The Wizard of Oz Essays & Research Papers

Best The Wizard of Oz Essays

  • The Wizard of Oz - 828 Words
    The Wizard of Oz Question: Do you think The Wizard of Oz provided Americans with the hope that their dreams could come true, or do you think that the movie might have made Americans even more upset with their own reality? Every human being faces their own demons and troubles. We try to escape them – some do it through their own battles, but most of us just want to forget, even if it is for a little while. After our moment in paradise is over, we can face our burdens with a new strength...
    828 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 881 Words
    Tiffini Bates ENGL 387.010 Introduction to Film Analysis Final Exam The Wizard of Oz Film Form (Form and Narrative Form) The Wizard of Oz uses film form by using similarity and repetition. With Dorothy being the main character, she is always reappearing in the film. As well as all of the characters, The Tin Man, The Lion, and The Scarecrow, have similarities to Dorothy. Each of them need something, Dorothy needs to go back home, The Tin Man needs a brain, The Scarecrow needs a heart,...
    881 Words | 3 Pages
  • wizard of oz - 834 Words
    Influence is the capacity or power of persons to produce an effect on the actions of others. Victor Flemming, the director of the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz, depicts a message that revolves around the reversal of power and gender roles. Moreover, Dorothy is a child in her physical presence but lives the role of a hero as she leads the scarecrow, lion, and tin man to the Wizard himself. Through the archetypes such as the hero being a women, Cultural values, and the stages of the journey,...
    834 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 380 Words
    The author’s primary argument was to show that the famous story “The Wizard of Oz” was an allegory according to an English teacher who wrote an essay. The essay became famous and more and more people started to believe all the accusations. His name was Henry M. Littlefield and he wanted to show the discrepancies throughout the book to give people an understanding to why he said the things he did. He made it seem like it was a full blown parable on populism. The evidence the author has to...
    380 Words | 1 Page
  • All The Wizard of Oz Essays

  • Wizard of Oz - 2088 Words
    The Wizard of Oz: Bringing the book to life The wizard of Oz has been a beloved story that has had an impact way beyond being a children’s fairy tale. Numerous papers in sociology and the humanities have been written analyzing the allegories contained in the story. The song “Over the Rainbow” is such an inspirational song that it has survived over the years, being covered by numerous artists and featuring even in movies today, like the movie “Australia”. This article however will...
    2,088 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz - 397 Words
    Childhood vs Adulthood The change in setting from Kansas to Oz is synonymous and also symbolic of Dorothy’s transition from childhood to adulthood. I will be drawing on specific examples from the movie where it is evident that Dorothy’s behavior in Oz reflects a more mature adult-like tone whereas similar situations in Kansas illuminate childishness. The most prominent example in Kansas where Dorothy demonstrates her child-like behavior is when Ms Gulch comes to take Toto away. Dorothy’s...
    397 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 624 Words
    The Wizard of Oz is a classic, a legend, and a children’s story that will never grow old. Quotes from the story such as “Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore,” “Lions, and tigers, and bears! Oh, my,” and “There’s no place like home,” are ones that will always pop into our heads when someone says “The Wizard of Oz.” These are the lines that are related right away to the famous story. Dorothy’s long, adventurous trip down the Yellow Brick Road is something that everyone loves to read...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 1340 Words
    The Wizard of Oz (1939) uses both mise en scène and sound to create an immense sequence of dream imagery, particularly in the second to last scene where Dorothy is at the point of going back to Kansas. This scene is distinctly significant in terms of mise en scène and sound as it concludes the film and highlights the themes that have been revealed throughout, giving a clearer message to the film’s audience. The mise en scène is used to describe what it is the frame and why it is there. The...
    1,340 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz - 429 Words
    Synopsis Dorothy (Judy Garland), a young Kansan farmgirl, and her dog Toto are whisked away by a tornado in her aunt and uncle's house to the land of Oz, where the house lands upon and kills the Wicked Witch of the East. Disliking the colorful world around her, Dorothy desires to go home, but not knowing how to do so, she sets out to inquire about the means of returning to Kansas from the Wizard of Oz, who resides in the Emerald City. On her way there, she meets the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman,...
    429 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 607 Words
    Wizard of Oz Interpretation The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a story about a girl named Dorothy who experiences a cyclone that takes her to a magical land of good and bad. When she is in this land she encounters a Scarecrow, Tin Man, and a Lion. These 3 characters are with her throughout the story and they go through different tough situations together. In the end they make their way to the Oz who grants their wishes and Dorothy goes back home. People say that this story is based off of populism,...
    607 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz - 927 Words
    Dorothy, an orphan who lived with her uncle and aunt in Kansas, was accidentally brought by a cyclone, as the cyclone lifted the house Dorothy and her dog, Toto, were in, to the Land of Oz. The house accidentally landed on a Wicked Witch of the East and killed her, which made the Munchkins freed from the Wicked Witch slavery. Despite the beauty of the Land of Oz and the gratefulness of the Munchkins, Dorothy still wanted to go back to Kansas. Thus the Good Witch of the North, which came to the...
    927 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 590 Words
    Essay Question #2 The Travelling Companions In most coming-of-age stories the hero is usually accompanied by friends that help him accomplish his journey. In Baum, L. Frank “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy meets three characters that help her find the wizard, defeat the wicked witch and return home. In this journey, every character helps her to grow up and understand why she needs a brain, a heart and courage. The journey would not have been possible without her three companions. The...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • the wizard of oz - 564 Words
    The Wizard of Oz Dorothy, from The Wizard of Oz, is an example of an Archetypal Hero. She has a quest; in which she gets help from other creatures, has a weapon that brings her magical powers, has an event that make her go on another journey, and is glorified forever. Her quest is to find her way back to Kansas. A person that helps her is the Scarecrow. The weapon that brings her power, are her red-ruby slippers. She has to go on many other journeys while finding her way back to Kansas. One...
    564 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 701 Words
    The 1939 film the Wizard of Oz is directed by Victor Fleming. Throughout this film the idea of dystopia is shown. Dystopia is a very unpleasant imaginary world in which ominous tendencies of our present social, political and technological order are projected into a disastrous future elimination. Dystopia is shown throughout this film as in a dystopian society people must believe they are happy and then discover they are not. Dorothy discovers she is unhappy in the film. This idea of dystopia...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz - 1661 Words
    The wizard of Oz Mythical elements in the Wizard of Oz * Flying of house * Dorothy goes to the munchkins country * Munchkins * Good witch of north * Bad witch of east * Bad witch of west * Lion’s talking * Friendship among scare- crow lion Dorothy and Tin-woodman * Scare crow was dancing, moving etc * Tin wood man was dancing, moving, talking etc * In animate objects were asking for animate qualities * Trees talking, throwing apples. Animate...
    1,661 Words | 5 Pages
  • Narrative Report on the Wizard of Oz
    Narrative Report on The Wizard of OZ Story and Plot When differentiating between story and plot in narrative film, we can identify the story as a series of all the events presented to us within the narrative, inclusive of all elements that have been overtly presented to us, as well as events that the viewer may infer or conceptualise. In contrast, the plot can be described as all the elements that are presented to us throughout the screen duration. That is everything that we see and hear...
    1,681 Words | 6 Pages
  • Genre Wizard of Oz - 477 Words
    Movies that fall into the musical genre have songs sung by the characters that are interwoven into the storyline of the movie. The songs are used to develop the plot of the movie, or further characterize the roles in the movie, whether directly or indirectly. Musicals came about from stage productions put to film. Musical films tend to have a better set of scenery and backdrops than stage productions because of the ability to move location and editing. Musicals differ among moods of the films...
    477 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz on Populisim - 1252 Words
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and it’s relation to populism Frank Baum first published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1930. The book later became an extremely popular motion picture film. Frank Baum was a supporter of William Jennings Bryan who stood three times, unsuccessfully, as a U.S. Presidential candidate for the Democratic Party. Henry Littlefield proposed the idea The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was a parable about Populism, money reform, and the 1890’s Midwestern political movement led by...
    1,252 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wonderful Wizard of Oz as Allegory
    Donovan Conner Mrs. Collins College Prep American Literature February 9 2009 In Lyman Frank Baum’s, more commonly known as Frank L. Baum, novel The Wonderful wizard of Oz Baum describes a story in which a young girl Dorothy and her dog, Toto go on a magical journey from the dull, gray land of Kansas to the colorful, magical land of Oz. This girl and her dog meet three companions, a Cowardly Lion, a Brainless Scarecrow, and a Heartless Tin Man and have adventure in the Land of Oz and...
    2,220 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz Review - 349 Words
    The Wizard of Oz is a musical fantasy and centers around a young, imaginative girl from Kansas. Dorothy’s hometown is suddenly hit by a raging tornado. Dorothy is knocked unconscious by a loose window while trying to take cover inside her small farm house that she shares with her loving Aunt, Uncle and three helpful farm hands. After being swept away in the tornado, Dorothy lands in a fantasy land called Oz. In order to get back home to Kansas, Dorothy has to make the long journey to Emerald...
    349 Words | 1 Page
  • Wizard of Oz Allegorical Analysis
    Sam Stillerman Wizard of Oz Allegorical Analysis 3rd Period Mrs. Stanley APUSH The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is believed by many to be an allegory of the current economical and political state that America was facing in the late 1800s. This allegory is mostly in line with the populist movement, a quickly growing belief that bankers and corporations controlled the two major parties in America. The Populist Party quickly arose from this movement, consisting mostly of farmers and other...
    615 Words | 2 Pages
  • the wizard of oz Allegory - 479 Words
    The Wizard of Oz was released August 25, 1939. In this story Dorothy, her little dog Toto, a Man of tin, a Scarecrow, and a cowardly lion all travel down a “yellow brick” road (a symbol for gold and a value to our currency) to find the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz. After a long journey, they finally get to him and find out that he is nothing more than a man behind a curtain speaking through a microphone and operating levers, knobs and switches to keep the illusion alive. Frank Baum, the...
    479 Words | 2 Pages
  • Populism and the Wizard of Oz - 1179 Words
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its Relations in Populism The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has caused quite a stir of controversy since it was first published in 1900. Written by L. Frank Baum, it was initially thought of to be only a magical story for children; but as it was later examined, there seemed to be more behind the well thought out novel than meets the eye. It appeared that Baum wrote an entire book as a metaphor relating to the populism of the 1890s. From the characters to the settings to...
    1,179 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - 1418 Words
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: Not So Wonderful In Frank Baum’s famous work, The Wizard of Oz, there was more meaning behind the tale besides a fragile girl and her dog embarking on a journey with a scarecrow, a tin woodsman and a lion to see the Wizard. Baum claims that this story is absolute children’s literature but scholars and critics believe otherwise. There were several comments calling Baum a “socialist” and that his characters and the setting represented the whereabouts of the United...
    1,418 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz - A School Lesson
    1. Introduction “The worth of a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it.” (James Bryce) Reading is essential for language learning. It improves vocabulary, grammar and fluency. To get our pupils to read, often a book is chosen to read together in class. As a teacher, one might have difficulties to decide which book to choose. For sixth grade it must not be difficult or the children will not have any fun reading it, it should be exciting for them to read and should improve...
    4,033 Words | 11 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Analogy - 865 Words
    If comparing the movie to current politics, much can be tied to the wicked witch. The witch has many of the flying monkeys which abide to all of her commands. Using this, the monkeys represent the US Congress in which senators and state representatives do what the president says. This further makes the house of congress seem like puppets on the larger scale. The monkeys also did not like the witch and they were excited when Dorothy melted her. This is analogous for the way the US is never...
    865 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sequence Analysis Wizard of Oz
    Sequence Analysis: Wizard of Oz Rabi Kumaraswamy October 31, 2014 DRAMA 3030 Dr. Aaron Taylor In the Wizard of Oz, we see the journey of a girl, Dorothy Gale, in her dreams to escape her dismal life on the farm and her troubles with her aunt and uncle. It is only after she dreams of being in a place unfamiliar and troublesome that she realizes how much her family means to her. From this we can see the film’s explicit meaning: “There’s no place like home.” Although this line can in ordinary be...
    1,026 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Review - 716 Words
    Dorothy’s A Long Way from Home! The movie the “Wizard of Oz” was made in the year of 1939. Ever since it premiered, many people instantly fell in love with it and continue to watch it to this day. The “Wizard of Oz” is considered a classic and a must see among all types of audiences. The plot of the film is a girl named Dorothy who lives in Kansas with her family and a dog that she recently found named Toto. A tornado hits Kansas and causes Dorothy to become unconscious. When...
    716 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Populism Movement
    Populism and the Wizard of OZ The Wizard of OZ is an allegory some say, written by Frank Baum during the turnoff the 20th Century. There are many people who have made numerous comparisons between the political climate of the time, the characters and themes of the book. Initially a children’s novel, the book has come to mean so much more for so many more. For this project you will research the Populist movement and compare what you find to the research you complete on the true meaning of the...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wonderful Wizard of Oz - 688 Words
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz was a mixture of happiness, sadness, and, most importantly, beneficial life lessons. Despite the obstacles imposed throughout the play, the characters had overcome them by realizing that they possessed the resources and skills all along. Overcoming obstacles was present throughout the play by Dorothy being African American, the lion finding his courage, and the use of technology in place of special effects. Being that the Wizard of Oz was a play, special effects...
    688 Words | 2 Pages
  • Journeys: the Wizard of Oz and Journey
    A journey is defined as the travelling of one place to another. However, whilst studying Journeys, I have found it is much more than that. Often, we underestimate the power and importance of the lessons a journey may possess. I have chosen three texts that relate closely to the aspects of Journeys of Discovery. My first selected text is a poem called ‘Journey’ by Narendra Kuppan. My second chosen text is the movie, ‘The Wizard of Oz’ and my third text is the book, ‘Tomorrow When the War...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Cinema - 1336 Words
    Wizard of oz Film As A Work Of Art According to Film Art, it consists of “setting, costume and makeup, lighting, and staging” (Bordwell 115). In “The Wizard of OZ” these aspects of Mise-en-Scene all come together to make up a spectacular viewing experience. Created in 1939 and directed by Victor Fleming, “The Wizard of Oz” was one of the first successful Technicolor films. Since this film was shot primarily in color, it gave the directors and costume designers many new opportunities to...
    1,336 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Outline - 482 Words
    Wizard of Oz: • Call to Adventure: Been living on the farm, Dorothy has an internal call to adventure in that she wishes to view a land (sings about it) and life greater than what she has living on the farm • Siddhartha lives in a relatively wealthy city in India with his Brahmin parents, but has a thirst for knowledge. He wants to join the wandering squad of possession-less Samanas (tells his father) • Refusal to Call: Dorothy is transported to Oz, “We’re not in Kansas anymore”, and at first...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • SYMBOLISM IN THE WIZARD OF OZ - 1080 Words
     SYMBOLISM IN “THE WIZARD OF OZ” An Nguyen History 1302: U.S. History after 1877 September 08, 2012 1. The Tin Man: He represents American workers. In Baum’s story, the Tin Man had been a human, a wood-chopper. However, the Wicked Witch of the East made him chop off parts of his body. A tinsmith helped him replace these parts with all of tin. This reflected that workers have to work harder and faster like machines. When Dorothy and the Scarecrow find the Tin...
    1,080 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - 305 Words
    Argumentative Piece: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is one of the most famous classic pieces of literature. The book, writtren by L. Frank Baum, was published in 1900 and the movie, directed by Victor Fleming, was released in 1939. The story has been adapted for the big screen several times. We found out that there are many contrasts between the book and the film. Some of them are so outstanding that the book and the movie seem to be two different stories. The most...
    305 Words | 1 Page
  • Wizard of Oz Political Allegory
    Janell Marshall December 29, 2013 Lewis- APUSH “There’s no place like home, there’s no place like home, there’s no place like home”, repeated Dorothy. A young girl trying to go back home to Kansas after a cyclone lands her and her dog, Toto, in the Land of Oz. There Dorothy meets the Scarecrow, the TinMan, and the Cowardly Lion who are all in need of something that is considered important to them; a brain, a heart, and courage. Along the way, they have to travel to Emerald City to see the...
    1,305 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Is The Wizard of Oz communist
    Why Is The Wizard of Oz Communist? When the book was published in the 1900s the United States was in a period of deflation and depression. There was a huge debt from prices falling. The populist party was set up to represent farmers and industrial workers. The United States was operated on the gold standard; the populist wanted silver, along with gold to be used for the currency. Using silver would increase the United States money supply. In the Wizard of Oz ...
    663 Words | 1 Page
  • The Wizard of Oz- Parable on Populism
    Max Lang 2/27/12 History 11 The Wizard of Oz: Parable on Populism When Lyman Frank Baum first publicized The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, it had been very popular from the start. The Wizard of Oz is filled with musical comedy and is a warm and touching production. This production was such a hit that it had been turned into three movies and there were a number of plays on it. The Wizard of Oz was not written for the purpose of a sequel, but it was so popular that there had been many...
    1,293 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz: The Theme of Belief
    Believe: A Detailed Look at Underlying Themes The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a novel published originally in 1900, and written by L. Frank Baum, who also wrote thirteen to seventeen other books centering around the magical land of Oz. This children’s book spawned a Broadway Musical in 1902 and a film adaptation in 1939. It has also been the basic building block for plenty of other films, musicals and novels having to do with this imaginative world, such as Wicked; Oz the Great and Powerful;...
    899 Words | 3 Pages
  • American Themes in the Wizard of Oz
    The Yellow Brick Road of America “There’s no place like home” (Baum) is a quote read by children and adults alike, from the gilded age of the 1950’s to the modernity of today. It is from the cleverly written bedtime story, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, which seems like an innocent fairy tale that is written solely to pleasure children. However, deep between the lines of L. Frank Baum’s novel, the various images of America that brings readers awareness to the troubles at the turn of the...
    2,000 Words | 5 Pages
  • Movies: the Wizard of Oz and Movie
    English Essay Marilyn Colon Do you like movies? I know I do! I watch movies all the time. There are so many different movies to choose from. There are comedy, thriller, action, romance and suspense movies. There are some movies that always make you cry no matter how many times you see them. There are also some that you can get emotionally attached too as well. “The Wizard of Oz” is a classic movie that I grew up watching over and over again. I love this movie...
    415 Words | 3 Pages
  • Closer Look at Wizard of Oz
    A closer look at the characters in The Wizard of Oz By Mary Ann Monjeau-Warner HUMA 205 Film Critique #1 Instructor: Dr. Tomory March 15, 2013 “Transported to a surreal landscape, a young girl kills the first woman she meets, and then teams up with three complete strangers to kill again.”(Polito) You would think this is a horror flick coming up. It’s...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Meaning of the Wizard of Oz - 523 Words
    20 January 2013 I recently learned the true meaning of one of my all time favorite childhood movies, The Wizard of Oz. The book turned screenplay originally written by L. Frank Baum is not a mere children’s story but a hidden tale of populism and government. The story is and its characters are packed with symbolism. The main character Dorothy Gale gets swept away in a twister along with her house, and lands in munchkin land. Dorothy’s last name “Gale” is supposed to represent her being the...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz as a Fairy Tale
    There’s No Place Like Home For hundreds of years, parents have been enthralling children with stories of magic and wishes coming true. Fairy tales are passed from one generation to the next through oral tradition, and, in modern times, books. As various societies develop, fairy tales are changed to fit the needs and morals those societies want to impress upon their children. Thus, the style and content of a fairy tale is directly affected by the social attitudes of a particular society at...
    1,568 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz Phenomena - 2327 Words
    The 1939 film, ‘The Wizard of Oz', was a colour and sound explosion that is as cherished today as it was when it was first released. But what a lot of the public doesn't realise, is that the movie is based on the first of 14 books written by L. Frank Baum. Publish in 1900, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" marked the beginning of a new type of fairytale. Baum steered away from the Classic European style fairytales like those of Hans Christian Anderson and the Grimm brothers, into a more...
    2,327 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Wonderful Wizard of Oz - 570 Words
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz The year of 1939 was a great year for classical movie lovers. With Gone with the Wind, Mr. Smith goes to Washington, Wuthering Heights, and The Wizard of Oz. This year during the Great Depression gave us more classics than most years combined. The Great Depression was one of the main reasons behind the making of all of these movies; the dark and bleak times needed a getaway, a place to escape to where ones troubles don’t matter, the movies were that...
    570 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard Of Oz Plot Summary
    The novel, like the movie, follows the story of Dorothy, a young girl who lives with her aunt, uncle, and dog Toto on a farm in Kansas. One day a cyclone sweeps up the farmhouse. Dorothy and Toto are caught inside the house, but they survive the storm. When the house is set down again, Dorothy and Toto find themselves in Munchkin Country, located in Oz. The house lands on the Wicked Witch of the East, killing her. The Munchkins are delighted to be freed from their evil ruler. The Good Witch of...
    775 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Narrative Report
    Assignment 1 – Narrative Report Story and Plot In a narrative film, a plot is considered all visible and audible elements present in a film, in essence the film in its entirety including nondiegetic images. In The Wizard of Oz, the plot begins with Dorothy (Judy Garland), a young farm girl from Kansas who dreams of escaping to ‘somewhere over the rainbow’ without troubles and torment for her dog Toto from a horrible neighbour Miss Gulch (Margaret Hamilton). During a tornado she is hit on...
    1,703 Words | 5 Pages
  • Good vs Evil in the Wizard of Oz
    Dualities of Good vs. Evil in The Wizard of Oz Through the expression of literature within the elementary school classroom, young children can become exposed to endless lesson’s regarding life and growing. “Realistic” stories have been criticized for being dull, too complex, and psychologically empty. For example, it is practically impossible to find any meaning within literature such as “See Dick. See Jane.” Nonetheless, fantasy restores this meaning within the reading process. As expressed...
    936 Words | 3 Pages
  • Book Report :The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    The Wonderful Wizard of Oz L. Frank Baum Dorothy, The story main character,she is very brave,helpful and kind. Scarecrow, has a silly head ,he want to improve himself,so want to find the witch to make a wish. Tin Woodman, He is not flexible, so he want to improve it .Therefore,he want ro find the witch. This book is talk about a gril,who called Dorothy,lived in the midst of the great Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who was the farmer's wife. Their...
    326 Words | 1 Page
  • Wizard of Oz - Imortamt Values Present
    Important values that are present throughout the Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum are that of friendship and kindness. The story presents these values through the character of Dorothy seen both expressing and receiving kindness. By illustrating these occurrences, this paper will show how it is through the kindness that Dorothy gives and receives, as well as the friendships that result, that she is able to find her way home to Kansas. Upon entering the Land of Oz, Dorothy receives...
    1,064 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fantasy: "Alice in Wonderland" and "Wizard of Oz"
    Alice in Wonderland/Through the Looking Glass and Wizard of Oz are great works of fantasy. Each novel incorporates aspects that can help the reader understand more about a child's way of thinking and his/her journey to adulthood. Also elements from Bettelheim, Freud and Jung can be applied in analyzing each work. In both Alice in Wonderland/Through the Looking Glass and Wizard of Oz , the authors delineate essential components to show how the main characters, Alice and Dorothy, mature from...
    1,541 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wonderful Wizard of Oz and the Populist Movement
    For many generations, adults and children alike have relished L. Frank Baum’s cleverly written bedtime story, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. On the surface, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz seems like an innocent fairy-tale that was written “solely to pleasure children today” ; however a deeper look into the main characters and symbolism inherent in the story, suggest an outlook into the Gilded Age. Many historians, beginning with Henry Littlefield, have interpreted The Wizard of Oz as being an allegory...
    3,025 Words | 8 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz Symbolic to the Populist Era
    Mieesha Box Mr. Wilson United States History 16 July 2013 Wizard of Oz Symbolic to the Populist Era I know you’re wondering how The Wonderful Wizard of Oz relates to the Populist Era, well it was said that the author L. Frank Baum was contrasting the Wizard of Oz to the Populist Era. In 1964 Henry M. Littlefield published “The Wizard of Oz: Parable on Populism” in the American Quarterly explaining the similarities between the two. He explains how a lot of the characters from the Wizard...
    436 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Tempest and Wizard of Oz Journey Esay
    The journey concept contains a number of components. It can be perceived as a process which leads to a conclusion or destination. The journey process is more significant than the destination. William Shakespeare’s play ‘The Tempest’, J.M Barrie’s novel Peter Pan and Victor Flemming’s film The Wizard of Oz (1939), all communicate journey concepts. Through analysing the ideas and textual conventions it will become evident that the ‘journey process’ is more important than the destination....
    1,121 Words | 3 Pages
  • Emotions and Confidence in the Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    Ryan Gates 3/11/2013 Short Paper Assignment Children's Literature Emotions and Confidence in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz The Wizard of Oz is a piece of American culture that children have been taking in since the early 20th century. L. Frank Baum first introduced The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, and would write 13 sequel novels after its publication. In 1939, MGM released The Wizard of Oz in technicolor to American audiences. The film exploded, and the popularity of The Wizard of...
    990 Words | 3 Pages
  • Book Critique on the Wonderful Wizard of Oz
    Book Critique Dorothy lives in Kansas with her aunt, uncle, and dog, Toto. The entire house is swept away by a tornado from Kansas to the bright Land of Oz. She is met by the Munchkins and the Good Witch of the North. They are very happy because Dorothy’s house smashed the Wicked Witch of the East. The Good Witch gives Dorothy the dead witch's silver shoes. The only thing on Dorothy’s mind is getting back to Kansas, so the Witch of the East helps. Dorothy is sent down the yellow brick road to...
    721 Words | 2 Pages
  • How The Wizard Of Oz Relates To History
    If you look deeper into everyday things, you may find that some characters or objects in a story represent real-life people or scenarios. When I was a young child, I watched the “The Wizard of Oz,” all the time; but when we watched it together in my U.S. History Class, I realized that the meaning is much deeper than it seems. Many of the characters and significant places or things in the movie can represent people, places, things and ideas from American history. There are many ways to connect...
    1,437 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Makes the Wizard of Oz Cinematic
    What makes the Wizard of Oz Cinematic? By: Eric Svenson The Wizard of Oz was a cinematic breakthrough when it was released in 1939. It became cinematic because of many different new ideas and technologies spliced together into one film. When Frank L. Baum wrote the book “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” in 1900 he had no idea of what a success it would become in the motion picture industry. The remainder of this paper will touch on some of the key points that made The Wizard of Oz a...
    976 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz: Behind the Camera's Eye
    The Wizard of Oz: Behind the Camera’s Eye, Through the Camera’s Eye, and Through the Audience’s Eye Thesis written by Kimberly Adams Instructor: Patricia Krapesh Saint Mary’s of the Woods College ID302 Film Culture My thesis on the Wizard of Oz will look at this classic and beloved 1939 film from the behind the camera’s eye, through the camera’s eye, and through the audience’s eye. I will examine the difference between the book, written by L. Frank Baum in 1900 and the screenplay...
    1,826 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mise-En-Scene in the Wizard of Oz
    Mise-en-scène The placement of a prop or altering the way the light shines on a scene, however insignificant they may seem, are ways that the director can select and control meaning in a film. Such is in The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939), specifically during the scene where Dorothy (Judy Galand) has been locked in the Wicked Witch of the West's (Margaret Hamilton) castle room by herself; many aspects of mise-en-scene are noticeable. Many of the elements of the scene she is in contribute...
    1,055 Words | 3 Pages
  • Genre Analysis: Musical "The Wizard of Oz"
    The Wizard of Oz is one of the biggest American Musicals in film. It has become known world wide, it is apart of our American popular culture, and is best known of all films. It was based on the novel, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz written by L. Frank Baum in the 1900s. It was produced by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayar in the year of 1939. This film just hit the end of the “Golden Age of the Musical” that started in the early 1930s. MGM benefited greatly from the hit of the rebirth of musicals. It's known for...
    503 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Wizard Of Oz: The Bimetallic Standard & Populism Representations
     The Wizard Of Oz: The Bimetallic Standard & Populism Representations At first look, The Wizard Of Oz just seems to be a story about a normal Kansas girl who simply just wants to get back to her home, and is able to do so with the help of some new friends she meets along her journey. However, there seems to more to the story than just that. The author L. Frank Baum wrote the story in the late 1890s and it was published in 1900. This was right around the same time there was a huge fuss over...
    2,142 Words | 6 Pages
  • Comparison of Wizard of Oz and Hairspray Gender Issues
    Sample (Extract) Section C – Comparison of American Films What have you found interesting in the representation of gender in your chosen films. Gender roles are central issues within the musicals The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming, 1939) and Hairspray (Adam Shankman, 2007). The differences between the representation of males and females may, in part, be as a result of the shifting ideologies in the USA in two different historical periods. In the Wizard of Oz, the central protagonist...
    660 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Archetypal Quest - Comparing "The Epic of Gilgamesh" to "The Wizard of Oz"
    The Archetypal Quest In almost every book you read, you will find that someone always has to go on some sort of journey or quest (Rice). If you examine each quest closely, you will notice that they are all very similar (Rice). When things are used repeatedly like that, they are said to have an archetypal pattern (Rice). The quest on which all these heroes go on is referred to as the archetypal quest (Rice). “The Wizard of Oz” focuses on a small-town girl living in Kansas. “The Epic of...
    1,927 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Wizard of Oz: an Exploration of the Connections to the Populist Movement
    The Wizard of Oz: An Exploration of the Connections to the Populist Movement Dorothy, as played by Judy Garland in the movie, was a young teenage girl who, when a tornado hit her house in Kansas, was magically transferred to Oz with her dog, Toto. Dorothy was seen as the Everyman who just wanted to get back to the way things used to be. She embodies what every American wants to be: loyal, strong-willed, and resourceful. Henry Littlefield identifies her, “"Dorothy is Baum's Miss Everyman....
    469 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz- How Is Dorothy a Feminist Hero?
    In what ways can Dorothy be described as a feminist hero? In The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, L. Frank Baum has made sure there is a feminist hero in his book. This is because everyone should see an example of a good feminist hero, especially around the time when this book was written; in 1900, it was very rare to read a book with any sort of feminism in it. Dorothy throughout the book, shows many heroic acts supporting the idea that she is a feminist hero. When L. Frank Baum is...
    889 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mirror Stage of Development Analysis on the Wizard of Oz (Magic Art of the Great Humbug)
    In the children's story, "The Magic Art of the Great Humbug", all of the characters run into problems with their identities. The old man has the most difficulty with his own identity. He wishes to be a great wizard with superhuman capabilities. The Tin Man, Scarecrow, and Cowardly Lion have trouble with desiring qualities that are only common to humans. Finally, Dorothy runs into trouble with the symbols around her that establish her identity. The common problem that consumes each character...
    2,402 Words | 6 Pages
  • Poem Indirect Conflict Between Scarecrow and Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz
    “‘All the same’ said the Scarecrow, ‘I shall ask for brains instead of a heart; for a fool would not know what to do with a heart if he had one.’ ‘I shall take the heart’ returned the Tin Woodman; ‘for brains do not make one happy, and happiness is the best thing in the world.’” – Excerpt from “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” by L. Frank Baum A Woodman of tin, a man stuffed with straw Each with a human-like question and flaw Where’s the importance, in the head or the heart? Subtle opinions,...
    305 Words | 1 Page
  • The Wizard of Oz: L. Frank Baum's Real Life Experience
    The Wonderful Wizard of Populism The “The Wizard of Oz” is a beloved children's story written by L. Frank Baum in 1900 and many historians have tried to come up with arguments that compare the mystical story with the movement of populism. All of these theories have some background but none of them are able to draw any real parallels between the story and populism that are not completely speculative. These historians have done nothing that could bring any evidence or tie any parts of the...
    700 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oz as Utopia - 1347 Words
    Taylor Wilton Dr. Ethna Lay The Wonderful Worlds of Utopia Americans crave Oz because of it's utopian vision. On the surface, Oz appears to be a perfect utopia to Dorothy. When she first arrives, Oz is bright, colorful and full of magic and wonder while her home in Kansas is dull, lifeless and devoid of hope. In Kansas, it's as if the citizens are stuck with no real plans or goals for the future. In Oz, traveling down the elaborate, intertwined yellow brick road offers Dorothy a great...
    1,347 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oz and Odessy - 487 Words
    Meagan Finnerty English 9R Chappell 8-9 12-14-10 The Odyssey and The Wizard of Oz The Wizard of Oz is like the Odyssey because both Dorothy and Odysseus are determined and anxious to return home. Odysseus and Dorothy both meet characters along the journey who help them and evil characters trying to not let them reach home. Good characters who give advice in the Wizard of Oz are the munchkins who show Dorothy where to go to get to the Emerald city to ask the wizard how she will...
    487 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Wizaed of Oz - 761 Words
    The Wizard of Oz Review by Harvey Karten Copyright © 1998 Harvey Karten I’d like five bucks for every time someone called out to me, “Hey, Toto!” when I walk my cairn terrier around the neighborhood. “Is that really Toto?” adults would stop and ask me, and I’d of course reply, “Sure it is; I’ve had him for sixty-three years now.” As for the kids, well, surprisingly enough some of them never saw “The Wizard of Oz” so the best they can do is say, “Ma, Ma, look at the dog!” Pretty...
    761 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oz and the Tinman - 1440 Words
    Oz and the Tin Man In the classic film, “The Wizard of Oz”, Dorothy meets a tin woodsman. The solemn Tin Man tells Dorothy that he wasn’t given a heart. He then sings his hit single, “If I Only Had a Heart”, and through song and choreographed dance, the Tin Man shares his dream. He would be “friends with the sparrows and the boy that shoots the arrows”. He would be kind, he would be gentle, and he’d be “awful sentimental”, if he only had a heart. He believes that professional help...
    1,440 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wonderful Oz Dorothy - 403 Words
    ESSAY The Wizard of Oz is a classic, a legend, and a children’s story that will never grow old. Quotes from the story such as “Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore,” and “There’s no place like home,” are ones that will always pop into our heads when someone says Dorothy from “The Wizard of Oz.” These are the lines that are related right away to the famous story. Dorothy’s long, adventurous trip down the Yellow Brick Road where she did make many specials friends and their find...
    403 Words | 1 Page
  • The Wizord of Oz Symbolizing the Gilded Age
    The story ( The Wonder World of OZ ) written by Frank Baum is filled with symbolism. Symbolism a style of writing using symbols and indirect suggestion to express ideas, emotions, people etc. The story gives a lot of symbols relating to the gilded age in American history which took place from 1880– 1900. The main symbols are: Dorothy, the Land of Oz, lion, Emerald City, flying monkeys.

    The first person the story talks about in the story is Dorothy. She's a girl that comes form Kansas...
    616 Words | 2 Pages
  • Script: Land of Oz and Tin Woodman
    A Visit to The Wizard of Oz -5 people play script A Visit to The Wizard of Oz by Wu Hsiu-yao Cast Wu Yu-chieh: Child A, Scarecrow, and Vicky’s mother Huang Chi-ying: Vicky Yeh Chung-cheng: The Tin Woodman Chang Tun-wei: The King of Oz and Park Keeper Lai Kuan-ling: Dorothy ——————————————————————————– SCENE I (This is a park; there is a tree in the middle of the stage. There is a bush on the right hand side of the stage. Some children are on the stage. They...
    741 Words | 4 Pages
  • bmbmbm - 938 Words
    A Parable on Populism (and American Monetary Policy) This popular and well-documented reading sees The Wizard of Oz as being about the collapse of the Populist Movement in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century. In this scenario, Dorothy represents the common citizen, the Tin Man is the industrial worker, the Scarecrow is a stand-in for farmers, and the Cowardly Lion is politician William Jennings Bryan (seen by many at the time as being all talk and no action). They travel...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • Old Yellow Bricks - 1255 Words
    Old Yellow Bricks Why do we sometimes feel as if we are watching our lives when we are actually watching a movie? Well, it is simply because movies are projections of the perfect miscellany of reality and imagination. Those two things – reality and imagination – are perhaps the only commonality all human beings have had a taste of. That is why everyone can somehow associate their own life with whatever they are watching, and thus, different perspectives emerge. "Out of Kansas" is an essay...
    1,255 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cinema of Attraction - 1659 Words
    When one contemplates the concepts of cinema and attractions, the ideas of the modern day blockbuster film might come to mind. World disasters, car chases, and high profile police investigations are just some of the story lines that attract people to theatres year round. The term "cinema of attraction" introduced by Tom Gunning into the study of film is defined more precisely. To quote Gunning, a cinema of attraction: "directly solicits spectator attention, inciting visual curiosity, and...
    1,659 Words | 4 Pages
  • critical lens - 1283 Words
    I.S.25 Emily Tan 722 September 27, 2014 “Circumstances are beyond the control of man, but his conduct is in his own power,” a quote by Benjamin Disraeli, is a statement about life and its tribulations. Situations cannot be predicted nor reined in by...
    1,283 Words | 3 Pages
  • Einstein: light to the power of 2
    The film Einstein: Light to the Power of 2 was a delightful tale of Albert Einstein’s quest to help a little girl with her struggles in school. She is being faced with a multitude of challenges including science fair, chastising peers, and the threat of remedial classes. Throughout the movie, Einstein carries a compass that his father gave him when he was a little boy. He has kept it all these years because he is intrigued by the fact that no matter what it always points north. This...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • cheating essay - 587 Words
    Oz essay – Research ll The wizard of Oz is a non-fictional novel for young readers. It created a world to show how bad the gilded age was. The characters represented things from that time. Dorothy represented everyman as in the citizens. Scarecrow represented the farmers because farmers didn’t use their head when needed. Tin-man was the industrial workers, and lastly the lion represented Jennings Bryon populist. My favorite character in this book is tin-man because he shows loving emotions...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Movies of the 1930's - 594 Words
    Movies in the 1930's Gangster films and musicals came from Broadway in the 1930's. These two new genres symbolized the impression that Hollywood had on national culture during the great depression. Some musicals like gold diggers were not just made to be enjoyed but intended to go against the economic depression. It did just that by showing the spirit of optimism and cooperation. Gangster film such as "Public Enemies"(1931) and "Scar face"(1932) dramatized violence. Violence in those films were...
    594 Words | 2 Pages
  • Journey of Heroes: Dorothy and Odysseus
    Ali Pederson Mrs. Spera English 9 Honors 5 March 2012 Dorothy and Odysseus A hero is someone who is courageous, loyal, and fearful. Odysseus is a hero from The Odyssey that is told by Homer. The epic story begins when Aphrodite cast a love spell on Paris and Helen. Paris is the prince of Troy and Helen is the queen of Sparta. Helen is Menelause’s wife who is the king of Sparta. Paris and Helen after having a love spell cast on them end up falling in love. When Paris takes Helen back to...
    1,312 Words | 4 Pages
  • Allegory Essay 1 - 484 Words
    Allegory in literature is an excellent way to write. It’s an imaginative way of writing, but it’s not just plain and simple it gives emphasis on the mortal of the story. It’s rhetorical and implies meaning that is not literal. In allegory a symbol or character may be consider symbolic of a concept like a person, fortune or reason. Although not everyone who writes uses allegory in their writing it is very effective. One example of an allegory in literature is Animal Farm, written by George...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay2 - 1471 Words
    The 1930s was the decade of the sound and color revolutions and the advance of the 'talkies'. The so-called "natural" or photographic colour processes became institutionalised at approximately the same time as sound, although, like sound, colour had been a component of the film experience for a long time. (David A. Cook, 2003: P.220) In the early 1900s, most films were made in black-and –white and many directors preferred to use black-and-white shock as some color film processes (including hand...
    1,471 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rhetorical Analysis of Stephen King's "Why We Crave Horror Movies"
    Marquita Simon Parkhurst English 1301 1/28/11 A Summary of “Why We Crave Horror Movies” By Stephen King Before I got pregnant with my son, I used to love watching scary movies. My favorite was all of the “Saw” movies, but there was a few I’m still scared of watching to this day. In “Why We Crave Horror Movies”, Stephen King explains how each and every one of us have some kind of weird and twisted side that likes to see the horror in some daily things. He talks about riding on the roller...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • Romulus Belonging Essay - 1077 Words
    To be secure one must belong and to obtain the life necessity of belonging one must feel secure and trusted in a certain group. Respect must be present and encourages important alliances and equality within a community. The inability to belong highlights faults, leaving an individual vulnerable to alienation by the community and isolation by themselves. Lack of common communication potentially leads to a sense of not belonging. Within Raimond Gaita's; Romulus my father conception of belonging...
    1,077 Words | 3 Pages
  • Film Form - 1119 Words
    Week 2 Film: The Wizard of Oz FORM: is the sum of all parts of the film, unified and given shape by patterns such as repetition and variation, story lines and character traits. - Film is not the product of a random collection of technical devices, but rather, it is a system THE CONCEPT OF FORM IN A FILM - Artworks involve us by engaging our senses, feelings and mind in a process. - The artwork cues the spectator to perform a specific activity.  Example: A poem’s words may guide us to...
    1,119 Words | 4 Pages
  • Judging Based on Your Appearance
    DO NOT JUDGE A BOOK BY ITS COVER BUT BY THE CONTENT INSIDE! In today’s society, we tend to judge people base on their appearance. Is it a good thing? Is it fair that we judge people this way? Take your time. Spend a few minutes thinking about this. How do you feel? Have you ever been judged by your looks? I am sure, you have been! Have you had a situation before when you cried because society didn’t accept how you dress or how you look? What are the difference between fat and skinny, tall and...
    539 Words | 2 Pages
  • Characters List - 2350 Words
    Wizard of Oz Characters: Top 7 The Wizard of Oz characters first came to life in L. Frank Baum’s 1900 fantasy book, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. More than a hundred years later they still have the power to captivate and enchant. Read a countdown of the seven most memorable characters from the land somewhere over the rainbow: 7. The Good Witch of the North Not all witches are nasty. In Baum’s book, the Good Witch of the North (portrayed by Billie Burke in the famous 1939 film The Wizard of...
    2,350 Words | 7 Pages
  • Inner Journey - 1266 Words
    Inner journeys An inner journey is the challenge of self reflection. Everybody has their own inner journey that is caused by certain events that happen in their lives and causes growth, understanding and change in perception of themself and the world. There is obvious inner journeys that the characters in Othello, Thelma and Louise, and the Wizard of Oz. Shakespeare’s play Othello is the story of a man in the military, who meets the woman of his dreams and woos her over with his beautiful...
    1,266 Words | 3 Pages
  • Drama scene. 4 people acting. Very interesting piece of work. Only for the VERY creative.
    Music: "Come Out, Come out Wherever you are..." Setting: A room with a bed, presumably a bedroom - Dorothy in night attire, desperate (lights in) Wizard as Munchkin: (taking a fit) Four feet, one and a half inches is not short! (grumbles under Dorothy) Dorothy: (impatient) I wasn't trying to insult you. I just want to know how you got in! Wizard as Munchkin: (not listening) I'm the tallest one around! (grumbling continues) Dorothy: I really don't want to argue - I just want your help......
    786 Words | 5 Pages
  • Wicked Play Critique - 579 Words
    In seventh grade, I was first introduced into the theatre world by a group of my eighth grade friends singing a song I had never heard before. I did not have the time to ask them what it was called, but they told me it was from a musical called Wicked; the song in question was called “What is This Feeling?”, though at the time, all I knew was that it was about some people hating each other; back then, I’d believed it to be a love song between the Wicked Witch of the West and some unnamed male...
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Interesting Characters from Witi Ihimaera's Short Stories.
    An interesting character in “Yellow Brick Road” by Witi Ihimaera is Matiu, a young boy who cares for his family and is very eager to meet with the future. Matiu helps to deliver the idea of going somewhere foreign with great enthusiasm in this story, unlike the character Hema from “Big Brother, Little Sister.” Hema is also an interesting character as he is protects and cares for the people in his family, and instead of purposely harming them when they betray him, Hema runs away. Hema and Matiu...
    841 Words | 2 Pages
  • Yellow Brick Road - 2159 Words
    Yellow Brick Road by Witi Ihimaera Follow the yellow brick road, Follow, follow, follow follow, Follow the yellow brick road ... We're almost there! Almost at Wellington, the Emerald City! Me and Dad and Mum and Roha, we been travelling for two days now in our car which Dad bought from Mr Wallace last week. No dents and honk honk goes the horn. Dad, he said I could have a drive of it myself when we left Waituhi but then it conked out on the Whareratas and that made him...
    2,159 Words | 6 Pages
  • Poking Fun at Personal Ads
    To the SWF with a PhD:

    Basically, I'm a nervous person. I'll tell you now that I've never had a date, but I just know that we were meant to be. The things you look for, "slim build, knowledge of the Wicca religion, and the ability to differentiate between Van Gogh and Picasso" describe me to a tee. I can't wait until our wedding day, which should be soon because I'm nearly over two hills. Did I mention that I'm a nervous person?

    Concerning the line of your ad stating "Slim build is...
    554 Words | 2 Pages
  • Imaginative Journeys - 1188 Words
    An imaginative journey can be defined as an extension of reality that transcends physical barriers. Through the use of abstract notions and an element of surrealism, an imaginative journey can result in distortion of the boundaries between imagination and reality. This type of journey involves readers by drawing on their imagination and can therefore result in the transformation of perceptions and attitudes, which may also stimulate a sense of enlightenment for both the characters and the...
    1,188 Words | 4 Pages
  • Road Not Taken Robert Frost
    Journeys illustrate the voyage between places of interest. They are demonstrated by expressing to the audience the hardship and mixed emotions you go through to the destination. Some examples of positive effects on those who embark on a mission are that it hinders them to get out of their comfort zone and helps them appreciate what they have, if a problem occurs while embarking on your voyage it will have to be resolved to make the mission you board on possible. The text analysed “The Road Not...
    914 Words | 3 Pages


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