Standardized tests Essays & Research Papers

Best Standardized tests Essays

  • Standardized Tests - 462 Words
    Clemmitt, Marcia. "School Reform." CQ Researcher 29 Apr. 2011: 385-408. Web. 23 July 2014. - This citation is from CQ Researcher that just talks about standardized testing in general and if whether or not teachers as well as students should be evaluated solely by their performances on these tests. It also contains some useful statistics about tests scores. I can use the information from this source in the introduction. This would be useful in the introduction because it is just an overview of...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Tests - 1382 Words
    Problems with Standardized Testing Do standardized test scores accurately describe the achievements of a student? Regardless of what reports and newspapers suggest, scores on standardized tests do not reflect a student’s achievements or abilities. Standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT are the focus of argument not only among teachers and educational reformers, but also among students. Opponents agree that the standardized tests are weighted too heavily, and that test anxiety obstructs...
    1,382 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Tests - 2501 Words
    Standardized Tests: Are they worth it? For years, children of all ages have been required to take standardized tests in order to assess their capabilities and theoretically prepare them for further education. These tests are often the main factor in acceptance into colleges and universities, used in grade advancement for younger ages, and an overall indicator of a person’s ability. However, because of the lack of variety in the subjects they evaluate, standardized tests are often under...
    2,501 Words | 6 Pages
  • Standardized Tests - 810 Words
    Standardized Tests Schools across the United States are forced to give their students standardized tests. Standardized tests are multiple choice tests based on a list of state standards that a teacher is required to teach. The state makes schools give these tests to measure student achievement. In most schools, these tests go toward a big percentage of a student’s grade and in some cases determine whether the student will pass or fail a class. One can argue that standardized tests are useful;...
    810 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Standardized tests Essays

  • The Effects of Standardized Tests on Education
    The Effects of Standardized Tests on Education Lawrence Jackson Armstrong Atlantic State University Standardized tests have been debated and argued for as many years as they have existed. It is worthwhile to look at some of the arguments for both sides and find out if there can be some middle ground. Two important factors of standardized tests are the way the tests are administered and how the results are handled. These two issues may be more important than the tests...
    1,562 Words | 5 Pages
  • Standardized Tests and Their Effect on the Community
    Standardized Tests and Their Effect on the Community Carol Childs Prof. Moore / Saint Leo University SSC101 14 October 2012 There are many types of standardized tests used within schools to determine levels of intelligence and knowledge of subject matter. Teachers and the school board use these test results to determine areas that need improvement for the student and what subject areas they excel in. For students, many of them do not like taking tests especially when they hold a very...
    3,230 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Validity of Standardized Tests - 1261 Words
    Standardized testing is the scourge that plagues the classroom and renders immobile the wheels of thought in a quagmire of ineffectual batteries of questions unintentionally fashioned to inaccurately assess a student's mastery of subject material. I intend to research the validity of standardized tests in school. The standardized tests can include the Stanford 9, PSAT, SAT, CRCT, etc. I chose this topic because I feel that educators and political leaders place an undue amount of importance on...
    1,261 Words | 4 Pages
  • Abolish Standardized Test for University Admission
    Abolish Standardized Test for University Admission What is the purpose of standardized test, such as Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT), for university admission? It was first introduced in 1930s to reduce socio­economic discrimination in admissions. James Bryan Conant, who was the President of Harvard University, discovered a number of qualified working­class students were rejected in ...
    653 Words | 1 Page
  • Standardized Test Scores and Its Effects on Students
    Have you ever sat down and thought about college and how one test can determine what college you can/will get accepted to. Everyone knows that colleges place so much stock into these standardized test scores. Knowing this makes students worried and develop anxiety about test taking. Colleges use these standardized tests to predict how well we do in college to succeed.Colleges shouldn’t be allowed to put that much pressure on us for our test scores on SAT’s or Act’s. “We all have...
    767 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Standardized Tests Really Measure Intelligence?
    Definitional Argument Analysis Do Standardized Tests Really Measure Intelligence? Some may beg to differ when people say the SAT or ACT are not fair to everyone. Not everyone may test well, so these tests are not an accurate assessment of someone’s intelligence. According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the SAT first stood for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, then the Scholastic Assessment Test; now it does not stand for anything. The SAT is a college entrance exam for high school students, and...
    913 Words | 3 Pages
  • Do Colleges Put Too Much Stock into Standardized Test?
    Topic: Do colleges put too much stock into standardized test Many students have the desire to succeed when taking college entrance tests, but some students have been proven as bad test takers which means they understand the concepts but are not able to put them on paper. Colleges should not deny prospective students just because their test scores are not as high as the next students; colleges should realize that students are more than just a standardized test score. Tests cannot predict how...
    1,055 Words | 3 Pages
  • standardized testing - 1240 Words
    One of the most controversial topics in education is the concept of standardized testing. Standardized testing has been around a long time and is used in many other ways besides in schools. Standardized testing can be used when getting a drivers license, or even to get a job. It first came about in 1917, when it was used as a mean of assessing militant recruits. During this time it was able to test young men quickly and enter them into the military based on their level of intelligence....
    1,240 Words | 4 Pages
  • standardized testing - 759 Words
    Child Growth & Development Standardized Testing Standardized testing has assumed a well-known role in recent efforts to advance the quality of education. Regardless of where they went to school or what curriculum they followed, students are tested on the same material, which can be loosely grouped into knowledge domains and skill sets that encompass; natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, reading, speaking, writing, and mathematics. National, state, and district tests, combined...
    759 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1158 Words
    Lainey Sullivan Evaluation Paper Standardized Testing Standardized tests are a common and popular way to evaluate the academic achievements of students, teachers and school districts. They are used in many areas such as the army, civil service, medicine and so on. Standardized tests are most widely used in the field of education to assess the academic performance of students. Two commonly known types of standardized tests in the United States are the SAT and the ACT. The SAT evaluates...
    1,158 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1662 Words
    Standardized testing is the most commonly used and well known method of testing used in the United States and many other countries around the world, but can harm educational quality and promote inequality. Standardized testing is used to determine student achievement, growth and progress. Standardized tests are tests that attempt to present unbiased material under the same, predetermined conditions and with consistent scoring and interpretation so that students have equal opportunities to give...
    1,662 Words | 5 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1352 Words
    Standardized tests have historically been used as measures of how students compare with each other or how much of a particular curriculum they have learned. Increasingly, standardized tests are being used to make major decisions about students, such as grade promotion or high school graduation, and schools. More and more often, they also are intended to shape the curriculum and instruction. Students across America have had to repeat classes because of the way standardized tests are...
    1,352 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 753 Words
    English I CPE/period 9 15 January 2013 Standardized testing should not be required to graduate high school Sitting in a classroom for forty-five minutes feels long and stressful. During the standardized tests students have to sit in a classroom for hours at a time, knowing that their future dreams of being a doctor, teacher, or lawyer could come to an end if they mess up one exam. Standardized tests should not be required for students to graduate high school. They cause...
    753 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Standardized Tests Are a False Interpretation of Who the Child Really Is
    Becca Papineau Amanda Hararch English 102 Research Paper 15 April 2013 Standardized Testing: False Interpretation Do you hate staring at a computer/ piece of paper for more than two hours and answering questions? I am sure most people would answer “no”, and that is why standardized testing puts more harm than good in today’s world. Standardized testing causes a lot more problems than usual. It used to be a part of life, but now it’s causing kids not to go to college, and it’s causing...
    2,569 Words | 7 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1037 Words
    English Comp. and Lang. AP Standardized Testing When you think of education, what comes to mind? Homework? Books? Essays? What about tests? Nowadays, that’s the only thing that seems to matter. As absurd as it is, no one truly cares about anything besides test scores; it’s all about how high students can score, and how good they can make the school look, rather than how much they can retain and actually apply when it really counts. Despite what some people may think, standardized testing is...
    1,037 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1252 Words
    Standardized testing is used across our nation as an assessment for students’ academic achievement. The t Act, No Child Left Behind, was signed into law on January 8th, 2002 by president George W. Bush. (Department of Education, 2005) This law was created to hold states and their schools accountable for the achievement of the students. Since then, each state has been required to create an accountability system for students’ performance. Many of these new testing systems hold strong...
    1,252 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 806 Words
    Thesis statement: Standardized tests in the public school system have become biased and they are becoming costly to the school systems. Introduction: According to Dr. Hoffman, it is the multiple-choice format that is to blame. “Multiple choice tests penalize the deep student, dampen creativity, foster intellectual dishonesty, and undermine the very foundations of education” he remarked in a 1977 interview. A standardized test is a test that uses uniform procedures for administration and...
    806 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized testing - 1047 Words
    Standardized tests is a common way of measuring a student's progress and performance in school. The tests may vary by different schools and grades and it usually takes up a large portion of a student's total mark. Although it is purposely designed to be a consistent and accurate tool. However, many questions the effectiveness of standardized testing. Standardized testing is an inaccurate assessment because it does not effectively judge the student's ability to learn or understand, it can not...
    1,047 Words | 4 Pages
  • standardized Testing - 2235 Words
    What’s So Wrong about Standardized Testing? Standardized testing in public schools is at an all time high. The state of Pennsylvania starts their testing on children as young as 10 or 11 years of age. Not to mention states like Georgia that begins testing kids while they are still in kindergarten. Many people can step up to defend standardized testing in schools, saying that it is in place to help build up our systems, and help to strengthen and progress the academic success of our young...
    2,235 Words | 6 Pages
  • Abolishing Grading - Standardized Testing
    Arguments for Grading * Standardized testing prepares students for college (but if there is not testing at any level then there is no need for standardized testing.) * It is practical- strict directions and easy to give and time efficient and easy to grade * Standardized testing offsets grade inflation ( consistently compares student knowledge) * Standardized testing is objective bc a machine grade it and the mood biases do not affect the grade. * Without grading how can u...
    352 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Testing Premise - 674 Words
    Joseph Cruz Garcia Premise 1 “The Case against Standardized Testing” by Alfie Kohn clearly outlines quite a few problems with thousands of schools across the nation placing so much emphasis and meaning on standardized testing. Alfie Kohn has been described by Time Magazine as perhaps the country’s most outspoken critic of education’s fixation on grades and test scores. Our students are tested to an extent that is unprecedented in American history and unparalleled anywhere in the world....
    674 Words | 2 Pages
  • Argument Essay: Standardized Testing
    Standardized Testing: Good or Bad? If someone was to ask you “how do you define student achievement?” what would your answer be? Would you say student achievement is measured by state achievement tests? Or would you say that student achievement is too complex a subject to be objectively measured? There are many important skills students must be taught, and we need a way to effectively measure if they are in fact learning those skills. However, standardized tests cannot effectively show the...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • Flaws of Standardized Testing - 1163 Words
    As a Senior applying to colleges, I have taken both the ACT and SAT multiple times. And I hate them. And it's not just because I have to get up early on a Saturday morning. But whoever created these tests surely isn't a teenager who loves their sleep. But that's beside the point. In today's society, they have become too important of a factor in the college admission process. They have the potential to be the only thing that prevents one from getting into a school of their dreams....
    1,163 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Unintended Consequences of Standardized Testing
    The Unintended Consequences of High Stakes Testing Since the beginning of the 20th century some form of high stakes standardized testing has existed in the United States. Test use has ranged from determining acceptance or rejection of an immigrant to enter the U.S. to declaring a citizen competent to enter the military. So, for nearly a century, high stakes testing has had significant rewards and consequences associated with it. Standardized testing of student comprehension and competency has...
    1,144 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Argument on Standardized Testing - 840 Words
    Standardized tests are now a common practice among America’s schools. This has caused one of the most controversial debates in society today. Supposedly, they are a great way to measure student achievement, but it appears that the exams could be much more detrimental than they seem. Students are failing to pass year-long classes due to a single test. There is no way that the information learned within such an amount of time can be accurately or even fairly assessed this way. Within every...
    840 Words | 3 Pages
  • Problems with Standardized Testing
    Gina Mancini Mrs. Sprague Honors English 12 December 19, 2011 The Tests That Can Determine an Entire Future Albert Einstein once said, "It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." How, though, may teachers follow these wise words, when they must constantly worry about educating their students so they can pass just one of the many standardized tests thrust upon them? John Dewey, an American philosopher, also said, "The real process of...
    1,785 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Evolution of Standardized Testing and Its Divided Opinions
    What is standardized testing? It is a type of test that is used to signify objective tests that include questions such as fill in the blank, multiple-choice, true/false, or short essay. All students take the same tests with the same questions so that the scores can be compared. Computers score most parts of these tests. People that have rubrics with guidelines on how to score the answers grade questions like fill in the blank and short essay answers. The results of these tests deliver two types...
    1,982 Words | 5 Pages
  • Research Paper over Standardized Testing
    Catherine Burgess 1 Burgess 1 Mrs. Edmonds English 3 AP 2/20/2013 Standardized Testing The current period of learning is being determined by standardized testing, and has become the main focus of many arguments within the education system. Students all over the United States are being subjected to standardized tests often throughout their years in school due to legislation that has been set by Government over the past several years. While there are many upsides to the...
    1,330 Words | 4 Pages
  • College Admisstion Test - 1156 Words
    College Admissions Test Problem Statement Test scores from the ACT and SAT are a main part of college admission applications today. Some view them as a necessary part of the application because it’s an easy way to see how prepared a student is for college and how his/her scores compare to other applicants’ scores. While those entrance exams are a good way to categorize and compare students, there is too much emphasis placed on scores and not enough on all the other work the student has...
    1,156 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Evaluation of TOEFL test - 1764 Words
    The Evaluation of TOEFL test Xiajie Tang TOEFL stands for Test of English as a Foreign Language. The test is not a test for business or professional purposes. That is, the TOEFL test is not intended for students of a particular subject or major. The purpose of TOEFL is to assess English proficiency of persons especially for international students whose native language...
    1,764 Words | 5 Pages
  • Should Standardized Testing Be Used In College Admission?
     “Should Standardized testing be used for college admission?” The purpose of standardized testing in high school for admission to college is to see how much you have retained in school in order to be able to do well in college. The reason is to try to prove that standardized testing isn’t the only thing necessary for college admission. What’s needed to learn first about this topic is: how many people agree with standardized testing, viewpoints on whether the upper class if favored in...
    2,535 Words | 6 Pages
  • Standardized testing: What's wrong with this picture?
    Rough Draft Persuasive Paper Standardized testing: What's wrong with this picture? The ACT: this particular standardized test has many connotations, and few of them are positive ones. When one thinks of the ACT, or American College Testing, feelings of nervousness, pressure to perform well, and the words “rigged,” “biased,” and “tricky” often...
    2,304 Words | 6 Pages
  • Are Test Scores a Good Indication of a Student's Competency?
    Are test scores a good indication of a student's competency? Nowadays, many students spend all their time in learning the courses and preparing the tests, and they don't have any time to take part in other activities. Is this phenomenon good or not? However, are test scores a good indication of a student's competency? Opinions vary from person to person. As far as I am concerned, test scores are not the only standard of evaluation, but it is still very important. First of all, not only those...
    477 Words | 2 Pages
  • Entrepreneur case study-Turner Test Prep Co.
    Entrepreneur Case 1A Turner Test Prep Co. Introduction In the Spring of 2003, Jessica Turner felt that she had come to a crossroads with her business. As the founder and CEO of Turner Test Prep, a California company specializing in preparing people for the Certified Public accountant (CPA) exam, she felt that she was not achieving market share and growing in the right direction. After three years of providing prep classed to both students and professionals, Turner had about 10 percent of the...
    1,941 Words | 7 Pages
  • Discuss the Role of Criterion Referenced Tests and Norm Referenced Tests in the Teaching and Learning Process
    Discuss the role of criterion referenced tests and norm referenced tests in the teaching and learning process Introduction According to Van der Linden (1982), the rise of new learning strategies has changed the meaning of measurement in education and made new demands on the construction, scoring, and analysis of educational tests. Educational measurements satisfying these demands are usually called criterion-referenced, while traditional measurements are often known as norm-referenced. Thus,...
    2,664 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Large Number of Tests Taken by the Average High School Student
    Totally Too Many Tests Typically, the average high school student graduating in the spring of 2015 in the state of Texas will have taken roughly 35 state-mandated and college entrance exams. Every single one of these tests, including, but not limited to, the SAT, ACT, PSAT/NMSQT, Subject Tests, TAKS, and STAAR exams are considered to be standardized tests. By standardized, these means they were all administered and scored precisely alike, and give an average score. As our society advances...
    1,186 Words | 4 Pages
  • EFFECTIVENESS OF CLOZE – TEST AS INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENT IN READING COMPREHENSION AT LAGUNA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY SAN PABLO CITY CAMPUS ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013
    EFFECTIVENESS OF CLOZE – TEST AS INTEGRATIVE ASSESSMENT IN READING COMPREHENSION AT LAGUNA STATE POLYTECHNIC UNIVERSITY SAN PABLO CITY CAMPUS ACADEMIC YEAR 2012-2013 For more details call the authors: 09103240206 & 09297447542 A Research Paper Presented to the Faculty of the College of Teacher Education Laguna State Polytechnic University San Pablo City Campus San Pablo City In Partial of Fulfillment Of the Requirements in Methods of Research for the Degree...
    8,550 Words | 37 Pages
  • Teacher Merit Pay - 1705 Words
    Running Head: TEACHER PERFORMANCE AND MERIT PAY 1 That’s Not Fair: Teacher’s Performance Based on Pay TEACHER PERFORMANCE AND MERIT PAY 2 Abstract There has been a huge debate on whether or not teacher pay or performance pay is a positive thing because there are no real guidelines. Many good points are brought into this debate as there are bad...
    1,705 Words | 5 Pages
  • Clep Precalculus Examination Guide
    Precalculus 2013 Examination Guide These materials are owned and copyrighted by the College Board. They may not be posted on the Internet or on any other public document sharing site. The materials in these files are intended for PERSONAL USE ONLY. Violations of this policy may be subject to legal action including, but not limited to, payment for each guide that is disseminated unlawfully and associated damages. V isit our website at w ww.collegeboard.org/clep f or the most...
    10,801 Words | 71 Pages
  • Park 1 - 2680 Words
    Park ch 10 As child growing up some of the frightful memories include a visit to the dentist; an evil man with scary drill whose solve purpose is to hurt you or the first day in elementary school you finally leave all behind the cozy classrooms and nap times of kindergarten and enter the big leagues. All of these are considered a cakewalk compared to standardize testing. Since the start of elementary school students in the United States are taught to test. In many instances students are held...
    2,680 Words | 7 Pages
  • Life Speech - 747 Words
    Stupid- adjective: lacking ordinary quickness and keenness of mind; Characterized by or proceeding from mental dullness; foolish; senseless. Failure- noun: lack of success, nonperformance of something required or expected; an insufficiency. Everyone has been called at least one of these, and felt that sideways glance or condescending stare from people that look over and see a low quiz grade or test score on your paper. Especially at our school, there is lots of pressure to be “the best”, and...
    747 Words | 2 Pages
  • Innovations in Surgical Instruments - 1500 Words
    RESEARCH PAPER REVISION COM220 RESEARCH PAPER REVISION COM 220 July 3, 2013 Negative Impact of Standardized Testing Jonathan Kozol, author of The Shame of the Nation: The Restoration of Apartheid Schooling in America, stated that “There is something deeply hypocritical in a society that holds an inner-city child only eight years old “accountable” for her performance on a high-stakes standardized exam but does not hold the high officials of our government accountable for...
    1,500 Words | 5 Pages
  • Flaws of educational testing - 1244 Words
    Mickel Hernandez Journalism Mr. H****** 5/30/14 The Flaws of Educational Testing The earliest record of standardized testing comes from china, where hopefuls for government jobs had to fill out examinations testing their knowledge of Confucian Philosophy and poetry.by World War 1, standardized testing was slandered practice: aptitude quizzes called Army Mental test were conducted to assign to U.S. servicemen jobs during the war effort. Grading was at first done manually, an arduous...
    1,244 Words | 4 Pages
  • Eliminate the Sat - 1865 Words
    Kaila DeBesse Eliminate the SAT The Scholastic Aptitude Test, better known as the SAT, is, “a test designed to predict college performance and to provide a means for admissions people to compare prospective students who have the same grades, but who come from widely varying high schools in different parts of the country” (Keisler 1). This standardized test has caused an immense amount of controversy all because of conflicting opinions arguing whether or not that definition is truly...
    1,865 Words | 6 Pages
  • standard testing - 723 Words
    Standardized Testing One of the most frequently stated criticisms of standardized test is that they do not measure creativity and problem solving ability. Because standardized tests are presented in a multiple choice format, a teacher cannot, for example, see where a child went wrong when he or she failed to solve a math problem correctly, because no work is shown. In addition, critics feel that the questions on standardized tests are too simplistic for children to fully demonstrate reading...
    723 Words | 2 Pages
  • High Stakes Testing - 1109 Words
    High Stakes Testing Name Course Date Professor Abstract Even though students taking high stakes tests are suppose to be educational for the student’s future education. It is only going to impact the students negatively. There is always going to be different points of views when it comes to high-stakes testing. The students are being taught to the test and not encouraged to use their critical thinking skills. Standardized test should be alleviated and allow teachers to teach. Research...
    1,109 Words | 4 Pages
  • Argumentation-Persuasion Essay - 1142 Words
    Name Teacher Argumentation-Persuasion Essay 17 February 2012 Standardized Testing and Students Standardized testing can be stressful for high school students. The outcome of the test determines whether the student passes or fails. The test is useful when diagnosing a problem or trying to determine if a student has learned what the teacher has taught them. Standardized test results are used as a large factor to make decisions regarding graduation and grade promotion. When standardized...
    1,142 Words | 4 Pages
  • ENC 1101 Argumentation Essay
    Madalyn Daniels ENC 1101 600 Instructor: P. Rentz July 24, 2014 Argumentative Essay Word count: 1080 Schools think they are doing well but they are really they are hurting students. The main focus of classrooms today is testing. Classrooms are no longer focused on learning, they are being centered on raising a standardized test score: schools are putting too much emphasis on standardized testing. However, it could be argued that emphasizing test scores promotes learning and is a key point in...
    1,064 Words | 4 Pages
  • Exams do not gauge ability
     Exams do not Gauge Ability In college the majority of students would agree that education is a top priority. These Students full capabilities are being based solely on standardized testing. The purpose of these exams is to gauge a student’s knowledge on a variety of subjects. The type of exam may differ depending on class, grade, age, or degree. Students are required to take these exams in order to see what their capabilities are in terms of what class the student is taking. Now although...
    819 Words | 3 Pages
  • Smartness - 565 Words
     How many of you have just memorized certain thing of a subject in order to get a good grade on a test, just to get it over with? But, you never though back to it. I believe a test should not define if a student is capable of being superior. "Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid". First of all, some students may be extremely good at a subject and understand the concept, but they may still get a...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychology - 25382 Words
    TOEFL ® Planner Test Prep test preparation Campus life reading profiCienCy 130 Countries speaking essential listening most widely aCCepted writing go anywhere your ideas do anything CommuniCate beCome suCCessful university Classroom preparation plan suCCess test preparation An eight-week plan to prepare for the TOEFL iBT® test, including: • Skill-building activities • Sample TOEFL iBT test questions • Tips for success on test day ... and beyond! TOEFL ® Planner Test Prep...
    25,382 Words | 108 Pages
  • Clep American Literature Study Guide
    American Literature 2014 Examination Guide These materials are owned and copyrighted by the College Board. They may not be posted on the Internet or on any other public document sharing site. The materials in these files are intended for PERSONAL USE ONLY. Violations of this policy may be subject to legal action including, but not limited to, payment for each guide that is disseminated unlawfully and associated damages. Visit our website at clep.collegeboard.org for the most...
    12,436 Words | 73 Pages
  • When Lilacs Las in the Dooryard Bloom'D
    Brittney Mathis Ms. Rivera English 1002-60511 20 February 2013 The ACT Should not be the key to Higher Education Should the ACT Test be the key to higher education? From my understanding The ACT Test is based on whether or not you will be accepted into college. The ACT test has affected many people lives, when they are not able to reach the requirements that are needed to pursue on with their education. The ACT test means, “American College Testing.” The ACT test should not be the key...
    661 Words | 2 Pages
  • High Stakes Testing Laws and Litigation
    High Stakes Testing Law and Litigation[1] Paul T. O’Neill* The exams are coming – exams with consequences for takers and givers alike. The new high stakes exam in Massachusetts and Texas kick in as of spring 2003;[2] those in California and Virginia take effect in 2004.[3] New York is phasing in its new testing program now, one new subject a year, until students must pass all five to graduate.[4] Many states are already at least as far along; by current count, eighteen states are in...
    15,035 Words | 43 Pages
  • exams made easy - 427 Words
    No shortcut work hard and practice very very hard Practice makes you precice and perfect. Good luck .Test preparation (abbreviated test prep) or exam preparation is an educational course, tutoring service, educational material or a learning tool designed to increase students' performance on standardized tests. Examples of these tests include entrance examinations used for admissions to institutions of higher education, such as college (e.g. the SAT and ACT), business school (the GMAT), law...
    427 Words | 3 Pages
  • Palestine - 1323 Words
    Standardized test scores have long been a major criteria to get into the various courses offered by colleges both at undergraduate levels. These mutltiple choice tests do not test the test takers ability to memorize things neither do they function as IQ tests. Clearly these tests have not proven to serve their purpose of indicating the test takers ability to perform well academically at the undergraduate level or graduate level. Moreover a lot of colleges have strict criteria on the score cut...
    1,323 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Socioeconomic Status of Parents Affects Kids
    How socioeconomic status of Parents affects their Children’s Development in Academics It is obvious that most people have set beliefs on when they see a family of a low socioeconomic class that their children will grow up to be the same as their parents. People believe that they will not be as likely to do well in school or even in the real world. Many psychologists have done studies that have proven that this assumption is right for the most part. Children that have parents, family and...
    600 Words | 2 Pages
  • Informative speech - 531 Words
     Standardized testing. Specific Purpose: After listening to my speech, my audience will know what standardized testing is, how it has developed and its effects on our schools and education. Introduction Attention Getter: So what exactly is a ‘standardized test’? It’s a test where everything from the questions to the scoring is the same for all test takers. Credibility Statement: We’ve all taken a standardized test. We took one in order to attend this college. Motivating Audience to...
    531 Words | 3 Pages
  • ASE H-Series - 6940 Words
    Transit Bus Test Brakes (Test H4) THOMSON * DELMAR LEARNING - A U5"t r a I i a Can a daM e x leo 5 i n 9 a P 0 r e S p a I nUn i ted Kin 9 d 0 rn - U nit e d 5 til t e 5 THOMSON • DELMAR L EARNING Thomson Delmar Learning's ASE Test Preparation Series Transit Bus Test for Brakes (Test H4) Vice President, Technology Professional Business Unit: Gregory L. Clayton Product Development Manager: Kristen L. Davis Product Manager: Kim Blakey...
    6,940 Words | 29 Pages
  • Examinations Should Be Abolished
    I think school exams are adequate to measure student progress. I don't like high-stakes testing because the participants are minors and the quicker you can get these students in a community college environment, the quicker they are able to mature and know why it's important to work hard. I also don't like them because they aren't content exams, but instead are literacy tests, thus while most people are going to perform in accordance with the literacy test as to their abilities, the correlation...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • No Child Left Behind act.
    Group Speech Have any of you ever noticed that the schools in poorer areas in which we consider "bad schools" do not seem to get any better? It's all thanks to the No Child Left Behind act. What’s that you ask? We will go into further details later but in short, it is an federal law in which schools within the United States have to average a certain standardized test score in order for their states to received federal educational funding. The idea of this act sounds good, but what happens to...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • no child left behind
     No Child Left Behind Act Introduction The No Child Left Behind tends to cause neglect to important subjects because they are non-tested subjects, such as Social Studies, Art, health, and Music. With the neglect of these subjects, there is more focusing that’s being done on the tested subjects, like Math and Reading. This may cause a greater impression that NCLB is a positive thing for our educational system but studies show this is misleading to the public. States can set their own...
    1,838 Words | 5 Pages
  • Racial Bias in the SAT - 1792 Words
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