Stanley Milgram Essays & Research Papers

Best Stanley Milgram Essays

  • Stanley Milgram - 934 Words
    Stanley Milgram conducted an examination, in the 60’s, based on the justification for the acts of genocide offered by those who were accused in the Nuremberg War Criminal Trials of WWII. Their defense, as they claimed was solely based on “obedience” and that they were in fact only following their superior’s orders. This eventually led to the study on the conflict between obedience toward authority and one’s personal conscious. His experiment was a model of simplicity. The idea was to take an...
    934 Words | 3 Pages
  • Milgram Stanley - 876 Words
    controversy surrounded Stanley Milgram for much of his professional life as a result of a series of experiments on obedience to authority which he conducted at Yale University in 1961-1962. He found, surprisingly, that 65% of his subjects, ordinary residents of New Haven, were willing to give apparently harmful electric shocks-up to 450 volts-to a pitifully protesting victim, simply because a scientific authority commanded them to, and in spite of the fact that the victim did not do anything to...
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Stanley Milgram - 623 Words
    Stanley Milgram Author’s Name Institution’s Name Stanley Milgram Stanley Milgram was a social psychologist of the 20th century, born in the city of New York. He has made many contributions in sociology by writing and publishing many articles, but few of them for which Stanley is known for are ‘Obedience to Authority’, ‘Familiar Stranger’, and ’Small World Experiment’. Stanley Milgram was working as a psychologist at Yale University when he conducted his famous...
    623 Words | 3 Pages
  • Stanley Milgram Obedience Experiment
     Stanley Milgram Obedience Experiment One of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology was carried out by Stanley Milgram (1963). Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University, conducted an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. He examined justifications for acts of genocide offered by those accused at the World War II, Nuremberg War Criminal trials. Their defense often was based on "obedience" - that...
    1,131 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Stanley Milgram Essays

  • Stanley Milgram Study - 431 Words
    Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Study Stanley Milgram was an American social psychologist most famous for his divisive study known as the Milgram Experiment. This study took place in the 1960s during Milgram's professorship at Yale. Many controversial events that were conducted during the Holocaust strongly influenced Milgram to carry out an experiment that would prove the relationship between obedience and authority. as well. Throughout his experiments, Milgram stated that obedience...
    431 Words | 2 Pages
  • Stanley Milgram experiment - 1434 Words
     Stanley Milgram Experiment Misty Chambers University of Phoenix PSYCH/620 Jay Grenier July 21, 2014 Stanley Milgram experiment Could you deliver electroshocks to a person you do not know? In addition, having someone behind you coaxing you the whole way until you get to 450 volts? That was Stanley Milgram’s idea. He wanted to find out how obedient one could be if they were in a position to harm another human being with an administrator in the same room. The administrator...
    1,434 Words | 5 Pages
  • Stanley Milgram, "The Perils of Obedience" Response
    Milgram, Stanley, “The Perils of Obedience.” Harper’s Magazine Dec. 1973: 62+. Print. Yale University psychologist, Stanley Milgram, conducted a series of obedience experiments during the 1960’s to prove that for many people, obedience is a compelling drive overriding their own morality and sympathy. These experiments ended in shocking results. The Milgram experiment consisted of a teacher, learner, and the experimenter. The teacher being the actual subject while the others were actors....
    503 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reasoning Critically - the Stanley Milgram Experiment
    After learning about the Stanley Milgram experiment, I found myself questioning why and how the majority of the subjects that participated in the experiment were willing to inflict apparent pain and injury on an innocent person, and found myself curious as to how I would react should I but put in the same situation. I believe that the most significant reason for this disturbing absence of critical thinking and moral responsibility is because the subjects involved in the experiment were blinded...
    304 Words | 1 Page
  • “Behavioral Study of Obedience” Stanley Milgram
    “Behavioral Study of Obedience” Stanley Milgram Shashi Bhatt “Behavioral Study of Obedience” Stanley Milgram The Milgram’s experiment on Obedience to authority figure was a series of experiment in social psychology conducted by Stanley Milgram. The experiment measured the willingness of study participants to obey authority figure, which instructed them to perform acts that conflicted with their personal conscience. It has been understood before this experiment that people tend to...
    1,027 Words | 4 Pages
  • Milgram Essay - 1729 Words
    Numerous of unethical experiments over time caused many mental and physical trauma towards countless of people who were basically treated like guinea pigs. The article, “Patients were Guinea Pigs, Analysis Finds,” showed an experiment of how the human body will react if radioactive dye was injected in them. This shows how far people are willing to go to search for knowledge that will harm others. The article states, “Patients are not always fully informed that they are guinea pigs in medical...
    1,729 Words | 5 Pages
  • Milgram Notes - 1231 Words
    Stanley Milgram Milgram, Stanley. Behavioral Study of Obedience (1963). Question? Why would people obey a legitimate authority figure even if they were asked to do something that was clearly and morally wrong? Hypothesis Milgram want to test the GADH (German’s Are Different Hypothesis), which was currently being used by historians to explain the systematic destruction of millions of Jews, Poles and other’s in the 1930’s and 1940’s. This hypothesis maintains • Hitler could not...
    1,231 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Milgram Experiment - 2404 Words
    The Milgram Experiment Outline Topic: The Milgram experiment I) The experiment A) Who was involved with the experiment? B) How they got participants C) What the subjects thought was happening i)Learning Task ii) Memory Study iii) Electric shock for wrong answer iv) “Prods” to continue the shocks D) What actually happened i) It was a test for obedience not memory ii) Vocal response from the...
    2,404 Words | 8 Pages
  • Milgram Experiment - 298 Words
    Critical Thinking Stanley Milgram Experiment I feel the reason the Milgram Experiment subjects were lacking the moral and critical thinking of how they reacted to the experiment was a multitude of things such as. The subjects felt they had to because they were being told to by “people of authority” They also felt that since they were participating in the experiment and they were only doing “as told” then they were okay to proceed. Some also stated that do to the trust they had for the school...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • milgram resubmit - 1731 Words
    Discuss three of the factors involved in obedience according to Milgram, and critically evaluate the research that led him to these conclusions. Cite at least one other study in your discussion. This essay will give a brief description of Milgram’s obedience study. It will then discuss the three factors involved in obedience according to Milgram. The results of his study will then be evaluated and the other studies that have tested obedience will be discussed. To summarise, a short conclusion...
    1,731 Words | 5 Pages
  • Milgram Study - 916 Words
    Individual task for CA2. Provide a brief description of the study in your own words (this should be no more than 350 words). Milgram started his obedience study experiments in 1961.He was highly influenced by the defense of criminal Adolph Eichmann used second world war that he was simply following instruction when he ordered death of millions of jews. He carried out his experiment in Yale University to check whether people obey the orders of authority figure to cause pain to a stranger....
    916 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Milgram Experiment - 1142 Words
    The Milgram Experiment Stanley Milgram, a famous social psychologist, and student of Solomon Asch, conducted a controversial experiment in 1961, investigating obedience to authority (1974). The experiment was held to see if a subject would do something an authority figure tells them, even if it conflicts with their personal beliefs and morals. He even once said, "The social psychology of this century reveals a major lesson: often it is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of...
    1,142 Words | 4 Pages
  • Milgram Experiment - 513 Words
    Stanley Milgram, a famous social psychologist, and student of Solomon Asch, conducted a controversial experiment in 1961, investigating obedience to authority. The experiment was held to see if a subject would do something an authority figure tells them, even if it conflicts with their personal beliefs and morals. This experiment brought uproar amongst the psychological world and caused the code of ethics to be reviewed and ultimately changed. In the experiment subjects were asked to...
    513 Words | 2 Pages
  • Milgram Study - 1036 Words
    1. What does Milgram’s study tell us about human behaviour? Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram conducted the Milgram experiment, study to see the participants' willingness to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts that differed with their conscience. The study is used to show the aim that Stanley Milgram himself placed to see the willingness of the participant to obey use pain if one of the participants got an answer wrong. Overall, 65% of the participants gave...
    1,036 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Milgram experiment - 1345 Words
    The Milgram experiment The Milgram experiment came about by a Yale University psychologist by the name of Stanley Milgram. The experiment was to test how well the study participants were and the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts that conflicted with what they thought was right. He concluded people obey either out of fear or out of a desire to appear cooperative even when acting against their own better judgment and desires....
    1,345 Words | 4 Pages
  • Milgram Experiment - 574 Words
    Brad Birnbaum October 30, 2012 The Milgram Experiment Sociology 115 The Milgram experiment, a study based on a person’s obedience to an authority, was a series of social psychology experiments. These experiments measured the willingness of people to obey a person with authority. During the study, head figures instructed participants to perform acts that would normally conflict with their personal morality. Milgram’s experiments started shortly after the trial of German Nazi...
    574 Words | 2 Pages
  • Milgrams Experiment - 595 Words
    Mrs. Lovejoy English J075 Essay #3 I would not be the kind of person who takes orders blindly whether it is from an authority figure or not. I personally would not like to be on the opposite end of this situation therefore I would find myself resisting the orders to end another’s life. Sometimes you don't have the necessary amount of time to decide whether or not what you are being asked to do is the right thing or not, and in those kinds of situations people normally find themselves...
    595 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Milgram Experiment - 1289 Words
    Stanley Milgram: 'electric shock' experiments (1963) - also showed the power of the situation in influencing behaviour. 65% of people could be easily induced into giving a stranger an electric shock of 450V (enough to kill someone). 100% of people could be influenced into giving a 275V shock. The Milgram Experiment Stanley Milgram (1963) Experiment: Focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. Investigate: Whether Germans were particularly obedient to...
    1,289 Words | 5 Pages
  • Evaluate Milgrams research into obedience.
    Evaluate Milgrams research into obedience. Stanley Milgram (1963) explains why 65% of the people did something they felt was morally wrong, that is they went into an agentic state and exhibited some aspects of denial in order to avoid moral strain. However, Milgram does not explain why 65% did not obey. In other words, it does not explain individual differences as the volunteers in Milgrams experiment seemed to resist the pressure and Milgram does not explain that. To continue, the...
    570 Words | 2 Pages
  • Milgram Obediance Study - 1318 Words
    Milgram Obedience Study In May of 1962 Stanley Milgram, a Social Psychologist at Yale University, conducted a study on “Obedience and Human Nature” that was influenced by his curiosity of the WWII German Nazi Holocaust and concentration camps. Milgram asked “How could it be, that ordinary German people could allow the extermination of the Jews” and wanted to know under what circumstances would a person disobey authority? The study took place in the greater New Haven area and consisted...
    1,318 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychology: Milgram Experiment - 491 Words
    Introduction Milgram Experiment Method 40 men were recruited for a lab experiment investigating “learning”. In exchange for their participation, each person was paid $4.50. After the WWII, Stanley Milgram a psychologist of Yale University posed a question, “Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the Holocaust were just following orders? Could we call them all accomplices? These men were introduced to another participant who were actually actors. These men were given...
    491 Words | 2 Pages
  • Obedience Milgram experiment - 1371 Words
    From the film “Obedience: Research carried out at Yale University”, Volunteers were paid a small sum to participates that understood the experiment to be a study of memory and learning. In truth, Yale University’s psychologist Stanley Milgram wanted to study the willingness of subjects to obey an authority figure while this authority figure made the subjects perform acts that were in conflict with their moral conscience. The question guiding this experiment was asking to figure out to what...
    1,371 Words | 0 Page
  • Milgram (1963) destructive obedience
    Milgram (1963) claimed that destructive obedience is not a consequence of moral weakness or an evil character; rather it is a response to a particular set of situational factors. Evaluate this statement. In order to evaluate this statement it is important to first understand what Milgram meant. This essay will first consider what is meant by destructive obedience and briefly look at Milgram’s work. It will then look at what is inferred by situational factors, focusing on conformity,...
    2,398 Words | 7 Pages
  • Was the Milgram Experiment Ethical or Valid?
    Was the Milgram Experiment Ethical or Valid? In 1961, Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University, conducted an experiment on a group’s obedience to authority. This experiment has encountered intense scrutiny ever since its findings were first published in 1963; many people question the ethics and validity of the experiment. Multitudes of researchers have taken it upon themselves to determine the answers to the questions (McLeod). Based on new guidelines for ethics, Stanley Milgram’s...
    890 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparative Critique: Milgram vs. Asch
    Comparative Critique In a comparative critique similarities and differences are given between two articles as well as the readers own opinion of the authors’ work. In Stanley Milgram’s “The Perils of Obedience”, certain experiments were conducted on separate types of individuals. Milgram forces his subjects to administer shocks to a non-existent person on the other side of a wall. This experiment questions the obedience of individuals when put in a sadistic environment. On the other...
    970 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Milgram Experiment on Obedience to Authority Figures: An Analysis
    Introduction to Social Science Mid-Term Essay on Social Scientist ( Milgram Stanley) Lee, Gi-woung (2010110845) Part 1 - A brief summary of who the person is and what they've accomplished. Stanley Milgram was born in 15th of August, 1933 in New York city. He was very smart during his childhood and he was rather interested in science than sports, when comparing with his friends. He attended Queens college and received a bachelor's degree in Political Science. He then went to Harvard, by...
    1,327 Words | 4 Pages
  • Critique of Stanley Milgram’s “Behavioral Study of Obedience”
    A Critique of Stanley Milgram’s “Behavioral Study of Obedience” Stanley MIlgram is a Yale University social psychologist who wrote “Behavioral Study of Obedience”, an article which granted him many awards and is now considered a landmark. In this piece, he evaluates the extent to which a participant is willing to conform to an authority figure who commands him to execute acts that conflict with his moral beliefs. Milgram discovers that the majority of participants do obey to authority....
    909 Words | 3 Pages
  • Describe and Evaluate Two Pieces of Psychological Research - Milgram and Asch
    Describe and evaluate two pieces of Psychological Research In 1963 professor Stanley Milgram carried out a ‘Study of Obedience to Authority’ in which he aimed to answer the question, “Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the Holocaust were just following orders" (Milgram, 1974). To do this. Milgram elaborated on two theories, one of which was Solomon Asch’s 1956 ‘conformity experiments’. In 1963 Milgram put out an advertisement asking for men, aged between 20 and 50,to...
    1,428 Words | 4 Pages
  • Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Milgram obedience study. Should the study have taken place?
    Psychology Homework Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the Milgram obedience study. Should the study have taken place? Milgram's study is a very controversial study as it broke many ethical guidelines and has many methodological issues, but it also had many strengths. One strength of the Milgram study on obedience is that the experiment was reliable as it can be replicated and the results are consistent. The fact that the experiment was a Lab experiment makes the study even more...
    1,153 Words | 4 Pages
  • MY LAI MASSACRE AS A RESULT OF OBEDIENCE TO AUTHORITY. Relates to stanly milgrams experiments and how authority play a part in genocide killings.
    MY LAI MASSACRE AS A RESULT OF OBEDIENCE TO AUTHORITY The Vietnam controversy made many people feel at distress. It was never considered a "war," although that is exactly what it was. The My Lai Massacre in Vietnam was one of the many atrocities of that war. There is an unquestionable connection between Milgram's "Obedience to Authority" and the My Lai Massacre. According to Kelman & Hamilton, "Unquestioning obedience has been the cause of such disasters as the My Lai massacre and the...
    1,235 Words | 5 Pages
  • Social Deviance - 1034 Words
    Discuss how members of a military unit could openly bring themselves to commit murder against some individuals and not feel any sense of deviance or criminal wrongdoing for the act. Be sure to include ideas from the work of Stanley Milgram in your answer. Many view murder as the malicious taking of human life. Murder during wartime in which one armed service member takes the life of an opposing armed service member is justified by military orders and beliefs. Of course, it is not always...
    1,034 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Evils of Obedience - 1466 Words
    The Evils of Obedience If one was to be asked to follow through with an order to inflict pain on another human being, would they obey this order? Many would answer “Never!” Yet, humans have been following orders such as these since the beginning of time, for example, the Holocaust or the murdering of innocent civilians during the Vietnam War. Some may think these people are psychopaths, but could they also be ordinary people followings the orders of a higher power or simply being influenced by...
    1,466 Words | 4 Pages
  • Effect of Authority - 1374 Words
    Running head: EFFECT OF AUTHORITY Effect of Authority on the Likelihood to Conform Abstract To explore the relationship between increased power or social status and a person’s likelihood to conform, forty high school students (5 boys and 5 girls from each grade level: freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors) will be taken one at a time into a room with five confederates (classmates who are considered by their peers to be in the “popular crowd”). The participants will be shown a variety...
    1,374 Words | 4 Pages
  • Six degrees of separation - 530 Words
    Six degrees of separation (also referred to as the "Human Web") refers to the idea that, if a person is one step away from each person they know and two steps away from each person who is known by one of the people they know, then everyone is at most six steps away from any other person on Earth. six degrees of separation Six degrees of separation is the theory that anyone on the planet can be connected to any other person on the planet through a chain of acquaintances that has no more than...
    530 Words | 2 Pages
  • Deviance in the Military - 912 Words
     Deviance and the Military Deviance This weeks’ writing assignment is to “discuss how members of a military unit could openly bring themselves to commit murder against some individuals and not feel any sense of deviance or criminal wrongdoing for the act. Be sure to include ideas from the work of Stanley Milgram in your answer.” In the 1960’s, Stanley Milgram conducted an experiment at Yale University regarding the relationship between obedience and authority where...
    912 Words | 3 Pages
  • Outline the similarities and differences between Milgram's obedience study and Burger's replication.
    1 Kelly Tankard C5627319 TMA02 Outline the similarities and differences between Milgram’s (1963) Obedience study and Burger’s (2009) replication. What makes people do evil things? How easy is it to make ordinary people commit atrocities such as the Germans in world war two? Psychologist Stanley Milgram was curious to see...
    1,030 Words | 4 Pages
  • Six Degrees of Lois Weisberg
    NETWORKS I Gladwell (1999). Six Degrees of Lois Weisberg Lois Weisberg has an extraordinary ability to meet people (and making new friends) and connect them each other. She is the Commissioner of Cultural Affairs for the City of Chicago and during her entire life she has hang out and built relationships with people from different backgrounds and jobs: musicians, doctors, lawyers, politicians, environmentalists and so on. Without any doubt, Lois is capable to reach someone outside her “world”...
    1,131 Words | 3 Pages
  • 'a Few Good Men' in Relation with Organizational Behaviour
    A FEW GOOD MEN (1992) (Tom Cruise, Jack Nicholson, Demi Moore) Table of Contents Introduction 5 Section 1.0 Movie in Relation with Organizational Behaviour 1.1 Milgram Experiment 7 1.2 Principles of Delegation of Authority 9 1.3 Flaws of Leadership 11 Section 2.0 Movie Analysis 2.1 Character Analysis 14 2.1.1 Lt.Daniel Kaffee 14...
    2,276 Words | 9 Pages
  • milgram's report - 839 Words
    Are you an authority figure? How far are you willing to go? "The social psychology of this century reveals a major lesson: often it is not so much the kind of person a man is as the kind of situation in which he finds himself that determines how he will act." –Stanley Milgram, (1974) This report is about obedience to authority which will take you into Milgram's experiment and how this study applies to trainee police officers. The following experiment was designed to test obedience to...
    839 Words | 3 Pages
  • Miss - 2396 Words
    The Milgram ExperimentOne of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology was carried out by Stanley Milgram (1963). Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University, conducted an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. The experiments began in July 1961, a year after the trial of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem. Milgram devised the experiment to answer the question "Could it be that Eichmann and his million accomplices in the...
    2,396 Words | 7 Pages
  • Schindlers List - 889 Words
    Schindler’s List March 6th, 2012 Schindler’s List You are put into a death camp because you are of a Jewish religion. Day after day you are talked down to by German soldiers and thought of as a plush toy that can just be thrown around. You try to put out some authority over anyone higher than you and you are instantly dehumanized, more than you already are, and are probably killed on the spot. You are a lucky one, however, because you were in the left line, not the right, so you get to live...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • outline and evaluate explanations for why people obey
    People are more likely to obey when under the influence of a legitimate authority or in a place of great importance. Milgram found this in his investigation when in his original study, 65% of the participants obeyed within the Yale setting whereas only 48% of the participants obeyed when the location was changed to a rundown office. The agentic state is also used, as this allows the participant to follow through with the actions without feeling any of the responsibility placed on them, thus...
    330 Words | 1 Page
  • Solomon Asch - 2454 Words
    Solomon Asch Solomon Asch was a social psychologist way back in the 1950s, which is even before my parents were born. Asch conducted a famous experiment on the effects of peer pressure on a person. What he found was that a person had a “tendency to conform, even it means to go against the person’s basic perceptions”. The web page also said that people “are swayed by the masses against our deepest feelings and convictions”. 1 These experiments that Asch created developed the theory of...
    2,454 Words | 7 Pages
  • Nicole Johnson - 756 Words
    Nicole Johnson Jennifer Ciccone Eng-111 3 Aug 13 Milgram Obedience Study One of the most famous studies of obedience in psychology was carried out by Stanley Milgram (1963). Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University, conducted an experiment focusing on the conflict between obedience to authority and personal conscience. He examined justifications for acts of genocide offered by those accused at the World War II, Nuremberg War Criminal trials. Their defense often was based on...
    756 Words | 3 Pages
  • Obedience with Authority - 883 Words
     Asch, Solomon. “Opinions and Social Pressure.” Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum. Columbus, OH: Pearson, 2013. Print. 655-659. According to the article “Opinions and Social Pressure”, Solomon Asch writes about how the affects of group pressure can alter a person’s decision. During the investigation, Asch describes how everyone in the group agrees with the answer that they have chosen except for one in which the author calls him the “dissenter (Asch 656)”. Solomon Asch stated...
    883 Words | 3 Pages
  • Obedience - 1369 Words
    Daniel Parks Freshman Studies Term II Critical Analysis and Milgram’s Response Obedience to Authority and the obedience experiments that produced Stanley Milgram’s famous book have produced almost equal amounts of surprise, curiosity and criticism. The criticism of social psychologist John Darley and playwright Dannie Abse are each representative of the general criticism Milgram has received; Darley focuses on whether the study has any relevance to real world events (such as the Holocaust), and...
    1,369 Words | 4 Pages
  • Critique - 559 Words
    Critique on “Five Steps of Tyranny” Written by: Sheena McDonald Directed by: Elizabeth McIntyre “Five Steps to Tyranny” is a documentary written by Sheena McDonalds revealing those mere five steps to implement tyranny and thus convert democracy and dictatorship. The tendency to do evil by the ordinary people like you and me has polluted the whole world in various forms. Adolf Hitler did not invent the idea of Nordic supremacy: the German society for racial hygiene...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • Milgram's Experiments - 1495 Words
    English 1A 20 June 2012 Sphere of Authority Stanley Milgram, a Yale psychologist, stunned the world when he stated that “perhaps the most fundamental lesson of our study is that ordinary people doing their jobs, and without particular hostility on their part, can become agents in a terrible destructive process.” Milgram’s stunning conclusions, which were derived from his experiments, proved that obedience is one of the basic elements in the structure of social life. The proximately of the...
    1,495 Words | 5 Pages
  • Describe and Evaluate Psychological Research Into Obedience
    Obedience results from pressure to comply with authority. Children are taught to obey from an early age by their care givers, in order for them to conform in society. The authoritarian rule continues through their education and working life, and is then passed on to the next generation. This essay will focus on the work of the American psychologist Stanley Milgram. It will also look at other studies into obedience that evolved from Milgram’s experiments from the early 1960s. Stanley Milgram...
    1,743 Words | 5 Pages
  • 5 Steps to Tyranny Documentary
    The origins of violence in individuals seem to remain a mystery for psychologists, biologists, and society as a while; and the question “are people hardwired to kill/be violent” arises. The BBC Documentary, ‘5 Steps to Tyranny’, shows us how human nature allows us to descend into a domineering society when we are provoked to act according to certain circumstances. The tyrannical acts are analyzed in 5 simple steps: ‘Us’ and ‘Them’, ‘Obey Orders’, ‘Do Them Harm’, ‘Stand Up or Stand By’, and...
    793 Words | 2 Pages
  • Social Psychology Week 6 Assignments
    Social Psychology Week 6 Writing Assignment 1: Question 1 of 1: | | | Theoretical Perspectives on Gender Introduction: A local college is organizing a seminar on gender bias in the workplace. You have been invited to the seminar as a guest lecturer. You have been specifically requested to deliver a lecture on the different perspectives of gender, including biology, socialization, and social roles. Task: Prepare an outline for the lecture, including notes on different...
    668 Words | 4 Pages
  • Milgram's Summary - 1290 Words
    Summary about The Perils of Obedience Obedience is something everyone has to follow growing up. Whether it is parents, grandparents, teachers, or even a manager, society implements a process of obeying people in charge. People often wonder how far someone will go to avoid disobeying authorities about a controversial topic. Throughout the article “The Perils of Obedience” by Stanley Milgram, a Yale psychologist, people become aware of the necessity to obey higher authority no matter what pain...
    1,290 Words | 4 Pages
  • i dont know what this is about
    7 October 2013 Synthesis Over Obedience In this chapter on the research of obedience, studying the psychological actions and reactions, the implications brought forth are the surprising effects of simple commands and the subliminal influence. The articles “The Perils of Obedience”, by Stanley Milgram, and “Opinions and Social Pressure”, by Solomon E. Asch, both exhibit the traits of simple, ordinary test subjects following orders and actions by someone who is illustrated to have power or the...
    985 Words | 3 Pages
  • Assignment Conformity - 1309 Words
     Running Head: CONFORMITY AND OBEDIENCE Hitler’s silent advantage? – Control of people in a totalitarian regime Laura Frei In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for Psychology 130-001 January 21, 2015 Bev Lenihan, Instructor Camosun College Hitler’s silent advantage? – Control of people in a totalitarian regime People tend to follow social norms when eating and watching TV. It lies in the nature of a human being to focus on the actions of others and act in groups. This orientation...
    1,309 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ethics in Psychology - 2953 Words
    1. • Discuss ethical considerations in qualitative research. • Discuss ethical considerations related to research studies at the biological level of analysis. • Discuss ethical considerations in research into genetic influences on behaviour. • Discuss ethical considerations related to research studies at the cognitive level of analysis. • Discuss ethical considerations related to research studies at the sociocultural level of analysis. • Discuss cultural and...
    2,953 Words | 9 Pages
  • Critique: Stanford Prison Experiment
    Cody Porter ACP Comp, Period 2 November 25, 2013 Redo Critique Paper Diana Baumrind’s Review on Obedience Experiments from Stanley Milgram In Diana Baumrind’s “Review on Obedience Experiments from Stanley Milgram, she asserted that his experiments were unethical in its procedure. She also states the main idea that the variables in the experiments could have affected their results of obedience. Baumrind points out that there should have been more and better steps in having safer tests in...
    650 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tma03 - 872 Words
    Milgrams’ study of obedience and its relevance to the conduct of soldiers at war Summary The armed forces rely on orders being given through the chain of command and being obeyed unquestioningly. Some of the actions you, as a soldier, may be told to do could go against what you feel is the right thing to do. Would you be able to refuse? Stanley Milgram conducted research to ascertain to what extent people would follow instructions and under what circumstance. Background Stanley...
    872 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychology - 295 Words
    Chapter 13 * Examples such as UFO sightings, cow mutilations by aliens, and crop circles demonstrate how ____social comparison_____________ can lead to mass hysteria and collective delusions. * The main task of the Solomon Asch studies was judging line lengths>>> conformity * one third * How many confederates did Asch find maximized the likelihood of conformity occurring? B) 4 * parametric studies * Masami, a Japanese female * Autokinetic effect *...
    295 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Dangers of Obedience to Authority: Writing and Reading Across the Cirriculum
    Obedience to Authority As a child growing up, everyone was told “respect your elders” or “listen and obey”. As children grow into teenagers, they start pushing the boundaries to see who they really need to obey. Throughout adulthood, though people have fewer and fewer authority figures as the years go by, everyone must obey someone. Though we all have someone to obey, when does the respectful obedience cross the line into dangerous territory? Obedience becomes dangerous when it becomes...
    770 Words | 2 Pages
  • Are the Actions of People in the Workplace a Consequence of Individual or Organisational Characteristics? What Would Promote Ethical Behaviour at Work?
    Chapter 7 Managing for Ethical Conduct Contents: (Please note: the Instructor Guide for every chapter will follow this structure.) 1. Chapter Outline 2. Teaching Notes 3. In-Class Exercises 4. Homework Assignments 5. Additional Resources Chapter Outline I. Introduction II. In Business, Ethics Is about Behavior A. Practical Advice for Managers: Ethical Behavior III. Our Multiple Ethical Selves A. The Kenneth Lay Example B....
    4,350 Words | 16 Pages
  • Conformity: Summary - 1043 Words
    Conformity - a change in behavior or belief as the result of real or imagined group pressure. Varieties of Conformity 1. Compliance - conformity that involves publicly acting in accord with an implied or explicit request while privately disagreeing. It is insincere. 2. Obedience - acting in accord with a direct order or command. 3. Acceptance - conformity that involves both acting and believing in accord with social pressure. Conformity and Obedience Studies 1. Muzafer Sherif on Norm...
    1,043 Words | 5 Pages
  • Obedience - 335 Words
     Obedience Ashley M. Martinez PSY/285 Stacie Flynn One of the most prominent studies of obedience in the study of psychology was performed by Stanley Milgram. The intent of this study was to research how far individuals would go in obeying a command while it involved hurting someone. Milgram’s curiosity to see how normal individuals could be influenced by enormity seems to be an influence for this study. My...
    335 Words | 2 Pages
  • Stanford Prison Experiment and Obedience
    Obedience to Our Parents To be obedient is to obey the orders of one's elders and superiors. There cannot be order unless there is obedience. One has to obey the laws of the country, otherwise the society cannot exist. The laws may be irksome, but, for the overall good of the law one must obey them. For instance, the laws to be obeyed on the road ensures road safety. The laws pertaining to property help society continue without hitches and hindrances. Even in our body our limbs obey the...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • obedience - 1222 Words
    Obedience Stanly Milgram and George Orwell present individuals who ignore their own moral codes when they are confronted by authority figures. In Milgram’s experiment people continued to shock other test subjects continuously despite their reservations against it. Even when the participants in Milgram's experiments did not want to continue with the experiment, the authority figure in the experiment was able to convince them to continue. Likewise, in Orwell’s autobiography “Shooting an...
    1,222 Words | 3 Pages
  • Stanford Prison Experiment - 320 Words
    Psychology 270 - 03 Homework Assignment 1 Prison Experiment (100 Pts) Go to the following site:http://www.prisonexp.org/. Click on Begin SlideShow at the bottom of the page. Read through the article and watch the video in entirety. Respond to all questions below. 1. If you were a guard in this scenario, what type of guard would you have become? Why? 2. What prevented "good guards" from objecting to or countermanding the orders from “tough” or “bad guards”?...
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  • Graduate Tracer - 749 Words
    This study is anchored on the theory of phenomenon on the six degrees of separation theory by Karinthy (1921) in his short story of “Chains”. He posited that despite physical distances between individuals, the gr owing density of human networks made the actual social distance far smaller. And also he believed that the modern world was shrinking due to the ever-increasing connectedness of human beings. Because of the technological advances in communications and travel, friendship networks could...
    749 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why People Obey - 927 Words
    Milgram (1974) gave reasons for obedience. Obedience is a type of influence causing a person to act person to act in response to a direct order from someone with perceived authority. In this essay I am going to explain Milgram’s reasons on why people obey. The process of learning throughout life or when a person learns to adjust to a group and act like the group is called socialisation. It is a central influence on behaviour, beliefs action but the society that one is raised in can also affect...
    927 Words | 3 Pages
  • The study of Obedience - 444 Words
    Stanley Milgram, an American social psychologist, conducted the Behavioral study of obedience experiment. Milgram conducted this experiment to measure the willingness of study participants to obey an authority figure instructing them to perform acts that conflicted with their moral view of right and wrong. The participants in the Milgram experiment were 40 men recruited using newspaper ads. The researchers hoped that the level of...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • B. F. Goodrich Air Force A7-D Brake Problem Case: Moral Issues
    Fin 330 Hand in Problem “Wy Should My Conscience Bother Me?” Howard Hehrer 12/3/2013 1. Identify some of the moral issues that are present in this case. a. There are many moral issues, but the story seems to revolve around several cases of ‘passing the buck’, or rationalizing how small of a part each respective individual plays in the conspiracy. In most of these cases, like Gretzinger’s scuffle with Line, the individual is charged with risking his job for potentially little or...
    1,237 Words | 4 Pages
  • Learning Acitivity 1: Chapter 3
    2.Identify and describe three leadership styles. Provide examples of these styles in society? Authoritarian Leadership is one that takes personal charge of decision-making, and demands that group members obey orders (Macionis, 2013. P110). Bill Gates is a great example of authoritarian leadership. Bill had a vision after he took lead of the company and he used all possible resources within his reach and made a dream reality. Bill Gates did not consult others on which way his company should...
    389 Words | 1 Page
  • The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal
    The Abu Ghraib prison scandal shocked the whole nation into disbelief that our United State's army can do such a thing. In Marianne Szegedy-Maszak's, The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism, explains the rough conditions and new situations these young soldiers were faced. The Abu Graib prison shared many traits needed to make our everyday human beings in to a torturer. But, what would it take for me and you to act out such a horrific ordeal? Yale psychologist Stanley Milgram created...
    503 Words | 2 Pages
  • Obedience - 554 Words
    Christies 2500 word essay on obedience and how I am going to ensure I don’t make the same mistake again. Obedience is defined as submissive to the restraint or command of authority; willing to obey. Obey is defined as 1. to follow the commands or guidance of, 2. To conform to or comply with (obey and order). Synonyms for obey: adhere to, comply with, conform to, follow, mind, observe, abide by, fall in with, keep to. Antonyms for obey: defy, disobey, rebel Related words for...
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  • English Comp 102 - 701 Words
    Replicating Milgram: Would People Still Obey Today? The Milgram Experiment Is a very well-known experiment in social psychology .The concept was first started in 1963 by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgren in the Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology in Behavioral Study of Obedience published a paper, later also in his 1974 publication Obedience to Authority: Discussed in the An Experimental View. The main purpose of this experiment is testing the subjects issued against...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • Power and Obedience - 1079 Words
    In today’s society it is human instinct to crave power, and to obey authority. Power is a mechanism individuals are taught to aspire to and obedience is norm individuals are told to conform to. When authority is present it is instinctual for a person to behave the way that the dominate tells them to even if what they are being told to do is wrong. Meanwhile, power can quickly go to a person’s head and make them react in cruel and demoralizing ways towards people they have supremacy over. The...
    1,079 Words | 3 Pages
  • Lord of the Flies and Human Nature
    Human nature Did anyone ever teach you how to lie? Did anyone show you how to steal? How did you learn to cheat? These basic questions form the basis of our debate. We believe that human nature is essentially evil based on religious sources, through human interaction, and our animal instinct. In order to understand our human nature we must first understand evil. Evil is the violation of, or intent to violate, some moral code. Definitions of evil vary, however, evil is commonly...
    1,142 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fear of Disobeying Leads to Genocide
    Fear of Disobeying Leads to Genocide Obedience, as well as disobedience, has been ingrained in our culture since the beginning of time, so it is no surprise that so many people obeyed Hitler and killed millions of Jewish people. In the Christian religion disobedience is viewed as bad and obedience as good. In the story of Adam and Eve, they disobeyed God by eating from the tree of knowledge and were exiled from Eden. In the story of Noah, he obeyed God and Noah and his family were rewarded and...
    899 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hitler and Sociology - 461 Words
    Alex Berntsen Most people would agree with doing something horrific to another person, since it is easier to conform, than to fight, people tend to protect themselves before protecting a stranger. Stanley Milgram put a study together to prove that Germans are more likely to be obedient to authority then American are. The study was called “If Hitler Asked You to Electrocute a Stranger, Would You? Probably.” Milgram explains the character aspects of why people listen to authority and why they...
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hidden side to mankind - 3014 Words
    Jesus Guadarrama Ms. LaPorta English 100 15 December 2011 Hidden side of mankind Throughout history, execrable acts of corrupt human behavior have stunned mankind. While one might not see themselves capable of committing acts of torture towards others, and possibly killing another human being, experiments and real historical events have proven that there is a gruesome side within human beings expressed when placed in a position of power or control. Those who are not in that position...
    3,014 Words | 8 Pages
  • Enemy of the People - 1115 Words
    ESSAY: AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE Harry Latirofian 07/SP_CORE_1006_22 The Global Challenge An Enemy of the people is a drama filled with ethical dilemmas and issues that are largely were caused by the contrasts between the Stockmann brothers. Thomas Stockmann is jovial by nature and likes to be surrounded by people like him that are intelligent and hard working. His brother in other hand is a representative of the conservative world-order. Thomas Stockmann or as he referred in play as Dr....
    1,115 Words | 3 Pages
  • Social Psychology - 12571 Words
    Module 1 Doing Social Psychology blz. 3 t/m 14 Social psychology The scientific study of how people think about, influence, and relate to one another. Forming and testing theories Theory An integrated set of principles that explain and predict observed events. Hypothesis A testable proposition that describes a relationship that might exist between events. Correlational research: detecting natural associations Correlational research The study of the...
    12,571 Words | 46 Pages
  • Mob Mentality - 1266 Words
    History tends to repeat itself and while the context may differ, the causative factors are most likely the same. One repetitive action throughout history is religious persecution, two examples include; Nazi Germany and the Salem witch trials. While the groups being persecuted had almost nothing in common the causes of the persecution were very similar: mob mentality. The responsibility is shared and thus responsibility is diluted. Being in a mob alleviates people’s sense of morality because...
    1,266 Words | 4 Pages
  • milgram's study of obedience - 1361 Words
    Milgram’s study of obedience to authority, and the ethical issues it raised for social psychologists The following essay will discuss psychologist Stanley Milgram’s study of obedience to authority, and will outline the ethical issues it raised for social psychologists. Milgram was inspired by the Nuremburg trials and the defense of many ex-nazis being that they were coerced into assisting the genocide by simply following orders from higher authority figures. Milgram set out to see if...
    1,361 Words | 4 Pages
  • Why Do Good People Do Bad Things
    Why do good people do bad things? (750 words) In this essay I will talk about the torturing of prisoners in Abu Ghraib. I will also write about the Stanley Milgrim Experiment and the Stanford Prison Experiment. All of these relate to one of the topics we have covered this term. There is an excellent example of uniforms influencing power in the Stanford Prison experiment which took place in1971, it was lead by Prof Zimbardo1 (see footnote) in which a group of students were selected to act as...
    779 Words | 2 Pages
  • conformity and obedience - 1936 Words
    This Essay will discuss the factors influencing the behaviour of Mark, in relation to conformity and obedience. Should he comply and obey with his officer’s strict instructions to work alone, or will he stop to help a fellow trainee. Mark is a soldier on training in the Brecon Beacons, he is under order to work alone and not to stop to help anyone. Mark is working well and is on track with about 5 other soldiers who he already knows. Whilst running through the country, Mark hears a colleague...
    1,936 Words | 6 Pages
  • Conformity and Obedience - 1479 Words
    Conformity and Obedience. In order to answer the question it is first necessary to define conformity and obedience. According to Woods, (2001 p. 107): ‘ We often adjust our actions or opinions so that they fit in well with those of other people. This is known as social conformity ......’ And Gross, (2001 pg.392) stated that: Obedience is affected by direction (from somebody in higher authority). This essay will explore circumstances in which we are likely to...
    1,479 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ethics Eassy - 1476 Words
    AP Psychology Ethics Essay Ethical Issues Arising from Social Experiments The following experiments were unethical to the participants. Some of their treatment was inhumane. The experiments broke moral principles and rules of conduct. There are many examples and evidence when these following events occurred. Such as in The Milgram Obedience experiment the participants were put through intentional deception. In A Class Divided: Jane Elliot, the participants (students) were put into high...
    1,476 Words | 5 Pages
  • Conformity And Obedience - 1009 Words
    Sonia sawmmal Dr. Young ENG. 101 09.30.14 Obedience and conformity in society: an undeniable human need. Obedience and conformity in society, the desire to be accepted and belonging to a group is an undeniable human need. If people face with any kind of social impact such as group pressure, great part of them shows conformity (the act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to group norms.) A person conforms if he or she chooses a course of action that a majority...
    1,009 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Stanford Prison Experiment , a Review.
    The Stanford Prison experiment, in my opinion is a remarkable experiment . It isn’t ethical in the least but the results that have emerged have exceeded even what Mr.Zimbardo set out to do. The aim of seeing whether people change their basic personalities , moralities , values when subjected to an external hostile environment has been successfully proven. My honest opinion is that , at that time in 1971 , it was rational enough to think about going out of the way to get an answer to a...
    765 Words | 3 Pages
  • Obedience - 1282 Words
    Society’s Tendency to Pass on Responsibility The Obedience to Authority Experiment of Stanley Milgram is one of the most studied experiments in American history due to its wide-ranging social implications. The study gained popular attention because it aimed to provide some insight as to why the Holocaust had escalated in such a way. The study was designed around testing the degree of inflicted pain strangers would give to others, under orders by an experimenter. Not only did the study defy...
    1,282 Words | 4 Pages
  • Conformity and Obedience - 963 Words
    Conformity and Obedience The desire to be accepted and belong to a group is an undeniable human need. But how does this need affect an individual? Social psychologists have conducted numerous experiments and concluded that, through various forms of social influence, groups can change their members' thoughts, feelings, and behavior. In her essay "Group Minds," Doris Lessing discusses our paradoxical ability to call ourselves individuals and our inability to realize that groups...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Submission To Authority - 855 Words
    November 30, 2013 Submission to Authority Marines are one of the most disciplined armed forces in our world today. They are taught to receive orders and to follow them without question. But when should submission to authority stop? Should orders be disregarded when they conflict with a person’s own morals and consciousness? Maybe they should, but in the Milgram experiment, it was found that it is actually very easy for a person to accept and follow orders while leaving out their own judgment....
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Are People Able to Commit Acts of Terror
    Why Are People Capable of Committing Acts of Terror We are socialized right from the beginning. Socialization is the modification of an individual’s behavior to conform with the demands of social life. Once we are born, our society and culture already helps define certain aspects of ourselves. As we grow older, we assimilate more of the culture into our own identity. During this process, we also learn of moral values, what is right and wrong or how an action could only be appropriate in a...
    1,994 Words | 5 Pages
  • Milgram's experiment - 2949 Words
     Behavioural Study of Obedience: Milgram’s Experiment M.J George Brown College #1) Obedience I think the three aspects of the situation faced by the subjects in Milgram’s study were the prestige of the university, the proximity of the experimenter, and the money paid. These aspects were the most influential in causing the subjects to obey. The influence of the prestige of Yale University was a key point to get the obedience of the subjects. People are prone...
    2,949 Words | 8 Pages