue his studies at the University of Santo Tomas.[2] He also gained the assistance of philanthropist Honorio Ventura, the Secretary of the Interior at the time, who financed his education.[6] After receiving his Bachelor of Laws degree in 1936, he was admitted to the bar, topping the 1936 bar examination with a score of 89.95%.[5] He later returned to his alma mater to take up graduate studies and earn a Master of Laws degree in 1941, a Doctor of Civil Law degree in 1947, and a PhD in Economics in 1957.[5] Early career

After passing the bar examination, Macapagal was invited to join an American law firm as a practicing attorney, a particular honor for a Filipino at the time.[7] He was assigned as a legal assistant to President Manuel L. Quezon in Malacañan Palace.[5] During the Japanese occupation of the Philippines in World War II, Macapagal continued working in Malacañan Palace as an assistant to President José P. Laurel, while secretly aiding the anti-Japanese resistance.[5] After the war,Macapagal worked as an assistant attorney with one of the largest law firms in the country, Ross, Lawrence, Selph and Carrascoso.[5] With the establishment of the independent Republic of the Philippines in 1946, he rejoined government service when President Manuel Roxas appointed him to the Department of Foreign Affairs as the head of its legal division.[4] In 1948, President Elpidio Quirino appointed Macapagal as chief negotiator in the successful transfer of the Turtle Islands in the Sulu Sea from the United Kingdom to the Philippines.[5] That same year, he was assigned as second secretary to the Philippine Embassy in Washington, D.C.[4] In 1949, he was elevated to the position of Counselor on Legal Affairs and Treaties, at the time the fourth highest post in the Philippine Foreign Office.:[8]) First marriage

In 1938 he married Purita dela Rosa and they had two children namely Arturo Macapagal and Cielo Macapagal-Salgado until Purita's death in 1943. Second marriage
On May 5, 1946 he married Dr. Evangelina Macaraeg, with whom he had two children, Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo who became President of the Philippines and Diosdado Macapagal, Jr. CONDITION OF THE PHILIPPINES

1. There were many uprisings against the Aquino administration 2. There was a...
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