Samurai Essays & Research Papers

Best Samurai Essays

  • Samurai - 379 Words
    Famous samurai In 1408 shôgun Yoshimitsu died and was won by Yoshimochi (1385-1428). Some years after he came to power, Yoshimochi decided to replace the head of the Yamana with one of his favourites, a Akamatsu Mochisada, said to be the shôgun’s lover. Learning of the plan, Mitsusuke departed Kyôto in 1427 and himself in Mimasaka. Yoshimochi said the act bad and called for his lieutenants to prepare for battle.Yoshimochi’s managed to talk the shôgun out of the business, making an...
    379 Words | 1 Page
  • Samurai Swords - 976 Words
    Samurai Swords Over 1300 years ago, on one of the tiny islands of Japan, the first samurai sword appeared. Japanese myth suggests that after losing a long and hard fought battle, an emperor returned home with his warriors horrified to find most of their swords broken or badly damaged. After thorough inspection of the blades, the men realized that their failure in battle resulted from faulty sword forging and promised to craft the perfect weapon. The men prayed for inspiration, and on the...
    976 Words | 3 Pages
  • Final Samurai - 1660 Words
    Mythology 251 Term Paper #2 The word Samurai means a fearless warrior sworn to protect without question. During their long history in Japan, Samurai lived lives in tradition, with a structured code of honor, discipline, and morality. By following their religious beliefs of Buddhism and Structural discipline Samurais are known to be one of the best warriors/solders in histories time. To be able to fight as brothers and protectors was their sworn life. The clothing of the Samurai...
    1,660 Words | 5 Pages
  • Samurai Women - 1058 Words
    ENL101 English Composition I Class Assignment 2 (10%) Date Distributed: OCTOBER 31, 2014 Instructions 1. Provide your assignment with the INTI cover page. 2. Do not plagiarize your project. 3. Hand in your assignment latest by NOVEMBER 12, 2014 4. Late submission will be penalized. Note the underlined sentences in the passage. Those are the ones you need to edit. Make sure the sentences are corrected in terms of grammar, precision in meaning and sentence structure according to...
    1,058 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Samurai Essays

  • The Last Samurai - 1999 Words
    The Last Samurai Think about your friends, family, and your loved ones for a second. Think about what luxuries you have and how you have come to love them. Doesn’t it make you feel blessed and lucky to be who you are? Now imagine being thrown onto enemy territory, a lonely and dangerous place with nothing. In order to survive you must communicate with the enemy and learn to live their way—the total opposite culture you hate. In the movie, The Last Samurai, the author portrays a Civil War...
    1,999 Words | 6 Pages
  • Samurai William - 1724 Words
    In Giles Milton’s novel, Samurai William, the reader is taken to the other side of the globe to experience the history of old world Japan. Though out the book, Milton provides reason for complex historical events and actions, while still communicating the subtleties and mysterious customs of the Japanese. The novel also closely examines the wide range of relationships between different groups of Europeans and Asians, predominantly revolving around the protagonist, William Adams. The book...
    1,724 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Last Samurai - 1266 Words
    The Last Samuri Movie Review The Last Samurai, directed by Edward Zwick, starring actor Tom Cruise is based on the Japanese history during the end of the 18th century and the start of the 19th. The main focus of the movie is the transformation between a thousand year old tradition of a samurai soldier using a sword as his weapon, with the introduction of modern day weapons. During this time period, the Japanese communicated with various other cultures such as those of the French, English,...
    1,266 Words | 3 Pages
  • the last samurai - 321 Words
    The last samurai In 1876, u.s. army captain Nathan Algren is traumatized by his participation in a massacre f Native Americans in the Indian Wars, and has become a bitter alcoholic. Algren is approached by his former commanding officer, Colonel Bagley, on behalf of Japanese businessman omura, who wishes to hire American soldiers to train the imperial Japanese Army to suppress a samurai rebellion. In exchange, Japan would ratify a lucrative trade agreement that would grant the U.S. exclusive...
    321 Words | 1 Page
  • The Life of Samurai - 963 Words
    The samurai were fearless warrior, who became powerful in Japan around the 1200s. The samurai, which means "those who serve," were hired by lords to fight their wars and protect their land. The samurai were expert fighters; they were skilled with the sword and bow and arrow, and they were superior horsemen. They were athletic and strong, and they developed their fighting skills into what is the basis of modern martial arts. The samurai had a code of honor called Bushido, which meant "Way of...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Last Samurai - 1536 Words
    Katerina Rizova The Last Samurai Samurai are a group of powerful warriors that existed in Japan until the late 1800’s. In the film “The Last Samurai” we have the opportunity to learn more about the positive characteristics of them. Samurai is very compassionate and they humbly express that emotion. Perhaps the most important trait of the Samurai, is discipline. The Last Samurai is a war and drama film, based on a true story depicting honour and courage. Nathan Algren (Tom Cruise) is...
    1,536 Words | 4 Pages
  • Samurai Warrior - 2889 Words
    The Japanese warrior, known as the samurai, has played a significant role in Japan's history and culture throughout the centuries. Their ancestors can be traced back to as far as can be remembered. Some stories have become mysterious legends handed down over the centuries. In this report you will learn who the samurai were, their origins as we know them, how they lived and fought and their evolution to today. It will be clear why the samurai stand out as one of the most famous group of...
    2,889 Words | 7 Pages
  • Samurai and Knights - 3385 Words
    For six centuries the medieval knight dominated the battlefield and influenced the Western world greatly. The armored, mounted warrior, born in Middle Ages, revolutionized warfare and became the foundation of the new political structure known as feudalism. The Church put the medieval knight to the ultimate test-the First Crusade of 1095. The Church, which Christianized almost all of the knights, gave them a very high status in society, one that was sought after even by kings and princes. In the...
    3,385 Words | 9 Pages
  • Samurai and Bushido - 408 Words
    Samurai today enjoy widespread popularity due to their depiction in western media as katana wielding warriors with a strict code of honor, comparable to the knights of arthurian legends. In reality, these two were not so different, as each upheld a similar code of conduct and chivalry. The Japanese variant, the samurai, followed a code of honor named Bushido, literally “The Way of the Warrior”. When the Chinese visited Japan in the early 5th century BCE, they brought not only...
    408 Words | 2 Pages
  • Samurai DBQ - 264 Words
    The samurai warriors became a prominent part of Japanese culture beginning in the early tenth century. The fundamental values of the samurai warriors depended heavily on their attitude of life and death in addition to having good character. With both of these aspects being tied to the legitimacy of one’s honor, samurai warriors focused on holding themselves to high standards on and off the battlefield, ……. ...
    264 Words | 1 Page
  • The Last Samurai - 761 Words
    1) Japan. The end of XIX century, Capt. Nathan Algren(main character), an American military officer hired by the Emperor of Japan to train the country's first army of the rising sun to contemporary art of warfare. The Emperor is trying to eradicate the ancient Imperial warrior class of samurai, in preparation for a more pro-Western government policies supporting foreign trade. Meanwhile, as a result of collisions with the samurai, Algren finds himself in the center of the confrontation of two...
    761 Words | 3 Pages
  • Seven Samurai - 1378 Words
    Shichinin No Samurai The film The Seven Samurai is a classic example of late 16th century samurai engaged in warfare. Throughout the film we are able to get a real sense of what values samurai hold, as well as some techniques used in battle. The film also provides some insight into how a samurai might define himself as a samurai. Though the seven samurai came from different backgrounds and are vastly different people, they share one common trait which is the label of samurai. Throughout...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Samurai and the Bakumatsu Era - 2875 Words
    The Samurai and the Bakumatsu Era Eric Lemaire 12/09/05 English Comp I Mrs. Halperin The Bakumatsu Era was a crucial period of Japanese history at the end of the Tokugawa Era or Edo Period. It was a period of war and anarchy that was brought about by the introduction of western culture and constant battles between the imperialists and the loyalists. During this time and throughout history, the samurai or bushi played an...
    2,875 Words | 7 Pages
  • Legacy of the Samurai: The characteristics, philosophy, and history of the samurai.
    LEGACY OF THE SAMURAI _The characteristics, philosophy,_ _and history of the samurai._ For seven centuries, the samurai ruled Japan as the powerful warrior class. As a class of warriors and knights, they led society in feudal Japan. The loyalty to his lord was much more important than his allegiance to his friends, family and even the emperor. Their philosophy was one liberated him from fear, and for these reasons, the samurai came to be the dominate force throughout medieval Japan. War...
    2,571 Words | 8 Pages
  • Samurai Ethic in Modern Japan
    Yamamoto, Tsunetomo Bushido: The Way of the Samurai Garden City Park, NY 2002 After reading this book it is my belief that it is important for Westerners to understand the seemingly strange concepts of Bushido, not only as a guide to events of the past, but as a primer for understanding the Japanese business mentality of today. The first thought that comes to mind when Japanese work ethic is hard working, no breaks, complete commitment to ones job. There may be a reason why Japan was able...
    1,334 Words | 4 Pages
  • knights vs samurai - 614 Words
    Warriors: Knights VS Samurai: Introduction: For this ‘Japan Under the Shoguns’ assessment task, I have chosen Warriors: Knights VS Samurais. A knight is a mounted warrior of the feudal system of Europe. A samurai is a member of a powerful military caste in feudal Japan, especially a member of the class of military retainers of the daimyos. Roles and responsibilities: Knights had the responsibilities of fighting in the king’s army and leading troops of soldiers to war. Not only those...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Masculinity in the Last Samurai - 1848 Words
    Masculinity/ Femininity Dimension in the Last Samurai According to Hofstede, Masculinity/ Femininity dimension explains Masculinity: The way the samurais in the movie were portrait are in fact extremely accurate to those that existed in the 18th century. From as young as seven or eight years of age, boys we turned from kids into killing samurais. In one of the scene’s of the movie, we see two young boys learning to fight with wooden sticks. Although so young, their skills were already...
    1,848 Words | 6 Pages
  • Bushido the Way of the Samurai - 1406 Words
    The Seven Virtues of Bushido The Way of the Samurai Bushido was developed between the tenth to fourteenth centuries in Japan and spread through the warrior class. It was a code of conduct that during the time was unwritten passed down from generation to the next. The Bushido code has seven main virtues whose roots come from “Confucius” and “Zen Buddhism.” These seven virtues are known as Gi, Yu, Jin, Rei, Makoto, Meiyo, and Chugi. In Inazo Nitobe’s book “Bushido: The Soul of Japan he...
    1,406 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Samurai films of Akira Kurosawa
     The Seven Samurai of Akira Kurosawa By Chi Wei SEVEN SAMURAI AND THRONE OF BLOOD Kurosawa Akira Akira Kurosawa (Mar 23, 1910--Sep. 6, 1998) was a Japanese film director, screenwriter, producer, and editor. He directed 30 films in a career spanning 57 years. He was the surprise winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival. In 1990, he accepted the Academy Award for Lifetime. Kuorosawa contributed Japanese history, culture, and society through this movie to audiences....
    1,236 Words | 4 Pages
  • Samurais Tale 1-8
    1. One day Taro’s mother dressed him in a servant’s clothes. She told their servant girl Yone to hide with me in in the storehouse. When the soldiers came, they found Taro and Yone. A soldier brought Taro to the leader. He saw his mother and brothers dead. When he held up his bamboo sword to defend himself, the officers laughed. Lord Takeda gave Taro as a servant to his officer Lord Akiyama. | | 2. In the morning, they had to march with the army. They came to the town of Kofuchu. There Lord...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Film Analysis of Twilight Samurai
    Introdution Twilight Samurai is a movie that revolves around the live of a samurai, years before the Meiji Restoration. The main issues that the movie looked at include stereotype of samurais, genders and social class differences. Unlike many typical samurai-themed movies which involve fighting, woman and pride, the director of Twilight Samurai focused on the everyday life and difficulties faced by the main protagonist, Iguchi Seibei. His story was told by her daughter, Ito who narrated the...
    1,344 Words | 4 Pages
  • Film Analysis of Twilight Samurai
    Directed by the experienced and renowned Yoji Yamada, Twilight Samurai is a film set in the 19th century, towards the end of the Tokugawa or Edo era. It was a time when the samurai system was beginning to wane as Japan started to advocate itself towards modernization. The Meiji reforms had started to begin, and the samurai class was gradually being disregarded as of a higher social status. The lifestyle and demand for the samurai was thus in a process of change, as the samurai began to take on...
    2,327 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Last Samurai Essay - 1061 Words
    The Last Samurai “The perfect blossom is a rare thing. You could spend your life looking for one, and it would not be a wasted life” (Zwick). These are the words of Katsumoto, an important samurai warrior. The movie The Last Samurai directed by Edward Zwick is about an American War Captain named Nathan Algren who is hired to train, lead and modernize a group of Japanese soldiers to defeat a rebellion of the country's remaining Samurai in 1876. Algren is captured by the Samurai and...
    1,061 Words | 3 Pages
  • Beowulf vs. the Last Samurai
    Courage is defined as the ability to conquer fear or despair. In both Beowulf and the Last Samurai, the heroes of each story had to fight obstacles and overcome fears to be victorious. Beowulf and the Samurai both showed unwavering courage and had honorable leadership skills. Beowulf was a very courageous character because he always went into battles with no fears in mind and he never gave up. In the story of Beowulf, Grendel, who is a monster that has a hatred for humans, went to attack...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cultural Analysis of "The Last Samurai"
    An Old Movie in a New Light "The Last Samurai" is one of my favorite films; I have watched it at least ten times. This time around, I was forced to watch it from a completely different point of view. I had never realized how much you can learn about the Japanese culture from this movie. It depicts the Japanese culture very well, and shows the contrasts between that culture and American culture very blatantly. Although the main conflict of the film lies within the Japanese culture, it...
    1,088 Words | 3 Pages
  • Who Were The Samurai - 294 Words
    1. Who were the samurai? Samurai, usually referred to in Japanese as bushi or buke , were the military nobility of medieval and early-modern Japan. According to translator William Scott Wilson: "In Chinese, the character was originally a verb meaning to wait upon or term in Japanese, saburau. In both countries the terms were nominalized to mean "those who serve in close attendance to the nobility," the pronunciation in Japanese changing to saburai. According to Wilson, an early reference to...
    294 Words | 2 Pages
  • Samurai Ideals in Chûshingura - 1658 Words
    Even before the Kamakura period the Japanese warrior had begun his ascent to a higher social status. During the Heian period collateral branches of the imperial line, the Minamoto and Taira clans, represented two of the greatest warrior associations. Wars and battles that broke out during the eleventh century in the Kanto area presented the local warriors and the powerful clans with the chance to continue to build up their power (Schirokauer 181). During Kamakura period the provincial...
    1,658 Words | 5 Pages
  • Samurai vs Knight - 476 Words
    The Samurai’s bushido and the European Knights chivalry were both codes of honor which consisted of fighting for their earthly lord, but when it came down to committing ritual suicide for their god only Samurais were up for the challenge; setting them aside from the Knights. These two different types of people clash swords when it comes to how they view women and what they wear going into battle. The Japanese Samurai lived by bushido, which was a code of honor that demanded bravery and...
    476 Words | 2 Pages
  • New Weapons that Changed the Way of the Samurai
    New weapons that changed the way of the samurai A Samurai Sword symbolizes and means the Samurai's prestige and his skills in battle. It is a measure of his stature in society. To all samurai it’s their prize possession and it is worn proudly by its master – until the teppō was introduced. The samurai considered it as dishonorable to tradition. This changed the way samurai fight and changed their view to samurai swords. The teppō is an example of a weapon that changed the way of samurai...
    1,771 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Last Samurai Being a Favorite Movie
    The movie The Last Samurai was not only a great fighting action movie but it also touched on human spirituality, cultural, lifestyle difference and the effect of Japanese culture on a western man. The movie was created in 2003 and takes place in Jap in the 1860s. An American military advisor is embraces the samurai culture that he was hired to destroy after being capture. The battle scenes in The Last Samurai are accurate to how the samurai fought back then from weapons to battle strategies....
    550 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reading for Understanding the Last Samurai and Flying
    Reading for Understanding/ Response The movie “The Last Samurai” is about a broken man who goes to Japan to train the army. During an attack from the samurai warriors Algren shows courage and the will to fight. He’s brought to the samurai leader Ausomoto as a prisoner. Over time he learns the way of the samurai and aids his new found friends to fight against the empire. Concerning the meaning of this story, looking at the guiding question “What makes us who we are?” this story has to do with...
    918 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Last Samurai and Flames and Dangling Wire
    How have the composers of the text you have studied explored the challenges and obstacles faced by characters who change? In my supplementary text “Flames and Dangling Wire” there are no characters but the society shows change. Composers have explored the challenges and obstacles faced by characters and the society. In the film ‘The Last Samurai’, directed by Edward Zwick and the poem ‘Flames and Dangling Wire’ by Robert Gray the composers have used techniques to make meaning, and have...
    637 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dissolution of Unity and Circumstance in Seven Samurai
    As a Japanese film, Seven Samurai (1954) directed by Akira Kurosawa is based upon circumstance; it is interested in what surrounds the human being and how ones circumstance is powerful in the portrayal of the film over the characters lives. “Circumstance unites man: the farmers with one another, just so the samurai, just so the bandits.” (Cardullo). It is through all of these circumstances that our narrative forms and the plot moves forward. The farmers unite with one another to try and find...
    1,583 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Samurai: Warrior and Ruler of Ancient Japan
    The Samurai: Warrior and Ruler of Ancient Japan Few countries have a warrior tradition as long and exciting as Japan. It is a tradition found in the Samurai, the loyal and self-sacrificing knight of ancient Japan. The Samurai is a valiant warrior who can both appreciate the beauty of nature in that of a rose blossom but will also kill or die for his master in an instant. This well-rounded warrior was the ruling class of Japan for almost seven hundred years. He fought for control of his...
    1,291 Words | 4 Pages
  • the economical problems of the samurai - late tokugawa
     During Edo era the society was rigidly divided into classes based upon Confucian values. At the very top was placed the emperor, considered a heir of the god Amaterasu, next under him was placed the sogun, the actual leader, which was invested by the emperor to protect Japan, he was followed by daymio and samurai, military figures that were placed in charge of administering the country, followed by farmers and artisans. Merchants, accumulated great wealth in cities like Edo, Osaka,...
    1,544 Words | 4 Pages
  • Samurai through the eyes of the West: Orientalism in Japanese culture
    Samurai through the eyes of the West: Orientalism in Japanese culture Said’s book Orientalism provides a framework in which a piece of literature about the Orient could be evaluated. Even in contemporary times, his framework remains very useful in analysing depiction of the Orient by the West, long after Said published the book. The Last Samurai (2003) is one of the most recent films the West had created in describing the Orient. It is a tragic and heroic story of a Japanese samurai named...
    1,388 Words | 4 Pages
  • 34 Samurai Daimyo Matthew Perry And Nat
    #34—Crash Course World History Video Notes Samurai, Daimyo, Matthew Perry, and Nationalism 1. So, if you’re into European history, you’re probably somewhat familiar with nationalism and the names and countries associated with it. ____________ in Germany, Mazzini and Garibaldi in __________, and Mustafa Kemal (aka Ataturk) in Turkey. 2. But nationalism was a __________ phenomenon, and it included a lot of people you may not associate with it, like Muhammad Ali in __________. 3. Nationalism...
    1,010 Words | 3 Pages
  • Samurai and knights were different but the similarities were grater
    Samurai V.S. Knight Samurai and Knights were different but the similarities were greater because of their rankings, training, armor, fighting technique, code of honor, and death viewpoint. The Japanese called their warriors Samurai, and the Europeans called their warriors Knights. They both swore oaths of loyalty to noble lords and fought to the death to defend them. This happened at the same time even though Japan and Europe were thousands of miles apart. Samurai were a little higher up than...
    455 Words | 2 Pages
  • Going Native in Avatar Shogun and the Last Samurai
    A stranger in a new land must get accustomed to their new lifestyle. In Henry Clavell’s Shōgun, James Cameron’s Avatar, and Edward Zwinks’ The Last Samurai, the protagonists must find a way to learn and live through the native culture. Going native is need for survival in an unknown place. Wearing the clothing, learning the language, falling in love, taking part in lifestyle activities, and risking their lives to be trusted are part of going native. All three works show the protagonist learning...
    674 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reaction of the Last Samurai and Reaction of Dekada Sitenta
    The film begins in the summer of 1876, introducing Captain Nathan Algren (Tom Cruise), a disenchanted ex-United States Army captain and an alcoholic, who is traumatized by his experience fighting in the Civil War and the Indian Wars. In the years following his army service, Algren makes his living by relating war stories to gun show audiences in San Francisco, an experience which further hampers his mental state. Fed up with Algren's perpetual drunkenness, his employer fires him, forcing Algren...
    1,571 Words | 5 Pages
  • List of Similarities and Differences Between Knights and Samurais
    Similarities and differences list – Similarities. * Both were a warrior class, who swore loyalty to their feudal lords, and who in turn were rewarded with land and money by those they served. * Both enjoyed special privileges in their societies, and place high value on ancestry. * At the same time, it was possible for people to "break into" the Knightly/Samurai class for much of both Europe and Japan's feudal eras. * Both started out as primarily cavalrymen, though the...
    332 Words | 1 Page
  • Philosophical Issues of Personal Identity in the Last Samurai
    David Kennedy Film Philosophy Final Essay 6/1/14 Philosophical Issues of Personal Identity, in The Last Samurai One of the most important philosophical discussions resides in the realm of personal identity. This is a concept that define people from an individual to a nation, and even a species as a whole. Interestingly enough, one of the greatest struggles of personal identity is embedded in Japanese history. This philosophical investigation is captured and portrayed in the war-epic film...
    2,632 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Contrast of the Heian-Era Courtier and the Kamakura Samurai
    The Contrast of the Heian-Era Courtier and the Kamakura Samurai April 29, 2011 The Contrast of the Heian-Era Courtier and the Kamakura Samurai The major periods that shaped Japan’s history and future were the Heian-era of Aristocracy and the Kamakura period of Samurai. The Heian-era and the Kamakura period are interesting because of their differences in social structure, tradition, and culture. In the Heian era, the aristocrat’s social class was sought by many because of their social and...
    2,046 Words | 6 Pages
  • Analysis of “the Last Samurai” Film Based on Postmodern Theory
    Analysis of “The Last Samurai” Film Based On Postmodern Theory By: Mauliana Dewi (090511100001) English Department Faculty of Social and Cultural Sciences Trunojoyo University of Madura 2012 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Films are made to be seen and heard, to appeal to our visual and aural senses. Like any art form, however, films are also meant to be felt and understood, to appeal to our emotions and minds. One of the best ways to determine whether a film has succeeded in any or all...
    2,638 Words | 9 Pages
  • Warriors in Peace: the Economic Life of the Samurai Class in Tokugawa Japan
    University of the philippines, baguio | WARRIORS IN PEACE | THE ECONOMIC LIFE OF THE SAMURAI CLASS IN TOKUGAWA JAPAN | | ANIDA, CESNA CO | 3/20/2013 | The warriors of Japanese history the samurai belongs to the upper class of the society. During the Warring States and before that samurai were used as killing machines ready to slay anyone who was against with their masters. But during this time of peace, samurai have no war to fight anymore. Despite their high status in the society...
    4,502 Words | 13 Pages
  • Saigo Takamori - 701 Words
    Saigo Takamori's life's achievements and struggles to accept or deny western influences is a perfect vessel in which to display the reforms and their effects on a feudal society now modeling itself after western methods and technologies. Saigo Takamori is deemed the last of the samurai class. His status is uplifted as a die hard warrior and hero among his people. He is renowned both in Japanese and Western cultures but especially in the south his homeland of Kagoshima the area in which he...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sakamoto Ryoma’ Eight-Point Proposal
    Of the many samurai who devoted themselves to helping our country before Japan was westernized, there was one famous national samurai hero, named Sakamoto Ryoma. Most Japanese people know his name well, and how he made a great contribution to Japan’s rapid modernization. Sakamoto Ryoma was a low ranking samurai who played a major role in Japan’s transmutation from a feudal society into a unified state intent on modernizing itself and overtaking the West. He appeared at a critical stage in...
    1,106 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Tale of Genji and the Tale of the Keike: a comparative essay
    1 The Tale of Genji and the Tale of the Heike are stories illustrating the Heian period of Japan. The Tale of Genji is a fictional work completed in the early eleventh century C.E. that takes place at the height of the court aristocracy, while the Tale of the Heike is a dramatic telling of the true events that led to the end of the era and the dominance of the warrior class. They show very different aspects of the time period, and while they both provide powerful sentiments, the Tale of...
    1,314 Words | 4 Pages
  • Comparing Hidalgo and the Last Samuraio
    Comparing “Hidalgo” and “The Last Samurai” When following a specific formula for developing a movie, sometimes you end up with two films that share many similarities. This is certainly true in the case of Hidalgo and the Last Samurai, from the start of the movie you can see obvious use of the classic elements of American film. The example I found most prominent were assimilation and the outsider being accepted by the group. It is clear in both movies that the main characters are with a...
    1,316 Words | 4 Pages
  • Struggle for the Soul of Japan - 752 Words
    Ancient and modern civilization at war for the soul of Japan is the main idea that revolves around the whole plot of the movie. The story takes place in the year 1876 where a rebellion took place in Yoshino Province. The revolt is primarily due to the rapid modernization of Japan through having an opened border for trading with the rest of the world. The movie encompasses the transition from Tokugawa shogunate up to the Meiji era as it illustrates the difference between the traditional ways of...
    752 Words | 3 Pages
  • Book Review of "Heart of the Warrior" by Catarina Blomberg
    This is my review on "The Heart of the Warrior," written by Catharina Blomberg. In this review I intend to go through each chapter pointing out what the chapter discussed and what I learned from reading this book. I chose this book because it seemed interesting and something that was worthwhile for the time I spent reading it. This book seems to take a more in depth look at what we have touched on in class. The introduction chapter of this book deals with a brief history of how the...
    2,119 Words | 6 Pages
  • Samurai's Garden - 768 Words
    Devoni Mackey Mr Pino The Samurai’s Garden Matsu was the Samurai in the novel “The Samurai’s Garden”. You may hear about legends and heros in your lifetime that have done great deeds to the world. You will also hear about heros on your local news channel, or even your local newspaper. However, you do not have to be known by everyone around the world to be a hero or a legend. You can be a legend in your state, or even in your local community. Matsu was a legend, hero, and also a warrior...
    768 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bushido Influence on Filipinos - 5056 Words
    Bushido Influence and Filipinos We need not question the success of the country of Japan over the years and decades that have passed. Despite being a small country, they have managed to surmount others through their handwork, heart, and passion. They are globally competitive and respected in many fields such as business, medicine, and sports. It is now generally recognized that Japan has been much the most successful of the countries outside Europe and North America in achieving modernization....
    5,056 Words | 14 Pages
  • The Analysis of “Loser-hero”, “Tragic loser-hero” and “Failed loyalist hero” Archetypes in Japanese Literature
    The Analysis of “Loser-hero”, “Tragic loser-hero” and “Failed loyalist hero” Archetypes in Japanese Literature In the book “Warriors of Japan as Portrayed in the War Tales”, as the title suggests, author Paul Varley studies numerous war tales from hundreds of years of Japanese history, throughout the rise of the samurai warrior culture and the societal change that went along with it. From ancient war tales like the Shōmonki to tales firmly in the medieval times like the Taiheiki, the...
    1,422 Words | 4 Pages
  • Japan Bushido Spirit - 623 Words
     Japan Bushido Spirit Student’s Name Institution of Learning Japan Bushido Spirit Bushido is a special code of behavior developed by a distinctive caste of Japanese warriors known as samurai. This code includes guidelines for honorable and moral conduct and stresses the importance of warrior’s courage, self-discipline and loyalty. However, Bushido is more than just a set of rules. It is a way of life, which is often compared to the knighthood of Middle Ages. Bushido emerged in...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Freedom and Independence, the Problem and the Solution the Main Things Fukuzawa Values in Life Are Freedom and Independence. He Believes That These Are the Key Fundamental Principles That a Nation Should Be Founded
    The main things Fukuzawa values in life are freedom and independence. He believes that these are the key fundamental principles that a nation should be founded upon. Fukuzawa states about Japan that the problems of the nation and the individual are the same when dealing with freedom and independence. The individuals who lack proper freedom are doomed to fail and cause detrimental effects to those around them as well. They will fail from having a lack of freedom because they were trapped in a...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Meiji Restoration - 810 Words
    To what extent did the Meiji Restoration change Japanese Society? The Meiji Restoration impacted upon the Japanese society to a significant extent. During this time the Japanese social hierarchy was completely transformed to reflect the ideals of western powers. The education system improved to such a point that it was considered the best in all of Asia. Furthermore, the Japanese military was reformed into a nation-wide conscription military equipped with modern technology. Finally, the...
    810 Words | 3 Pages
  • History Elective - 592 Words
    Shogunate Japan essay “Examine the role of women in Shogunate Japanese society.” Shogunate Japan was a period from 1192 – 1867 where Japan was ruled under a system of heredity military dictatorship by shoguns. The shogun was appointed by the emperor and was known as the de facto reiler as they had great political and military power. In Shogunate Japan, society was divided into two main classes; the nobility and the peasants. The place of women in Shogunate was not as bad as in other...
    592 Words | 2 Pages
  • The 47 Ronin Story - 1484 Words
    The 47 Ronin Story Paper (#1) The 47 Ronin Story takes place in 1701, approximately 100 years after the Tokugawa Shogunate was formed. The story displays much of the changes going on in Japanese society and culture. From the declining importance of the Samurai, to the rising influence of the merchant class, and finally to the inevitable changing of values that are all exacerbated by the long peace imposed by the Tokugawa Shogunate. The changing of values were not just commonplace among the...
    1,484 Words | 4 Pages
  • Bushido Religion - 1941 Words
    Bushido: The Way of the Warrior Bushido is known as the code of the samurai, but it is much more than that. Bushido is a way of life. Bushido is an ancient code of conduct for the samurai of feudal Japan. Bushido is one of the few things that has not changed threw the years. Bushido first appears in 712AD in one of the oldest books of Japan. Bushido has been compared by many to the English Knights’ Chivalry. Even though they have some of the same principles, they have little in common....
    1,941 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ancient Japan Annotated Bibliography
    Annotated Bibliography N/A. Nara and Heian Periods (710-1185). 9 June 2002. October 2011 . This page was very informational. It talked a lot about the political climate of the Heian period and goverment. N/A. Heian Period. 27 February 2008. October 2011 . This text was very informational. It explained the government in depth as well as giving me more specific information about the people of the time. N/A. Heian Period Politics. 18 June 2011. October 2011 . This website gave me...
    353 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ronin - 2343 Words
    Arellano 1 Karsten Arellano Professor Hargis East Asia History 22 March, 2015 Analysis of the ​ 47 Ronin​ Story 1. Describe the story of the ​ 47 Ronin​ . The story of the ​ 47 Ronin​ is a parable meant to exemplify the noble traditions of th the Samurai. It is based on a series of events that transpired in Edo Japan during the 18​ century. During this time in Japan’s history, tremendous political, social, and economic ...
    2,343 Words | 2 Pages
  • Japanese Popular Culture - Anime in Popular Culture
    1 Ethan Drury ID: 2680832 AST-240-01 4/12/13 Remove the spaces after each line here. The Timeless Warrior How Time and Popular Culture Distorted the Samurai This title not specific- could be I have made book a point of pointing out The samurai are understood to be master swordsmen of great power. Mysterious, certain words that do enigmatic characters that wander the mountains and villages of feudal Japan searching for not flow corr- something once lost to them, cutting down everything in...
    1,623 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Fashion of Warriors - 907 Words
    9/2/13 Japan: Memoirs of a Secret Empire . Samurai | PBS Search Support for PBS.org provided by: What's this? Sam urai warriors em erged as an elite force in Japan's prov inces during the early 1 0th century . Recruited by local chieftains, these fighting forces were m aintained long enough to wage a specific war, after which the soldiers would return to their lands to till the soil. With Japan's em peror liv ing in the ancient capital of Ky oto and unable to m aintain control of...
    907 Words | 3 Pages
  • IGS 200 - 993 Words
    Seppuku The word seppuku comes from the words setsu, meaning "to cut," and fuku meaning "abdomen." Seppuku also less commonly known as hara-kiri originated in Japan as a ritual for suicide that was practiced by the samurai and daimyo of Japan. A samurai is a highly skilled warrior. A daimyo was a feudal lord in shogunate Japan, from the 10th century to 19th century. The daimyo were large land-owners who Samurai warriors served to protect the lives and properties of. The word "daimyo"...
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • European Imperialism on Japan - 1600 Words
    European Imperialism on Japan Ever since the Industrial Revolution, the Europeans were restless in between the intensified economic activity and competition; many industrialists at this time believed that the only way their nations could ensure their economic necessities was the acquisition of overseas territories, and this belief later expanded into Imperialism. The second motive for Imperialism/Colonialism would be that once Europeans obtained the knowledge of 'outer beyond'...
    1,600 Words | 5 Pages
  • Sammuri Argumentative Essay - 605 Words
    Samurais Argumentative essay Samurais were a vital part of Japanese culture and should have been allowed to continue. Although there were dangerous aspects of this tradition, it was also a large part of Japanese culture. As time passed, their existence had gradually lessened, resulting in their loss. Although the Samurai ways are no longer practiced, they have left a legacy that keeps on affecting the lives of people in Japan today. The traditions of the samurai still have an influence on...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Meiji Restoration - 3614 Words
    “By this oath we set up as our aim the establishment of the national weal on a broad basis and the framing of a constitution and laws (Meiji Government qtd. in “The Charter Oath”).” This is the preamble of the Charter Oath of the Meiji government. This document was revolutionary in that it proposed radical change in a country known for its traditional ways. It is a list of hopes and dreams, including “all matters decided by public discussion,” “all classes… shall unite,” “that there may be no...
    3,614 Words | 10 Pages
  • The presentation of the conflict between the traditional and modern views in The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea
    These two passages, page 60-61 and page 162-163 from The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea (The Sailor), respectively, demonstrate the recurring conflict throughout the novel between the traditional views and modernity. The first passage (lines 1-23) is at the end of chapter five of the first section, Summer, in which Noboru performs some kind of ceremonial surgery on a stray kitten to prove his strength of manhood in the audience of the group of nihilistic boys. In the second...
    1,313 Words | 4 Pages
  • Naturalization of Confucianism in Japan - 1866 Words
    The Naturalization of Confucianism in Japan and the “Way of the Warrior” Confucianism was first introduced to Japan with the importation of Chinese culture from China long before the beginning of the Tokugawa period in sixth century AD. From an alien philosophy to a widely accepted ideology, Confucianism experienced its unique modification and naturalization in Japanese society. It was in the Tokugawa period that Confucianism was widely spread throughout the nation and studied by many Japanese...
    1,866 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chapter 27 Study Guide
    Chapter 27 Study Guide 1. The process of industrialism threatened traditional and social hierarchies in both societies. In Russia, the aristocracy was threatened by the abolition of serfdom, the creation of regional zemstvoes, and reforms of the army. In Japan, the samurai were almost destroyed by the fall of the shogunate, the destruction of feudalism, and military reform. Both nations used territorial expansion as a means of mollifying the aristocracy and building support for the imperial...
    921 Words | 3 Pages
  • Host vs. Hostess club in Japan
    10 October 15, 2014 VFT 4 Asan120 What is the difference between a host or hostess club in Japan? Traditionally, in Japan, women have catered to the men but now the roles are reversed with host clubs catering to women. Essentially, host clubs are exactly like hostess clubs. The duties of the host is the same as a hostess. They are both paid to be attractive, to give members of the opposite sex non-sexual attention in the form of flirtation, flattery, lighting cigarettes, laughing at jokes...
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mugen and Jin - Comparison and Contrast
    April 23, 2011 Jin and Mugen: Comparison and Contrast Jin and Mugen are two very different characters in the Anime series Samurai Champloo. While Jin is the level-headed, reserved, disciplined and orthodox samurai, Mugen is the wild, aggressive, rude, unorthodox vagabond. Throughout the series their differences are displayed in great extremes, whether they come from their different backgrounds, their styles of combat, or their personalities. Samurai Champloo is a series about the journey of an...
    1,732 Words | 5 Pages
  • Samuria kids essay - 484 Words
    The novel, White Crane by Sandy Fussel teaches us that the samurai kids achieve because they obey the code of Bushido. Sandy Fussel’s novel White Crane demonstrates that despite disabilities the Samurai kids achieve success because they follow the code of Bushido. In the novel, Yoshi learns to become a great leader and shows great courage. Niya shows great kindness to others, and Taji demonstrates great wisdom and perceptiveness. By honouring the code of Bushido, they and the rest of the...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Musui's Story - 1623 Words
    Newsletter for October 6-10 Musui's Story is a samurai's autobiography that portrays the Tokugawa society as it was lived during Katsu Kokichi's life (1802 - 1850). Katsu Kokichi (or Musui) was a man born into a family with hereditary privilege of audience with the shogun, yet he lived a life unworthy of a samurai's way, running protection racket, cheating, stealing, and lying. Before we discuss how Musui's lifestyle was against the codes that regulated the behavior of the samurai, it is...
    1,623 Words | 4 Pages
  • Zen's Influence on the Art of the Sword
    Zen's Influence on the Art of the Sword Zen has long had a great influence upon Japanese culture. Many aspects of this culture are touched upon by Zen including art, literature, and specific ceremonies such as the one concerning tea. During the Kamakura period of Japan, another area of culture began to be affected by Zen; the martial arts of the samurai class. Somewhere along the line, the samurai realized the ease with which the monks of Zen Buddhism dealt with issues such...
    360 Words | 1 Page
  • Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan’s History
    Jonathan Mendez Global Civilization II Professor Michael Efthimiades March 6, 2009 Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan’s History The Tokugawa shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa bakufu, and the Edo bakufu was a feudal regime of Japan established by Tokugawa Ieyasu and ruled by the shoguns of the Tokugawa family. This period is known as the Edo period and gets its name from the capital city of Edo, now Tokyo. The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle from 1603 until 1868, when it was...
    394 Words | 2 Pages
  • Asian History Notes - 1030 Words
    Asian History Study Guide Japan 1. As an Island – Consequences relating to trade and isolation 2. Arrival and expulsion of the Portuguese 1543 - Shipwrecked Portugese traders blown off course during a storm landed near Tangeshima island off the Southern coast of Japan. The local daimyo (warlord) bought two guns from European sailors and commissioned his swordsmith to make copies then asked the Portugese for shooting lessons. 3. Rise of Ieyasu Powerful after HIdeyoshi died, did...
    1,030 Words | 4 Pages
  • HK China Hk - 2256 Words
    Passage from http://afe.easia.columbia.edu/special/japan_1750_meiji.htmIn 1868 the Tokugawa shôgun ("great general"), who ruled Japan in the feudal period, lost his power and the emperor was restored to the supreme position. The emperor took the name Meiji ("enlightened rule") as his reign name; this event was known as the Meiji Restoration. The Reign of the Meiji Emperor When the Meiji emperor was restored as head of Japan in 1868, the nation was a militarily weak country, was primarily...
    2,256 Words | 7 Pages
  • compare and contrast of feudal systems in Japan and Europe
    Japanese feudal system during the Kamakaru Shogunate from 1100 to 1868 and Europe’s feudal system during the middle ages from the 800’s to the 1600’s were similar regarding warriors and weapons, considering that they were based on similar codes of conduct and weaponry, were similar in their socio-political division that had a similar hereditary hierarchy, but the treatment of women differed in that women were allowed to serve in Japanese warrior class but not in the European’s. European...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • Charlie chaplin - 1460 Words
    Thesis : A sense of belonging originates from our choice in who we are and where we want to be. Though Belonging cannot be achieved until we understand ourselves Introduction: There are many concept of belonging that composers often explore through the idea of understanding one’s individual sense of belonging.This is exploited in the novel; Rainbow’s end by Jane Harrison, Film; The Last Samurai by Edward Zwick and the Dictator speech by Charlie Chaplin. These three texts I will be...
    1,460 Words | 4 Pages
  • 47 Ronin - 981 Words
    The 47 Ronin Breaching the perimeter of the Edo Castle with a full armament and a flawless plan, the 47 ronin sought vengeance and honor. Seeking remittance in bloodshed, the 47 ronin remained loyal to Asano Takuminokami and avenged his death by killing their enemy, Lord Kira Kozukenosuke. The actions leading to this vendetta initiated during the receiving of the imperial delegation within the Edo Castle. When Kira continually discredits Asano’s efforts to prepare the Castle for the...
    981 Words | 3 Pages
  • To What Extent Was Socialism Involved in the Meiji Restoration
    To what extent was socialism involved in the Meiji Restoration? The Meiji Restoration was one of the fastest and most effective political, social and economic overhauls of an entire country. In merely one generation Japan as a country unified and became one of the most powerful countries in the world. Yet were the changes fundamentally socialist or just incorporated aspects of socialism? When viewing it at as a whole, the Meiji Restoration did exhibit ideas from the majorly state socialism...
    1,321 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hara-Kiri ~the Spirit of Japan~
    Almost one million people die in Japan every year. In other words, people die every 31 seconds. Some people die because of illness. Some people die because of car accident. Some people commit suicide. There are many kinds of death in this world. I believe most of those deaths are disconsolate and absurd. However, the honorable but unbelievable death existed in Japan in the middle ages. We call that hara-kiri. Hara-kiri is basically an act of killing your self by cutting open your stomach with a...
    525 Words | 2 Pages
  • Japan and European Feudalism - 461 Words
    Japan and Europe during the middle ages had both been affected by agriculture, social classes, and lack of power from the king/emperor. However, there had been major differences such as the role of women, and the different beliefs for a warrior between Chivalry (knights) and the Bushido code (samurais). Japan and Europe during the middle ages had both been affected by agriculture, social classes, and lack of power from the king/emperor. For example, in each place, peasants provided food for the...
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • Anime review - 734 Words
    Jamell.C.Mclean Prof.Ludvigsen May,5,2013 Basilisk Review, By: jamell mclean Context: Basilisk: The Kōga Ninja Scrolls) is a Japanese manga and anime series. The manga was written and illustrated by Masaki Segawa and published in Japan in 2003 and 2004, based on the novel The Kouga Ninja Scrolls by Futaro Yamada published in 1958. The anime, produced in 2005 by Gonzo Studios, closely follows the manga aside from a handful of distinctions. The manga won the 2004 Kodansha Manga Award...
    734 Words | 3 Pages
  • Honorable Women in Tokugawa Society
    Eric Godfrey 3/20/13 Honorable Women Tokugawa era Japan was a very different period than those before it, instead of proving loyalty and honor on the battlefield it was drawn from more diplomatic situations. The Tokugawa period brought with it an era of lasting peace for nearly 250 years, and with it came different ways in which to occupy ones self. Many things in society changed including, the warring ways of the samurai where honor was drawn from the strength and skill turned into...
    1,189 Words | 3 Pages
  • Musui's Story - 1289 Words
    Musui's Story The time after the fifteen hundreds marked a time of great change in Asian countries. Places like China saw a new dynasty take control of the country. And almost every Asian civilization from India to Indonesia came in contact with people from western nations which changed the way people did business and the way Asians viewed the world. Japan, however, seemed to keep separate from the rest of Asia in the way that they were hesitant to deal with westerners. Despite their...
    1,289 Words | 4 Pages
  • Unification Methods of the Meiji Period
    The Meiji government of Japan had stepped into power after the military power of the shogun and Bakufu fell. In efforts to change Japan for the better, the Meiji government decided that the best thing to do for the country is to unite it. The Meiji government, used the following 3 methods out of many to make an attempt at the unification of Japan. This is includes control by beliefs and liberality. The Meiji government took over the previous feudal control and slowly replaced it with a...
    827 Words | 3 Pages
  • Japan CCOT essay - 1090 Words
    In 1853, Western imperialism was at its height. It was spreading to several countries. British colonized India, the dutch colonized Indonesia, the United States colonized the philippines, and the french colonized vietnam. In 1929, the crash of the stock market brought a worldwide depression, known as the Great Depression. The depression caused instability in many countries. International commerce declined and tax revenues, profits, and personal income decreased. The great depression especially...
    1,090 Words | 3 Pages
  • women can be as brave as men
    Yes, because Bravery isn't about physical strength but strength in character: For example, here's stories of women heroes, women who were called samurai. Yeah, we only think of men but the women were trained; In wartime samurai women sometimes had to defend their homes. Trained in weaponry, women carried a dagger in their sleeves or sashes and could throw with deadly aim. The naginata, a long, curved sword, was considered the weapon most suitable for women. Japanese girls today continue...
    596 Words | 2 Pages
  • Was the Meiji Period a Restoration or Revolution?
    Was the Meiji Period a Restoration or a Revolution? The Meiji restoration occurred during the last half of the nineteenth century in Japan. This period is one of the most important events in Japanese history as it brought about significant transformations to Japan’s social and political structure. This explosion of change began with the adoption of Western ideologies which had previously been shunned in Japan. With the flood of new technology and other important ideas, Japan was able to reshape...
    2,056 Words | 6 Pages
  • Copy of japan ccot student sample
    Analyze major changes and continuities in the political and economic structure of Japan from 1600 to 1900. CCOT student sample Between the years 1600 and 1900, the island of Japan underwent profound change in an effort to catch up with the industrialized world, but throughout this process, many aspects of Japanese policy and culture remained stagnant. The economy of Japan changed in that the balance of wealth tilted towards the ...
    640 Words | 1 Page
  • The Emperor’s Decree to the Outer Barbarians
    #1. The Emperor’s Decree to the Outer Barbarians and Letter to the English Ruler are both sent from Qing Dynasty to Great Britain. The emperor’s Decree to the Outer Barbarians was written to Britain during the flourishing period of Qing Dynasty. The emperor sent a decree to Britain as a respond to requests of Britain on trade regulations. On contrary, Letter to the English Ruler, written before Opium War occurs, includes “warnings” of Qing Dynasty to Britain to no longer harm their people...
    1,297 Words | 4 Pages
  • Meiji Period - 1097 Words
    Before opening to the west Japan had a feudal political system, an inherited rigid social structure and a thriving economic system. The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from 1603 until 1868, when it was abolished during the Meiji Restoration. The Meiji Restoration, was a chain of events that restored imperial rule to Japan in 1868. The Restoration led to enormous changes in Japan's political and social structure, and spanned both the late Edo period and the beginning of the Meiji period. The Japanese...
    1,097 Words | 3 Pages
  • The 47 Ronin Response - 651 Words
    The 47 Ronin Response John Allyn’s The 47 Ronin, is the true, although slightly embellished, tale of 47 masterless samurai bent on avenging their fallen leader, Lord Asano, as well as a fairly accurate portrayal of the culture of Japan during the eighteenth century. Each page of the 47 Ronin is steeped in the aura of Samurai, Confucian, Taoist, and Buddhist ethics. The most prominent of these ethics, is that of the Samurai; the code of Bushido is modeled by seven core virtues: rectitude...
    651 Words | 2 Pages


All Samurai Essays