Administrative Reforms Commisssion

Topics: Emergency management, Risk management, Crisis management Pages: 196 (57146 words) Published: June 3, 2013
3
THIRD REPORT

SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE REFORMS COMMISSION

CRISIS MANAGEMENT

CRISIS MANAGEMENT
From Despair to Hope

From Despair to Hope

Second Administrative Reforms Commission Government of India 2nd Floor, Vigyan Bhawan Annexe, Maulana Azad Road, New Delhi 110 011 e-mail : arcommission@nic.in website : http://arc.gov.in

SEPTEMBER 2006

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

SECOND ADMINISTRATIVE REFORMS COMMISSION

THIRD REPORT

CRISIS MANAGEMENT
FROM DESPAIR TO HOPE

SEPTEMBER 2006

PREFACE
The neglect of our natural assets and environment has always led to crisis. Whether it is the Mithi River of Mumbai or Tapi of Surat or the civilisational crises in the past in which the “cradle of civilisation” in the Middle East eventually became a desert, Greece and Turkey were deforested, and the destruction of the American prairie contributed to the Dust Bowl, these are eloquent testimony to such neglect. The once mighty Khmer Empire in Southeast Asia or the small tribes that lived on Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean were consigned to the throes of oblivion only because they so willfully decimated their natural assets and environment. India is endowed with extraordinary natural and civilisational resources. Around the time of our Independence, the American scholar Kingsley Davis gave a glowing account of the fabulous geography of India, especially the great Indo-Gangetic plain: “India is probably the third most gifted of the world’s regions with respect to industrial capacity, and the second or third with reference to agricultural resources. But in sheer area it is big enough. The geographical traits of the subcontinent are fabulous and their description requires unblushing superlatives…” The key to the region’s peculiar geography lies more outside than inside the boundaries, although it has its main effects inside. This is the Himalayan range, the loftiest mountain barrier in the world, which shuts off the subcontinent from the rest of Asia. From 150 to 250 miles, the Roof of the World stretches over 1,500 miles across the north of India. It boasts of the three highest points on the earth’s surface, fifty summits of 25,000 feet or more, and an average elevation of 19,000 feet. The Himalayas contribute greatly to the soil, climate and the isolation of India. They are eroding rapidly and sending out rich loam to the plains below. Because high plateau lands lie to the north, the drainage runs southwards towards India. The three main rivers of the subcontinent - Indus, Ganges and Brahmaputra - with most of their tributaries, have their sources in the Himalayas and bring down silt that has made the Indo-Gangetic plain, covering the whole of northern India, the most fertile areas of its size in the world. True, we cannot prevent natural hazards, which are endemic to our geology, geography, climate, social and cultural settings, but we can certainly strive to manage crisis more efficiently so that hazards do not degenerate into disasters. With a coherent and meaningful crisis management strategy in place, it is quite possible to visualize our country despite its manifold hazards as a place that will eventually be free of all disasters. In the realm of crisis management, announcing a policy or promulgating a law or creating an institution is a relatively easy task; the challenge lies in implementing policies to achieve the desired outcomes. Crisis management, a governance issue that is both vital and complex, is at the core of India’s administrative system. The system requires innovative thinking and fundamental

“Crisis shouldn’t turn them beggars...”
Mahatma Gandhi during the Bihar Earthquake in 1934

changes in order to quicken the emergency responses of administration and increase the effectiveness of the machinery to meet the crisis situation and enhance crisis preparedness. To that end, it is necessary that the apparatus of crisis management should perform and deliver. The India Meteorological Department...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay on Administrative Reforms in the Philippiens
  • Administrative Reforms Essay
  • administrative theory Essay
  • Administrative Essay
  • Essay about Administrative Reform in Bd
  • Political reform Essay
  • Reform Essay
  • Health Care Reform Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free