Roman Polanski Essays & Research Papers

Best Roman Polanski Essays

  • Macbeth as a Tragic Hero: Shakespeare and Polanski
    Macbeth Project Part I- The Tragic Hero Both Aristotle and Shakespeare included the presence of a rigid code of conduct in their definitions of “hero”, but they didn’t need them to be morally upright. The inventory of people who could be heroes included sinners; the requirement to be nice is never even suggested by either, and “fitness of character” is more about determination and discipline than anything else. Aristotle preferred that the hero be “good or fine” in The Poetics, but he also...
    1,603 Words | 5 Pages
  • Comparative Essay of Goold and Polanski Macbeth Films
    Macbeth, like any play, is open to interpretation by the performers. Each separate performance is unique. The different stylistic choices made in performances of the play change the way that viewers see the characters and events. This means that while the events of the Goold and Polanski films are the same, they tell us slightly different stories. It is interesting to look at the two films in terms of their faithfulness to, and their divergences from the original text, and the effects that these...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Contrast Between Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Roman Polanski’s Macbeth
    Avneet Saini Mrs. Fera ENG3U0-D November 2nd, 2012 The Contrast between Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Roman Polanski’s Macbeth Shakespeare’s play Macbeth is a tragedy that plots the fall and death of once a great man, revealing how ambition can lead to downfall. Many directors and producers have tried to portray his play into modern films but Roman Polanski produced the most successful Macbeth film, but Roman Polanski’s movie Macbeth changes many details that the viewer is unable to fully...
    1,223 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rosemary's Baby - Film Review
    Rosemary's Baby Film review by Mischel Figusch Director: Roman Polanski Cast overview: Mia Farrow .... Rosemary Woodhouse John Cassavetes .... Guy Woodhouse Ruth Gordon .... Minnie Castevet Sidney Blackmer .... Roman Castevet Maurice Evans .... Edward 'Hutch' Hutchins Ralph Bellamy .... Dr. Abraham Sapirstein Victoria Vetri .... Terry Gionoffrio (as Angela Dorian) Patsy Kelly .... Laura-Louise Elisha Cook Jr. .... Mr. Nicklas (as Elisha Cook) Emmaline...
    1,913 Words | 7 Pages
  • All Roman Polanski Essays

  • Fifteith Gate/Pianist/Module C
    Memory helps form the basis of history, whereas history can be used to clarify fragmented memories. For a true understanding of the past there has to be a balance between documented evidence and personal experiences and memories. In Mark Baker’s nonfiction biography ‘The Fiftieth Gate’ (1997), and Roman Polanski’s film ‘The Pianist’ (2002) have both reconstructed the past through a combination of memories and historical documentation. The interplay of historical documentation and memories...
    1,102 Words | 3 Pages
  • Macbeth Comparative Essay - 1150 Words
    The Power Couple Macbeth Comparative Essay Word Count: 1147 In Western culture today, it is a widely accepted fact that men and women have equal power in a marriage; whereas in Elizabethan times, a woman was dominated by her husband and she would have very little control over her life. The leading omnipotent couple in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth have a compelling marriage with a power dynamic that is beyond the boundaries set by society at the time in which he wrote the play. The...
    1,150 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chinatown: Jj Gittes Within the Archetype of Noir Heroes
    J.J. Gittes is a private detective in L.A., 1937. The film begins when a woman claiming to be Evelyn Mulwray comes into his office and insists that her husband, Hollis Mulwray, is having an affair. But when Gittes follows Hollis, he winds up spending more of his time exploring the drought than discovering romantic liaisons, until finally a small blond enters the picture. The setup is that of quintessential film noir standards, though rooted in historical events. However, director Roman Polanski...
    1,003 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chinatown Reading Response - 546 Words
    Chinatown Reading Response The film Chinatown, directed by Roman Polanski, incorporates the image system of blindness vs. seeing to effectively increase the depth and complexity of how the plot is revealed to the audience. The effect of this is the audience feeling that they are not just watching a film, they are solving a mystery in time with the characters and what they see is not always the truth. This image first appears in the form of the bi-focal glasses seen at the very...
    546 Words | 2 Pages
  • Racism in Chinatown - 371 Words
    Chinatown – Racism “Chinatown”, one of director Roman Polanski’s finest films, contains an underlying deep rooted sense of racism within it. Those who weren’t of white race were constantly in the background of scenes yet rarely ever heard, busily tending to their wealthy superiors. The roles they were presented with in the film, including that of waiters, cleaners, housekeepers, gardeners held as little as authority as possible, yet unfortunately, seemed to be realistically representative of those...
    371 Words | 1 Page
  • How Do the Authors of the Two Texts Not Without My Daughter and the Pianist Use Their Protagonists to Explore a Response to Violent Social Change?
    How do the authors of the two texts Not Without My Daughter and The Pianist use their protagonists to explore a response to violent social change? A response to violent social change is explored within the two texts, Not Without My Daughter written by Betty Mahmoody, with William Hoffer and the film The Pianist directed by Roman Polanski. In these texts the authors use their protagonist to explore the idea and impact of the violent social change that these characters must survive....
    2,032 Words | 5 Pages
  • History & Memory Essay - 1178 Words
    How have texts studied in this elective challenged your ways of thinking about ‘History and Memory’? Make detailed to your prescribed text and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. “That men do not learn very much from the lessons of history is the most important of all the lessons that history has to teach.” Perhaps in recognising man’s failure to take heed of his fellow man, Aldous Huxley was recognising that humans lack the capability to learn vicariously. For in history,...
    1,178 Words | 4 Pages
  • Technique Analysis of the Pianist - 796 Words
    Within the film The Pianist Roman Polanski presents us with the important idea that man is capable of committing acts of great brutality and of destroying their fellow man and in turn humanity itself. However, Polanski also reveals that it is not a condition of Germans to be evil and Jews to be noble. In fact, it is humanity which is capable of great acts of kindness and great acts of atrocity. Polanski reveals the dual nature of humanity through the journey and rapid decline of Wladyslaw...
    796 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Is Act 2 Scene 2 Such a Vital Turning Point for Macbeth and Lady Macbeth?
    Macbeth Draft Essay In William Shakespeare’s tragedy ‘Macbeth’, the protagonist, Macbeth, and his wife Lady Macbeth, dramatically change throughout the course of the play. Macbeth starts the play as a more submissive husband and Lady Macbeth, the more dominant wife. This helps to generate a mixture of pity and fear, which is a key ingredient for making this play a tragedy, along with the death of the protagonist due to his “vaulting ambition”. Act 2 Scene 2 is a key turning point in...
    1,097 Words | 3 Pages
  • Review of Chinatown - 563 Words
    Polanski’s Chinatown is a classic of 1970’s cinema, as it tells a tale of murder, due to greed and the political issue of the drought in California. Jack Nicholson, who superbly plays the character of Jack Gittes, is a detective who investigates matters considering adultery. A woman by the name of Evelyn Mulwray insists that her husband is having an affair, asking for Mr.Gittes to find out the truth, although it is not until later on when the photos of Mr.Gittes and a lady have been released...
    563 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Pianist Oral Presentation: Inhumantity and Will to Live
    Roman Polanski’s The Pianist presents viewers with the story of one man’s desire to survive against all odds, as he endures terrible hardship and pain. Set in Warsaw, Poland, during the German invasion of World War 2, it follows the journey of Wladyslaw Szpilman, a Jewish piano player who tries to stay alive as the Jewish people are all forced into submission. The Pianist gives a very stark portrayal of the events the Jewish people endured because of the Nazi’s tyranny and also details a story...
    1,137 Words | 3 Pages
  • Polanski's Macbeth: A Review
    “The actor's performances, while far from classic, are not detrimental to the film, though his choice to portray Lady Macbeth as soft-spoken and quiet downplays the manipulative nature Shakespeare established for her in the play... In an effort to preserve realism in the film, director Roman Polanski opted to change the traditional conveyance of Shakespeare's soliloquies and asides... The opening scene with the witches was rather poorly done. Polanski made the women look so grotesquely ugly that...
    260 Words | 1 Page
  • Film Review - Chinatown - 2426 Words
    Chinatown Introduction Chinatown is a 1974 American neo-noir film, directed by Roman Polanski. The film features many elements of the film noir genre, particularly a multi-layered story that is part mystery and part psychological drama. The story, set in Los Angeles in 1937, was inspired by the California Water Wars, the historical disputes over land and water rights that had raged in southern California during the 1910s and 1920s, in which William Mulholland acted on behalf of Los Angeles...
    2,426 Words | 7 Pages
  • Chinatown - 451 Words
    Chinatown What is the central theme of Chinatown and what key symbols and motifs are used to develop this theme? Fashioned as a great film nior the 1974 classic; Chinatown is a crime drama in which central themes coincide with the idea that the world is an inherently corrupt place where men of vice conquer over the helplessness of the innocent and ignorant. Plot, characters, and setting mark this piece as a neo film nior. However it is the use of pessimistic tone, also found common in...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • History and memory - 297 Words
    emory helps form the basis of history, whereas history can be used to clarify fragmented memories. For a true understanding of the past there has to be a balance between documented evidence and personal experiences and memories. In Mark Baker’s nonfiction biography ‘The Fiftieth Gate’ (1997), and Roman Polanski’s film ‘The Pianist’ (2002) have both reconstructed the past through a combination of memories and historical documentation. The interplay of historical documentation and memories is...
    297 Words | 1 Page
  • Chinatown Film Review - 347 Words
    History through Film: Chinatown Review Stefania Pedersen In a paragraph of about 300 words, answer the following question: do you think Chinatown had the appropriate ending or should Polanski have stuck to Robert Townes’? Explain Robert Townes’ ending then tell us how it actually ends and then whether you agree or not. Use quotes from Gilliat and Kael. The film Chinatown (1974) is a neo-noir, psychological drama film, based on the California Water Wars. If the film had ended the way...
    347 Words | 1 Page
  • Angels in America: A Troubled Relationship from the Start
    Mr. and Mrs. Pitt: A Troubled Relationship from the Start In the renowned fantasy novel Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J.K. Rowling, Albus Dumbledore says, “indifference and neglect often do much more damage than outright dislike.” The play, Angels in America, A Gay Fantasia on National Themes by Tony Kushner, presents several relationships of characters. The relationship of Joe and Harper Pitt in particular plays a vital role in his play. By not making the effort to fix the...
    1,634 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chinatown: Movie Analysis - 450 Words
    Chinatown Jack Nicholson stars in Romon Polanski’s part mystery and part psychological drama Chinatown, Set in the 1940’s dried up Los Angeles. This Film is made up of a complex story line that is supported by the articulate acting of costars Fayne Dunaway and John Huston. The multilayered story line pulls you in and doesn’t let you go, as J.J. Gittes (Jack Nicholson) discovers himself trapped between mysteries trying to solve his way out. J.J. Gittes (Nicholson), a former cop, now private...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • Importance of Chinatown on the Film Chinatown
    Why is the movie Chinatown called Chinatown? The movie is called Chinatown for many reasons. The story leads up to a point where everything sort of resolves and it does it in Chinatown. To my understanding most of the Americans think of Chinatowns across the country as dangerous places. Because it is not to their understanding. And the average American citizen fears the unknown. I'm not entirely sure but the crime rate is probably higher in those areas. I mean i watched a lot of movies that...
    396 Words | 1 Page
  • The Pianist Essay - 1146 Words
    ‘The Pianist’ is a cinematic masterpiece by the Polish director Roman Polanski. One of the key ideas that appear throughout much of the film is that of ‘hope being instrumental in our survival’. This idea is portrayed through Wladyslaw Szpilman, a Polish pianist, as he struggles for survival in Warsaw as everybody that he once knew and everything that he once had is lost. The idea of ‘hope being instrumental in our survival’ is worth learning about as it allows the audience to realise the...
    1,146 Words | 3 Pages
  • Belonging101 - 432 Words
    Belonging Essay Belonging is about finding a sense of place in the world. Without this sense of place, people do not feel like they belong and belonging is a natural need, as stated by “Maslow’s hierarchy of needs”. So to achieve this natural feeling of belonging, people strive to find their sense of place in the world. In Peter Skrzynecki’s “Migrant Hostel” the whole theme of the poem is people thrown into this hostel searching for their own nationalities “like a homing pigeon” to find a...
    432 Words | 1 Page
  • Jake Gittes Character Analysis
    Nicole Lopez ENC1101 In the movie China Town Jake Gittes depicts some of the traits of your typical indifferent private investigator dealing with his clients’ marital issues including recording their adulterous acts. Jake was never fazed by anything and was a big advocate of provocative humor, even when he seemed to always find a dead end when he has a strong hunch about something. Jake seemed to be sort of a underdog of the film even from his grungy brown worn out jacket...
    550 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Pianist - 1167 Words
    Johnson 1 Kayla Johnson Prof. Hirchfelder, K-213 ENG2102, Sec. 06 26 March 2013 Scene Analysis Paper Musical Dependency The 2002 film, The Pianist directed by Roman Polanski focuses on the hardships of a well-known, local concert pianist, Wladyslaw Szpilman. Wladyslaw Szpilman is played by actor Adrien Brody, who does an excellent job portraying both the warmhearted side of Szpliman and the desperate struggling side we see later on in the film. The film is based on Szpilman’s book, The...
    1,167 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nang Nak Film Response
    Is Nang Nak ultimately a ghost story or a story about the efficacy of Thai Buddhism? Nonzee Nimibutr’s Nang Nak (1999) tells a compelling story of Nak, a ghost whose strong longing desires kept her within the human realm. Desperately trying to live a normal life with Mak, her husband, Nak kills any characters that try to inform the unsuspecting Mak of her death. Eventually Nak goes on a rampage when Mak finally realizes the truth. With the central plot being based mainly on the ghost of Nak...
    1,205 Words | 3 Pages
  • Different Types of Horror-film Viewers
    Student: Ivy Liu 402110219 Professor: Ching Ching Yi English Composition (1): Classification 2013.12 Different Types of Horror-film Viewers Horror films have always been a popular genre among the movies. You might wonder: If the film is so scary and terrifying, why are people still willing to spend time and money to be frightened? What are they thinking when they are watching? Generally speaking, these people can be divided into three categories depending on their different...
    652 Words | 2 Pages
  • Macbeth Guilts - 1046 Words
    As Macbeth enters the banquet hall (Macbeth in the movie by Roman Polanski enters the room talking to everyone happily; it zooms out to show the Lords and Lady Macbeth’s reaction to Macbeth’s toast). At this point we can tell that he cares about social status since he tells the Lords that they should sit in their own “degrees”. He feels powerful and more superior to the other Lords. Macbeth feels no remorse and guilt for having killed his friend, Banquo. On the other hand, he is more unstable...
    1,046 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Does Macbeth Engage Modern Audiences?
    Macbeth, an exciting and suspenseful drama written in the seventeenth century by William Shakespeare, still engage modern audiences. The three universal themes of Macbeth are the supernatural, the conflicts of order and ambition, which are still relevant today. This is demonstrated through the original play and Roman Polanski’s film of Macbeth produced in 1971. Shakespeare’s theme of supernatural is apparent all through his play, Macbeth. It was believed that he wrote it especially for King...
    1,020 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Pianist - 656 Words
    The pianist General information: Director: Roman Polanski. Starring: Adrien Brody, Thomas Kretschmann Book: based on the autobiographical novel “The pianist” by Wladyslaw Szpilman. Script: Ronald Harwood. Country: Polish – German – French – British co-production. Awards: Palme d’Or at Cannes, Oscar for Best Director, Best Actor, Best Adapted screenplay. Music: Wojciech Kilar, Frederic Chopin Distribution: Focus Features Plot The film is about a Jewish –Polish pianist,...
    656 Words | 4 Pages
  • Shoe Horn Sonata - 1019 Words
    English Assignment The Pianist is about world war 2. The pianist is about how the Jewish were fighting with the Narzi because the Narzi wanted to take over the nation. Szpilman is the main character in the movie, he is known as a polish jew. He and his family are have limited resources and in order for them to gain money they had to sell their piano has sentimental value because it was treasured to him and his family. Szpilman and his family and the jewish were forced to move to another...
    1,019 Words | 3 Pages
  • Critical Analysis of the Artful Dodger in Dickens' Oliver Twist
    Write a Critical Analysis of the Character of the Artful Dodger in Dickens’ Oliver Twist. Would You Describe the Dodger Only as a Victim of Circumstances? Jack Dawkins, also known as the Artful Dodger, is one of the most interesting and memorable characters in Dickens’ Oliver Twist. He is reckless and very good at pickpocketing. He is denied the opportunity of choosing his own way of life and is fated to become a criminal. Jack has been a victim of circumstances all his life....
    651 Words | 2 Pages
  • Macbeth vs Scotland, Pa
    Macbeth: The thin line between tragedy and dark humor. William Shakespeare's Macbeth has always been considered one of the literary worlds most celebrated tragedies. It is arguably the darkest and most gruesome of his plays. The protagonist, Macbeth, is the poster child for tragic hero, "a literary character who makes an error of judgment or has a fatal flaw that, combined with fate and external forces, brings on a tragedy" (www.dictionary.com). And until recently we were satisfied...
    1,155 Words | 3 Pages
  • WHY WE CRAVE HORROR
     Calvin brown Analyzing “Why We Crave Horror movies” EN1320 The purpose of this article is to explain why we as people are so in to horror movies. The intended audience is anyone who loves horror movies. Why We Crave Horror Movies he attempts to explain the reasons we go in to dark movie theaters and endure the horror of a scary movie. His main conclusion is that we are all a little deranged as he states, “If we are all insane, then sanity becomes a matter of...
    476 Words | 2 Pages
  • Macbeth Film Interpretation - 1087 Words
    Polanski’s Macbeth There have been many different versions of Shakespeare’s Macbeth. All of which include different endings and portrayals of characters. However, Polanski’s adaptation is probably the most contradistinctive to the other films. Polanski transformed the ordinary script to something new, refreshing and ingenious with his selection of exceptional actors he was able to create a whole new story of Macbeth. Polanski created this film after the gruesome murder of his wife, Sharon...
    1,087 Words | 4 Pages
  • Banquo and Macbeth - 358 Words
    Banquo's Ghost appearing at the banquet is a graphic manifestation of the guilt that Macbeth feels. Since, Lady Macbeth needs to make excuses for Macbeth’s interaction with the ghost of Banquo means that the ghost is only visible in Macbeth’s eyes. During Macbeth’s coronation banquet, Lady Macbeth pulls Macbeth asides and asks him the reason behind his inappropriate behavior. Macbeth becomes angry because Lady Macbeth robustly accuses him of lying. When Lady Macbeth calls Macbeth a liar he...
    358 Words | 1 Page
  • Striping Away Humanity - 927 Words
    Myriam ENG 101 Section 16 12/03/2013 Pratt Striping Away Humanity The Pianist is a phenomenal movie that successfully put the audience into the life of Wladyslaw Sziplman, a fugitive trying to survive World War II in Poland. The cinematography of the movie overall looked carefully crafted together with just the right amount of contrast, symbolism, and depth. He was not remembered as a hero, but as a man who was lucky enough to survive through such a tragedy. Roman Polanski efficiently...
    927 Words | 3 Pages