Strike action Essays & Research Papers

Best Strike action Essays

  • strike action - 1913 Words
    Strike action A strike is a collective withdrawal of labour by employees. Under such action, employees refuse to perform all work, not just selected duties. Strikes are usually, but not always, organised by a union. The purpose of a strike is to pressure an employer (or other third party) into complying with particular demands or refraining from doing something. Under the federal Fair Work Act 2009 strike action may be 'protected action' if undertaken during a bargaining period for an...
    1,913 Words | 8 Pages
  • Germinal: Strike Action and Workers
    Germinal is a novel set in northern France, in the 1860’s. It is written by the French writer Emile Zola, who offers what he thinks is the best solution to the problems in the industrial revolution through Germinal. The plot of the book is centered on a strike that occurs in the mining community of Montsou. The strike takes place because of the constant deteriorating conditions of the miners. Etienne, a newcomer to Montsou, is leading the work stoppage, protesting for the better working...
    1,794 Words | 5 Pages
  • Strike Action in Recent Years
    Throughout history there are many examples of conflict between employers and employees at the workplace. Even nowadays, the problem persists. In recent years, it is becoming a major dispute not only in the UK but in the whole world. The dispute arises because of the different demands by workers and employers. This leads to an “industrial action” such as strike activity-when workers, through their trade unions, withdraw their labour as a means of reinforcing their bargaining power...
    1,594 Words | 4 Pages
  • Strikes - 27874 Words
     Strike [Sec. 2 (q)]: Strike means "a cessation of work by a body of persons employed in any industry acting in combination or a concerted refusal under a common understanding of any number of persons who are or have been so employed, to continue to work or to accept employment". Mere stoppage of work does not come within the meaning of strike unless it can be shown that such stoppage of work was a concerted action for the enforcement of an industrial demand. Procedure of Strikes According...
    27,874 Words | 78 Pages
  • All Strike action Essays

  • Strike - 432 Words
    A strike is a form of protest whereby a group of employees withhold labour in order to pressure employers into granting a particular demand. (Cambridge Dictionairies) Causes and effects of strikes in South Africa: Causes - Lack of transformation, mutual respect, trust, and socio-economic equity (SABC, 2014). - Dissatisfaction with pay or working and living conditions. Effects - Companies: financial losses, reduced productivity, profitability and market share, and delayed service delivery....
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • How far was the failure of the general strike due to the actions of the conservative government?
    How far was the failure of the general strike due to the actions of the conservative government? (24) The general strike of May 1926 was not a success for those attempting to force the government to act to prevent wage reductions and worsening conditions for coal miners. Had the TUC been more prepared to strike and followed through with what the miners wanted them to do, the government would have been faced with a much tougher challenge. Despite this, even if the conservative government were...
    1,230 Words | 3 Pages
  • Types of Strike - 1066 Words
    Strikes and lockouts constitutional or official strikes unofficial strikes general strikes lockouts rotating or revolving strikes sit-ins tool-down or pen-down strike The data supplied to the ILO do not include statistics on sympathetic or political strikes or on gheraos (harassment of employers, etc. by workers preventing them from leaving the premises until their claims are granted) which result in work stoppages. The statistics for these types of action are collected and published...
    1,066 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Pullman Strike - 423 Words
    The Pullman Strike: The U.S went through a serious depression in the late 1800’s, promoting wage cuts and layoffs. Many strikes and uprisings occurred at this time. Unfair treatment by employers was one of the main causes that led to the majority of strikes and uprisings. They usually ended when the government intervened and stopped the workers from boycotting. One of the major strikes occurred in Pullman, Chicago. George Pullman founded the town, Pullman, for the workers who manufactured...
    423 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Teacher's Strike - 990 Words
    TURZAR, ALMA F. BSE-B12 THE TEACHER’S STRIKE It was April of 1990 when the teacher’s strike began and ended at the end of May of the same year. The teachers’ strike at our Boystown/ Girlstown in Manila where I studied High School was classified as one of the major crises in the life of the Sisters and our Founder, Msgr. Aloysius Schwartz. At first, Fr. Al misjudged the situation and treated it as...
    990 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Right to Strike - 792 Words
    | | |The Right to Strike | |Mini Case 3 | Seven of the employer’s 11 concrete truck...
    792 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pullman Strike - 537 Words
    Assignment 2: The Pullman Strike If I were a worker living in Pullman Town with my family during the late 1880’s I’d be very comfortable with life; however, in 1893 when the nation goes into a depression, and work is cut for all of the workers in Pullman Town, life would change dramatically. Because of decreased profits for the car company, my wage would be reduced but the cost of living would remain the same. It would be very difficult to continue the same way of life. Once this happened,...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • Strikes and Lockouts - 627 Words
    Lockouts and its psychological effect on workers A lockout has been defined at common law as the cessation by the employer of the furnishing of work to employees in an effort to obtain for the employer more desirable terms. Lockouts can have three purposes: 1. Designed to frustrate bargaining efforts 2. An economic countermove to union’s right to strike 3. To minimize economic or operational losses threatened by an imminent strike The third type of lockout is legally...
    627 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ups Strike - 286 Words
    The 1997 Teamster strike against UPS was not simply a victory, but a smashing victory for the US working class and therefore offers many valuable lessons for today’s labor militants, both with respect to the strategic orientation and the day-to-day tactics. UPS is a “Fortune 500” company, meaning it is one of the most profitable in the nation, boasting of a $1.15 billion profit margin prior to the strike. In 1992, the workforce was evenly divided between full-time and part-time workers, but by...
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • The General Strike - 623 Words
    The General Strike The General Strike started May 3rd 1926 and lasted nine days ending on the 12th May 1926. Mine owners wanted to normalise profits even during times of economic instability – which meant that miners’ wages would be reduced and working hours would be extended. The miners were not happy with the changes that were about to happen so they decided to go on strike. This documentary exercise is going to evaluate two primary sources from the General Strike. It will consider form,...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Labor Strike - 465 Words
    Devante Williams pd 7 Labor Strike The labor strike in which I chose was the textile workers strike. The textile strike happen in 1934 which then was in U.S. history the largest labor strike. The strike involved half of million strikers. Textile workers came from New England, the Mid-Atlantic states, and the U.S. Southern states. The strike present o for twenty-two days. They strike twenty-two days about issues were deplorable working conditions, low wages, and lack of union recognition....
    465 Words | 2 Pages
  • Industrial Action - 3188 Words
     Background of Study 1.1 Problem Statement Some would say that industrial action is a pest, eating away at the crux of Pakistan's industrial and social development. In many ways, this is true. Take for example, the doctors calling for strike in 2011 which led to multiple avoidable deaths. But it is also essential at times as it plays a vital role in bringing light to major issues that might be plaguing society, and sometimes it is used as a tool to protect one’s...
    3,188 Words | 11 Pages
  • Is the Strike No Longer Necessary?
    Is the strike no longer necessary? Throughout the years conflict has occurred between managers and workers resulting in industrial action taken either individually or as a collective form. The most favoured form of industrial action is the strike where employees demonstrate the importance of the issue concerned by stopping work and leaving the workplace. Strikes occur for a number of reasons one being pay. Strike patterns have changed over the years showing a decline in numbers that are due...
    1,991 Words | 6 Pages
  • Impact of Strike in an Organization - 363 Words
    The impact of strike to an organization Article by Rajalakshmi Rahul on June 11, 2012 Discuss now (0) Go to comments An organizational strike not only destroys the power of labor at its source while still professing theoretical support for the right to strike, but also causes many other losses. Labor on the other hand in demanding freedom to use the organizational strike is seeking an instrument fundamental to its rising power. The right to strike restricted in any way is the right shorn of...
    363 Words | 1 Page
  • American Strikes 1920s And 1930s
    1919 began with a general strike in Seattle. Police officers in Boston went on strike, touching off several days of rioting and crime. The infamous Boston Police Strike of 1919 begins, causing uproar around the nation and confirming the growing influence of unions on American life. Using the situation to their advantage, criminals took the opportunity to loot the city. In Boston in 1919, police officers worked 83-98 hour weeks and were paid $.21-$.25 per hour. Amidst a nationwide strike...
    504 Words | 2 Pages
  • Causes of General Strike - 432 Words
    Causes of the General Strike, 1926 Long Term Problems (Pre-1914) Conditions for miners * Mining was notoriously dangerous due to the presence of gas and accidental cave-ins * Miners suffered poor health due to coal… ‘Black Lung’ (Pneumosilicosis). State of mining industry * The majority of mines were old or small and the coal was still being cut by hand. * Ownership was fragmented with little investment from companies. Unionised workforce * One in ten of all male...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • Should Teachers Strike? - 822 Words
    Wednesday the 30th November saw 67% of England’s 21,700 state schools completely closed due to industrial action. By Cameron Wall The strike action from millions of public sector workers was triggered after the government announced its plans for pension reforms that include; a £2.8 billion rise in contribution payments by 2014/2015; changing the retirement age to the same as the state pension age; and moving public sector workers from final salary schemes to career average schemes....
    822 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Winnipeg General Strike - 1454 Words
     Labor Relation 4330 Assignment 1 The Winnipeg General Strike Table of Contents 1.0 Executive Summary The main purpose of this report is to analyze how the environment factors have effect on the goals, strategies, value and power of the actors in Winnipeg General Strikes. By the Industrial Relations System model in Canada, the internal factors of the actors in this strike will be intertwined with outputs of the Winnipeg General...
    1,454 Words | 6 Pages
  • great strike of 1877 - 978 Words
     What was the most important event in U.S History between 1877 and 1920? The most important event in U.S History between 1877 and 1920 was The Great Strike of 1877. The Great Strike of 1877 was the most important event between 1877 and 1920 because it began the Great Strike, it was the most violent labor-management confrontation to that point in American history and the amount of people who died, went to jail or went on strike was insurmountable. The Great...
    978 Words | 3 Pages
  • 2007 Writers Guild Strikes
    Gina Wickham Labor Management December 20, 2009 Final Paper Introduction The AMPTP is the primary trade association with respect to labor issues in the motion picture and television industry. As the entertainment industry’s official collective bargaining representative, the AMPTP is responsible for negotiating with virtually all the industry’s guilds and unions, including the American Federation of Musicians (AFM); American Federation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA); Directors...
    3,522 Words | 9 Pages
  • Government Employee and the Right to Strike
    Government Employees and Right to Strike – right to strike – At present, in the absence of any legislation in government employees the right to strike, recognizing their right to do so, or regulating the exercise of such right, they are prohibited from striking by express prohibition of MC No. 6 and as implied in EO 180. The 1987 Constitution, in the Article on Social Justice and Human Rights, provides that the State "shall guarantee the rights of all workers to self-organization,...
    278 Words | 1 Page
  • Can Doctors Go on Strike?
    CAN DOCTORS GO ON STRIKE? The answer is simply yes since strike is a legitimate action to frown on unfavorable conditions. Strike action is legal and any institution that has legal rights can embark on strike when it deems fit by the abiding conditions. If doctors qualify under this democratic legitimacy, then under which conditions should doctors be on strike? * WHY DOCTORS GO ON STRIKE? From our history as Ghanaians, we have seen doctors going on strike for salary increment....
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Health Care: Union and Strike
    HEALTH WORKERS- UNIONS AND STRIKES “Union in business usually refers to Trade Unions. It is a combination of either temporary or permanent union formed mainly for the purpose of amending the relations between employer and employee. It can also be between employer and employer as well. These unions are designed to safeguard and encourage the welfares of its members. The main function of trade unions is to guard the workers from biased labor practices” (Hema, 2012). Healthcare workers should...
    753 Words | 3 Pages
  • Should Teachers Be Allowed to Strike?
    Janisha Can you imagine what it would be like if all the sanitation workers went on strike? Presently in Chicago public school teachers have joined together forming picket lines for the last several days. Amongst them stood parents even children. One can understand that teachers are fed up, however their current situation is causing a dominoes effect throughout Chicago for everyone. 87 percent of Chicago...
    385 Words | 2 Pages
  • Effects of Assu Strike in Nigeria
    Strike as a social problem can first be traced to the disfunctioning of the society when looking at it from the functionalist perspective. Functionalism which is one of the perspectives of studying the society was developed in the 19th century, it’s a framework for building theory that sees society as a complex system whose parts work together to promote solidarity and stability. This approach looks at society through a macro-level orientation, which is a broad focus on the social structures...
    2,707 Words | 7 Pages
  • Winnipeg General Strike Essay
    Winnipeg General Strike Shai-li Gawne July 14, 2015 During the Winnipeg General Strike the actions of the authorities were not justified. The unjust actions were that they did not have any jobs for the soldiers coming home from the war. The authorities did not care that the working conditions for the citizens were unfair. Also, the authorities attacked striking citizens for no reason. For these reasons, their actions...
    503 Words | 2 Pages
  • Winnipeg general strike - 960 Words
    Winnipeg General Strike The Winnipeg General strike has been one of the most intensive episodes in Canadian history, and it was also an important development in the building of the democratic socialist movement in Canada by laborers in the 20th century. During the 1900’s after World War I and the success of the Russian Revolution in 1917, workers were faced with much leadership in factories. They did not have very many rights and the government often allowed owners to treat employees...
    960 Words | 3 Pages
  • Homestead Strike of 1892 - 4185 Words
    The Homestead Strike of 1892 By: Industrial Relations Homestead is located on the Monogahela River eight miles from Pittsburgh. In 1892 the town had a population of about 12,000 people. In 1880 it had a population of about 600 people. The town evolved around the Carnegie mills. With out the steel mill the town would have little existence. The mill property covered 600 acres of the 600 acres 37 of that is covered with varies buildings. The mills facilities were lighted by electricity...
    4,185 Words | 11 Pages
  • Boston Police Strike - 728 Words
    On September 9, 1919 more than 1,100 officers in Boston went out on strike, which removed more than three-fourths of the force from the city's streets. The police force had seen its wages lag badly during the war. Efforts were made to organize an order to gain not only higher pay, but also shorter hours and better working conditions. When people came to the realization that there was nobody to stop them from doing anything people began looting and several violent events occurred. Eventually the...
    728 Words | 2 Pages
  • Winnipeg General Strike - 874 Words
    The Winnipeg General Strike was a landmark in North America. The strike officially began on May 15th, 1919 at 11:00 AM and continued until late June, 1919, and approximately 35, 000 workers, basically the entire workforce of Winnipeg, walked off their jobs, risking their entire lives (Naylor, 2009). This strike has been one of the most studied historic moments in Canadian history. The General Strike had been brewing for many years prior to 1919, a large series of circumstances contributed to the...
    874 Words | 3 Pages
  • Trade Union and Time Strike
    Strike refers to an act of abstinence from work for sometime in order to protest against some injustice or exploitation. It is a joint activity of a group of persons having a common goal to achieve. Originally, it was a major instrument in the hands of the labour union for establishing their demands to the proprietor of the concern. The labourers used to interrupt the work indefinitely until their demands were paid heed to. The causes of this strike were generally demand for a hike in the wage...
    375 Words | 1 Page
  • Jet Airways Strike - 594 Words
    Written Assignment Format Name: Ankita Sharma Due Date / Day: 3rd January 2011 Class: 27th batch H.R Roll No: 2703142 Subject: IRTU Assignment No: 1 Topic: Industrial dispute in a company Title of the Assignment: A report on Jet Airways strike. Signature: (Of the student) Marks out of 15 Name (Of the faculty) : Signature: Date of Evaluation: Remarks (By Faculty): _________________________________________...
    594 Words | 3 Pages
  • General Strike Essay - 1407 Words
    To what extent was the failure of the 1926 general strike, due to the unpreparedness of the TUC? To a substantial degree the failure of the 1926 general strike was due to the unpreparedness of the TUC. The TUC did not prepare effectively as they did not anticipate a general strike would actually take place, they feared revolutionary elements to the strike and wished to avoid industrial action. However, in addition to this, Stanley Baldwin’s conservative government used the 9 months in which it...
    1,407 Words | 4 Pages
  • Great Bombay Textile Strike
    Great Bombay Textile Strike The Great Bombay Textile Strike was a textile strike called on 18 January 1982 by the mill workers of Bombay (currently Mumbai) under trade union leader Dutta Samant. The purpose of the strike was to obtain bonus and wage increases. Nearly 250,000 workers and more than 50 textile mills went on strike in Bombay.[1] History of Mills in Bombay | | Built in 1887, Swadeshi was Bombay's first textile mill, the first of the factories that spread over Girangaon,...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Winnipeg General Strike - 1677 Words
    On May fifteenth, 1919, the city of Winnipeg came together in a union, and essentially shut down. At exactly eleven o’clock in the morning on this day, over thirty thousand Winnipeg workers walked off the job to begin what became one of the most influential strikes in Canadian history. The initial reaction was overwhelming. Of ninety-six unions in Winnipeg, ninety-four of them joined the strike. The only two that did not join were the typographers and the local police. In fact, the police had...
    1,677 Words | 5 Pages
  • Industrial Action in Sa - 1219 Words
    INDUSTRIAL ACTION WITHIN SOUTH AFRICA OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS INTRODUCTION: This assignment will be based on Industrial Action within SA over the past few years. It will begin by a brief explanation of what Industrial Action is from a legal point of view, the context of industrial action over the past five years or so, the contribution factors to industrial action and the increase in violence during the industrial action. 1. BRIEF EXPLANATION OF INDUSTRIAL ACTION FROM A LEGAL POINT...
    1,219 Words | 4 Pages
  • If the Military and Government Could Go on Strike…
    Terry Spitnale Instructor Jennifer Hazel English 112-H02 21 March 2014 If the Military and Government Could Go on Strike… In an ideal world when someone does not agree with their boss’s actions it would be a wonderful benefit to not go to work until your superior sees reason and conforms to the subordinates’ logic. There are some careers, in which this is not only a great thought, but also an actual possibility. For example, unionized employees often go on strike when they have...
    1,620 Words | 4 Pages
  • Strikes: A Debate on the Frequency and the Reason of Occurrence
    It is a common consensus that the issue on the demonstration of strike is becoming increasingly a central issue as the democratic principles continue to progress and evolve in our current society. There are diversity of view that concern the act of labor strike, and some prominent aspects embedded in the demonstration of strike come to raise some questions. The debate on both the frequency and the reason of the occurrence of strike in various working environments is significantly the most...
    613 Words | 2 Pages
  • Taxation of Strike Benefits from Union
    180 T.C. No. 14 UNITED STATES TAX COURT JOHN AND DAGNY GALT, Petitioner v. COMMISSIONER OF INTERNAL REVENUE, Respondent Docket No. 7777-01. Filed February 2, 2010. In 2005, P participated in a strike against his employer, Taggert Transcontinental. P was a member of the United Auto Workers at the time of the strike. P received $1,800 in strike benefits from the UAW. In addition to the monies he received from his own labor union, P received another $300 from the Teamsters Union and...
    2,448 Words | 7 Pages
  • different kinds of industrial action wi
    Different kinds of industrial action within the workplace Industrial action usually happens when a dispute in the workplace can't be resolved through negotiation. There are many forms of industrial action such as: strike Where workers refuse to work for the employer, a strike is a collective withdrawal of labour by employees. Under such action, employees refuse to perform all work, not just selected duties. Strikes are usually, but not always, organised by a union. The purpose of a strike is...
    790 Words | 3 Pages
  • The 2005 New York City Transit Strike
    2005 New York City transit strike The 2005 New York City transit strike was a strike in New York City called by the Transport Workers Union Local 100 (TWU). Negotiations for a new contract with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) broke down over retirement, pension, and wage increases. The strike began at 3:00 a.m. EST on December 20, 2005. Most New York City Transit Authority personnel observed the strike, effectively halting all service on the subway and buses. Millions of...
    609 Words | 2 Pages
  • The British Airways Strikes Effects on Employee Motivation
    The British Airways Strikes Effects On Employee Motivation Introduction British Airways is one of the leading airline company in Europe, nevertheless in the last few years it has financial problems, talks begin between British Airways and the Unite (Britain’s biggest union) from January of 2009 to solve the problem. At the beginning, the relationship between the two parties was composed, but the milestone was in 2009 October, when the British Airways stated that they are going to cut the...
    1,653 Words | 5 Pages
  • Should Workers Be Allowed to Strike? - Argumentative Essay
    It is difficult to see how anyone could deny that all workers should have the rights to strike. This is because striking gives workers freedom of speech. This is justifiable, because Britain is a democratic nation.

    My first reason supporting the motion that workers should be allowed to strike is in order to bring to the fore poor safety conditions. For instance, in the nuclear power industry, any breaches of safety can have tragic consequences. If the employees are exposed to nuclear...
    561 Words | 2 Pages
  • Should Public Servants Have the Right to Strike?
    Ruben A. Rodriguez Paul Hansen English 1301-2005 06 April 2011 Should Public Servants have the right to strike? There has been much debate lately about public servant union group’s right to negotiate or collective bargain for pay and benefits for the employee’s. Some state that all workers have the right to negotiate their pay and benefits by what ever means. While other state that some employees’ positions, like teachers, police and fireman, are much too important to allow them to...
    517 Words | 2 Pages
  • Should Congress outlaw the use of “permanent replacements” During Strikes? Advantages, Disadvantages and Alternatives to Public Sector Strikes
    Should Congress outlaw the use of "permanent replacements" During Strikes? Advantages, Disadvantages and Alternatives to Public Sector Strikes Charlie Morgan University of Maryland University College Adelphi, Maryland Strike replacement occurs when employers hire or use individual to perform the work of employees on strike. In the United States, it is not unfair labor practice for employers to replace the striking workers with others in effort to carry on the company's business. Most other...
    3,597 Words | 11 Pages
  • Essay Question; Why Has Strike Activity Increased Recently Compared with the Past?
    Essay question; why has strike activity increased recently compared with the past? Reasons of Latest Strike Actions Strike can be defined as work stoppage that means concerted refusal or employees to do work that their employer has assigned to them so as to force the employer to grant certain demanded concessions such as, increased wages or improved employment condition1 but, work stoppage is generally undesirable option for both employees and employers. The reasons for that employee are not...
    1,487 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dispute Resolution- the South African 2010 Public Sector Strike
    The year 2010 presented an organized chaos of auspicious and inauspicious occasions. Brewing beneath the preparations that stood ahead of an international showpiece and celebratory vuvuzelas was a disgruntled workforce. More than 1.3 million civil servants (Bekker and Van der Walt, 2010) largely members of unions affiliated to COSATU and FEDUSA and CONSAW under the banner of Independent Labour caucus went on strike few weeks after the Fifa Soccer World Cup demanding an 8.6% wage increase,...
    3,051 Words | 9 Pages
  • How Far Was the Government to Blame for the General Strike of 1926?
    How far was the government to blame for the general strike of 1926? The general strike took place in 1926; It had lasted 9 days from 4 May 1926 to 13 May 1926. It was called by the general council of the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in an unsuccessful attempt to force the British government to act to prevent wage reduction and worsening conditions for coal miners. There are many reasons for the causes of the General strike including; the government, the TUC; Coal mines and the return of the...
    995 Words | 3 Pages
  • Was government mismanagement the most important cause of the General Strike of 1926?
    Was government mismanagement the most important cause of the General Strike of 1926? There were many factors in the lead up to the strike of 1926 which could be blamed for causing it. However it is argued Government mismanagement is the most important cause due to the fact that it had such a significant impact because it was a continual cause and that it could be blamed as a trigger for the start of it. One of these factors that could be classed as a cause for the General Strike of 1926...
    967 Words | 3 Pages
  • When Children Raised Their Voice in Protest: the Newsboys Strike of 1899 and Its Consequences
    When Children Raised Their Voices in Protest The Newsboys Strike of 1899 and Its Consequences Child labor was a major issue in our nation’s history, from its founding through the early decades of the twentieth century. In 1900, United States census records counted at least 1.75 million children who were “gainful workers,” (that is, worked for pay), comprising six percent of the nation’s workforce. (Many others may not have been reported.) Most child laborers worked in agriculture, but many...
    2,263 Words | 6 Pages
  • Unite Union Seeks Fresh British Airways Strike Talks
    The British Airways cabin crew union, Unite, has urged the airline to hold fresh talks to avert strikes which could disrupt thousands of travellers. Members plan to walk out for four separate five-day strikes as part of a bitter dispute over cost-cutting plans. The first strike will begin on 18 May, ending on 22 May, with further strikes planned on 24 May, 30 May and 5 June. But the union said BA could still prevent the walk-outs if it opened what it called "meaningful negotiations"....
    624 Words | 3 Pages
  • "Large Scale Strikes in the Uk Have All but Disappeared”. Critically Discuss Trends in Industrial Conflict in the Uk over the Last Decade
    There is a clear evidence to support the notion that large scale strikes have decline in the UK. Strikes are reported to be at an historical low level. They have gone into decline due to numerous factors. The fall in the level of strike activity can be attributed to lower trade union membership, stable economy, rise of individualism and (HRM) Human Resource Management, restrictive trade union legislations and sectoral shift in employment from manufacturing to service. The latter part has being...
    2,176 Words | 7 Pages
  • Right of Lawyers to Strike in India: Ex Captain Harish Uppal V. Union of India
    LEGAL METHODS EX- CAPT. HARISH UPPAL v. UNION OF INDIA: Exceptions to the Right to Strike Table of Contents TABLE OF CASES 2 TABLE OF STATUTES 2 Introduction: 3 Research methodology: 4 What is the right to strike and why do we need it? 5 Exceptions: 6 Case review 7 Issues: 7 Analysis: 8 Conclusion 11 Bibliography 13 TABLE OF CASES CASES: 1. Communist Party of India (M) v. Bharat Kumar, (1998) 1 SCC 201, (Supreme Court of India). 2. Ex- Capt. Harish...
    3,882 Words | 11 Pages
  • What Have Been the Main Developments in Strike Activity in Britain over the Last 35 Years?
    What have been the main developments in strike activity in Britain over the last 35 years? Strike activity is a form of industrial action that can occur in the workplace once conflict has risen. It is a complete stoppage of work by a group of employees and its aim is to express a grievance or to enforce a demand. (Dundon, Rowlinson, 2011) Employees will usually use a strike as a last resort to deal with issues in the workplace; workers are not able to perform a strike without a stringent...
    1,334 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fundamental Lessons Which We Can All Learn from the Bus Strike (Singapore)
    Fundamental lessons which we can all learn from the bus strike (Singapore) Against the backdrop of the now famous bus strike, there have been efforts undertaken by the following parties: The Singapore Government calling on all parties to voice their grievances through the appropriate channels and a flurry of measures adopted by SMRT in response to public and government sentiment. Whilst the reactions and actions undertaken after the strike are laudable, one can’t help but express concern...
    910 Words | 3 Pages
  • Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization V. Reagan: the Strike That Helped Shape U. S. Labor Relations
    PROFESSIONAL AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS ORGANIZATION V. REAGAN: THE STRIKE THAT HELPED SHAPE U. S. LABOR RELATIONS Thirty one years ago, when President Ronald Reagan threatened to fire approximately 13,000 air traffic controllers unless they called off an illegal strike, the president not only transformed his presidency, but also shaped the labor relations in the United States. The Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (PATCO) strike of August 3. 1981 was a remarkable day in...
    3,282 Words | 10 Pages
  • What Are the Differences and Similarities Between Public and Private Sector Unions? Include Methods of Organizing, Organization Structure, Legislation, Right to Strike, Reasons Employees Organize, and What the Future Might Hold for Each.
    When we speak about unions for example the United Auto Workers, the Teamsters and the Steelworkers I was surprised to learn this week that public employee unions don’t have the same rights. One key difference that makes public different than private unions is that fact that in individual states public sector unions are not covered by the National Labor Relations Act. Public sector unions’ rights to strike vary depending on state laws as well as negotiation with state government. While many...
    393 Words | 1 Page
  • What Were the Strengths and Weaknesses of Workers Unions
    1. What were the strengths and weaknesses of workers unions? By the end of the nineteenth century, workers unions had become major forces influencing wages and working conditions. In 1886, when successful strikes on some western railroads attracted a mass of previously unorganized unskilled workers, the Knights of Labor grew to a peak membership of a million workers. They bargained with employers, conducted boycotts, and called members out on strike to demand higher wages and better working...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • Industrial Dispute - 8878 Words
    The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947 Preliminary: The Industrial Disputes Act, 1947 extends to whole of India. It came into operation on the first day of April, 1947. This Act replaced the Trade Disputes Act of 1929. The Trade Disputes Act imposed certain restraints on the right of strike and lockout in Public Utility Services. But no provision was existing for the settlement of Industrial Disputes, either by reference to a Board of Conciliation or to a Court of Inquiry. In order to remove this...
    8,878 Words | 26 Pages
  • Communists Positive Role In The Farm Worker Strickes Of The 1930's
     The involvement of the Communist Party during the labor strikes of the 1930’s was incredibly valuable to the migrant workers. They provided technology, leadership and foresight necessary to make changes that the migrant workers desperately needed. These changes included not only physical changes to the environment in which they worked, slept and rate of pay, but also the mind set in which the growers and owner thought about the workers. The biggest plight against the farm workers was...
    1,224 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Success of Organized Labor in the late 19th Century
    The Success of Organized Labor in Improving Working Conditions in the Late 19th Century The late 19th century was a time of great change in America, a time of rapid industrialization and great improvements in the quality of life for the majority of people. The industrialization that occurred however led to a large working class who began to feel oppressed by the capital interests; this ted to the formation of unions and banding together of workers for mutual benefit. Despite this, organized...
    913 Words | 3 Pages
  • indian automobile industry survey
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