Urban area Essays & Research Papers

Best Urban area Essays

  • Urban Area and Village Life
    “Differences and Similarities between Villages and Cities” A village is composed of small population that is not advanced whereas a city is very advanced and has large population. Life in a village is completely different from life in a city. This difference is like distinction between earth and sky. These lifestyles are totally different from each other. It is hard to find similarities between persons of different characteristics and same as with life in villages and cities. Cities are...
    442 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Area and Small Town
    Jessica Roberts Professor Ebert English 101 Compare and Contrast A topic that is widely debated is that of living in a big city compared to living in a smaller town. I believe both have their benefits and drawbacks. Every person has one option that they are just better suited for. Personally, I am more drawn to small communities because I simply find them more comfortable. Yet I would like to try and expand and see the bigger picture and understand the details of both options. The...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • URBAN AND RURAL AREAS - 322 Words
    URBAN AND RURAL AREAS Human settlements are classified as rural or urban depending on the density of human-created structures and resident people in a particular area. Urban areas can include town and cities while rural areas include villages and hamlets. While rural areas may develop randomly on the basis of natural vegetation and fauna available in a region, urban settlements are proper, planned settlements built up according to a process called urbanization. Many times, rural areas are...
    322 Words | 1 Page
  • Urbanisation: City and Urban Areas
    Introduction Urbanization is increasing in both the developed and developing countries. However, rapid urbanization, particularly the growth of large cities, and the associated problems of unemployment, poverty, inadequate health, poor sanitation, urban slums and environmental degradation pose a formidable challenge in many developing countries. Available statistics show that more than half of the world’s 6.6 billion people live in urban areas, crowded into 3 percent of the earth’s land area...
    3,396 Words | 10 Pages
  • All Urban area Essays

  • Economic Development in Urban Areas
    Many villagers and small town dwellers want a living in big cities. With some expectations, they make a movement from villages to big cities. This migration from rural areas to big cities is called urbanization. There are two kinds of factors why rural people seek for urban life. The first one is urban pull factor. They dream for higher wages, better housing and utilities, better school and hospital, more jobs opportunity, and more experience that they can get it all from a living in big...
    1,743 Words | 4 Pages
  • Urbanization: City and Urban Areas
    Urbanization is the process by which people living in the rural areas shift to the urban areas in order to find a better life. Since medieval times people have been migrating to the places where resources are in abundance. This process is being in witnessed all over the world, and many consider it to be bad thing. Some even regard urbanization to be a “Modern Disease”. Before embarking in to any conclusion I would like to see both the aspects of the topic. The shift or movement to the city...
    364 Words | 1 Page
  • Community and Communication in Changing Urban Areas
    Community and Communication in Changing Urban Areas ------------------------------------------------- Part 1: Urban Studies, Theoretical Perspectives & Telematics How we view technology & impact is grounded in our theoretical perspectives: Technological Determinism: * Change in the city is a direct result of change in telematics OR reaction to technological innovation/invention * Urban change = inevitable, unalternable, predictable * Physical change...
    1,979 Words | 9 Pages
  • The Traffic Safety Problem in Urban Areas
    THE TRAFFIC SAFETY PROBLEM IN URBAN AREAS J. ARCHER1 and K. VOGEL2 1 CTR, Kungliga Tekniska Högskolan, Stockholm, Sweden; 2 VTI, Linköping, Sweden E-mail: jeffery.archer@infra.kth.se; katja.vogel@vti.se As the number of people who reside and work in urban areas increases, so, too, do the needs and demands placed on the infrastructure. This has led to severe congestion in many European cities, a situation which affects not only the environment in terms of pollution, but most notably...
    19,247 Words | 56 Pages
  • Cause and Effect of People Migrating from Rural Areas to Urban Areas
    There have always been a continuous trend of people migrating from rural dwellings to urban area in search of an earning, better education or may be due to environmental degradation in rural areas. Even, political conflicts, wars, and income disparities among and within regions may also be a motivating factor which results in migration whether international or national. Whatever may be the reasons, migration is a very common phenomenon nowadays in most of the cities. Recent studies reveal...
    957 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ruralisation of Urban Areas: Reversing Development in Zimbabwe
    International Journal of Advanced Research in Management and Social Sciences ISSN: 2278-6236 RURALISATION OF URBAN AREAS: REVERSING DEVELOPMENT IN ZIMBABWE Jacob Mugumbate* Francis Maushe* Chamunogwa Nyoni, PhD* Abstract: Urbanisation is on an upward trend in Zimbabwe as evidenced by expansion of urban centres. Notwithstanding advances towards urbanisation, some urban centres are actually de-urbanising or ruralising as witnessed by deteriorating livelihoods, services and...
    6,591 Words | 21 Pages
  • Examine How Urban Areas Have Become Increasing Sustainable
    Examine how urban areas become increasing sustainable (25 marks) Sustainability is the improvement on the quality of life while living within the Earths carrying capacities. Sustainable development in urban areas are increasing due to people realising that today’s quality of life is in need of an improvement, doing this sustainably will improve situations of today in a way that does not have to be paid for tomorrow. This sustainable development phrase is defined as to meet the needs of today...
    1,197 Words | 3 Pages
  • urban crime - 336 Words
    Lecture Series: Space – society – economy WS 2014/2015 Organized crime and its cinematic representation How do they influence each other? Barbora Holevová Matrikelnummer: 65985 WS 2014/2015 barbora.holevova1@gmail.com Katholische Universität Ingolstadt – Eichstätt Fachbereich Geographie Professur für Wirtschaftsgeographie Prof. Hans – Martin Zademach & Cornelia Bading Table of Content 1. Introduction 3 2. Familiarization with an issue of urban crime: the mafia 4 3....
    336 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Sprawal - 820 Words
    St. name: cookie Class:A4 Score: In England, 1765, an English worker named James Hargreaves invented an efficient spinning machine which is called Spinning Jenny. It is the invention of this machine that means the start of Industrial Revolution. Afterwards, mankind went into a new generation. As the machine replaced the manpower, mankind developed very fast. In the late 19th century, the first car was invented. These two factors made cities expand in an incredible...
    820 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rural and Urban - 901 Words
    RURAL AND URBAN Imagine that all people live in villages or they all live in cities. How would the life be if people lived the same lifestyle? A proverb in Yemen says,” Being rural is the best color of lifestyle.’’ In which is meant living in villages is better than living in cities. Well, there is no doubt that life in villages is so beautiful, and very interesting indeed, but at the same there are people who prefer to live in metropolitan cities and this is due to their lust of...
    901 Words | 3 Pages
  • Urban Renewal - 457 Words
    Urban Renewal What comes to mind when the term Urban Renewal have for people when mentioned? Turns out there are mixed feelings about this approach; many are for it meanwhile others are very much against it. This act alone can help build up cities but destroy lives in one swoop. I for one have mixed feelings when it comes to urban renewal, I both understand and agree with the overall mission of it but at the same time think about who suffers on the other end of this reconstruction. First...
    457 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Renewal - 1828 Words
    What is Urban renewal? Discuss the issues and strategies of urban renewal of a state capital. Urban renewal is a program of land re-development in areas of moderate to high density urban land use. It can be envisaged as the physical and infrastructural changes in land use, built environment or intensity of the use of land or building that could be considered as inevitable outcome of the action from economic, social, political, technical and environmental forces acting upon urban areas at...
    1,828 Words | 7 Pages
  • Urban Sprawl - 1542 Words
    Effects of Urban Sprawl on Wildlife Imagine yourself driving down the street in the middle of your suburban neighborhood and all of a sudden a deer jumps out in front of your vehicle causing you to slam on the brakes. You sit in your car wondering why there was an animal in the middle of you neighborhood. You should ask yourself: Is urban sprawl effecting our wildlife? Urban sprawl is definitely effecting our wildlife, but many species are learning to adapt to living so close to humans....
    1,542 Words | 5 Pages
  • Urban Education - 299 Words
    Suburban schools are located in the suburbs and rural schools are located in small, rural areas. Urban Education is defined as education taught in a school located in the city (urban areas). These schools have numerous distinct traits that make them easy to be recognizable. The students that attend these schools come from a wide variety of homes, incomes, beliefs, morals, priorities and are mostly African American, Mexican, and Asian. Unlike suburban and rural schools, the classrooms in urban...
    299 Words | 1 Page
  • Urban Conservation - 1340 Words
    10 URBAN ENVIRONMENT Suneel Pandey, Shaleen Singhal, Pragya Jaswal, and Manraj Guliani Great cities are planned and grow without any regard for the fact that they are parasites on the countryside, which must somehow supply food, water, air, and degrade huge quantities of wastes. —Eugene Odum Six to seven million people are added annually to urban India. At the beginning of this millennium, 285 million Indians lived in its nearly 4400 towns and cities (Census...
    1,340 Words | 6 Pages
  • Urban Culture - 629 Words
    Urban Culture Urban industrial development combined with mass transportation and urban growth destroyed the old pedestrian city of the past. The physical expansion of the city attracted industry, capital, and people. By the early 1900s, the modern American city, with its urban mass and distinct constituencies, was clearly taking shape. Cities grow in three ways: through physical expansion, by natural increase, and through migration and immigration. In the late nineteenth century,...
    629 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Sprawling - 3313 Words
    INTRODUCTION OF URBANIZATION City can be defined with different definitions. There are some researchers claimed the purpose of the city based on the physical aspects only. However, there are also some researchers claimed the purpose of the city based on the aspects to human .According from puan Katimah Rostam (1988), meaning the city can be translated into the size of the population that is more readily available than other information. Therefore, when a settlement has met minimum...
    3,313 Words | 11 Pages
  • urban decline - 1663 Words
    urban decline is the drastic decline of a city, It is usually characterised by increased unemployment, depopulation, deindustrialization and increased crime. Urban Decline is when parts of the city become run down and undesirable to live in. It causes economic, social and environmental problems. Examples of the impacts from urban decline are: Slum housing, overcrowding, no hot water or heating, Many poorly built buildings, crumbling brickwork and increased crime and vandalism.Urban decline...
    1,663 Words | 4 Pages
  • Urban Governance - 3353 Words
    Urban Governance for sustainable development 1 URBAN GOVERNANCE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Dr. Alka Bharat, Professor, Dept. of Architecture & Planning, M.A.N.I.T., Bhopal – 462007, India. E-mail: alka_bharat@yahoo.com Ms. Chandan Chawla, Architect / Urban Planner.E mail: ccassociates@rediffmail.com INTRODUCTION The importance of sustainability in the urban setting cannot be over emphasized, as it concerns the very survival of a city. Healthy cities contribute to a healthy nation....
    3,353 Words | 12 Pages
  • Urban Backpack - 2043 Words
    Urban EDC Backpack http://www.youtube.com/user/TheUrbanPrepper Definitions: Everyday carry (EDC) or Every Day Carry refers to a small collection of tools, equipment and supplies that are carried on a daily basis to assist in tackling situations ranging from the mundane to the disastrous. The term EDC also refers to the philosophy or spirit of 'preparedness' that goes along with the selection and carrying of these items. Implicit in the term is the sense that an EDC is an individual's...
    2,043 Words | 6 Pages
  • Urban sprawl - 2076 Words
    URBAN DESIGN AND CONSERVATION 1. Urban Design The term “urban design” may have been coined in the mid-1950s but 20 years later it was still largely unused outside a small circle of people concerned with the four-dimensional development of precincts of cities. It has a wide, almost boundary-less definition with different connotations depending on professional discipline or the particular context within which the urban environment is being assessed. It is the process of making or shaping...
    2,076 Words | 8 Pages
  • Urban Agriculture - 501 Words
    Date: ……………. To ………………………. ………………………… …………………….. Statement of Purpose Dear Sir/ Madam, I (Name) permanent resident of ……….. ………… wishing to pursue my higher studies in Masters of Sustainable Future, two years research program under the heading “Urban Agriculture for Sustainable Development” at City Campus, University of Technology Sydney, Australia. Urban agriculture is probably as old as our cities, but never received much attention from the aspect of planning and governance till now....
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Growth - 538 Words
    URBAN GROWTH URBAN • It is derived from the Latin 'Urbs' a term used by the Romans to a city. • spatial concentration of people whose lives are organized around non- agricultural activities. • Placed-based characteristic that incorporates elements of population density, social and economic organization, and the transformation of the natural environment into a built environment. • GROWTH • An increase, as in size, number, value, or strength; extension or expansion....
    538 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rural Urban - 396 Words
    Rural-urban continuum is a process of socio-economic interaction between the villages and the towns or cities. Many cultural traits are diffused from cities to the rural areas. For example, dress patterns like pants, shirts, ties, skirts, jeans, etc. diffuse from cities to the rural areas. Besides these, new thoughts, ideologies are also diffused from the cities to the rural areas due to increase in communication via radio, television, newspaper, etc. The urbanism, which is urban way of life,...
    396 Words | 1 Page
  • Urban Sprawl - 5986 Words
    Iran. J. Environ. Health. Sci. Eng., 2010, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 43-52 URBAN SPRAWL AND CLIMATIC CHANGES IN TEHRAN *1Gh. R. Roshan, 2S. Zanganeh Shahraki, 3D. Sauri, 4R. Borna 1 Faculty of Geography, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran Geography and Urban Planning Department, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran 3 Department of Geography, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Spain 4 Islamic Azad University, Branch of Ahvaz, Ahvaz, Iran 2 Downloaded from http://journals.tums.ac.ir/ on...
    5,986 Words | 21 Pages
  • Urban Sprawl - 1082 Words
    Urban Sprawl Rapid expansion of our metropolitan areas has been coined the term “urban sprawl”. Urban sprawl is now looked at negatively because of its affect on society. Because of capitalism and the idea of having your home with the white picket fence, urban sprawl has taken over the United States of America. The affects of urban sprawl can be seen in our environment, our community, and in our health. Our community has changed the most due to urban sprawl. “One in two Americans now...
    1,082 Words | 3 Pages
  • urban life - 6686 Words
    URBAN LIFE ARTICLES AND SUGGESTIONS FOR RESEARCH REPORT Page 1 DICTIONARY DEFINITION OF URBAN. urban (ˈɜːb n) ə Definitions adjective 1. 2. 3. of, relating to, or constituting a city or town living in a city or town (of music) emerging and developing in densely populated areas of large cities, especially those populated by people of African or Caribbean origin. Word Origin C17: from Latin urbānus, from urbs city Synonyms View thesaurus entry = civic, city, town,...
    6,686 Words | 27 Pages
  • Urban Gentrification - 620 Words
    Urban Gentrification The urban renaissance occasioned by towns and cities does promote gentrification. The habit of gentrification is prone to the middle class households. The middle class has the potential of transforming an urban centre given their disposable income (Atkinson 108). The Europe countries link gentrification in the city to public policy interventions. This suggests a global strategy to transform the socially divisive regeneration. The private-public partnership intends to...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Pattern - 3115 Words
    URBAN PATTERN Settlements of any size and type can always be formally synthesized by their patterns, so it means pattern identify the settlements. Town houses in gridiron blocks, high-rise office structures, academic campuses, suburban estates, and highway retail sprawl are good examples. Urban form, then, is a result of the bringing together of many elements in a composite totality:the urban pattern. Patterns are the outstanding formal features of urban areas. A pattern can be...
    3,115 Words | 10 Pages
  • Bop Urban - 6680 Words
    UN-HABITAT - WORKING GROUP A Bottom of the Pyramid Approaches for Urban Sustainability Background Paper – Draft 0 At the Fourth Session of the World Urban Forum held in Nanjing in November 2008, the private sector decided to organise two working groups which would be based on the themes of Urban Governance and Bottom of the Pyramid Approaches for Urban Sustainability. Through their work, the groups will also contribute to the preparation of Core Business Principles for Sustainable...
    6,680 Words | 20 Pages
  • lit review: The effects of strucual model of therapy on single mothers living in urban areas
    Introduction Urbanization is exponentially growing in the world while rural living is decreasing; over half the world's population lives in a urban areas (Meyer­Lindenberg, 2015). Urban being defined as an constantly built­up area with 50,000 or more residents with at least 1,000 residents per square miles as defined by the United States Census. Urbanized living is accompanied by many risk factors that are common to the development of mental health issues and disorders ...
    2,479 Words | 3 Pages
  • Urban Environmental Pollution - 516 Words
    More than half of the world’s population lives in cities, a trend that is rapidly accelerating, especially in developing countries. In the USA, urban areas are merging into huge megalopitan areas, especially along interstate highways. Cities require and use large quantities of energy and materials, metabolizing them and generating large quantities of waste products and pollutants, resulting in unsustainable environments that adversely affect ecological integrity and...
    516 Words | 4 Pages
  • Urbanization Urban Development Manage
    Urbanization & Urban Development Management Block I Urbanization & Urban Expansion 1 Urbanization & Urban Development Management Introduction to Module • Module Description • Basic core concepts of Urban Development Studies • Urban, Urbanization, Urban Expansion • Sustainable Urban Development • Integrated and Strategic Urban Management 2 Module Description ( cont.…) • Issues of urbanization & urban development • Factors , opportunities & challenges of Urbanization • Focus on Urban...
    2,954 Words | 32 Pages
  • Urban vs Rural India
    Urban vs Rural India About 80 per cent of the Indian population live in villages. When travelling through the length and breadth of this subcontinent, one can really visualise the difference betweenrural and urban India. There is a big difference between urban and rural India. One of the major differences that can be seen between rural India and urban India, is their standards of living. People living in urban India have better living conditions than those living in the rural parts of India....
    414 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Overcrowding ( the Body Part )
    Urban overcrowding is not a fresh happening, but it has recently become an international demographic trouble. The growth of the world's 'Megacities' such as Tokyo, Jakarta, Sao Paulo and Cairo, with populations approaching 20 million, is one of the most marked trends of recent decades. In 1950 for instance, New York City was only one of its kind among the world's cities in having more than 10 million inhabitants. By 1975 that number had grown to 15...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chapter 13 Urban Geography
    Chapter Chapter 13 Urban Geography Where question at 2 scales, why differences occur,& distribution within urban spaces The process which the population of cities grow LDC: migration of rural residents to the cities in search of jobs in manufacturing/ services. MDC: a consequence of changes in economic structure Delhi, Jakarta, Mexico City, Mumpal, Sao Paulo, and Seoul. Reversal of historical trend, is not a measure of an improved level of development Lack o agreement among authorities...
    789 Words | 3 Pages
  • Urban Consolidation and Environmental Sustainability
    Urban consolidation is a rising issue in amny capital cities and could have a dramatic effect on the environmental sustainability of Australian cities in the near and distant future. “Urban consolidation policies concentrate on increasing housing densities in the large cities to produce more compact development, shorter travel distances and less dependence on automobiles.” (Forster 2004, p.171). Some of the main negative issues that is caused by urban consolidation are a drop in value of...
    664 Words | 2 Pages
  • with reference to examples, discuss the degree to which the level of economic development in a country affects planning and management in urban areas
     With reference to examples, discuss the degree to which the level od economic development in country affects planning and management in urban areas. The type of urban problems that require careful planning and management are largely decided by the economic wealth of a countryside. LEDC countries have problems with rapid urbanisation into the cities. However, on the other hand the problems that MEDC countries face include; suburbanisation, counter urbanisation. Urbanisation is the...
    1,357 Words | 4 Pages
  • Characteristics Of Urban And Rural - 1501 Words
    http://www.friendsmania.net/forum/b-com-part-1-pakistan-studies-notes/27009.htm Q.3. Describe the differences between the rural and urban societies in Pakistan. Rural Societies Pakistan is an agriculture country and 80% of its people form the rural population of the country. The villages, towns and small cities form the rural areas of Pakistan. Their main profession is cultivation اِصلاح and ploughing. The entire population of Pakistan is scattered and resides in villages, towns and big...
    1,501 Words | 5 Pages
  • Urban Sprawl and Motorization - 1106 Words
    Urban sprawl and motorization are currently critical issues, because they cause environmental problems as well as ecological and social issues which pose a threat to human health and social stability. Urban sprawl is the enlargement of city’s development that spread far away from the centre to the outskirt of that city. Urban sprawl is the result of the increasing urbanization. Motorization happens when people mostly use cars for traveling in the city. The rise of the automobile industry...
    1,106 Words | 4 Pages
  • Urban Pollution in Karachi - 537 Words
    “Because we don't think about future generations, they will never forget us” -Henrik Tikkanen. Urbanization is defined by the United Nations as movement of people from rural to urban areas with population growth equating to urban migration. Urbanization has led to numerous breakthroughs in society. Because of urbanization, we see the world as it is today. Skyscrapers along the horizon, industries in every corner and development projects underway everywhere the human eye can see. However,...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Geography Terms - 2078 Words
    URBAN GEOGRAPHY TERMS Action space—The geographical area that contains the space an indivdual interacts with on a daily basis. Annexation—the process of legally adding land area to a city. Beaux arts—This movement within city planning and urban design that stressed the marriage of older, classical forms with newer, industrial ones. Common characteristics of this period include wide thoroughfares, spacious parks, and civic monuments that stressed progress, freedom, and national unity. City...
    2,078 Words | 6 Pages
  • Urban Ecosystem and the Ecopolis - 2095 Words
    Urban ecosystem and Ecopolis Lai Wei March 29, 2012 Introduction When people talk about the city, the first thing they thought is the building and the traffic. It’s hard to connect city to the ecological and the environment. But as the humanity is rapidly urbanizing, by 2010, more than 50% of the world population is expected to live in the city. (The World Bank, 2010) Cities can be tremendously efficient. It can easier to provide water and sanitation for a large number of people...
    2,095 Words | 7 Pages
  • Difference Between Rural and Urban
    Difference between rural and urban rural areas are settled places outside towns and cities. they can have an agricultural character,though many rural areas are based on natural gas, petroleum, etc... rural areas are less modern and open than urban areas. people there are probably more attached to there traditions and beliefs.we dont usually see the society moving, and i mean by that, seeing the populationg chaging habits, accepting other cultures and adopting some, etc. however we do found in...
    264 Words | 1 Page
  • Urban Growth and Decline - Essay
    Australia is a highly urbanised country where over 85% of the population live in cities and large towns. These urban centres are subject to urban growth and decline, which are largely due to a number of socioeconomic factors. One of these centres, the Pyrmont-Ultimo area in Sydney, had experienced such changes over the last century. Situated on a peninsula to the west of Sydney’s CBD and Darling Harbour, the inner suburb is a manmade environment used for service and residential use. In the...
    994 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rural Urban Market Linkages
    PART A Conceptual framework CHAPTER 1 Introduction Chapter 1 outlines the background to urban - rural linkages: | 1. | It describes the recent phenomena of urban growth accompanied by increased food demand. | 2. | It describes the role of small and intermediate urban centres in facilitating exchange between the towns and the countryside. | 3. | It defines the objectives of improving linkages by making marketing interventions. | 4. | It outlines the purpose of the guide as a...
    17,952 Words | 54 Pages
  • Geographical issues Urban sprawl
    Geographical issues: Urban sprawl and changes in housing structure Urban sprawl is defined as low-density residential, and sometimes commercial, development that is outside the borders of the higher density urban centres. Planners, scholars, community activists and public officials all offer numerous possibilities as the cause of urban sprawl. What is urban sprawl? Urban sprawl is the spreading of a city or its suburbs. It often involves the construction of the residential and commercial...
    360 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rural Urban Migration - 337 Words
    Rural Urban Migration Aaapka Naam kya hai? Mera Naam “Bechaara” Hai Bechara ji..aap kahan jaa rahe ho? Mein apna gaon chod ke “Seher” Jaa raha Hoon Aap apna gaon chod ke seher kyun jaa rahe ho? Sahab jii…mein he kya…mere bahaut yaar dost jaa chuke hain..or ab mein bhi jaa raha hoon Lekin Kaaran toh bataoo….Bechara Ji Sahab jii…ek kaaran ho toh bataun…lekin aap zor de rahe ho toh sunoo.. Reasons for Rural-Urban Migration • Poverty/Low Income • • • • Unemployment...
    337 Words | 2 Pages
  • Urban Heat Island - 5905 Words
    Urban Heat Island – Cause, Effects and Mitigation Measures in USA Table of Contents • Introduction • The Phenomenon of Urban Heat Island • Causes and Effects of UHI • Mitigation Efforts • Urban Heat Island (UHI) of Urban Cities of United States • UHI and Climate Trends of Some Major cities of US • Urban Heat Island (UHI) Mitigation Strategies in United States • Conclusion Urban Heat Islands Introduction Urban Heat Island – UHI is one of...
    5,905 Words | 17 Pages
  • Complexity of Urban Living - 10981 Words
    PIDE Working Papers 2008:46 On Measuring the Complexity of Urban Living Lubna Hasan Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, Islamabad PAKISTAN INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS ISLAMABAD 2 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise—without prior permission of the author(s) and or the Pakistan Institute of Development...
    10,981 Words | 35 Pages
  • Urban Growth and Decline - 1449 Words
    Year 10 Geography Research Task Issues in Australian Environments Contents 1. Introduction * State the issue that you are investigating. * Locate the issue on a map – use a title, scale, direction and key. * Identify the scale at which the issue is relevant. 2. Geographical Processes/Causes * Outline the geographical processes and causes involved in this issue and explain how they operate. 3. Interest Groups and Perspectives * Identify key interest groups...
    1,449 Words | 5 Pages
  • Rural-Urban Migration - 473 Words
    In poorer countries, many people from the countryside move to the cities. This is called rural-urban migration. There are so many reasons for this popular action. But it happens mainly because of better education and better standard of living. As it plays an important role in the growth and development of countries, rural-urban migration certainly has its positive effects. Firstly, more and more kids from rural areas will obtain better education. Education is necessary for the development of...
    473 Words | 2 Pages
  • Japan's Urban Transportation System
    Transportation 6 (1977) 171 189 © Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam - Printed in the Netherlands JAPAN'S URBAN TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM I N T HE MAJOR TRANSPORT S P H E R E S * T OMOKI NOGUCHI Urban Transportation Program, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 ABSTRACT T he urban areas in Japan have undergone rapid changes in the last two and one-half d ecades. At the same time, the urban transportation system has...
    6,844 Words | 44 Pages
  • Urban Growth Creates Problems
    Bangladesh e-Journal of Sociology. Volume 5 Number 1. January 2008. Rapid Urban Growth and Poverty in Dhaka City Shahadat Hossain• Abstract The paper aims to explore the nature of urban growth and poverty in Dhaka City, Bangladesh. It has highlighted the city of Dhaka as the urbanisation of the whole country is interlinked with the intense development of the city. The paper is based on data collected through surveys of population censuses and relevant studies. It reveals that the...
    12,414 Words | 38 Pages
  • Rural and Urban Migration - 453 Words
    Statement of the Problem The researcher attempts to answer the following in this research study: 1. What are the differences between rural and urban areas? DifferenceBetween. (2014). Difference between Urban and Rural. http://www.difference between.info/difference-between-urban-and-rural. 2. In what ways do rural people live in order to meet their daily needs? Callanta, Ruth S. Poverty The Philippine Scenario. Makati: Bookmark Inc., 1988. pp. 41. 3. What are the problems...
    453 Words | 2 Pages
  • urban exclusion in India - 5447 Words
    Topic : Urban Exclusion in India with Focus on Inequalities in Urban Areas Urbanisation is the physical growth of urban areas as a result of global change. Urbanisation is also defined as the movement of people from rural to urban areas with population growth equating to urban migration. Urbanisation is closely linked to modernisation and industrialisation. Urban growth takes place as more and more people leave villages and farms to live in cities. Urbanisation is a welcome phenomenon of...
    5,447 Words | 18 Pages
  • The Geotechnical Implications of Urban Greening
    School of Civil Engineering Geotechnical Implications of Urban Greening March 2013 Geotechnical Implications of Urban Greening March 2013 Report prepared by (Joshua Webb) As part of the MEng research project 2012/13 The material in this report was prepared as part of the M.Eng. course in Civil Engineering and should not be published without the permission of The University of Birmingham. The University of Birmingham accepts no responsibility for the statements made in this...
    15,019 Words | 48 Pages
  • Urban Environment Issues - 6485 Words
    | URBAN ENVIRONMENT ISSUES A Summary of Issues and Approaches AU G U ST 20 0 5 This is the second in a series of briefing papers providing an overview of key Canadian environmental issues, intended to provide background information on the issue and serve as a starting point for discussion on strategic approaches and collaboration on environmental grantmaking. Written by Ray Tomalty, with editing and additional content by Kathryn Townshend Many thanks on behalf of CEGN to the...
    6,485 Words | 27 Pages
  • Green Areas and Parks - 7791 Words
    ABSTRACT It is obvious that green areas and parks have enormous effects on the community or people who live in that neighborhood. Green spaces and parks help the children to have a playing area around the community which brings more comfort. Green spaces and parks beautify the community, create a pleasant environment for the people and protect the natural environment. The aim of this article is to investigate the effects of green areas and parks on people in Nicosia considering its influence...
    7,791 Words | 28 Pages
  • Alienation in the Urban Environment - 1161 Words
    Outline how three of the texts we have studied so far explore a sense of alienation for individuals in an urban landscape. In T.S. Eliot’s “Preludes”, William Blake’s “London” and Ray Bradbury’s “The Pedestrian”, individuals are alienated in an urban environment. Alienation and isolation is evident through the contrast to monotony and the lone individuals standing out in the environment. Their existence is described and associated with a monotonous and bleak existence. Through language,...
    1,161 Words | 3 Pages
  • Urban Development & Growing Slums
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  • Urban Sprawl's Affect on Water Quality
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  • Urban Crime: as Portrayed in Mystic River
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  • Rural Life Vs Urban Life
    What are rural values. cities and metropolises were rare up until five hundred years ago. Neighbors are also a big part of country life. One might feel comfortable that he knows and is well known by his neighbors maybe as a sense of protection. Honesty is also another stereotypical trait portrayed by rural people, possibly due to fewer obstacles and variables city people have to deal with. Rural people might appear to be friendlier than city people, most likely because of less contact with...
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    Urban areas, those high population density and built up places, are the epicenters of our modern world. Over the centuries urbanization has brought upon the rise of big cities as the epicenters of human culture, economy and society. While cities have thrived and become great wealth centers, eventually dissatisfaction with the urban was bound to happen. Dissatisfaction with the urban was due to a large variety of reasons, but itself it was the primary cause of creation of the suburban ideal. The...
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  • Urban Envinronments in Third World Countries
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  • Migration: Rural-Urban Migration of Newlyweds
    Migration – Rural-urban migration of newlyweds Migration is the physical movement by humans from one region to another over vast distances across geographic barriers or shorter distances from rural areas to more urbanized cities in their own country of residence. In recent years the rate of rural-urban migration in many less economically developed countries such as China has become alarming as more people waft into the urban centres from the rural areas. In particular many young, newlywed...
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  • Broader Forces That Shape Urban Life
    This essay will be looking at some of the different ways in which broader forces shape urban life. For the purpose of this paper references will be drawn from different authors including Wirth( 1938), Jacobs(1961), Wilson (1996), Harvey, Foucault and cooper. This essay will also look at some definitions of what urban life is and the characteristics of it. For Wirth (1938), Urbanism is a way of life, and although in the city, urbanism looks beyond the physical structures of the city, it looks at...
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  • The causes and consequences of rural to urban migration.
    The causes and consequences of rural to urban migration. In many countries, particularly in third world countries there is a noticeable pattern of rural to urban migration. This pattern of migration is not a new phenomenon. There are various reasons for its occurrence and these reasons may vary from country to country and over periods of time. The consequences of this type of migration however have similar results for different countries and over periods of time. One cause of rural to urban...
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  • Differences Between Urban and Rural Settlements
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  • Urban People Versus Country People
    Most of an urban people have higher income and better opportunities than small town people. Based on the location and surrounding of a person, it can influence his/her dreams, objectives, and goals. The person who grew up in New York City is most likely to have a dream of working in Wall Street (Investment firms, Banking, Business Analysis) or 5th Avenue (Designing, Modeling, and Retail Businesses). And the person who grew up in country side around farm lands is most likely to dream of becoming...
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  • Impacts of Urban Renewal on Pyrmont, Sydney.
    Impacts of Urban Renewal on Pyrmont, Sydney. Urban Renewal- The redevelopment of an urban area. INTRO Since 1992, the 100-hectare peninsula of Pyrmont-Ultimo has been the subject of major master-planning, intensive infrastructure and property development that is expected to result in the residential population increasing from 3,000 originally to 20,000 by 2021. The Ultimo-Pyrmont re-development is part of a government-led Urban renewal program (now administered by the Sydney...
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  • rural development policies vs urban development policies
     Introduction According to the King of Economics, Adam Smith: “No society can be flourishing and happy of which, by far, the greater part of the numbers are poor and miserable.” With respect to the current positions of least developing countries; Adam Smith could not have been more accurate. The purpose of this essay is to show that a developing nation can only achieve new levels of growth by implementing both rural and urban development strategies simultaneously, as they converge towards...
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  • What Are the Problems Associated with Rapid Urban Growth?
    The urbanization process refers to much more than simple population growth; it involves changes in the economic, social and political structures of a region. Rapid urban growth is responsible for many environmental and social changes in the urban environment and its effects are strongly related to global change issues. The rapid growth of cities strains their capacity to provide services such as energy, education, health care, transportation, sanitation and physical security. Because...
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  • Sustainable urban form for Chinese compact cities
    ARTICLE IN PRESS Habitat International 32 (2008) 28–40 www.elsevier.com/locate/habitatint Sustainable urban form for Chinese compact cities: Challenges of a rapid urbanized economy Haiyan ChenÃ, Beisi Jia, S.S.Y. Lau Department of Architecture, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong Abstract Land saving in the process of rapid urbanization is critical to the long-term sustainability of China. Compact cities, characterized by relative high density, mixed land-use and...
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  • Rural -Urban Linkages, Their Role in Sustainable Development.
    RURAL –URBAN LINKAGES, THEIR ROLE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. BY:LADYANGE INTRODUCTION Although policy makers and the development community have widely used the phrase “rural development. The concept of rural development has changed significantly during the last 3 decades. Until the 1970s, rural development was synonymous with agricultural development and, hence, focused on increasing agricultural production. This focus seems to have been driven primarily by the interests of...
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  • PREDICTING VIOLENT CRIME USING URBAN AND SUBURBAN DENSITIES
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  • “the Comparison Between Urban People to Rural People”
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  • The Effectiveness of Urban Renewal Strategies in the Sydenham Road Are
    Identification of a Question
    Sparkbrook is a typical inner city area of Birmingham; predominantly Victorian and Edwardian in character and its multi-cultural society live in a deprived district suffering from high unemployment and a generally poor quality environment. For such reasons it is part of a ‘regeneration' scheme and this investigation will assess the success of this scheme.

    Development of Strategy
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  • Spotting the Areas of Improvement for Yamaha India - Case Study
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  • Various land use in nigeria urban environment
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  • Urban Sprawl Development Around an Emerging Metropolis Aligarh
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  • Urban Life and Use of Public Space Study of Responsive Public Open Spaces for Supporting Urban Life in Dhaka City'
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  • With reference to examples, evaluate the success or otherwise of urban regeneration schemes in combating the causes and consequences of urban decline. (40 marks)
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  • to extent can the problems of urban development be met by a policy of sustainable development
    Urbanization (or urbanisation) refers to the increasing number of people that live in urban areas. It predominantly results in the physical growth of urban areas, be it horizontal or vertical. The United Nations projected that half of the world's population would live in urban areas at the end of 2008.[1] By 2050 it is predicted that 64.1% and 85.9% of the developing and developed world respectively will be urbanized.[2] Urbanization is closely linked to modernization, industrialization, and...
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  • EFFECTS OF URBAN SPRAWL ON RURAL LIVELIHOOD BY GROUP ONE OF UDS WA 2013
    CHAPTER ONE 1.1 Background to the Study Sprawl is the spreading out of a city and its suburbs over more and more rural land at the periphery of an urban area, it involves the conversion of open space (rural land) into build-up, develop land over time. While many factors may have helped in explaining urban sprawl and its causes, it ultimately has always been a population and land- use issue. Globally, the world is undergoing rapid industrialization and urbanization and which substantially...
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  • Discuss Whether Unbalanced Growth Necessarily Leads to Urban Bias
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  • A REPORT ON HOW TO HANDLE MAJOR ISSUES IN THE URBAN STUDIES MODULE
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  • How Gambling, Alcoholism and Racial Discrimination Affect Our Urban Community
    “How Gambling, Alcoholism and Racial Discrimination Affect Our Urban Community” Gambling, alcoholism, and racial discrimination in our urban community dates back to before the Great Depression. A major part of the United States of America's history, gambling and alcohol abuse took on a major role during the Great Depression. When African-Americans moved north, they struggled with the need to make money because the formal economy was weak and unwelcoming for those looking to get their first...
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  • Patronage of Local Cinema Among Urban Youths in Ado Ekiti Southwest Nigeria
    11 Patronage of Local Cinema Halls among Urban Youths in Ado Ekiti, Southwest Nigeria Babatunde Joshua Omotosho Introduction and Statement of Problem Globally, urban areas are noted for the provision of social and public spaces in terms of education, energy supply, leisure, recreation facilities in order to make life conducive for the urban dwellers. Nigerians are deprived of these facilities in urban centres due to poverty and failure to maintain the existing ones, among other reasons....
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  • Cuases & Impact of Rural - Urban Migration from District Swabi to Peshawar
    abstract MIGRATION IS THE MOVEMENT OF HUMAN FROM ONE PLACE TO ANOTHER. THERE ARE TWO TYPES OF MIGRATION. ONE IS EXTERNAL MIGRATION AND OTHER IS INTERNAL MIGRATION. MIGRATION OF PEOPLE FROM RURAL AREA TO URBAN AREA IS INTERNAL MIGRATION. AS A RESEARCHER WE HAVE TRIED TO EVALUATE CAUSES AND IMPACT OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRATION FROM SWABI TO PESHAWAR. THE RESEARCH IS CONDUCTED UNDER THE FOLLOWING OBJECTIVES: (I) TO KNOW ABOUT VARIOUS SOCIO-ECONOMIC CAUSES OF RURAL-URBAN MIGRATION. (II) TO HIGHLIGHT...
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  • A Gis Analysis of the Impact of Modern Practices and Polices on the Urban Heritage of Irbid, Jordan
    Cities 26 (2009) 81–92 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Cities journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/cities A GIS analysis of the impact of modern practices and polices on the urban heritage of Irbid, Jordan Sharaf Al-kheder a,*, Naif Haddad a, Leen Fakhoury b, Suha Baqaen c a The Hashemite University, P.O. Box 150459, Zarqa 13115, Jordan The University of Jordan, Jordan c Consolidated Consultants Engineering and Environment, P.O. Box 830746, Amman 11183, Jordan b...
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  • How Did the Industrial Revolution Change the Urban Environment in Industrializing Countries?
    How did the Industrial Revolution change the urban environment in industrializing countries? The Industrial Revolution was a period of time from the 18th until 19th century when significant changes transpired, and these changes contributed to the economic, social, political, and environmental conditions of that time. A major turning point occurred in the history due to the Industrial Revolution, which positively changed lifestyle in various ways. Opposing that, these changes damaged the...
    598 Words | 2 Pages


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