Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor Essays & Research Papers

Best Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor Essays

  • Migraines: Serotonin and Caffeine - 724 Words
    Migraine headaches are the result of a disturbance in the neurochemistry of the central nervous system. They are relatively common, affecting three times as many women as men. Migraine sufferers typically report a definite pattern to their headaches, and they can report what stimuli bring them on. Most migraine sufferers experience their first attack before the age of 20. There is no single cause of migraines, but the tendency to get migraines does tend to run in families. When a migraine...
    724 Words | 2 Pages
  • Serotonin: a Classic Neurotransmitter Linked with Many Disorders
    Serotonin: A Classic Neurotransmitter Linked with Many Disorders Serotonin has a range of influences on the neurological and physiological function of the body. It has a significant influence on sensitivity to pain, emotionality, and a behavioral response to positive and negative consequences. Serotonin, along with other major neurotransmitters, is also linked with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia. Serotonin, or HT-5, also has an effect on sleep, eating patterns, and thermoregulation...
    704 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Treatment of Selective Mutism
    “The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Treatment of Selective Mutism” The article, “The Current State of Empirical Support for the Pharmacological Support of Selecive Mutism”, identifies a specific psychological disorder which is called selective mutism. Selective mutism is a rare disorder which occurs during childhood which inhibits a child’s ability to speak in an uncomfortable environment. This environment for such instances most commonly occurs in school...
    685 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ocd, Real Disease or Not
    How would you feel if you had to wash your hands six times before you went to sleep, or touch every door handle before going for a drive, having to make sure everything is in complete order or you just couldn't go out the rest of the day? These are common things Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, OCD, suffers’ go through every day. OCD is a disorder which causes an individual to have intrusive thoughts of a frightening or disturbing nature, which in turn may cause the person to do things repeatedly....
    733 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor Essays

  • Psych Final research paper
    Final Research Paper When deciding on a research question, I wanted to choose a topic that really interested me, so I chose obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). This topic has been used in my household for a long time as I was diagnosed with it at 5 years old. When doing this research I wanted to learn of other treatments and tools for people with OCD. This is very important because the spectrum of OCD cases varies significantly, so some of these people dealing with the disorder have a large...
    1,122 Words | 3 Pages
  • OCD research paper - 493 Words
    OCD, which is obsessive-compulsive disorder, can affect your daily routine and life. There are complications and reasons that cause OCD. It’s really difficult living a normal life with this disorder. They have tests and diagnosis to help people in this condition. Talking about OCD can really help to patients who have it and to people who want to know more. OCD is an anxiety disorder. There are many signs if a person has OCD. You can identify if someone had OCD, or if you do....
    493 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ocd Treatment - 1667 Words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a disorder in which patients have intrusive thoughts that lead them to do repetitive behaviors to ease their anxiety. Treatment options for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, medication, and Psychotherapy can help the person suffering by reducing the frequency of compulsive behaviors. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, also known as CBT, is an effective way for treating Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. CBT is the training of a...
    1,667 Words | 5 Pages
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - 1300 Words
    Mental Illness Awareness Assignment Literature Review HSP3U Obsessive-Compulsive disorder is factor that affects the daily lives of many, especially in the twenty-first century. Through a questionnaire aimed to evaluate the true awareness of Obsessive-Compulsive disorder in the modern day high-school, society may finally be able to take a look into how educated in mental illnesses today’s children truly are. Such research is essential, through these statistics it will help society...
    1,300 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ketamine and Treatment of Depression - 420 Words
    Ketamine and Treatment of Depression Ketamine is known for being taken illicitly for psychedelic effects in the streets and also as an anesthetic, but has recently struck interest in researchers for its potential as a rapid-acting antidepressant. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-asparate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, as said on Medscape, which will work with patients who have severe treatment resistant depression. In 2000, there was a placebo study that showed intravenous infusions of...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • review form - 504 Words
    Topic #6 – Anxiety Disorders (OCD) Reviewed by : ............................... / JC2 a) Definitions, Measures, Examples of Obsessions and Compulsions DEFINITION OF OBSESSIONS & COMPULSIONS Obsessions involve recurring and persistent thoughts, images, or impulses that are experienced as inappropriate, intrusive, and anxiety provoking, and are not just excessive worries about real-life problems. Compulsions involve repetitive and rule following behaviour or mental acts that the sufferer...
    504 Words | 3 Pages
  • Panic Attack Outline - 1252 Words
    Panic Attack Outline I. Introduction A. Panic Attacks are a form of Anxiety characterized by unexpected and repeated episodes of intense fear accompanied by physical symptoms. B. Panic Attack disorder affects about 6 million American adults and is twice as common in women as men. (Huppert) C. Panic Attacks often begin in late adolescence or early adulthood, but not everyone who experiences panic attacks will develop panic disorder. II. Thesis Statement A. Panic Attacks can occur at any...
    1,252 Words | 4 Pages
  • Social Phobia - 1456 Words
    Social Anxiety Disorder: Social Phobia The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders defines social anxiety disorder as a marked and persistent fear of social or performance situations in which embarrassment may occur (DSM). Exposure to these situations provokes an immediate anxiety response such as a panic attack (DSM). In order to be diagnosed, fear or avoidance of these situations must interfere significantly with the person’s normal routines, occupational or academic...
    1,456 Words | 5 Pages
  • Behavior Modifying Drugs - 1684 Words
    Austen Myers Ms. Watenmaker English 10CPA 22 March 2010 Behavior Modifying Drugs: Should parents turn to drugs in efforts of helping their children with ADHD? “ADHD is a common behavioral disorder that affects an estimated 8% to 10% of people in the United States” (Kutscher). Boys are about three times more likely than girls to be diagnosed with it, though it is not yet understood why. Children with ADHD generally have problems paying attention or concentrating. They cannot seem to...
    1,684 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mental Illness Paper - 1807 Words
    Mental Illness Paper Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is real illness that can be treated with medicine and therapy. When have OCD, you have recurring, upsetting thoughts (called obsessions). You repeat doing the same thing, over and over again (called compulsions) to make the thoughts go away. And, you feel like you cannot control or stop these thoughts or actions. The obsessions, or upsetting thoughts, can include things like a fear of germs, a fear of begin hurt, a fear of hurting...
    1,807 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mental Behavioral Case Studies
     Mental/Behavioral Case Studies Jean Izean HCS/245 May 11, 2015 Tynan Mara Jim Wolf is a 45 year auto-parts old store owner who incessantly washes his hands. He continually checks and rechecks his part lists, equipment, and his employee’s schedules. His wife becomes concerned about his work performance and inability to sleep, she advises him to a physician. After a complete evaluation, a psychiatrist has diagnosed him with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). ...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • Brain Hiccup (Ocd) - 1083 Words
    Brain Hiccup Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a type of anxiety disorder that is characterized by obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior. OCD is an illness that really makes an impact in the lives of the people. This disorder traps its victims in endless cycles of repetitive thoughts and behaviors. This debilitating disorder called OCD exhibit obsessive thoughts linked to compulsive behaviors and causes symptoms that are difficult to treat, but medications and cognitive behavioral...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Evaluation on Ocd - 3561 Words
    An Evaluation of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Abstract This paper will evaluate Obsessive Compulsive Disorder to include a historical overview of the disorder including a literature review, current research of the disorder, and a Christian worldview of the disorder. Literature review Overview Obsessive compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder diagnosed when obsessions and/or compulsions seem to be unreasonable or excessive, cause the sufferer distress, consume a certain amount of...
    3,561 Words | 10 Pages
  • Compulsive Hoarding - 1900 Words
    COMPULSIVE HOARDING BY RACHEL DILLIE THOMAS EDISON STATE COLLEGE Hoarding 2 While some people believe it is not, hoarding is a mental disorder that is difficult to treat and is often judged as a personal problem rather than a mental disorder. The new appearance of television shows that are specific to this mental disorder, place this disease in the spotlight. Compulsive hoarding has become something that is looked down upon and that the person whom it is affecting is just messy and...
    1,900 Words | 6 Pages
  • Psychological Disorders - 1486 Words
    Among many psychological disorders, anxiety disorders are the most predominant in the United States. According to Antony (2011), anxiety disorders affect nearly 28.8 percent of the population. An extreme and unrealistic anxiety is the most common symptom that characterizes all the psychological conditions within the category of anxiety disorders. The category includes specific phobia, agoraphobia, social phobia, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, and...
    1,486 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Perspective - 1171 Words
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Obsessive compulsive disorder is an anxiety disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts that produce uneasiness, apprehension, fear, or worry; by repetitive behaviors aimed at reducing the associated anxiety; or by a combination of such obsessions and compulsions. Symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder vary with each person and include the following: obsessive thoughts, fear of dirt or...
    1,171 Words | 4 Pages
  • Impact of Advertisement on People's Decisions
    This is a case of a man living opposite to my friend’s tuition center. He washes his hand after he touches any thing. He feels that everything he touches the dirt on it would make him sick. This is a psychological disorder named as obsessive-compulsive disorder. Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts that produce uneasiness, apprehension, fear, or worry, by repetitive behaviours aimed at reducing the associated anxiety, or by a...
    5,329 Words | 16 Pages
  • Eli Lilly: Developing Cymbalta
    Introduction: Eli Lilly and company is a pharmaceutical company that was established in 1876 by Colonel Eli Lilly, who had served in the union army during the Civil War. One of the products the company developed includes the antidepressant drug Prozac, which has been a legendary product for the company and has generated billions of dollars since its launch. As Prozac’s patent expiration date approached, thereby allowing the sale of generic versions in the U.S., the company decided to pursue a...
    1,416 Words | 5 Pages
  • Social Psychology of Sport - 578 Words
    Alvernia University BHS 330 Crisis Intervention Reaction Paper #3 Larry Harris BHS November 30, 2011 Professor: Raymond Jacobucci Crisis intervention BH 330 1.What are the five common maladaptive patterns of PTSD? Describe each pattern and give at least one example. Natural disasters, like earthquakes and hurricanes man-made disasters, such as war, genocide, and terrorism a car accident or plane crash a physical threat to oneself, such as rape or physical assault unexpectedly...
    578 Words | 2 Pages
  • SSRI's - 658 Words
    Before, during and after pregnancy moms may have or may experience depression. I have decided to do my research focusing on SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) used to improve depression. My preference is to take a holistic approach, using natural remedies first and if necessary moving to pharmaceutical drugs. SSRIs are used to help improve depression symptoms and other disorders such as anxiety. Some common drug names of SSRI’s are Citalopram (Celexa), Escitalopram...
    658 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evaluate the biological treatments of depression
    Evaluate the biological treatments of depression. (16 marks) Antidepressants such as monoamine-oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and trycyclics (TCAs) are effective in reducing depressive symptoms. Antidepressants have been tested in trials with placebos and have found to be effective in reducing symptoms of severe depression in around 65% to 75% compared with around 33% for placebos – Gitlin 2002. Gitlin carried out a clinical trial testing selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and...
    775 Words | 2 Pages
  • importance of newspapers - 3355 Words
    Teen depression facts Depression that extends beyondsadness to the point of illness is that which interferes with the sufferer's ability to function in some way. Depression affects about 20% ofadolescents by the time they reach adulthood. Depression in teens does not have one single definitive cause, rather a number of biological, psychological, and environmental risk factors that contribute to its development. General symptoms of depression regardless of age include having a depressed or...
    3,355 Words | 12 Pages
  • Persuasive Paper - 2251 Words
    Cognitive Behavior GEORGE A. SMITH PSY 3002 Developing a Psychology Perspective Capella University Cognitive Behavior There are so many different forms of depression, even with the different diagnoses some of the symptoms are similar and at times the very same. Trying to decide whether or not the cognitive perspective outweighed the biological perspective was unfair because both are equally important with both causing...
    2,251 Words | 7 Pages
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (Psychology)
    In Germany, psychiatrists regarded OCD as a disorder of intellect. The German word for “obsession” is Zwangsvorstellung and was translated as “obsession” in Great Britain and “compulsion” in the United States. The term “obsessive-compulsive disorder” became the compromise term. Over time, the way people view O.C.D. has changed. For example, in the seventeenth century people who suffer from obsessions and compulsions were thought to be religious fanatics or melancholic (Frankel, 2011). It wasn't...
    1,284 Words | 4 Pages
  • Obessisive Compulsive Disorder - 1007 Words
    *Still, in the most severe OCD cases, patients may lose such rational perspective on their illness and start thinking that their obsessions and compulsions make sense and are justified. *The presence of either obsessions or compulsions. *The person recognizes that these obsessions or compulsions are excessive or unreasonable. *The obsessions or compulsions cause distress and disability, and take up more than an hour daily. *The obsessions or compulsions are not better explained by another...
    1,007 Words | 3 Pages
  • Negative Effects of Gmo Foods
    * extremely biased – condescending, talking down to us like we’re a bunch of dummies * says twice “opponents to GM are too ‘dumb’ to think for themselves and decide whether or not GMs are good or bad” * we, as consumers, want food labeled so we can decide whether we want to eat it or not * GM foods is not plant breeding, it’s changing the genes – something that nature cannot do on its own – introducing DNA from a different species into the plant * This is not hybridization...
    1,037 Words | 4 Pages
  • pharmacology - 1109 Words
    Adrenergic Agonists (a.k.a. Sympathomimetic Drugs) I. Direct stimulants of α and β receptors 1. Epinephrine (Adrenaline) 2. Norepinephrine (Levophed) 3. Levonordefrin (Neo-Cobefrin) 4. Dopamine (Intropin) 5. Ephedrine II. Direct stimulants of α receptors (α agonists) 1. Phenylephrine (Neo-synephrine) III. Direct stimulants of β receptors (β agonists) 1. Isoproterenol (Isuprel) 2. Selective stimulants of β2 receptors in the bronchi (for asthma) 2.a. Salbutanol (Ventolin) 2.b....
    1,109 Words | 11 Pages
  • What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder?
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? PTSD is an illness that occurs after traumatic events happen in which harm is threatened or caused to a person. People often associate this disorder with being in the military during war, such as now, and suffering traumatic events (Getzfeld & Schwartz). This is very true, but this disorder can affect people from all walks of life. Some other examples of people that develop PTSD are cancer patients, someone...
    1,175 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anxiety Disorder - 1949 Words
    Anxiety Disorder Anxiety is a normal reaction to stress and can actually be beneficial in some situations. Anxiety is also a normal human emotion that everyone experiences at times. Many people feel anxious, or nervous, when faced with a problem at work, before taking a test, or making an important decision. For some people, however, anxiety can become excessive. While the person suffering may realize their anxiety is too much, they may also have difficulty controlling it and it may...
    1,949 Words | 8 Pages
  • Final Psy 270 - 1442 Words
     Psychological Disorder Analysis Nicole Jones PSY/270 Christopher Van Ness May 18, 2014 Psychological Disorder Analysis Patient: Marla a 42- year old Hispanic female who comes to the mental health clinic complaining of having trouble sleeping, feeling” jumpy all the time,” and experiencing an inability to concentrate. These symptoms are causing problems for her at work, where she is an accountant. Interview with Marla Marla: Good morning! Me: Tell me what bring you in today?...
    1,442 Words | 5 Pages
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - 1992 Words
    Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) At some point during their lifetimes, some people are bound to suffer from a psychological disorder. They may be afflicted with schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder. However, one anxiety disorder interests me personally, which locks the individuals that suffer from it into a perpetual cycle of continuous thoughts and behaviors. This disorder is obsessive-compulsive...
    1,992 Words | 6 Pages
  • Depression Research Paper - 1510 Words
    People every day are diagnosed with mental and emotional illnesses that completely change their lives. Depression is one of the many illnesses that take its toll on an average person. Medical experts believe that depression causes more disability throughout the world than almost any other medical illness or disorder (World Book). Depression affects more Americans than cancer, AIDS, or coronary heart disease. About one in five Americans will develop a mood disorder, usually depression, at some...
    1,510 Words | 4 Pages
  • Critical Thinking Paper - 1749 Words
    Critical Thinking Paper In the world of psychology there are many different forms of psychological disorders. Many of these disorders are portrayed in movies, television, music, and in literature. The portrayals of these disorders can be effective in showing the true colors of psychological disorders, or they can leave the audience with a false impression. The pop culture event that I studied was the film As Good as it Gets. The film did a good job depicting the disorder of obsessive...
    1,749 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cymbalta - 1238 Words
    Cymbalta case Analysis Mohamed A. Kamara AMBA 650: Marketing Management and Innovation January 22, 2013 Table of Contents 1.0. Identification of the strategic issues and problems. 2.0. Analysis and evaluation. 3.2. Recommendations. 1.0. Identification of the strategic issues and problems. In April 2000, Eli Lilly’s New Antidepressant Team (NAT) convenes to review the potentials of alternative medications, and to subsequently adopt a replacement to the company’s premier...
    1,238 Words | 4 Pages
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Post-traumatic stress disorder is a psychological reaction to experiencing or witnessing a significantly stressful, traumatic, or shocking event. Did you know that one in three returning troops are being diagnosed with Post-traumatic stress disorder and less than 40% will seek help (PTSD Foundation of America). When people think of PTSD they automatically assume it just has to do with war veterans. But what people don't know is that children and teens all over...
    1,496 Words | 4 Pages
  • Causes and Treatment of Panic Attacks
     Causes and Treatment of Panic Attacks Rosendo Rodriguez Liberty University Abstract It is necessary to first understand what anxiety disorder is in order to understand more easily what and how panic attacks occur in an individual. Anxiety is a normal reaction to different situations of life. However, when it comes as chronic or excessive it becomes a disease that prevents the normal functioning of a person. The anxiety symptoms are a response to a situation...
    2,499 Words | 8 Pages
  • Aneroxia Nervosa - 814 Words
    "Anorexia Nervosa is a mental illness in which a person has an intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of their weight and body shape. People with this illness believe themselves to be fat even when their weight is so low that their health is in danger" (Encarta). Eating disorders, such as Anorexia, are a major issue in society today due to society's stereotypical view of women and young teenage girls, in, but many cases men are affected too. Anorexia Nervosa has been...
    814 Words | 3 Pages
  • Antidepressants Are over Prescribed
    Antidepressants are overprescribed Mitrea (2007) defines antidepressants as an agent or a drug that is most commonly used to prevent or treat depression. However, in today’s society it could be said that antidepressants are being over prescribed and are being used to treat a vast range of other conditions, as well as clinical depression. When the first antidepressant was developed, manufacturers were reluctant to put it on the market due to the extremely low number of people suffering from...
    2,113 Words | 7 Pages
  • Anxiety Disorders - 984 Words
    Anxiety Disorders Anxiety is an unpleasant state of inner turmoil, often accompanied by nervous behavior (Seligman, Walker, and Rosenhan). Everyone has felt anxiety at some point in their life, but for some, anxiety is much more severe and prevalent than the normal butterflies in the stomach. There are several types of anxiety disorders, including social phobia, panic disorder, phobias, obsessive compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. Each of...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • Body Dysmorphic Disorder - 836 Words
     Nursing Research Paper Body Dysmorphic Disorder or “Imagined Ugliness” is a mental disorder that is chronic with . This disorder mainly affects the individual by amplifying a minor flaw or defect to the person. So much so that they spend hours upon hours wondering if they should isolate themselves indoors or going outside at the risk someone might look upon their flaw. The individuals affected by BDD see themselves as ugly or unattractive, some even try to improve their appearance...
    836 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hoarding OCD behavior - 6491 Words
    Review Álvaro Frías-Ibáñez1 Carol Palma-Sevillano1 Francisco Barón-Fernández1 Inma Bernáldez-Fernández2 Elena Aluco-Sánchez2 Nosological status of compulsive hoarding: obsessive-compulsive disorder subtype or independent clinical entity 1 FPCEE Blanquerna. Universitat Ramon-Llull, Barcelona 2 Servicio de Psiquiatría. Hospital de Mataró, Barcelona ABSTRACT. This theoretical study reviews the main research and findings on the nosological status of compulsive hoarding....
    6,491 Words | 31 Pages
  • Outline and evaluate biological therapies as treatments of depression.
    Outline and evaluate biological therapies as treatments of depression. There many forms of treatment to cure depression, many of which are biological. These target the physical and chemical side of the body. Anti-depressants and other drugs are the most common forms of treating depression. They work by boosting levels of insufficient neurotransmitters such as serotonin and nor-adrenaline. They will either reduce the amount of re-absorption or block the enzyme that is trying to break down...
    1,370 Words | 5 Pages
  • Bdd Study Patient Consent Form
    This is a request for your participation in my research focusing on the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in conjunction with medication, in the treatment of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). The purpose of this study is to assess if both treatment strategies, delivered concurrently, are more successful in treating BDD. Within psychology research, there has been ample evidence documenting the efficacy of both CBT and the drug fluoxetine in treating BDD, but there no studies have...
    378 Words | 1 Page
  • Anxiety and Panic Disorder - 1851 Words
     Everybody has experienced feelings of anxiety from time to time; and sometimes people get so overwhelmed, they go into a state panic. Anxiety is actually a normal human reaction to stress. However, in severe cases, anxiety and panic can become disabling and interfere with everyday living. For an adolescent, life is already stressful enough. How does an adolescent, then, live day to day with one or both of these conditions? This paper will take an in depth look at what anxiety,...
    1,851 Words | 5 Pages
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Essay
    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) is a cyclical mental health condition which involves unending obsessions paired with unsatisfying compulsions performed to attempt to alleviate the emotional and physical suffering generated by the obsessions. There are approximately five main clusters of OCD; checkers, doubters and sinners, counters and arrangers, hoarders, and washers and cleaners. Accounting for about one quarter of OCD sufferers, the most abundant category is washers and cleaners and...
    1,534 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Case Study of Obsessive Impulsive Disorder
    A Case Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Some Diagnostic Considerations INTROD UCTION Prior to 1984, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was considered a rare disorder and one difficult to treat (I ) . In 1984 the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA) initial survey results became available for the first time, and OC D prevalence figures showed that 2.5 % of the population m et diagnostic criteria for OCD (2,3) . Final survey results published in 1988 (4) confirmed these earlier...
    2,793 Words | 10 Pages
  • Teen Eating Disorders - 849 Words
    Eating disorders are characterised by an abnormal attitude towards food that causes someone to change their eating habits and behaviour. A person with an eating disorder may focus excessively on their weight and shape, leading them to make unhealthy choices about food with damaging results to their health. Types of eating disorders Eating disorders include a range of conditions that can affect someone physically, psychologically and socially. The most common eating disorders are: anorexia...
    849 Words | 3 Pages
  • As Good as It Gets Essay Example
    As Good As It Gets Before further investigation, I thought that As Good As It Gets was about a man, Melvin, with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. At first glance, this seemed like the obvious diagnosis; he portrayed both obsessions and compulsions. Melvin was very careful not to touch things that may have been germ ridden, such as door handles, borrowed jackets, and coughing children; he even brought his own dining utensils out to eat with him. He also engaged in some compulsions, such as...
    1,051 Words | 3 Pages
  • OCD SYMPTOMS TREATMENT - 1589 Words
    New york college-empire state college OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD): SYMPTOMS & TREATMENT Abnormal Psychology Cleopatra Papathanasiou Fall Semester 2014 There are numerous and different mental illnesses and disorders that affect millions of people around the world. One such disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is defined as the persistent, uncontrollable, unwanted and obsessive feelings, thoughts or images and compulsive behaviors such as routines or rituals...
    1,589 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chart Analysis Hip Fracture Patient
    Paula Meza Chart Analysis 91 years old Allergic to Aromasin DNR History of Present Illness: Hip Fracture - patient fell in her home and broke her hip (admitting diagnosis). Vascular Dementia brought on by several TIA’s (Etiology/Pathology) Pts. progressive cognitive deficits led to her fall, and inabilility to perform normal ADL’s and self care. Since being admitted to Thompson, pt. has had consults with oncology in regards to her breast cancer diagnosis, with a GI...
    674 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psychological Disorder Paper - 794 Words
    Psychological Disorder Paper XXXXX XXXX Psychology 450- Diversity and Cultural Factors in Psychology Prof. X Psychological Disorder Paper Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is defined as an anxiety disorder that most people acquire as a result of seeing or enduring dangerous events (National Institute of Mental Health, 2013). Danger comes in many forms and in most cases, danger that cannot be detected such as an earthquake, a robbery or an accident. We are all equipped with the...
    794 Words | 3 Pages
  • PharmaPoint: Major Depressive Disorder - US Drug Forecast And Market Analysis To 2023
    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric diseases worldwide. The MDD market is a crowded and competitive market, with more than 30 marketed products available for the treatment of patients with MDD. The depression market is about to enter a dynamic phase with imminent patent expiries for top selling products, such as Eli Lillys Cymbalta, and Otsuka/BMSs Abilify, along with the recent launch of the multimodal antidepressant, Lundbeck/Takedas Brintellix, in January...
    446 Words | 3 Pages
  • Are Antidepressants An Oxymoron? - 433 Words
    Are Anti-Depressants Oxymorons? Suicide is one of America’s biggest problems among adults 25 and younger. Many people think people with suicidal thoughts should just take anti-depressants, but are the anti-depressants increasing the thoughts of suicide and depression? Are the anti-depressants oxymorons? In the article “Study Questions Antidepressants-suicide links” the author explains that that most anti-depressants can actually worsen depression within young adult and make there...
    433 Words | 2 Pages
  • A critical evaluation of how the biological basis of major depression can be explained by examining the pharmacological actions of antidepressant drugs
    Critically evaluate how the biological basis of major depression can be explained by examining the pharmacological actions of antidepressant drugs Major depression is a severe, recurrent and disabling mental disorder usually characterized by a constant sense of hopelessness and despair, coupled with low self esteem and a loss of interest in usually enjoyable activities. In the US, 3.4% of people with major depression commit suicide, and roughly 60% of people that commit suicide have some...
    940 Words | 3 Pages
  • Kleptomania - 1392 Words
    Klepto, Kleptomaniac, Kleptomania, some are just punned names, typically used to describe anyone who steals, but Kleptomania is more than just stealing and is recognized as an Impulse Control Disorder. Kleptomania [Gr.,=craze for stealing], irresistible compulsion to steal, motivated by neurotic impulse rather than material need. No specific cause is known. The condition is considered generally as the result of some underlying emotional disturbance rather than as a form of neurosis in itself....
    1,392 Words | 4 Pages
  • Generalized Anxiety Disorder - 1748 Words
    I. Introduction A. What is Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)? B. Living with Generalized Anxiety Disorder II. Symptoms of GAD A. Mental B. Physical III. Who gets GAD? A. Risk Factors B. U.S. Statistics on GAD C. When does GAD start? D. Co-morbidities IV. Treatments for GAD A. Medications B. Therapy C. Self-Help V. Conclusion A. The future of GAD B. Living life with less anxiety C. Final thoughts Anxiety happens to everyone, at some point in time....
    1,748 Words | 6 Pages
  • Mental Illness Ptsd Hca 240
    Week 8 Mental Illness Paper HCA 240 For this week’s assignment, I have selected to write about Post traumatic stress disorder. I have quite a bit of experience will this illness as well because my husband suffers from Post-traumatic stress disorder following a severe car accident that he was in about 6 years ago. Exposure to trauma is anything but new to the humankind. Post-traumatic stress disorder, also known as PTSD, has been around for centuries but was not given the name...
    1,325 Words | 4 Pages
  • Informative Speech - 692 Words
    Outline for Informative Speech Compulsive Hoarding Specific Purpose: At the end of my speech my audience will know about compulsive hoarding. I will inform them what hoarding is, the signs and symptoms and as well as treatments for hoarding. Introduction 1. Compulsive Hoarding is considered to be a clinical syndrome reported to affect approximately 3 million Americans across the United States. We believe however, that these statistics are highly underrepresented due to the...
    692 Words | 6 Pages
  • Week2 Mental Behavioral Case Study
    Carolina Gasca Mental/ Behavioral Case Study Anxiety/ OCD Jim Wolf is a 45 year old store owner who constantly washes his hands. He continually checks and rechecks his part lists, equipment, and his employee’s schedules. After his wife raises concerns about his work performance and inability to sleep, he is referred to a physician. A psychiatrist has diagnosed him with OCD. OCD is an anxiety disorder that has two parts, obsessive and compulsive. The obsessive portion relates to an individual’s...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • OCDResearchPaper ShaaraimKJJamier - 2707 Words
     Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Shaaraim K. Jamier Liberty University Author Note This paper was prepared for Psychology 430-B04, LOU taught by Professor Cooper. Abstract Obsessive-Compulsive disorder (OCD) was once considered to be a disease that was uncommon and even rare in the psychological field. Since more studies have been conducted on the disorder, the previous belief of rarity has been revoked and it is now considered to be grouped into the top ten disabling disease as...
    2,707 Words | 8 Pages
  • Depression Research Paper - 1800 Words
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