Sitting Bull Essays & Research Papers

Best Sitting Bull Essays

  • Sitting Bull - 766 Words
    Sitting Bull was believed to be born in March of 1831 in present-day South Dakota. When he was born, his parents named him Jumping Badger. As a little boy there was nothing to set him apart from other children of his tribe. His nickname was “Hunkesi”, meaning, "Slow," because he never hurried, and did everything slowly and carefully. As a young man, he successfully increased hunting grounds. Soon, he became known for his fearlessness in battle. He was also generous and wise. As young Sitting...
    766 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Sitting Bull - 2441 Words
    I believe the author’s purpose of this book was to show that Sitting Bull was a very intriguing individual not only as an Indian but a human as well. I think the author chose this to illustrate the sacrifices it takes to be a leader of a nation. He displayed Sitting Bulls attributes that really separates him from most people but also depicts that he is human and makes mistakes and let his flaws get in the way of his thinking at times. I believe that we should study Sitting Bull more closely to...
    2,441 Words | 6 Pages
  • Sitting Bull - 502 Words
    Prabhjot Singh Professor Shukis-Fraser English 101 24 March 2013 Sitting Bull Fearless, spiritual, and inspirational are some of the words to describe Sitting Bull. Two different stories tell us about the life of Sitting Bull; one story was written in the early twentieth century and the other one was written in the early twenty first century. Sitting Bull was a chief leader who fought against the white army men to protect the land of his tribes and his people. In 1911, the story of...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sitting Bull - 686 Words
    Nicole Smith Professor Ben Beshwate History of the United States (132) Homework Assignment 2 05 February 2013 Sitting Bull With the possible exception of Crazy Horse, nobody is a more recognizable figure in the Indian resistance against the US settlers. I believe the author chose him as the focal point of this chapter not only for that reason, but because he, perhaps more than anybody else, embodied the spirit of the Lakota people, and nobody fought with more determination to protect it....
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Sitting Bull Essays

  • The Sitting Bull - 511 Words
    In the spring of 1868, a conference held at Fort Laramie (present day Wyoming), resulted in the Sioux Treaty of 1868. The treaty stated that as long as the Sioux agreed to settle within the Black Hills reservation in the Dakota Territory, there would be peace between the whites and Sioux. However, when migrant workers repeatedly violated the treaty, they found gold within the Black Hills. So in 1874, General George A. Custer and the United States Army led an excursion to the Black Hills with the...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sitting Bull - 1844 Words
    Sitting Bull The life of Tatanka Yotanka better known as Sitting Bull and the tragic events that led to his death will be discussed in this paper. Yotanka led a carefree life as a young boy with the Sioux tribe. He received early recognition from his tribe as a warrior and man of vision. During his youth he joined in the usual tribal raids for horses against traditional enemies such as the Crow and Assiniboin. This paper will explain the history behind Sitting Bull and how he grew into a...
    1,844 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chief Sitting Bull - 565 Words
    Loughmiller 1 Austin Loughmiller Davis Research Paper 15 April 2011 Chief Sitting Bull Strong Hearted and Brave “I wish it to be remembered that I was the last man of my tribe to surrender my rifle.” Chief Sitting Bull is one of the most well known Native Americans to this day. He was known for fighting bravely for his people. He died while fighting off white soldiers that were forcing Chief Sitting Bull and his tribe of their own land. Chief Sitting Bull had a life that many people...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sitting Bull and the Medicine Line
    In early May 1877, the Lakota Sioux medicine man and war chief Sitting Bull led his following of 135 lodges across the "medicine line" which was the name used for the border between the United States and Canada. Sitting Bull's decision to move his people north into the Province of Saskatchewan was the outcome of the gradual erosion of the Sioux way of life in the American plains because of the decimation of the buffalo herds. In addition, he was unable to protect his people against the U.S....
    2,096 Words | 6 Pages
  • Review over the Paradox of Sitting Bull
    In the late 1800’s the Americans viciously forced many Native Americans off their lands all because the federal government wanted the U.S. to expand and obtain Manifest Destiny. The main Native American and tribe that stood against the federal government was Sitting Bull, Chief of the Sioux and entire Lakota nation. He led a large amount of Sioux warriors in many battles against the American government that were fought over the rights and lands of the Lakota nation. He was against the American...
    4,165 Words | 10 Pages
  • Sitting Bull and the Paradox of Lakota Nationhood
    A Hunkpapa Lakota chief named Sitting Bull and the history of the Lakota nationhood was the chosen subject of Gary C. Anderson to write a biography on. Although most of the history about Sitting Bull took place back in the eighteen hundreds, Anderson did not come out with his book tell around 1995. Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers published the book in 1996. The book follows the history of Sitting Bull and the native Indians fight with the "white man" over land. The first chapter goes back...
    2,736 Words | 8 Pages
  • Sitiing Bull - 3563 Words
    The Trials and Tribulations of Sitting Bull and the Plains Sioux David Paul HIST3216 - First Nations in Canada: Historical Perspective Instructor: Daniel E. Shaule, M. A. Monday, April 8, 2013 The Sioux nation was a powerful proud nation which migrated and traveled over the Great Plains; their hunter gather lifestyle was encroached upon after the civil war in the United States. The Sioux were victimized socially politically and genocidal. The need to develop the western hemisphere of the...
    3,563 Words | 9 Pages
  • Little Big Horn Bat
    tleThe US army lost the Battle of the Little Big Horn because of the mistake made by General George Custer The battle of little big horn took place on 25th June 1876. All 210 soldiers in General Custer’s force were killed by Indians led by sitting bull. The Battle began because the white settlers and the Native American’s lived in peace but the American’s started to abuse their trust with the Native American’s as they started to dig for gold, as the gold was discovered in the Rocky mountain and...
    764 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Did Technology Affect the Plains Indias?
    As a result of technological development and government actions the Plains Indians suffered many losses. Most notably, the expansion of the railroad led to a severe loss of the Indian population as well as their culture and way of life which depended heavily on the buffalo. Railroad expansion brought white settlers to lands which were nearby to pre-existing Indian territories. This caused much conflict between Native Americans and whites who wanted to claim the land. Indians also...
    355 Words | 1 Page
  • Western Expansion - 474 Words
    Western Expansion Many atrocities happened while the white people tried to subjugate the Native Americans and near the 1900s several events happened that helped quell the Native American rebelliousness and help their assimilation into America. Some of these events were the Wounded Knee Massacre, the Battle of the Little BigHorn, Sitting Bull, and Cultural Assimilation. In June, 1976, the Sioux and the Cheyenne Indians held a sun dance. During the sun dance, Sitting Bull had a vision of...
    474 Words | 2 Pages
  • Not everything you can buy with money
    Nowadays the thirst of money is almost the most often common quality.This reflects the people's selfishness and weakness in front of such a worthless thing.For most people in our modern-capitalism world, money is the first thing, and sometimes the only thing to which they aspire.People run after these pieces of paper sealed by the evil believing that nothing else matters but money.This kind of persons think that with money they can buy everything in this world, but it's not true. Money...
    306 Words | 1 Page
  • The Ghost Dance - 575 Words
    The Ghost Dance In January 1889, Wavoka, a Paiute Indian, had a revelation during a total eclipse of the sun. It was the genesis of a religious movement that would become known as the Ghost Dance. It was this dance that the Indians believed would reunite them with friends and relatives in the ghost world. The legend states that after prayer and ceremony, the earth would shatter and let forth a great flood that would drown all the whites and enemy Indians, leaving the earth untouched and as...
    575 Words | 2 Pages
  • Battle Of The Wounded Knee - 463 Words
    Newspaper Report: Battle of the Wounded Knee Yesterday, December 29, the continuous American tension with Indians finally shatters into a massacre between the Sioux Indians and the U.S Army’s 7th regiment. It is said that this battle truly begun when an outburst of ghost dancing from the Sioux Indians brought fear of rebellion to James McLaughlin, an Indian Agent. McLaughlin later recalls what he had said to his superiors that day, “Indians are dancing in the snow and are wild and...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cultural Appropriation Vs Cultural Exchange
    Culture Appropriation versus Culture Exchange Cultural Appropriation is the means of borrowing features of one culture by members of a different cultural group. The term “Cultural Appropriation” is often negative, because the use of one cultural outside their minority, oppressed culture's symbols or other cultural elements, music, dance, costume. A cultural exchange, on the other hand, can be an intentional act of bringing two or more people together to exchange information about their...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hist12 - 1546 Words
    1.|What happened to the Plains Indian population between 1780 and 1870?Ø The population declined by half because of disease and as the Sioux pushed west, they defeated weaker opposition. Cheyenne warrior anguished, disease shifted balance of power | 2.|Explain the Indian wars on the Great Plains:Ø It marked its last resistance of its population devastated by disease and demoralized by the removal policy pursued by the government. Some tribes including the crow, Arikara, Pawnee and Shoshoni...
    1,546 Words | 5 Pages
  • Custer's Last Stand - 435 Words
    Custer’s Last Stand well you guys all know of the story “The Battle of little Bighorn” right? Well if you don’t you probably know it as “Custer’s Last Stand”. . . You still never heard of if ok then here's a quick summary. . . Custer’s Last Stand June 25, 1876 On the morning of June 25, 1876, lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and the 7th Cavalry charged into battle against Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians. Custer's orders were to wait for reinforcements at the mouth of the...
    435 Words | 2 Pages
  • the battle of little bighorn - 1909 Words
    the battle of little bighorn is tThe Battle of the Little Big Horn ensured for General George Custer the fame he had always wanted. His death and the destruction of those men in the US Army's Seventh Cavalry who fought with him by the largest gathering of Native American warriors that the country had seen, immortalised Custer in films, books and in the psyche of Americans. Paintings by the likes of Edgar Paxson and Kurz and Allison portrayed Custer as the all-American hero fighting with his men...
    1,909 Words | 6 Pages
  • Wounded Knee Massacre - 1088 Words
    “Wounded Knee Massacre” Melinda Belcher May 2, 2010 In 1848 a series of gold and silver discoveries signaled the first serious interest by white settlers in the arid and semiarid lands beyond the Mississippi, where many Indian nations had been forced to migrate. To open more land, federal officials introduced in 1851 a policy of “concentration.” Tribes were pressured into signing treaties limiting the boundaries of their hunting grounds to “reservations” The Sioux tribe was limited to...
    1,088 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Events Caused the Massacre at Wounded Knee?
    Essay: What Events Caused the Massacre at Wounded Knee? On December 29, 1890 the United States Army opened fire at a group of three hundred Sioux men, women, and children. Commanded by Colonel James W. Forsyth, the Seventh Cavalry attempted to unarmed the Sioux when a shot rang out. The first gunshot led to many more, mostly from the Cavalry, who killed many defenseless people with a rage-like assault. At the time of the massacre, Lakota Sioux Indians were living peacefully on a...
    500 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Great Sioux War - 1089 Words
    The Great Sioux War of 1876 By 1876, gold had been discovered in the Black Hills of South Dakota. The gold was found on Sioux land, and this region was considered sacred to the Lakota Sioux Indians. The he land was to be protected and respected by the United States Army, because of the Fort Laramie Treaty of 18681, but the Army could not keep miners off the Sioux ground, which led to the increase of Sioux grievances towards the Americans; some grievances that are still taken offense to...
    1,089 Words | 4 Pages
  • Killing Custer Book Review
    Dexter, Christian A. Review of Killing Custer: The Battle of Little Bighorn and the Fate of the Plains Indians. By James Welch and Paul Stekler. New York: W.W Norton Company, 1994. From time to time, a book of true historical significance is written on a subject that has been written on almost endlessly. The Battle of the Little Big Horn is one of the most written about, speculated on, celebrated, talked about, and glorified events in American History. Popularly known as "Custer's Last...
    424 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wounded Knee Massacre - 360 Words
    US History Mid-Term Essay 1a. Describe at least four important factors that led up to the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. In addition, explain the significance of Wounded Knee in the larger context of the Indian Wars. The Wounded Knee massacre occurred in 1890 between white American settlers and the Sioux people. The Sioux refused to follow US military orders to give up their weapons and instead engaged in battle. Over 300 people, including women and children, were massacred during the...
    360 Words | 2 Pages
  • 500 Nations - 720 Words
    For Centuries, Indian Nations converted their knowledge into wealth and social order through that process of innovation. The purpose of innovation is to create a new value for a society at large. Indian Nations created those new values in the form of advancements in many fields like Mathematics, Architecture and Religion that modern society continues to build on. Divergent Indian Tribes, throughout North and South America, had been thriving and living for generations with a deep reverence for...
    720 Words | 2 Pages
  • Native Americans and the Declaration of Independence
    The Declaration of Independence states that all men are created equal, have the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness, and have control of the government when it becomes destructive, these rights , although stated in Americas constitution, were not granted to the Native Americans. The Native Americans were made to endure the hardships of being forced out of their land, being killed, thrown into countless wars, and promised lies. The 1830's and 1890's proved to be some of the...
    489 Words | 2 Pages
  • Native Americans vs. Whites
    Native Americans had no other option than assimilation. Today, we have the right to choose. Back in the days you had rights only if you were part of the elite society, in this case, a white person. White people were so hungry power that they did whatever they had to as to gain all the land that belonged to the Native Americans. They took advantage of the inocense of the Native Americans and achieved their goals. Whites wanted total control over the Native Americans, they forced them to...
    778 Words | 2 Pages
  • Battle of Little Big Horn
    The Battle of Little Big Horn: The Prelude to Disaster It is hard to say how many years ago the Dakota Indians of the Northern Mississippi River began to spill over the Missouri in search of game, and became hostile toward the other tribes claiming the western country. Dakota was their traditional tribal name, but as they crossed this Northwestern Rubicon they became known by the name the Chippewas had given them years ago: "Sioux". It was by that moniker they became known as the most...
    6,139 Words | 14 Pages
  • Bruh - 310 Words
    Desmet, Pierre Jean (1801-1870), Jesuit missionary among the American Indians. He was born in Dendermore (Termonde), Belgium, on Jan. 1801. He went to the United States and joined the Society of Jesus in 1821. Ordinated a priest in 1827, he was among a group sent west to found the Missouri Province of the Jesuits, but poor health forced him to retire to Belgium for four years. Returning to the American West, Desmet founded a mission among the Potawatomi Indians at Council Bluffs, Iowa, in 1838....
    310 Words | 1 Page
  • History Research Paper on Battle at Wounded Knee
    “To own the Earth, There is no word for this in the Sioux Language.” The Battle of Wounded Knee was the last battle of the American Indian Wars it was also one of the most gruesome battles that either side had seen. An estimated three hundred Indians lay dead while the US army had lost twenty five and thirty nine were wounded some of who would die later. This was one of the worst acts that the Americans have ever done to the Native Americans. One Native American stated later “it was as if the...
    1,756 Words | 4 Pages
  • the last day of the sioux nation
    1. The Field of Wounded Knee On December 29, 1890 the Sioux nation had a war against the cavalrymen and suffered a tremendous impact on their nation. The day after the battle had been fought a severe blizzard had swept over the Sioux reservation and lasted for two days. Led by Dr. Charles A. Eastman, a full-blooded Santee Sioux and an agency physician, about seventy-five Oglala Sioux searched for their loved ones they were faced with the tragedy of the truth, their loved ones had suffered a...
    1,452 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ush Chapter 5-6
    Chapters 5-6 1869: Central Pacific and Union Pacific complete the transcontinental railroad 1870: Red Cloud, chief of the Oglala Sioux, states his people's case in Washington DC 1876: Alexander Graham invents the telephone 1877: Munn vs Illinois establishes government regulation of railroads 1877: Mother Jones supports the Great Strike of 1877 1879: Thomas A. Edison invents a workable light bulb 1880: James Garfield is elected president 1881: Garfield is assassinated....
    1,481 Words | 8 Pages
  • Native American Americanization - 573 Words
    The United States wanted to prevent hostility, so they tried to get the Indians to agree to living on reservations instead of on their homelands. For the rest of the following century they struggled to force the Indians to accept it, they failed to do so in the end and were forced to more desperate measures to clear the west for western settlement. The first policy was the Medicine Lodge Treaty, signed in Kansas, 1867. It divided the Great Plains into two huge Indian territories. In return for...
    573 Words | 2 Pages
  • battle of little bighorn - 836 Words
     What Impact Did the Battle of Little Bighorn Have on the Native American Way of Life? The Battle of Little Bighorn is said to have been the greatest Indian victory in history. There were several contributing factors which rested in the battle and it had a huge impart on the Native American way of life. Some resultants were the loss of Indian culture and being forced to live on reservations. The Indian Chiefs, Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull, were strong, determined leaders however, and they...
    836 Words | 3 Pages
  • Lakota Paper - 1612 Words
    Lakota History Throughout North American expansion the Lakota people have suffered some of the worst and straight forward persecutions against Native American Indians, and live in some of the poorest if not the poorest conditions in the United States. This is sad for a people who use to be one of the strongest nations in the Central Plains, feared by white men and other Indian nations alike for their ferocity and warrior abilities in the heat of battle. The Lakota arrived at positions of...
    1,612 Words | 4 Pages
  • Annie Oakley 1 - 3709 Words
    Annie Oakley Annie Oakley, legendary sharp-shooter and celebrated member of Buffalo Bill's Wild West show, was one of America's first superstars. In the late nineteenth century, her image was known all over the world. She had tea with Queen Victoria, met the Austrian Emperor Franz Josef, and was challenged by Grand Duke Michael of Russia to a shooting match. Though the Grand Duke was noted for being an excellent wing shot, Annie Oakley beat him, missing only three birds out of fifty, while...
    3,709 Words | 10 Pages
  • The Other America - 2276 Words
    History of the counterculture in the US: The Other America What is the Other America? Is it correct to talk about the “Other America”? Who are the “other Americans”? Indians, “Nigros”, workers, immigrants (emigrants?) can all be accounted for that role. But why are they called “others”? Others to whom? Isn't it correct to say that the Other America actually is the real America? History first. When did this phenomenon start? The date that most recognise as the beginning of the Other...
    2,276 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Battle at Wounded Knee - 1676 Words
    History Research Paper 1-3 The Battle at Wounded Knee The Massacre at Wounded Knee The Massacre at Wounded Knee was a terrible battle in American History. This massacre was between the Native Americans and the US government. Back then; the US government hated Native Americans. They would treat Native Americans horribly by killing them, stealing their land and much more. One early and freezing morning on December 29th, 1890, an elderly...
    1,676 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Four Cardinal Virtues of the Lakota
     What were “the four cardinal virtues of the Lakota” that Sitting Bull embodied? Why do you think that one fellow tribesman remarked that there “was something in Sitting Bull that everyone liked”? Describe how this great Sioux leader also represented the “three distinct personalities” that the Lakota valued. The “the four cardinal virtues of the Lakota” that Sitting Bull possessed was bravery, fortitude, generosity, and wisdom. These four virtues are characteristics that most leaders we see...
    2,301 Words | 6 Pages
  • Lakota Culture During the 19th Century
    The Lakota Indians had the sad and unfortunate luck of becoming personally acquainted with the westward thrust of American development when the Americans’ attitudes toward Indians had grown cynical and cruel. This interaction caused the Lakota culture to change a great deal during the nineteenth century. Horses and guns brought about a dramatic change in the Lakota’s culture. They “enabled them to seize and defend their rich hunting grounds, to follow the great migrating herds of buffalo that...
    758 Words | 2 Pages
  • Immigration and migration - 1201 Words
    Immigration & Migration Migration is the movement of people from one place to another. During 1867 to 1917 Westward expansion was taking place. Many people believed in Manifest Destiny, which meant that it was destined for people to migrate to the west. That God wanted it to happen this way. That it was destined to bring civilization, technology, and industry to uncivilized land that didn’t have these important things. As Westward expansion continues you notice a few things happening,...
    1,201 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Western Crossroads - 605 Words
     The Western Crossroads Gabrielle Arthur 12/2/2013 Hour E I. Indian Country Bureau of Indian Affairs- was the government agency responsible for managing American Indian issues. The 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie had guaranteed American Indians land rights on the Great Plains A. Year of Struggle The army also enlisted some American Indians as scouts or as soldier struggling to perform their duties A.1. Sand Creek A.1.a) John M....
    605 Words | 3 Pages
  • CHAPTER 5 Textbook PowerPoint
    The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier The culture of the Plains Indians declines as white settlers transform the Great Plains. Meanwhile, farmers form the Populist movement to address their economic concerns. Next Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier SECTION 1 Cultures Clash on the Prairie SECTION 2 Settling on the Great...
    2,109 Words | 19 Pages
  • Son of the Morning Star - 1964 Words
    Son of the Morning Star Analysis Evan S. Connell has a unique writing style. While most stories are told from beginning to end, Son of the Morning Star: Custer and The Little Bighorn (North Point Press, 1984) begins with the aftermath of The Battle of the Little Bighorn. It is then followed by numerous events which led up to this battle. Connell chose this non-linear writing style in order to distribute the details he finds most fascinating and interesting to share with his audience. Using the...
    1,964 Words | 5 Pages
  • Battle of Little Bighorn - 756 Words
    Why was General Custer Defeated at the Battle of Little Bighorn? History The Battle of Little Bighorn was a conflict, which changed the history of the Indians and Americans. It was in 1876, that Sitting Bull combined forces with the Cheyenne and Sioux Native American tribes, defeating the U.S 7th Cavalry, under the leadership of George Armstrong Custer. But how could a highly trained, heavily armed cavalry officer and his command be defeated by a group of Native American Indians?...
    756 Words | 3 Pages
  • Lakota Indian Genocide - 1194 Words
    Zack Siemsen Merri Ferles HIS 202 02-12-13 Native American Genocide The Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of Genocide states that according to Article 2. “Genocide, deems any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group. Such as killing members of a group, causing serious bodily or mental harm, inflicting the group member lives to cause destruction, imposing measures intended to prevent birth, and...
    1,194 Words | 4 Pages
  • Attack on Culture - 587 Words
    Written Reflection: The Reconstruction Era: 500 Nations, Attack on Culture The attack on culture is taught so much differently when you are learning about such things in regular, high school history classes. We are given an idea of how the Natives were thrown from their land and homes, but not a lot of in depth information to it. Many Natives welcomes the White people onto their land and into their homes, willingly, offering help and a kind hand. This is something that is not completely...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • American History -Indians. - 2038 Words
    It is said to be, that people arrived in multiple different groups or tribes to America at least 15,000 years ago. The first Americans came from Asia and followed herds of grazing animals across a land bridge during the Ice Age. The people journeyed on foot slowly into North America. They battled many hardships, including harsh weather conditions and starvation. They were excellent hunters and gatherers. They hunted and fished. They ate moose, caribou, deer, bear and small animals like rabbits,...
    2,038 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sand Creek Masacre - 427 Words
    Sand creek massacre- Date November 29, 1864 Location Colorado Territory Present-day Kiowa County, Colorado Result United States Army massacres Native Americans. Belligerents United States Cheyenne Arapaho Commanders and leaders United States John M. Chivington Black Kettle Strength 700 [1] 60–200 Casualties and losses 24 killed, 52 wounded[2] 70–163 killed[2] *the aftermath-The Sand Creek Massacre resulted in a heavy loss of life, mostly among Cheyenne and Arapaho women...
    427 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
    Over a century ago, the Black Hills of the Dakota Territory were home to several tribes of Native American Indians, including the Lakota Sioux. This land was rich in resources and provided plentifully for these people, who were very spiritual, and believed that it had been left to them by their god. By 1876 however, life had been violently disrupted by the greed and disregard of the white men who felt entitled to the gold of the Black Hills and invaded the territory; laying railroad, depleting...
    1,089 Words | 3 Pages
  • Crazy Horse - 2034 Words
    Crazy Horse (Curly) was definitely a hero not only to his tribe but to many other people. Crazy Horse was groomed according to tribal customs. At this time, the Sioux prided themselves on the training and development of their sons and daughters, and they did not overlook a step in that development. Before he was 12, Curly had killed a buffalo and received his own horse. He witnessed the shooting of an old Sioux chief, Conquering Bear, by white soldiers on the Oregon trail. Seeing this dying...
    2,034 Words | 5 Pages
  • 19th Century, Native American Policy
    “During the second half of the 19TH century, the United States Government took all appropriate actions to maintain peace with Native American tribes. Furthermore the United States was justified in its aggressive measures used to seize land from unruly Native American tribes during the era.” There little validity in this statement. During this time period American troops were interloping on Native American territory, starting violence, and forcing them out of their homes. The hostility of...
    694 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wounded Knee - 888 Words
    Tragedy at Wounded Knee Response Indians in America from the beginning of the new world have always been mistreated. Our American government has run them off their lands massacred thousands and taken their means of life. We killed off all their buffalo made them migrate to camps or reservations were the ground was unable to grow the Indians crops. So the Indians no longer had buffalo to live off or land that was sufficient enough to grow food they were not able to survive the way they were...
    888 Words | 3 Pages
  • Buffalo Bill’s True Character in Indians
    Hero Balani Dr. Susan Proctor Rockhurst University TA 1000 October 26, 2012 Buffalo Bill’s True Character in Indians by Arthur Kopit “Those who do not learn from history are doomed to repeat it” ~ George Santayana The quote above by George Santayana clearly depicts Arthur Kopit’s motive of teaching his audience a lesson in Indians by taking the audience on a “hallucinatory” trip through the mind of Col. William F. Cody, the legendary hero also known as Buffalo Bill. The play is based on...
    2,880 Words | 7 Pages
  • Black Elk Speaks Essay
    Personal Essay Black Elk Speaks Before reading Black Elk Speaks I thought that Native Americans were all the same they fought wars and rode around on horse. They either won or lost the wars they fought in and they all lived in teepees. I really didn’t have much knowledge on them. I’ve always know that they had a very deep spiritual connection to nature and their world around them but I didn’t know the reasons why. Before reading I didn’t think about things as much like the world and animals;...
    1,253 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Strategies and Tactics of the Wagon Box Fight
    Executive Summary The strategies and tactics of the Wagon Box Fight were truly amazing. Both the Sioux Indians and the American Armies had special methods, which served as an advantage for both sides. With Americans scattering everywhere throughout the west tensions became high for the Sioux Indians. Eventually Ambushes and even war would occur between the two sides causing a need for better strategies and technology. While some moves were better than others were, the strategies involved in...
    1,236 Words | 4 Pages
  • Black Elk Speaks: Analysis
    Black Elk Speaks Black Elk Speaks is an autobiography of a Sioux Indian that shared his story to author John Neihardt. As you read through this novel it becomes clear that Black Elk gave Neihardt the gift of his life’s narrative, including the visions he had and some of the Sioux rituals he had performed. Black Elk tells a story about his family, his tribe, his people, and the circle of life. But most of all Black Elk speaks about his life and his spiritual journey. This is a story of a Lakota...
    1,052 Words | 3 Pages
  • Little Big Horn - 1250 Words
    * Custer entered West Point the U.S. Military Academy. He graduated last in a class of 34 in June of 1861. * In the two years since the war had broken out, he had been promoted several times all the way to the rank of Brigadier General of Volunteers, commanding the Michigan Cavalry Brigade. * Through the rest of the war he steadily advanced in responsibility and rank. By war's end in 1865, Custer commanded an entire Cavalry Division holding the rank of Major General. In many cases,...
    1,250 Words | 4 Pages
  • Thunderheart : FBI Agent Raymon Levoi Investigates a Murder
    Juan Adrian Ccopa Thunderheart 1 Discuss how the main character Raymond Levoy changes throughout the story and how he rediscovers his Sioux identity. Discuss what specific characters and events influence him as well as how the change is manifested. You can look at any aspects of the movie “Thunderheart”. Do not summarize the plot! Only refer to specific event to support your points. The main character Raymon Levoi, a young mixed-blood FBI agent is assigned to work with the senior agent,...
    360 Words | 1 Page
  • Dakota 38: Inspired by Lakota Spiritual Leader Jim Miller
    Christian Carde Gina Baldoni-Rus ENGL1310-004 December 8, 2014 Dakota 38 ( Bonus) I have seen the Dakota 38 documentary three times now. Each time it is stirred something in me that has no words, but much emotion. The film was inspired by Lakota spiritual leader Jim Miller, who in the spring of 2005 had a dream in which he rode 330 miles on horseback. He eventually came to a riverbank in Mankato, Minn, where he saw 38 of his own ancestors hanged. He soon discovered that he had dreamed of the...
    515 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Compareison Between When the Legends Die and Dances with Wolves
    Symbolism In the novel When the Legends Die and in the film Dances with Wolves symbolism is very important. Throughout both of them the used symbols are very similar but have very different meanings. In the movie, Dances with Wolves the wolf, Two Socks, and the horse, Cisco, are animal symbols, like the bear in When the Legends Die. Two Socks and Cisco are the main two symbols in Dances with Wolves. Two Socks, is the wolf that befriends John Dunbar symbolizing the Sioux Indians who start...
    415 Words | 1 Page
  • settlement of the west - 1549 Words
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