Structuralism Essays & Research Papers

Best Structuralism Essays

  • Structuralism - 1776 Words
    A Brief Introduction to Structuralism Zhu Gang The English word “structure” comes from structum, the past participle of the Latin struere, meaning “put in order.” There are two kinds of structuralism: structuralism as a mode of thinking, a general tendency of thought, or a philosophical view, and the narrower definition relating it to a method of inquiry, deriving chiefly from linguistics. Structuralism as a way of thinking can be traced back at least to Aristotle, whose Poetica is...
    1,776 Words | 5 Pages
  • Structuralism - 395 Words
    Structuralism is an intellectual movement that developed in France in the 1950s and 1960s, in which human culture is analysed semiotically (i.e., as a system of signs). Structuralism originated in the structural linguistics of Ferdinand de Saussure and the subsequent Prague and Moscow schools of linguistics.[1] Just as structural linguistics was facing serious challenges from the likes of Noam Chomsky and thus fading in importance in linguistics, structuralism appeared in academia in the...
    395 Words | 2 Pages
  • Structuralism - 899 Words
    STRUCTURALISM - A theoretical method which is analytical not evaluative. - A way of approaching texts and practices derived from Ferdinand de Saussure. Exponents of Structuralism include: |Name |Field | |Claude Lévi Strauss |Anthropology |...
    899 Words | 4 Pages
  • Post Structuralism - 378 Words
    Post Structuralism And Deconstruction . · without a fixed point of reference against which to measure movement we cannot tell whether or not you are moving at all. · · Post Structuralism accuse of not following through the omplications of the views about language on which their intellectual system is based. · Post structuralism says, in effect, that fixed intellectual reference points are pemanently removed by properly taking on board what structuralists said about language. · We...
    378 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Structuralism Essays

  • Linguistics and Structuralism - 645 Words
    Structuralism Structuralism is a mode of thinking and a method of analysis practiced in 20th-century social sciences and humanities; it focuses on recurring patterns of thought and behaviour – it seeks to analyse social relationships in terms of highly abstract relational structures. Structuralism is distinctly different from that applied to Radcliffe-Brown – it involves more the bio and psychological aspect of human studies rather than social structures. Claude Levi-Strauss was the one to...
    645 Words | 2 Pages
  • Structuralism and Semiotics - 5223 Words
    Structuralism and Semiotics What is Structuralism? Structuralism is the name that is given to a wide range of discourses that study underlying structures of signification. Signification occurs wherever there is a meaningful event or in the practise of some meaningful action. Hence the phrase, "signifying practices." A meaningful event might include any of following: writing or reading a text; getting married; having a discussion over a cup of coffee; a battle. Most (if not all) meaningful...
    5,223 Words | 14 Pages
  • Psychoanalysis & Structuralism - 2846 Words
    Psychoanalytic Criticism Classical Psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud Theory of the Psyche Humans are motivated, even driven, by desires, fears, needs, and conflicts of which they are unaware, that is unconscious The world through psychoanalytic lens Individual human beings Psychological history Childhood -> adolescent -> adult behavior Goal: help us resolve problems Disorders Dysfunctions Patterns of behavior – destructive (in some way) The Unconscious The storehouse of those painful...
    2,846 Words | 14 Pages
  • Post Structuralism Paper - 1574 Words
    Bertrand Joseph M. Roldan October 1, 2013 BA Literature – Management IV Lit 121 – Literary Criticism A Post- Structuralist Analysis of Francisco Sionil Jose’s “The God Stealers” Post-Structuralism literary theory discards the conventional methods of analysing literature as obvious and natural and offers a method of reading which analyzes questions, evaluates, challenges and opens up the text to find out multiplicity of meanings. One of the main influences on Post-Structuralism is the...
    1,574 Words | 5 Pages
  • Summary of Post-Structuralism - 837 Words
    Post-Structuralism Post-structuralism is a continuation and simultaneous rejection of structuralism – not only literary structuralism but even more so the anthropological structuralism of Levi-Strauss (Bertens, 2008: 93). * Post-structuralist thought has discovered the essentially unstable nature of signification. The sign is not so much a unit with two sides as a momentary ‘fix’ between two moving layers. Saussure had recognized that signifier and signified are two separate systems, but...
    837 Words | 3 Pages
  • Structuralism And Literary Criticism - 604 Words
    ‘Structuralism and Literary Criticism’ - Gerard Genette Structuralism is a way to examines a literary text to arrive at their meaning, rather than the actual meanings of the text themselves. It is a study of structure wherever they occur. In the essay Genette analyses content, logics, grammars and semiotics. He is considering structuralism as a method to study literary criticism. In the beginning of the essay Genette is establishing difference between Bricoleur and Engineer, Art critic and...
    604 Words | 3 Pages
  • Structuralism of the Novel Disgrace - 502 Words
    Structuralism of Disgrace The dictionary definition of structuralism says: an approach that explores the relationships between fundamental elements of some kind. Coetzee's stylish writing is rather post-structural in its' views than structural, it is David the protagonist of the novel who is set in his structural ways. Coetzee prefers to write his story with more interest in the gaps, silences and absences of his texts. One can see this through his choice of a distant narrator, a narrator...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reading Reaction on Structuralism and Power
    This week’s readings were on structuralism and power. The first text, “structure, sign and play”, was written by Jacques Derrida. In his text Derrida seems to discuss structuralism by arguing that there it is no longer unthinkable to think of structure as one that has no center. He argues that there is no longer a center to culture, as would be seen through a fixed frame which would act as the center presence within it. In example, during the medieval period, God would have been seen as the...
    764 Words | 2 Pages
  • Levi Strauss Structuralism - 2366 Words
    Explain what is meant by the term structuralism, and assess both the strengths and weaknesses of structuralism as a theoretical perspective “Structuralism is often said to be hard to define because it has taken too many different forms for a common denominator to be in evidence”, (Piaget 1971 p3), there are however 5 main thinkers that are strongly associated with the term despite its ambiguity. Of these 5 perhaps only one would proudly refer to themselves as such. This one would be...
    2,366 Words | 7 Pages
  • Comparison Post-Colonialism and Post-Structuralism
    The aim of this essay is to compare and contrast post-colonialism and post-structuralism as theories of international politics, by providing an explanation of the basic principles of each theory and an analysis of the similarities and differences. The first part of this essay will explain the basic principles of post-colonialism and post-structuralism as theories of international politics in order to examine the differences and similarities between these two approaches. In the second part...
    1,196 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ferdinand de Saussure’s Theory of Structuralism
    The word structure is derived from the Latin word structura which means to build. The theory of structuralism is considered to be a part of French structuralism, started in 1950s, by the cultural anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss. It is developed by Ferdinand de Saussure in his Course in General Linguistics (1915), who applied a variety of linguistic concepts in analyzing a literary text. His theory of the structure of language is considered as the origin of structuralism. Ferdinand de...
    603 Words | 2 Pages
  • Science of Signs Semiology: Ferdinand de Saussure and Charles Sanders Peirce
    Some semioticians see semiology as Arthur Asa Berger phases it "as the queen of the interpretive sciences, the key that unlocks the meanings of all things great and small." (1998, p 4). Although this could arguably be something of an over statement, in relation to the study of English and media studies it is crucial , for it deals with how we as readers generate meaning from texts. In this essay, I hope to explain how the study of semiotics has evolved, and how and to what effect it can be...
    1,625 Words | 5 Pages
  • cow of the barricades - 3405 Words
    HOME ABOUT THEORIES SEARCH SITE MAP CONTACT US LINKS STUDYING LITERATURE You are here : Home Page / Theories / Derrida / Deconstruction and différance AVAILABLE LANGUAGES Consultez cette page en FRANÇAIS Consult this page in ENGLISH Deconstruction and différance By Lucie Guillemette and Josiane Cossette Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières lucie_guillemette@uqtr.ca 1. ABSTRACT` DERRIDA Jacques Derrida's theory of the sign fits into the poststructuralist movement, which runs...
    3,405 Words | 11 Pages
  • Roundtable Discussion Structure, Sign and Play - Jacques Derrida
    Roundtable Discussion Structure, Sign and Play - Jacques Derrida ‘Structure, Sign and Play’, is a paper which involves the author - Derrida, encouraging the use of several different perspectives to view a concept. In doing so, he is able to find a common ground between different viewpoints whilst finding new ways of thinking against a classical perspective. Derrida finds a way to put an argument (against old concepts) into a correspondence within themselves whilst introducing his own...
    1,053 Words | 4 Pages
  • Genette - 1015 Words
    STRUCTURALISM-GERARD GENETTE. Centre for Post –Graduate Studies Prof.S.Jayaraman & Research in English, email:jayaraman121@gmail.com Muslim Arts College, Thiruvithancode-629174. How does Gerard Genette view the nature of literary criticism? (Or) Elucidate the views of Gerard Genette on the nature of literary criticism. Gerard Genette is one of the most important literary theorists of the 20th century. He was very much influenced by...
    1,015 Words | 3 Pages
  • Formalism and New Criticism - 1240 Words
    Formalism and New Criticism “Formalism” is, as the name implies, an interpretive approach that emphasizes literary form and the study of literary devices within the text. The work of the Formalists had a general impact on later developments in “Structuralism” and other theories of narrative. “Formalism,” like “Structuralism,” sought to place the study of literature on a scientific basis through objective analysis of the motifs, devices, techniques, and other “functions” that comprise the...
    1,240 Words | 4 Pages
  • Modernism and Post Modernism in Literature : Defining Briefly
    Modernism and Post Modernism in Literature Modernism in Literature Literary Modernism has its origins in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, mainly in Europe and North America. Modernism is characterized by a self-conscious break with traditional styles of poetry and verse. Modernists experimented with literary form and expression, adhering to the modernist maxim to "Make it new." The modernist literary movement was driven by a desire to overturn traditional modes of representation and...
    960 Words | 3 Pages
  • Barthes’s Mythologies as Semiotics Diciplines
    BARTHES’s MYTHOLOGIES AS SEMIOTICS Diciplines From the rituals, taboos, and myths of primitive cultures it is only a short step to contemporary culture. After Levi-Strauss had shown the way, a whole range of contemporary cultural phenomena came under structuralist scrunity. The French literary critic Roland Barthes (1915-1980) who later would straightforwardly claim that culture is a language in 1950 published Mythologies in which he applies a very loose and freewheeling structuralist analysis...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • literary teory - 6975 Words
    LITERARY THEORY Misconceptions about theory: 1. Theory is difficult What is difficult however is the language because most of the theorists are French 2. theory is meaningless, pretentious jargon 3. that we are intellectually incapable of coping with it(i.e we are at fault) 4. We take everything as gospel truth; We should question What is literary theory? Theory is a coherent set of conceptual hypothetical and pragmatic principles forming the general frame of reference for a...
    6,975 Words | 20 Pages
  • Deconstructionism - 826 Words
    Deconstructionism I Derrida: takes an ethical turn in looking at literature. He critiques to a small extent Levi-Strauss' theory. He writes in a difficult style on purpose. In Deconstructionism it tries to deconstruct the grounds whereby we suppose our thinning can be derived from one or another definite concepts. Derrida is not a literary theorist. We cant discriminate against genre. There is discourse. There is a field of text that there are always differences but no discernible...
    826 Words | 3 Pages
  • Language and post strucutal theories
    Sarangpani Ramchandra Shinde Every critical theory has something to say about language. Many theories have shown great uneasiness about the role of language which it puts forward. As feminists combat on the very idea of language by saying it as the medium of patriarchy, post colonialism thinks it as the expression of Eurocentricism and the list goes on. The language is the major concern in near about all the critical theories. Poststructuralists have discovered the unstable nature of...
    3,571 Words | 9 Pages
  • Historical Development of Philosophy’s Existentialism and Phenomenology
    Continental philosophy is a collective term used to describe the distinct philosophical traditions, methods, and styles that was popular in the European continent during the time of Immanuel Kant. Continental philosophy is usually countered with analytic philosophy or sometimes referred to as Anglo-American philosophy. During the 20th century continental philosophy embraced schools of thought such as phenomenology and existentialism. The major influences that this type of philosophy had were...
    551 Words | 2 Pages
  • fashion theory -roland barth
    Roland Barthes and the End of the Nineteenth Century Roland Barthes was a French philosopher, linguistic, critic and theorist. He was also the first begins systematically to think through the intellectual changes in the study of fashion and clothes. His fashion theory has a close relationship to his structuralism and linguistic knowledge, and defined fashion, clothes their origins and functions within the system. First of all, Barthes saw fashion as a whole system. Based on the...
    1,485 Words | 4 Pages
  • Structure Sign And Play In The Discourse Of The Human Sciences
    Dainy Daniel Mrs. Susan George B.A. English Hons.(II-B) 20 April 2015 Structuralism is an idea based on the belief that all human understanding is built out of a structure. Every structure also has a deep structure as well as an origin. Origin is complex and articulated. The structuralist believed center is immobile, static, controlling, all powerful, balanced point which controls the structure from playing. The center can be anything universally accepted (God, Being, presence, truth or man...
    1,324 Words | 4 Pages
  • Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences: Revie
    ‘Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences' (Derrida, 1978: 278 –293) may be read as the document of an event, although Derrida actually commences the essay with a reservation regarding the word "event", as it entails a meaning "which it is precisely the function of structural – or structuralist – thought to reduce or suspect" (278). This, I infer, refers to the emphasis within structuralist discourse on the synchronous analysis of systems and relations within them, as...
    1,580 Words | 5 Pages
  • Postmodern Materialism and Subsemantic Cultural Theory in Art
    Postmodern materialism and subsemantic cultural theory 1. Structuralist rationalism and the subcapitalist paradigm of reality In the works of Gibson, a predominant concept is the concept of patriarchialist truth. The primary theme of the works of Gibson is not narrative, but neonarrative. But the closing/opening distinction prevalent in Gibson's Neuromancer is also evident in Idoru, although in a more mythopoetical sense. Lyotard's model of subdialectic Marxism suggests that the...
    581 Words | 3 Pages
  • Discourse: Ellen Lupton's Deconstructivist Theory
    Discourse: Ellen Lupton's Deconstructivist Theory Key concepts from Ellen Lupton's A Post-Mortem on Deconstruction? * Deconstruction is part of a broader field of criticism known as “post-structuralism,” whose theorist have included Jacques Derrida, Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Jean Baudrillard, among others. Each of these writers has looked at modes of representation – from alphabetic writing to photojournalism – as culturally powerful technologies that transform and construct...
    1,181 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jacques Derrida Structure Sign and Play in the Discourse of Human Sciences
    Jacques Derrida (1930-2004) first presented ‘Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of Human Sciences’ as a paper in a conference titled ‘The Language of Criticism and the Sciences of Man’,held at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, USA in 1966. This lecture was later published as a chapter in one of Derrida’s seminal works ‘Writing and Difference’ (1967). Derrida, in ‘Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of Human Sciences’ appraise Structuralism for repressing the “structurality...
    4,163 Words | 11 Pages
  • Deconstruction/ Krapp's Last Tape
    General overview The auther of this essay is interested in finding the meaning of absurdity, Beckett is master of absurd theater, and Krapp’s last tape is one of the most influencial plays in absured theater which is deconstructed by nature. Not just the work and auther but the approach itself help the auther of this essay to find the true meaning of absurdity which itself leads human, after passing a chaos, to absolute peace. In the following paragraphs, first there is a biography of Samual...
    7,357 Words | 19 Pages
  • Pulp Fiction - a Sociological Debate
    Sociology 2XX Critically anlayse a popular culture ‘text’ utlising relevant theories and debates In sociological theory there are many concepts discussed that are utilized in the analyses of society and culture. Some of the main concepts are Postmodernism, Historical Materialism, Structuralism, Interpretive Sociology and Poststructuralism to name a few. These theories are relevant to the research of understanding certain or specific cultural texts. These concepts provide problems and...
    1,402 Words | 4 Pages
  • Semiotics - 3274 Words
    Lecture1 : Review: Last week we talked about interpersonal communications. Gofman’s argument that people put on a front or a face. Comm is dramaturgical. Different circumstances call for different aspects of yourself to be brought into the public sphere. We all know that everybody is putting up a front and acting. It is in the acting that society comes together and is able to live together. Gofman is continuation of Katz two step flow, role of opinion leaders, and importance of people in...
    3,274 Words | 11 Pages
  • I Am the World - 1420 Words
    I AM THE WORLD Translation by Karlo Antonio G. David My translation of Alejandro Abadilla’s poem “ako ang daigdig” has proven to be the most popular post in my blog thus far. Many of the search items that led people to the post indicate that an analysis was being sought. This consequently gave me the idea of making an analysis of my own. Here, I will make a close reading of the poem. I will proceed by using English, but will focus on the original Filipino text. Later I shall attempt to...
    1,420 Words | 4 Pages
  • gerard genette - 1414 Words
    Gerard Genette: Structuralism and Literary Criticism What is structuralism? How is it applied to the study of literature? Structuralism (Structuralist Criticism): It is the offshoot of certain developments in linguistics and anthropology. Saussure’s mode of the synchronic study of language was an attempt to formulate the grammar of a language from a study of parole. Using the Saussurian linguistic model, Claude Levi-Strauss examined the customs and conventions of some cultures with a view...
    1,414 Words | 5 Pages
  • Derrida Abstract - 587 Words
    Abstract 4:”Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences” “Structure, Sign, and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences” was written by Jacques Derrida, a French philosopher, as a contribution to a colloquium on structuralism in 1966. This piece was known for Derrida’s contradiction of structuralism, and his formation of three main ideas: complexity of meaning-making, meaning existence, and interpretation. Derrida begins his piece by talking about the center of...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theories of Performance in Theatre - 1117 Words
    Critical theory, with it’s origins in cultural theory is, “the attempt to understand in a systematic way the nature of human cultural forms such as language and art” (Fortier, 2002. P2). The subject is not new and began at least as far back as ancient Greece. In the ninteeth and twentieth centuries with the rise of philosophical and psycological analysis and its application in literary criticism has lead to a diverse, and sometimes divided, debate on languge, text, art and meaning. Here I will...
    1,117 Words | 4 Pages
  • Frankenstein - 1438 Words
     Scene Analysis Frankenstein David Gonzalez Vargas October 7th, 2014 Dr. Jeremy Citrome English 2851 Introduction to Film Theory and Film Form Word count: 1425 Scene Analysis Frankenstein James Whale’s 1931 iconic film, Frankenstein, is an open door to the world semiotics. In the film, each frame has a series of audio-visual elements that signify certain messages intentionally placed by Whale in order to be decoded along with the narrative of the film. A scene that is of paramount...
    1,438 Words | 4 Pages
  • Baseer - 2929 Words
    The Use of Symbolic Language in Ibsen’s A Doll’s House: A Feministic Perspective Abdul Baseer, Ph.D. Candidate Sofia Dildar Alvi Fareha Zafran, M.Phil. English Candidate ==================================================================== Language in India www.languageinindia.com ISSN 1930-2940 Vol. 13:3 March 2013 ==================================================================== Abstract This paper is a feministic analysis of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House in Julia Kristeva’s perspective of...
    2,929 Words | 10 Pages
  • Thorpe, James. the Aims and Methods of Scholarship in Modern Languages and Literature
    STRUCTURALISM is a theoretical paradigm emphasizing that elements of culture must be understood in terms of their relationship to a larger, overarching system or structure. It works to uncover all the structures that underlie all the things that humans do, think, perceive, and feel. Alternately, as summarized by philosopher Simon Blackburn, Structuralism is "the belief that phenomena of human life are not intelligible except through their interrelations. These relations constitute a structure,...
    5,728 Words | 16 Pages
  • Role of the Author: New Criticism and Poststructuralism
    Role of the Author: New Criticism and Poststructuralism This paper studies the role of the author from the perspectives of New Criticism and Poststructuralism. The nature of the two critical approaches must be elucidated before the discussion. According to ‘The Norton Introduction to Literature’, New Critics’ critical practice is to demonstrate formal unity by showing how every part of a work contributes to a central unifying theme. Every part is related to the whole and the whole is...
    1,158 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soci220 Quiz4 - 615 Words
    Part 1 of 1 - 20.0 Points Question 1 of 10 2.0 Points Which of the following statements about post-structuralism is the LEAST accurate? A.It rejects the idea of an underlying structure up one which meaning can rest secure and guaranteed B.Meaning is always in process; it is a very unstable thing. Correct C.Popular culture can be studied based on the relationship between signifier, signified and the sign. D.Texts and practices are only experienced and given meaning in an...
    615 Words | 4 Pages
  • Araby analysis - 898 Words
    Araby James Joyce’s prose Araby in Dubliners is a story written with a nameless first-person narrator. It is about the narrator’s life on Northern Richmond Street and his tremendous crush on the sister of his companion, Mangan. In my opinion, the girl has significance in symbolizing the frustration and blind pursuit of romance. In view of the portrait of her “brown figure” and that “her dress swung as she moved her body”, as well as the boy’s timidity towards her, she appears to be...
    898 Words | 3 Pages
  • Assess the Strengths and Weaknesses of the Structuralist View of Social Life as the Product of Hidden, Unconscious, Forces and Its Relevance to Important Aspects of Contemporary Society
    Introduction Originating in the study of languages, structuralism has exerted a vast amount of influence in the social sciences especially in the work of Saussure, Levi-Strauss and Roland Barthes. Although these theorists may disagree with the exact view of structuralism, there is, on the other hand, a broad consensus that a structuralist approach to the study of human society and culture involves the notion of wholes. The purpose of this essay will be to develop the points of structuralism and...
    2,036 Words | 6 Pages
  • Approaches of New Criticism - 1406 Words
    New criticism approaches - FOUZIA LAKHMOR - G3 - S4 - ON : 530 New Criticism A literary movement that started in the late 1920s and 1930s and originated in reaction to traditional criticism that new critics saw as largely concerned with matters extraneous to the text, e.g.,...
    1,406 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Structure of Myth and the Structure of Western Film
     The Structure of Myth and the Structure of Western Film Based on Saussure (1974), structuralism is a theoretical method derived from his theoritical work. He divides language into two component parts which together produce a third (signifier, signified and meaning). According to him, meaning is produced through a process of combination and selection. As Saussure insists, “In language, there are only differences without positive terms… language has neither ideas not sounds that existed...
    745 Words | 3 Pages
  • Binary Opposition - 415 Words
    5. Binary Opposition Definition: A binary opposition is a pair of related terms or concepts that are opposite in meaning. It is an anthropological term proposed by Claude Levi-Strauss, one of the key figures of structuralism. Levi-Strauss borrowed concept from linguist de Saussure and Roman Jakobson that culture is like the language system, and the language system is about differences, and is composed of pairs of oppositions. Therefore Levi-Strauss held that cultures are structured,...
    415 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Summary of the Myth of Photographic Truth
    In the book “Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture” written by Marita Sturken and Lisa Cartwright, the myth of photographic truth is addressed. Sturken and Cartwright stated that “photography[…] was developed in Europe during the mid-nineteenth century, when concepts of positivist science held sway” (Sturken and Cartwright 17). Positivism is a philosophy deems that “scientific knowledge is the only authentic knowledge and concerns itself with truth about the world” (Sturken and...
    361 Words | 1 Page
  • Critical Theory - 2021 Words
    The relationship between language and literature This essay explores, the implications Saussure’s statement, “language is a social institution”, has in the study of literature, and a study of literature with other kinds of language and communication. In order to achieve this, two of the theorists, Ferdinand de Saussure and Jacques Derrida, from the Norton anthology of Critical Theory are going to be examined closely. Moreover, a brief encounter of Bakhtin’s essay, “Discourse in the Novel”,...
    2,021 Words | 6 Pages
  • Similarities and Differences Between Critical and Interpretive Traditions
    Similarities and Differences between Critical Traditions and the Traditions of the “Post” “Post”-traditions have developed as reactions and reflections of dramatically altered material and ideological conditions that have taken place over the last fifty years across the globe, such as the collapse of communism, the official demise of colonialism, the renewal of aggressive capitalism, the incredible speed of technological change and the terrifying possibilities of scientific inventions. All...
    493 Words | 2 Pages
  • Semiotics - 1115 Words
    Marketing Theory lecture 11: Marketing and the sign. Chapter 10 Culture has the substance of science. How does signs come to mean anything. When we see a sign, such as the apple on our Apple products, we connect this apple with many things. And we may not connect this apple with the same assumptions. E.g. what a company can charge for a bottle of water can depend on the company’s choice of signs used in their marketing. They can advertise that they donate some of the money to charity etc....
    1,115 Words | 4 Pages
  • Prague School - 3074 Words
    Revenire Cuprins THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE PRAGUE SCHOOL TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE Asist. univ. drd. Crina Herţeg ,,Universitatea 1 Decembrie1918”, Alba Iulia The Prague Linguistic Circle represented an important moment in the development of phonology, structuralism and linguistics in general and it prepared the grounds for research and the subsequent evolution of linguistics. The paper attempts a general view on what The Prague School meant for linguistics and it aims at giving a general...
    3,074 Words | 9 Pages
  • Structuralistic Criticism and Gerard Genette
    Gerard Genette writes at the outset in his essay ‘Structuralism and Literary Criticism’ that methods developed for the study of one discipline could be satisfactorily applied to the study of other discipline as well. This is what he calls “intellectual bricolage ’, borrowing a term from Claude Levi-Strauss. This is precisely so, so far as structuralism is concerned. Structuralism is the name given to Saussure’s approach to language as a system of relationship. But it is applied also to the study...
    1,053 Words | 3 Pages
  • Study of Proppian Analysis as Applied to film.
    Course: Film and Television Production BA Name of Module: Story, Structure and Style Module Code: 2FTP514.1 Name of Student: Ashwin Arvind Email Address Of Student: Arvind.Ashwin@gmail.com Assignment: How can Vladimir Propp’s analysis of fairytale or folktale narratives help in understanding how film stories work? Word Count: 1526 Essay It’s interesting to see how the work of Vladimir Propp and his study of the Russian folktales has provided such rich and diverse grounds for...
    1,774 Words | 6 Pages
  • Postmodernism - 1566 Words
    The term ‘ Postmodernism’ is the buzzword that has been widely debated and engaging political, social and cultural ideas since the late 1960’s as it is apparent in various fields such as architecture, visual arts, literature, and technology. Though it has become incredibly universal practice, its connotations are tremendously complex and versatile, to the extent that it is often mutually contradictory. Charles Jenks (1978) defines Postmodernism as double coding “ the combination of Modern...
    1,566 Words | 5 Pages
  • What Is Literary Theory and Do We Need to Study It?
    What is Literary Theory and do we need to study it? It is possible, even now in the 21st century, to complete a degree course in Literature without doing any literary theory. You might do perfectly well—even emerge as a star in the firmament of literary study—without ever having to engage with any of the by now canonical areas of literary theory, like formalism, structuralism, poststructuralism, psychoanalysis and deconstruction. You could even get by, with no damage at all to your...
    619 Words | 2 Pages
  • Swiss Mythology - 615 Words
    A Swiss Myth; Barbegazi Introduction The definition of myth varies greatly amongst scholars, some have a functionalist approach where myths serve as approvals for social action, and others have a structuralist view where myths serve to facilitate conflicting or dualistic elements of society and life (Magoulick, 2003). A classical definition of myth from William Bascom (1965) is that they are tales believed to be true, usually sacred, in distant or past worlds with extra human, inhuman...
    615 Words | 2 Pages
  • Summary of Daniel Chandler's "Semiotics for Beginners", And Beverly Zimmerman's "A Rhetorical Approach to Understanding Images in the New 'Visual Age'"
    Daniel Chandler tells us that a sign consists of two parts: the signifier and the signified. The signifier is the form that the sign takes, and the signified is a reaction of the signifier. For example: if the signifier is a symbol, then the signified could be a concept in the mind pertaining to that symbol. Knowing that there are tens of thousands of different types of signs. Charles Pierce categorized them into 3 modes. The symbolic mode is one where the signifier is not directly related to...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Ambiguity of Blackberries - 573 Words
    The Ambiguity of Blackberries A poem’s deeper meaning is rarely apparent on the surface. Poems, however small or large typically have an ambiguous message. The true beauty of a poem is that they are open for the interpretation. Ellen Hunnicutt, the author of the original “Blackberries,” inspired many others to write poems on the subject of blackberries. Similar to some extent, Robert Hass’, “Picking Blackberries with a Friend Who has Been Reading Jacques Lacan” and Seamus Haeney’s,...
    573 Words | 2 Pages
  • Deconstruction - 2185 Words
    Deconstruction Deconstruction is a reaction against patterns of structuralists. It dismantles the idea of ‘structure’ to present it as concept which has been used to determine the way of understanding; rules of how we articulate meaning and readings by outlining an authority. Deconstruction is primarily a post-structuralist position in its objective approach to accept structure. It questions assumptions about how the universe has searched for a definitive; philosophically there is no definite...
    2,185 Words | 6 Pages
  • Roland Barthe's Myths: Black as a Symbol of Grief
    Black as a symbol of grief. “Myth is a type of speech chosen by history”, this definition of myth by Roland Barthes can be seen at play in most of our cultural contexts today. According to him, words cannot produce meaning on their own, we agree on their meaning hence, we can always change the meaning of words. Barthes refers to a word as a signifier, and the image produced by the word as the signified; both come together to produce a sign. These signs are then interpreted...
    1,204 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Analysis of Come Undone Song by Robbie Williams
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  • Lynx Advertisement Semiotic Pitch Presentation
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  • Baz Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet
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  • Nature of Linguistic Sign by Ferdinand de Saussure
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  • SOC 315 Week 3 DQs
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  • English literature - 434 Words
     Structuralism In this paper, the analysis of structuralism in “The Necklace” short story by Guy de Maupassant will be explained. “The Necklace” short story is representing three characters. This short story is about a woman, Mathilde who is never satisfies with what she has. This story begins when Mathilde borrowed Madame Foreister’s necklace. Then, Mathilde lost it and have to replace it. She spent ten years to pay the debt. Roland Barthes’s theory is used in this analysis. Roland...
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