Trench warfare Essays & Research Papers

Best Trench warfare Essays

  • trench warfare - 357 Words
    Things to mention in a trench warfare essay • World War 1 trenches were dirty, smelly and riddled with disease. For soldier’s life in the trenches meant living in fear. In fear of diseases (like cholera and trench foot) and of course, the constant fear of enemy attack. • There were millions of rats in ww1 trenches. A pair of rodents could produce as many as 900 young a year in trench conditions so soldiers attempts to kill them were futile. • 80,000 British Army soldiers suffered from...
    357 Words | 2 Pages
  • trench warfare - 1202 Words
    Dddddd Ddddddd World history 9 February 2014 World War 1: Trench Warfare World war 1 was the extremely bloody war that swallows up the Europe from 1914-1919. “In late June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Bosnia that was one of the reason, which rose the tension between Austria and Serbia” (modern world history 410). But the three main reasons, which lead to World War 1, were: rise of nationalism, imperialism and militarism....
    1,202 Words | 4 Pages
  • trench warfare - 556 Words
    World War I occurred in the years 1914-1918. The following countries were involved in Trench Warfare; Britain, France, and Germany. Trench warfare was a common form of battle on the Western Front during World War 1. Trench warfare is a military operation in which the soldiers fight from protected ditches. At the beginning of August 1914, soldiers had a positive attitude going off to war. They thought they were going to have a fun adventure. However, everything did not go as they planned....
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trench Warfare - 348 Words
    Trench warfare speech I’m here today to talk to you about the techniques and conditions of trench warfare in World War 1. Trench warfare was a living environment for troops fighting in World War 1. Conditions in trenches were harsh, unsanitary and extremely dangerous, Trenches were always under threat of attack from bombs or other weapons, and there were also many threats to health that developed into big problems for doctors. Apart from the unstoppable cold during the winters in France,...
    348 Words | 1 Page
  • All Trench warfare Essays

  • trench warfare - 1512 Words
    Trench Warfare World War I was one of the most historic wars in United States history. The war was mostly fought in France or Germany. What sparked the start of the war was the assassination of Arch Duke Franz Ferdinand. There were 65 million men from 30 countries fighting in the war and there were over 35 million casualties. Trench Warfare was one of the many ways used to fight in World War I. The method of fighting was to have trenches, and other enemy’s would also have trenches across...
    1,512 Words | 4 Pages
  • Trench Warfare and African Americans
    Respond to each of the following questions in a complete paragraph of your own words. Be sure to include supporting details from this lesson in your responses. 1. How did the new technologies of WWI affect soldiers fighting on the front lines? Please include at least three examples of new technologies in your answer. New technology in WWI made soldiers have to invent new forms of deffience which included trench warfare. Soldiers would hide in trenches and firer at enemys. People who went in...
    389 Words | 1 Page
  • Ww1 Trench Warfare - 1016 Words
    Nature of Life in the Trenches The nature of life in the trenches was a dangerous place. It was a place for the dead or for the survivors. Trenches were a front line which was dug metres underground, inside the trenches, were supplies, training areas, stores and mainly headquarters. The trenches were the main area to store arms of artillery and mortars. Life was hell for soldiers. Bearing the pain they went through, the diseases, the infections, the bad conditions living in, having to deal with...
    1,016 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wwi Trench Warfare Research
    World War 1 Trench Warfare The Western Front during World War 1 stretched from the North Sea to the Swiss Frontier with France. Both sides dug themselves in ending any possible chance of a quick war; this caused a stalemate, which was to last for most of the war. Over 200,000 men died in the trenches of WW1, most of who died in battle, but many died from disease and infections brought on by the unsanitary conditions. The Great War lasted from 1914-1918 simply because of the fighting in the...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • Manipulation of the Truth - Trench Warfare
    Advertisement During WW1-Manipulation of the Truth. Mitchell¡¦s Golden Dawn The picture we are studying is an advertisement for Mitchell¡¦s Golden Dawn Cigarettes. The advert was made during WWI therefore it is based and inspired by a war theme. It is from the World War One in 1914 and shows a scene from a trench with soldiers. There are a number of ¡§inaccuracies¡¨ in the picture which would not have been in the trench. I intend to point these out and explain what would have been different...
    661 Words | 2 Pages
  • World War 1 Trench Warfare
    World War One was a four year war, it started in 1914 and ended in 1918.over 12 countries were involved, for example Belgium, France, Italy and America. WW1 started for many reasons. For instance militarism (building up strong armed forces to prepare for war), Alliances (an agreement between counties to work together to achieve a common goal), imperialism (policy of powerful countries seeking to control the economic and political affairs of weaker or smaller countries) and nationalism (strong...
    1,485 Words | 4 Pages
  • Trench Warfare and Christmas Truce Robert
    Christmas Truce Robert graves The young man Stan visits his grandfather. He wants the grandfather to join in the demonstration against nuclear bombs. The grandfather is a First World War veteran and has lost his foot in the war. He does not want to join in the demonstration because he does not believe that you can fight organized propaganda with amateur propaganda. The grandfather’s friend Dodger visits him meanwhile Stan is there. Dodger tells about the first Christmas Truce in 1914. He...
    321 Words | 1 Page
  • WWI: Heavy Artillery to Combat Trench Warfare
    Heavy artillery was introduced in World War 1 to combat trench warfare. It was a new a new type of weaponry which would have a major impact on the outcome of the war. It was used in most of the major battles with varying success. What actually is heavy artillery? Heavy artillery were massive guns, which could shoot 900kg shells over 18km. In the First World War artillery was divided into light and heavy, depending on the weight of the shot fired. Heavy artillery could also be used to deploy...
    486 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trench Warfare: Characteristics of Life in the Trenches, and how propaganda played a role in trench warfare
    World War One was a horrific event. The number of known dead has been placed at about 10,000,000 men. The main method of combat during the first world war a.k.a. the Great World War, was trench warfare. Trench warfare was one of the main reasons so many men died. It was a ruthless system of warfare, in which lines and lines of men were repeatedly mowed down, one after the other. Life in the trenches, on the daily, was filled with horror, and death. Death was a constant companion to those...
    1,342 Words | 4 Pages
  • Describe the Nature of Trench Warfare and Outline the Life in the Trenches for the Soldiers
    Describe the nature of trench warfare and outline the life in the trenches for the soldiers. The characteristics of trench warfare are that it was a static war due to the impregnability of a side’s frontline once trenches were dug. Within these trenches, soldiers lived and often died in conditions that began as horrendous, but as the war progressed the trenches developed into a comfortable living space. Often the soldiers were not alone as they lived alongside large rats and lice. For the...
    677 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trench life - 1864 Words
     Trench Life As no one expected the war to last as long as it did, the first trenches were hurriedly made. They were holes in the ground dug by soldiers to protect themselves from the enemy. These constructions were hastily made and often flooded and collapsed. As the front line movement began to slow down these trenches became deeper and more sophisticated. Trench construction was difficult. It took nearly six hours for 450 men to construct 250 metres of trenches. After the initial trenches...
    1,864 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trench Foot - 1492 Words
    World War One: Table of Contents: What is Trench Foot?....................................pg3 Causes of Trench Foot?.................................pg4 Symptoms and Treatment……………………pg5 Why does it affect the soldiers during the world war one?...............................................pg6 Bibliography……………………………………..pg7 What is Trench Foot? Many soldiers who fought in the First World War suffered from trench foot. Trench foot is a medical condition caused by long period of time in...
    1,492 Words | 5 Pages
  • World War One - Trench Warfare -- describing the horrific conditions.
    Introduction World War 1 was like nothing that had ever happened in the world before. Although it was inevitable, the horrific loss of life was pointless. Almost no-one except the politicians ruling agreed with it, which has been proven by soldier's diaries, and most famously the football match between the British and the Germans on Christmas Day 1914. All-in-all, World War 1 resulted in a revolution in infantry tactics which fundamentally altered how wars were fought. The armies which clashed...
    1,528 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trench Letter - 636 Words
    TRENCH LETTER-BY ASHNA SAILUS Dear mum, It is Mothers Day and my thoughts are with you as always, I wish that I could be with you on this special day instead of being here in this hell hole which Belgium has become. I miss you little Delson and Christopher so very much and I pray for the day that this war comes to an end, please pass my love on to my two baby brothers and kiss them for me, mum. We arrived at the front line just over a week ago and the smell was so bad that many of...
    636 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trench Letter - 1155 Words
    March 31, 1917 Dear Father, Mother & Arthur, I just wanted to let you know that I`m doing well and the healthy meals you gave me Ma are truly coming in handy! The truth is that the battles here are tougher than I thought but this is what enlisting in to the army would have brought me. But there is some good news; I have been ranked as a Corporal. Also how is the entire family doing, Arthur, Uncle Nichols and the rest? Father, how have the crops been doing this season and is Arthur helping...
    1,155 Words | 3 Pages
  • Trench Project - 1573 Words
    Introduction World War 1 is one of the greatest, yet tragic, historical events that has ever taken place. It involved many of the world’s strongest and greatest countries joining together to form alliances against one another. WW1 started on the 28th July 1914. It then continued for another 4 years and finally ended on the 11th November 1918. This tragic event took the lives of 16.5 million people, which includes civilians and over 4 million people were wounded. There were two alliances;...
    1,573 Words | 5 Pages
  • Warfare of Ww1 - 1516 Words
    The Warfare and Strategy of World War One: Birth of Modern Warfare The European summer 1914 was a very productive one before the onset of World War One. International exchange and co-operation fueled the belief that war was impossible to come. In 1910 the author of The Great Illusion, Norman Angell, demonstrated that the breaking of international credit caused by war would either deter its outbreak or bring it to a quick close (the first world war, ebook location 272). However, the...
    1,516 Words | 4 Pages
  • Trench warfare was a very important in WW1 as it could save many soldiers and protect them
    The purpose of the trench warfare was so that defending units could be protected by small arms fire and provide sheltered against artillery. This shows they would protect as much land from the enemy. Trench warfare was very important in WW1 this is because when the Germans realized that they were going to lose due to Russia and France they dug in and tried not to let the enemy take any of their land back so that their country would grow bigger and stronger. I will be answering the question...
    1,923 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trench Foot and Trench Rats during WW1
    Trench Foot was a serious disorder during World War 1, especially during the winter of 1914-1915, when over 20,000 Allied men were affected. Whale oil played a vital role in minimizing the condition but even so some 74,000 Allied troops had been afflicted by the end of the war. In Flanders and France trenches were dug in land that was often at or near to sea level and where the water table was just beneath the soil surface. After a couple of feet of digging the soldiers inevitably hit water and...
    603 Words | 2 Pages
  • The horrific effects of trench warfare during WWI can be attributed to the clash of outdated military tactics and devastating modern weaponry.
    Outline Thesis Statement: The horrific effects of trench warfare during WWI can be attributed to the clash of outdated military tactics and devastating modern weaponry. I. Introduction II. What is trench warfare III. What was effected by trench warfare a. what was gained b. what was lost 1. lives 2. land 3. resources 4. communication IV. When trench warfare was used successfully a. American Civil War b. Russo-Japanese War V. Military tactics of trench warfare a. Western Front 1....
    2,345 Words | 10 Pages
  • The Trench Movie Analysis - 2498 Words
    The Trench is a color, British, 98 minute drama film that was released in 1999, produced by Steven Clark Hall, written and directed by William Boyd and distributed by Somme Productions. According to Nicholas J. Cull, University of Leicester: “In 1916, a British filmmaker named Geoffrey Mallins made and released a one-hour film of life in the British trenches entitled The Battle of the Somme. It captured the imagination of the British public at the time with a host of memorable images, the...
    2,498 Words | 6 Pages
  • Trench Life and the Condition of Soldiers
    Source C shows a group of German soldiers positioned in a trench in northern France. The soldiers in the trench are holding a heavy machine gun and have an advanced gas mask over their faces. This tells me that they are prepared for a gas attack. This photo was taken three years into the war which tells me that gas attacks became more frequent and therefore they felt the need to improve the gas masks to be more prepared. The source is German, and on one hand it is good because it shows us the...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • world war one warfare
    Warfare of World War 1 Contents Page 2: Introduction Page 3: Why did WW1 start? Page 4: Alliances, The Schlieffen Plan and why it went wrong Pages 5-9: Trench warfare Pages 10-11: Weapons Pages 12-14: Changes in WW1 Page 14-15: Battles on the Sea and in the Sky Page 16: Russia joining and U.S leaving Page 17: Conclusion and sources Introduction I decided to do my project on the warfare of World War 1 because I thought it would be interesting to research about how the war was...
    4,675 Words | 14 Pages
  • World War One trench Diary.
    November 166h 1916. As I lie here in my dug out writing to you, by torchlight, under my lice infested, rat chewed blanket, I suddenly realise just how cold it is in these trenches. I think I don't usually feel it because I am so used to it by now. But after the heavy rain of today the usually cold and damp trench seems much, much worse, in fact I'm not sure if it really qualifies as a trench anymore; it has become more like a collapsing pit of flowing mud, with a few decomposing bodies, whom I...
    931 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trench Life During World War One
    The life of a soldier in the trenches during World War I was unimaginable to the people back home in Canada. Soldiers carried out their duty to their country in the most horrifying conditions. The trenches were rivers of mud and blood, food rations were very basic and designed only to keep the soldiers alive, hygiene was non-existent, and military direction was poor as these men fought for their country. Constant shelling and gas attacks made many soldiers feel that death was imminent and a...
    2,686 Words | 7 Pages
  • World War 1: Trench Weaponry and Tactics
    World War I: Trenches – Weaponry and Tactics Tactics – Germans * Gases: Mustard gas was the most poisonous chemical used in the war. It was odourless and took about 12 hours to take effect. Gases caused internal and external bleeding and completely burn the throats and lungs. * Tunnelling: Specialists dug tunnels under the enemy defenses and place mines to collapse the opposing trench. * Scorched Earth: Retreating German troops applied scorched earth policy to prevent any use of...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why the First World War lasted so long New style of warfare - attrition - trenches - stalemate
    Why the First World War lasted so long The First World War (1914-1918) was a war that lasted substantially longer than anyone anticipated. This was largely due to the technological developments created by the industrial revolution coupled with the sheer scale of the conflict and the huge amount of resources that the two armed sides were willing to commit. The war lasted as long as it did because of the new style of warfare employed and the fact that military leaders of the time were slow to...
    897 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Letter from the Trenches - 1331 Words
    My Dear Brother I had attended to write earlier, however the Germans had us covered with the constant rain of shells falling, we had to stay on Guard duty to make sure they did not get here. On the way back, Zack got caught in a mudslide after one of the bombs hit the nearby hill. He went out like the others. My company just acquired some new novices to fight and obviously they hadn’t seen rats before, consequently they were scared and it wasn’t helped by our stories of how the brown rats...
    1,331 Words | 4 Pages
  • How Far Does General Haig Deserve to Be Known as ‘the Butcher of the Somme’?
    How far does General Haig deserve to be known as ‘The Butcher Of The Somme’? By the battle of the Somme in 1916 the war had been in a huge stalemate for 18 months that didn’t look like it was going to be broken any time soon. Trenches had been dug on the Western front all they way from the coast at Ostend to the Alps. Just before the offensive at the Somme, Verdun was under a heavy attack from German forces forcing the French to pull all their troops back to Verdun. General Haig was asked to...
    954 Words | 3 Pages
  • Butcher of the Somme - 605 Words
    Does field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig deserve the name ‘The Butcher of the Somme’? The battle of the Somme took place in 1916 and was Haig’s idea. He wanted to draw enemy troops away from the battle at Verdun to give the allies a better chance of victory. Haig’s tactic was to send troops over the top to attack the German trenches and end the stalemate. Before the troops were sent over the top there would be severe artillery bombardment of the enemy trenches. This was designed to damage or...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • hhiel@msn - 360 Words
    In this, and subsequent descriptions of the trenches, I may lay myself open to the charge of exaggeration. But it must be remembered that I am describing trench life in the early days of 1914, and I feel sure that those who had experience of them will acquit me of any such charge. To give a recipe for getting a rough idea, in case you want to, I recommend the following procedure. Select a flat ten-acre ploughed field, so sited that all the surface water of the surrounding country...
    360 Words | 1 Page
  • World War 1 Soldier Paper
    World War I Soldier Paper HIS/120 U.S. HISTORY 1865 TO 1945 * * Analysis of the role played by American troops in the Second Battle of the Marne and subsequent engagements with the Germans * Although US troops assumed mainly a support role in this action, the battle came to be known as the beginning of the end for Germany. 85,000 US troops participated, with 12,000 casualties, gaining the praise of not only their own officers, but the French and British commanders as...
    1,175 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wwi Poetry Analysis - 1147 Words
    Joey Padon Juana Collegio 2-28-13 Hell Where Youth and Laughter Go During WWI, many citizens were oblivious of the war and its imminent consequences. War poems and literature were the only effective methods to remove the distance and reveal the some of the truth. Siegfried Sassoon wrote “suicide in the trenches” as an anti war poem in the 20th century. Sassoon creates a dark atmosphere for the loss of innocence taken place during WWI in “Suicide in the Trenches” using a three-part...
    1,147 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Far Did General Haig Deserve to Be Known as Butcher of the Somme
    07/10/12 How far does General Haig deserve to be known as ‘The Butcher of the Somme’? The Battle of the Somme was the most costly battle in terms of casualties every in the history of British Military. A decisive breakthrough was needed by the allies after 2 years of stalemate on the Western Front however after the first day of fighting at the Somme, it became very clear that the artillery bombardment had fail to smash German defences and barbed wire and so there were 60000 casualties on the...
    906 Words | 2 Pages
  • Social Changes of Ww1 - 1629 Words
    Social Changes Of WW1
 “ Ready! aye, ready! “ the soldiers were to say as the call for war came, but were they really that ready? As well, was the rest of the world ready? “ Back by Christmas “ they promised their loved ones who were filled with such pride and watched in awe as their brave boys set off for war. Most including Henri Bourassa, thought that this was an opportunity to unite the Canadians, French, and English. Little did they know the battles they, and the whole world were about to...
    1,629 Words | 4 Pages
  • letter to the trenches - 330 Words
    Letter from the trenches Dear Mom and Dad , I am a soldier in the war. I’m sorry for not telling you that I was joining the army but didn’t want to get your hopes up if something happened to me. Life as a soldier was difficult because you had small rations and a lot of people died from scared food and products that were already spoiled. I remember my Sargent telling me to be careful out there in the trenches because enemy forces could rush you at any time and kill you from behind. I will...
    330 Words | 1 Page
  • The Battle of the Somme. - 690 Words
    “The Battle of the Somme was a total failure” How far do Sources A-F support this statement? On the 1st July 1916, the battle of the Somme began. Sources A, D, E and F suggest that the Battle of The Somme wasn’t a total failure. However, Sources B and C suggest that the British underestimated the Germans and this was the cause of their massacre. Source B proposes that although the British were organized and everything was going according to their plan, the first line, which had nearly...
    690 Words | 2 Pages
  • ESSAY A SOLDIER S JOURNEY
    CHC2D Nick Jones A SOLDIER’S JOURNEY Only 10 months ago, I was lying in my bed, next to my wife, with my two children right around the corner. So much has changed since then. Take a look back into the past with me. Toronto, Ontario: Recruiting Station, August 1914 The news is in, and Britain has declared war on Germany. This means I have to make a decision. Most of my friends, like Jeffery and Cam have already headed to the recruiting center down on Bay Street to enlist for duty. I think...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why War Is Necessary
    For as far back as mankind dates back in it's existence, there has always been and always will be war. History all throughout the world holds numerous acts of war dating all the way back to the early years of civilization, up until even today's most recent problems. I believe war is a perfectly necessary action, especially when a hostile force makes unjustifiable attacks that put the safety of our country at jeopardy. This does not mean that every issue's solution has to be war. Simply, this...
    1,571 Words | 4 Pages
  • Is It Glorious to Die for Your Country?
    Is it glorious to die for your country?.... This question has been posed to many young people about to embark on war although the answer has usually been yes in response to their country due mainly to the fact that the government instills it in the people of the country to support one's country and one way is to send young abled bodied men into the army. If you were one individual that was not in favour of fighting for your country you would surely become an outcast by the countries people. To...
    2,027 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Length of Ww1 - 374 Words
    fighting across vast lengths of trenches stretching from the English Channel to the northern borders of Switzerland as each army tried to outflank the other. No one in 1914 would have predicted the stalemate that was to follow; it was a common belief back home in Britain that it would all be 'over by Christmas'. The Germans had similar views at the start of the war; they thought they could rapidly capture France before invading Russia, therefore preventing a war on two fronts. But the failure of...
    374 Words | 1 Page
  • view of the soldier during ww1
    Do you agree with the view that the British soldier’s life in the trenches of the Western Front during the First World War was one of unbroken horror? Trench conditions varied widely between different theatres of war, different sectors within a theatre, and with the time of year and weather. Trench life was however always one of considerable squalor, with so many men living in a very constrained space. Source 7 supports this by saying “troops fell prey to dysentery and trench fever as a result...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • Young People Have It Easy
    In source a it is discussing the trench warfare and it tells us that soliders did such as manning the fire-step . source b supports this by showing a British solider manning the fire step, source b also supported source a because in source a it says ‘night was the time of major activity’ … this shown in the photograph in source b because it shows that is quite light which indicates it is daytime and a solider is sleeping during this time because in the night most of the attacks happen ....
    390 Words | 1 Page
  • Gallipoli - 768 Words
    Sose Essay Conditions at Gallipoli 11/04/13 Australians fought at three Theatres in World War One. The following essay describes the conditions, the food, the mateship they made, hygiene and the noise. The Australians troops had indeed experienced all of this. The conditions that the soldiers were living in and had to put up with at Gallipoli was not great. The troops had limited supplies and resources. These men would not have been very well nourished and were probably feeling week from...
    768 Words | 2 Pages
  • Was the Battle of the Somme a Success or Failure?
    Battle of the Somme Notes Successes|Failures| · 650,000 Germans killed by the end of the Battle of the Somme, 200,000 more than the British· After first day, learnt a lot of lessons· Tanks were first introduced (16th September)· The British used many news tactics, including bombaring the army trench, causing it to collapse and tunnel underground and attack the enemy by surprise· They used barbed wire as well· Started placing commanders on first line, so that they could give out commands...
    563 Words | 2 Pages
  • Were the British soldiers lions led by donkeys?
    The question "were the British soldiers 'Lions led by Donkeys?'" has been an ongoing debate since the end of the war. A war which is dominated by images of bloody battles such as the Somme and Passchendaele - futile frontal attacks against the machine guns. There is a lot of evidence to suggest that the troops were 'lions led by donkeys'. The definition that the soldiers were 'lions' in the war has never been questioned - due to the horrific reports of their lives in the war. The soldiers were...
    2,355 Words | 8 Pages
  • A Wwi Soldier's Account - 1244 Words
    CHC 2D1 Unit 1 Culminating A WWI Soldier’s Account Mrs. Lyrea Lee August 31, 1914 77 Wendell Rd. London, On M6T 2W3 Dear Mother, It’s been a week since we arrived at camp in Québec, called Val Cartier. I won’t regret running off against your will; as soon as the call for war came, I felt a sense of fear mixed with excitement, adventure and patriotism, which I’m sure the feelings are mutual within the militia. We know little about the details of the...
    1,244 Words | 4 Pages
  • BUTCHER OF THE SOMME - 1032 Words
    To what extent does Haig deserve the title “Butcher of the Somme”? On 27th June 1916 the Battle of Somme began. This battle is also known as the battle of the most dead soldiers in all the wars. Most of the historians blamed Haig for all the deaths and casualties who are known as the orthodox but there were many contradictions on this point by many historians who are known as revisionist. This essay is going to be looking at both the perspective and then will conclude by evaluating on which...
    1,032 Words | 3 Pages
  • World War I Trenches
    What were the trenches? Only a small number of the army actually spent their time in the trenches.The trenches were the equivalent of the front line but also happened to be the most dangerous place. Behind the trenches were many more trenches leading to civilisation and neighbouring towns, these trenches were training establishments, stores, workshops and headquarters. The trenches were the area of the soldiers, with space for the machine-guns, the engineers and the space where the soldiers...
    1,435 Words | 4 Pages
  • An analysis of Paul Fussell's 'Troglodyte World'.
    Life in a World War One trench would have been far more hellish than any other experience in previous times. In those days, little thought would have been given to the men fighting the battles; instead it went into the battle plans. In theory, these battle plans would have been successful, but with variables such as troop morale, battlefield conditions, weather, and enemy advances, in practice they had a high failure rate. No commander or general could have accurately planned an attack without...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Life in the Trenches - 408 Words
    LIFE IN THE TRENCHES For soldiers, life in the trenches was not a fun or easy task. Men from the age of 13 signed up to join the army, for various reasons. Britain’s were very patriotic and wanted to proudly represent their country! Others were simply afraid of receiving a white feather from the women. After 3 weeks of training they were sent up the line towards the front. The soldiers slept in dugouts which were of shocking condition. Why were the German dugouts better? – Because they could...
    408 Words | 2 Pages
  • the suffragettes - 751 Words
    The suffraggetes were fed up with being ignored. They decided to take there campaign directly to the politicians. The suffragettes would shout out there slogan ‘votes for woman’ while the politician was speaking, such actions were very unusual and gained alot of publicity. However they knew that in time they would need new tactics if they were to be successfull. How and why did they the campaign become more violent? . The prime minster promised to change the law and then didn’t do it, he...
    751 Words | 3 Pages
  • Modern History WW1 HSC
    War on the Western Front Reasons for the Stalemate: The failure of the Schlieffen Plan – Russia mobilized faster than expected, forcing Germany to redirect some troops from France. The resistance of Belgium meant that the Germans were unable to pass through. Britain quickly entered the war in support of Belgium and sending the BEF. Germany experienced supply problems and failed to realise that once off the railways, the speed of the army was determined by foot, making the deadline of 42 days...
    3,582 Words | 11 Pages
  • Why Haig Is Bad Leader
    What kind of leader was Haig? Interpretation – A view from somebody’s point of view that may not be necessary be true. The battle of the Somme occurred on the 1th of July 1916, with the English and French army fighting against the German. English’s army’s leader, Haig, was considered to be a donkey, meaning to be a bad general. The historian John Laffin claims that Haig was an awful leader; he says that “Haig really thought he was doing what the people wanted him to do” which makes us think...
    705 Words | 2 Pages
  • Battle Strategies of Wwi - 1251 Words
    Battle Strategies of the First World War A battle strategy is a plan of action or policy designed to achieve a major or overall aim or a tactic used to direct military operations and movements in war or battle. In World War I, battle strategies were often planned with the idea of wearing down the enemy’s supply of troops and equipment allowing the enemy to become more vulnerable to a later attack. Battle strategies were used to deploy aircraft in the sky, direct soldiers and vehicles on...
    1,251 Words | 3 Pages
  • To What Extent Do You Agree with the View That Douglas Haig Deserves His Reputation as the ‘Butcher of the Somme’?
    Haig was born in Edinburgh on 19 June 1861. He was born into a wealthy family that had good business. When Haig was younger he went to a good school and in 1884 went to Royal Military Academy at Sand Hurst. He first served as a Calvary Commander; however this experience was not useful in the battle of Somme because it was trench warfare which was a new kind of war so he couldn’t use the same tactics. He was also a celebrated commander of the Boer war, but the Africans were weaker and were poorer...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • Battle of Somme Sucess or Failiur
    Was the battle of the Somme a success or failure? It’s a question that has plagued the minds of many historians over the years. On one hand, without the battle the war could have had a very different outcome; but on the other hand, was it really worth all the slaughter and bloodshed? In 1916, General Sir Douglas Haig was enforced with chance to conduct a major offensive against the Germans, ‘The Big Push’ some called it. His plan was to gather thousands of troops to attack the enemy at the...
    888 Words | 2 Pages
  • Descriptions of the Battles of Verdun and Somme
    Descriptions of the battles of Verdun and Somme The Battle of Verdun in 1916 was the longest battle of World War One, which yielded many casualties and was the catalyst for the British starting the Battle of the Somme in July 1916. The objective of the Battle of Somme was to help alleviate the pressure on the British that the Germans had been exerting at the battle Verdun. “The attack on Verdun (the Germans code-named it 'Judgment') came about because of a plan by the German Chief of...
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  • Purpose of Anthem for a Doomed Youth
    Owen’s purpose in writing Anthem for a Doomed Youth is to reveal the cruel reality of war which was always hidden from the public in World War One and to show anger to the people who sent him to the trenches. He says in his preface "All a poet can do today is warn....” this shows he aims to prevent war from happening in later generations. One way that Owen conveys rage is through the men not getting the recognition that they deserved. He does this by dehumanizing the soldiers and comparing...
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  • Haig: Butcher of the Somme? - 1363 Words
    “HAIG WAS A BUTCHER WHO THOUGHT NOTHING OF SENDING MEN TO THEIR DEATHS.” DO YOU AGREE? Field Marshal Douglas Haig was a British senior officer during World War 1. He commanded the British Expeditionary Force from 1915 to the end of the War. This meant that he was in charge of the Battle of the Somme. His part in this battle has led to split views on him as an army officer. Some believe that his tactic was poor and he was mindlessly sending men to their deaths. However, some believe that the...
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  • Ww1 Assignment - 291 Words
    WW1 Trench Warfare Assignment Part 1: * Trench Warfare - A type of combat in which opposing troops fight from trenches facing each other. An example would be in the Battle of Passchendaele and also through WW1 trench warfare was used. * “No Man’s Land” – The terrain between front lines of entrenched armies. An example would be in the battles of WW1 in the trenches there would be land between two fighting forces. * “Going over the Top” – Is a phrase that was used during WW1 and...
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  • Battles of WW1 - 588 Words
    BATTLE OF PASSCHENDAELE 1914 One of many important battles in 1914 in which both sides attempted to fight a war of movement which would see the war ended by December 1914. It was also important in contributing to the stalemate which eventuated at the end of 1914. It heralded the failure of the Schlieffen Plan. The importance of this battle is that it was the culmination by both sides of any attempt at a war of movement, as it was realized that frontal offensives were impossible. Thus the...
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  • History - Does General Haig Deserve the Title the Butcher?
    General Haig's status prior to the Battle of the Somme had been remarkable. In 1885 General Haig was commissioned in the cavalry and served in several campaigns - Sudan and in the Boer War in South Africa between 1899 and 1902. In the Boer war General Haig had served with distinction and showed a lot of potential and was later promoted to the war office. Many people during this period after his first taste of success thought he had a lot of potential. And he didn't disappoint. In august 1914...
    622 Words | 2 Pages
  • Letter from the Trenches - 775 Words
    Letter From The Trenches An Assessment – Milan Dragacevic 9B Dear beloved Anne, I just finished digging out the trench and adding on the duckboards for preparation for tomorrow’s warfare. I just couldn’t help it; I need to express myself to you on everything that has been going on here in the trenches. The trenches are so cold at the moment darling; I wish it would stay this way though. It’s perfect right now, beautiful snowfall and this I am happy for, brings us back the old memories of me...
    775 Words | 2 Pages
  • Modern History Noted - Ww1
    War on the Western Front * THE REASONS FOR THE STALEMATE ON THE WESTERN FRONT * War began August 14th * Both sides thought it would be a rapid war, ‘all over by Christmas’ and that their side would be victorious -> views were unrealistic Schlieffen Plan * Based on the idea that Germany would eventually have to fight France and Russia but should avoid fighting both at once * France would expect Germany to invade from the east, so would not be prepared for an...
    8,471 Words | 32 Pages
  • poems analysed - 500 Words
    Exposure transports the reader into the pitiless trench warfare of the First World. It allows the reader to share the experience of having all vestiges of shelter removed, stripped back to the nakedness and feebleness of the human body against the wintry savagery of a snow storm in the dark, at the point of death. It starts by setting the scene of tired soldiers being ‘knived’ by the wind, too worried to sleep because of the unnatural silence. “Worried by silence, sentries whisper, curious,...
    500 Words | 2 Pages
  • Was General Haig the Butcher of the Somme?
    'Was general haig the butcher of the Somme?' Introduction General Haig's title of 'butcher of the Somme' originated after the First World War, when, due to a large number of casualties Britain suffered from the war and mostly the Somme. The people of Britain wanted someone to blame. This was a coping mechanism in which people could deal with the loss of the 'lost generation'. Feild Marshall Haig has often been called the butcher of the Somme because 20000 soldiers died on the first day of...
    1,421 Words | 4 Pages
  • No Mans Land by Kevin Major
    Independent Novel Study Assignment: No Mans Land By Kevin Major Kelvin Jiang Ms.Hurst December 13,2012 No Man's land Paragraph The last line of the story is “He did not want to leave the spot, but after a time he got to his feet and found the way to the aid post off St.johns road”(251 Major) (1)No Man’s Land by Kevin Major takes place during the Battle of Somme and is about a a few soldiers that were sent overseas and were in the Canadian regiment that participated...
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  • Soldier Boy - 833 Words
    Soldier Boy is a fabulous novel as it tells the readers the life Jim Martin had before, during and after the war. This is Jim’s strange story of how an inexperienced and excited school boy became Australia’s youngest Anzac. The main theme of Soldier Boy is about the life of war. The story starts with the death of Jim aboard a hospital ship. It explains how he dies and the way the family were notified by the nurse sending a letter to them. Then his story starts from the beginning...
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  • The Christmas Truce - 2434 Words
    The Christmas Truce You are standing up to your knees in the slime of a waterlogged trench. It is the evening of 24 December 1914 and you are on the dreaded Western Front. Stooped over, you wade across to the firing step and take over the watch. Having exchanged pleasantries, your bleary-eyed and mud-spattered colleague shuffles off towards his dug out. Despite the horrors and the hardships, your morale is high and you believe that in the New Year the nation's army march towards a...
    2,434 Words | 8 Pages
  • WWI: Letters From The Trenches
    October 29, 1914 Dear Mother, It has been a while since I last wrote to you. Give my regards to father and the twins. I hope everything is going well for the family. Unfortunately I cannot say the same for myself. The last time I wrote to you, we had just arrived in France and everybody was in high spirits. Since then we have moved twice a week in the worst of conditions. We have lost a lot of men since the fighting started 3 weeks ago. I have been assigned to the front lines in the...
    1,003 Words | 3 Pages
  • Newspaper feature article on Gallipoli in world war 1
    Sunday 15th July 1915 THE DAILY MAIL A feature article on ... Daily Life at Anzac Cove War correspondent Mark Smith reports on the two days he spent in Gallipoli So far all the information the public received on Gallipoli has been positive. It has been said that our soldiers live comfortably and we are showing no possibilities of defeat. But what is life really like in Gallipoli? The food and water are of a bad quality and insufficient, the medical facilities are primitive and hundreds of...
    1,354 Words | 4 Pages
  • Martin and the Hand Grenade - 1041 Words
    Notes on ‘Martin And The Hand Grenades’ Subject Matter Martin is a young boy presenting a grenade to his classmates as part of a show and tell segment of a history lesson. The classes’ reaction to the grenade is one of great excitement. In contrast, the narrator, the classroom history teacher, is disgusted by the weapon and the children’s excited reaction. Themes The main theme of the poem is the differing attitudes towards weapons which are symbolic of war. From that stems three...
    1,041 Words | 5 Pages
  • Life in the Trenches - 319 Words
    Life in the trenches, during World War I, was a horrible experience for the soldiers of that time. Many soldiers were faced with death during these times. The sources of their deaths were either enemy attacks or their contraction of harmful diseases. Another major obstacle, in the trenches, was of the infestation of rats. Rats, either black or brown, were feared and were nuisances to the soldiers. Brown rats, especially, were detested due to their tendencies to feed on human remains, including...
    319 Words | 1 Page
  • War Weapons - 385 Words
    Bibliography Duffy, M. Weapons of War: Grenades First World War 2009 22/6/11http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/grenades.htm N/A Sopwith 7F.1 Snipe 2012 22/6/11 http://www.theaerodrome.com/aircraft/gbritain/sopwith_snipe.php Fisher, R. The Vickers Machine Gun 23/6/11 www.vickersmachinegun.org.uk Standsbury, H. Maryland's 117th Trench Mortar Battery in the World War, 1917-1919 Rainbow Division (1942) 1917 War Weapons Manual Contents Gun Plane Big Gun Trench Mortar Grenade...
    385 Words | 3 Pages
  • History-Lions Led by Donkeys
    “Lions led by Donkeys.” How accurate an assessment is this of the British Army on the Western Front in the First World War? Written by Alan Clark a politician in the 1960s this quotation describes the leadership of the British Military and their strategies used in the Great War. It suggests that soldiers fighting in the World War were brave and courageous as he refers to them as lions. In comparison their leaders, the generals were mindless and stupid like donkeys. By holding these...
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  • Why Did The Battle Of The Somme Go So B
     Why Did the Battle of the Somme go so Badly for the British Army? The Battle of the Somme took place during 1916 to take pressure off the French at Verdun and the Russians on the Eastern Front. The French were under heavy fire at Verdun and had been since February, and the army itself was close to cracking. The Russians had fought gallantly on the Eastern Front to try and avert the German Forces away from the Western Front. After launching many small offensives the Russians had gained very...
    1,160 Words | 3 Pages
  • Horror of War - 1672 Words
    Explore the ways in which Sherriff’s Journey’s End present the horrors of war. Compare and contrast your finding with Sebastian Faulks’ treatment of the same theme in Birdsong, ensuring that your response is informed by interpretations of other readers. Both Sherriff and Faulks depict the horrors of war through the various dramatic and linguistic techniques used. Some of these horrors can be perceived as the separation from loved ones, the responsibilities and expectations men faced in the...
    1,672 Words | 4 Pages
  • World War One Letter
    Somewhere in France Somewhere in France Dear Mother, March 1 It’s been months since I last wrote a letter to you – and that was when I was still a trainee. I’m really joyful and thankful that I had the chance to receive your letter before winter. I terribly miss you and I hope I did not make you worry. The censorship is still being done; but I am grateful that I was able to send a letter earlier than expected. Right now, I’m writing in a nearby casualty clearing station – recovering...
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  • Life in the trenches : Letter home.
    Dear Michael, It has been quite some time since I have last written, the more I learn about this god forsaken war the less I want to discuss it, however I know you are sixteen now and may see it a duty to follow my footsteps. So I am taking the time to describe the theatrics of my life in the trenches and the daily occurrences. Firstly I must enquire on the home life, how is your brother and mother? Has the grieving process of father slowed, are they coping? Make sure you take good care of them...
    940 Words | 3 Pages
  • General in bed chapter reviews
    GENERALS DIE IN BED – Charles Yale Harrison JR’s TEACHER NOTES Explain and speculate what the title of the novel is inferring about the Generals. A. The title is a pun or is having a go at the generals. Generals die in bed while the soldiers die on the front lines. Generals don’t fight. Instead they command soldiers from a safe distance behind the frontlines The title suggests that there is a total lack of respect for generals or for people in positions of power/ authority. If this happens...
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  • The Nek Gallipoli - 788 Words
    Gallipoli is an Australian Film set made in the 1981, directed by Peter Weir. Starring Mel Gibson and Mark Lee, as Frank Dunne and Archy Hamiton. The film depicts the two young athlete runners journey with being enlisted in the Australian Army during the First World war. They are sent to the peninsula of Gallipoli in Ottoman Empire, where they are involved in the Gallipoli Campaign. Throughout the Film Peter Weir demonstrates the young soldiers start to lose their true innocent belief of war....
    788 Words | 2 Pages
  • Letter from the Trenches - 1799 Words
    My dear Lucy, I know that I am not supposed to be writing to you right now but I just couldn’t help it; I need to express myself to you on everything that has been going on here in the trenches. The trenches are so cold at the moment; I wish it would stay this way though. It’s perfect right now, beautiful snowfall and this I am happy for, brings us back the old memories of me and you. Unfortunately it will not be like this forever, it will be summer in a while and that is going to be bad. I...
    1,799 Words | 4 Pages
  • Generals Die in Bed Notes
    Generals Die In Bed Chapter by Chapter Chapter One • Montreal, Quebec – Setting • Dilapidated, squalid red brick houses • Heavy odour of stale booze and women is in the air • Sleeping in a barn-like bunk room • “The room is fouled with the odours of dissipation.” • They are all recruits waiting to go to the war • “Men are hauled out of there bunks and strapped into their equipment.” • Main character is only 18 • The people of the city celebrate...
    2,303 Words | 8 Pages
  • World War One Home Front
    War on the Western Front Reasons for the stalemate on the Western Front (217 Words) There was a clear expectation that WW1 would be a quick, offensive military war over by Christmas. Introduction of new technology such as munitions and tanks changed the structure of war as many were not prepared for modern warfare. Millions of men participated in war along with vast numbers of horses and later trucks, there was a great need for food and medical supplies however, it was hard to sustain. There...
    853 Words | 3 Pages
  • Letter from the War Front (World War One)
    ~The following letter is not an authentic letter from a soldier, but a letter I wrote myself from a soldier's perspective that describes what the ANZAC's went through during WWI~ Dear Homefolks, I am currently having a short period of rest time and have time to write to you all to give you a feel of what we are doing and going through. I heard somewhere that the letters are being censored but I’m not sure if it’s true or just another story going around. I am doing well and eating like a...
    1,865 Words | 4 Pages
  • To what extent is it fair to call General Haig the ' Butcher of the Somme'
    Title: To what extent is it fair to call General Haig the ‘Butcher of the Somme’ The Battle of the Somme was important and crucial to the development of the First World War; and earmarked the final result of the War. Both the Allies and the Germans were extremely eager to make some achievement in order to boost the morale of the armed forces and the confidence of their own countrymen after a long period of stalemate in the various battle fronts. They were both prepared to exhaust...
    622 Words | 2 Pages
  • WAR ON THE WESTERN FRONT - 6086 Words
    1 WAR ON THE WESTERN FRONT The reasons for the stalemate on the Western Front During 1914-18, the weapons of defensive warfare - artillery, machine guns and barbed wire- were stronger and more reliable than the weapons and technology of the offensive Aircraft were not developed sufficiently Tank was neither powerful or reliable The Schlieffen plan was an effect of this, as: the technology was not available for the German army to move with the speed that was critical to the success of the...
    6,086 Words | 26 Pages
  • World War 1 Research Project
    Table of Contents Introduction…………………………………………………................................03 How had science and technology changed the nature of warfare?......................................................................................................04 How awful was daily life for soldiers in the trenches?…………………………………………………......................................10 Why was defending the Ypres Salient so difficult?………………………………………………….......................................15 Why was the...
    7,583 Words | 19 Pages
  • tggg - 1186 Words
    Trench Letters August 13, 1916 My darling and loving wife Vera Words cannot describe how much I miss being in your company. I wish I could come back for just one day to see your beautiful face. This place I’m in is awful. I’m always wet with mud surrounding me and sounds off guns and artillery shooting every second of the day. At night I can barely get any sleep knowing at any moment the Germans could attack my part of the long wet, muddy trench that stretches for miles. The only thing...
    1,186 Words | 3 Pages
  • Was General Haig to Blame for so Many Deaths at the Battle of the Somme?
    Was General Haig to blame for so many deaths at the battle of the Somme? In this essay I will be trying to answer the following question: ‘do you think General Haig was to blame for so many deaths in the battle of the Somme?’ Haig became General of the Army on the 10th of December 1915 at the age of 54. At the time, he appeared to be the best man for the job as he had led and won successful battles in his past. In 1916, he launched an attack. His attack took place near the Somme River, against...
    1,232 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Sun Also Rises - 562 Words
    "I write to try to find out who I am. One of my main theme is manliness..." once said by Ernest Gaines . Although Ernest Hemingway takes a different route to manliness in his book, The Sun Also Rises. It is made evident with the radical reevaluation of what it is to be masculine, and the rendering of Jake's manhood, useless because of an injury obtained during World War 1 that the recurring theme is the male insecurity. First, the male insecurity is shown as World War 1 questioned what...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Is It Fair to Criticise General Haig as a Donkey Who Led Lions
    Is it fair to criticize General Haig as a donkey who led lions? Douglas Haig was a General during World War One. There is much controversy over General Haig’s reputation due to the high level of losses during his battles in command. Many people agree with David Lloyd George’s attitude of Haig and many other British Generals of World War One. They are said to be “donkeys”, incompetents who sent the “lions” (the soldier) into futile bloody battles. Many popular books, films and television...
    950 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Battle of the Somme: Futile or Necessary
    Was the Battle of the Somme in 1916 a futile endeavour or a necessity for the allies to win the Great War? In 1916, the battle that took place by the Somme was one of the bloodiest battles ever recorded in European warfare. For many years historians have had countless debates concerning the battles contribution towards the Great War and whether or not it ever really held any worth military-wise for the British. In order to assess if the Battle of the Somme was futile or necessary several...
    1,760 Words | 5 Pages
  • Tanks and Flamethrowers - 457 Words
    Tanks and Flamethrowers of WWI WWI was a new type of war with new weapons and new Techniques. Although neither the flame thrower were heavily used in WWI, Both weapons were very effective at what they did. And both weapons had many Uses in the war. Constructed to help fight the stalemate in trench warfare, the tank had A rotating turret and 2 wing guns in the front and back plus a majority of the tanks had light artillery gun as well. Although they had a top speed of 4mph the tanks...
    457 Words | 2 Pages
  • Goodbye to All That - 360 Words
    There were many fine, powerful memoirs published about the First World War, and Robert Graves' “Good-Bye to All That” is considered to be one of the most honest and insightful. Based on “ Triste La Guerre”, the descriptions of battle are horrifying, and the descriptions of military bungling and pomposity are darkly amusing. The book was published in 1929, it is hugely effective in describing the everyday dangers Graves faced, how death was always minutes away and how it was inevitable that after...
    360 Words | 1 Page


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