Rabbit-Proof Fence Essays & Research Papers

Best Rabbit-Proof Fence Essays

  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 660 Words
    Advanced English Preliminary; Area of Study - Journeys Good morning/good afternoon Ms. Bateman & classmates. The related text that I have chosen to associate with journeys is the film, Rabbit Proof Fence directed by Phillip Noyce. The film relates to the journey concept as it is based on a true story of three Aboriginal girls who were forcibly removed from their mothers in 1931 to a settlement 2000 kilometres away, where the Aboriginal children were forced to accept & adapt to the Australian...
    660 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 1108 Words
    How does Noyce position the reader to sympathise with the three protagonists? Throughout Rabbit-Proof Fence, Noyce encourages the viewer to understand and imaginatively experience the story through the feelings of the children. The narrative structure, visual symbolism, camera angles, music, characterisation and use and absence of language are techniques that Noyce uses to position the reader to sympathise with the three protagonists. In the scene in which the children arrive at the Moore...
    1,108 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 722 Words
    Composers of texts use a number of individual (and combinations of several) techniques to reprensent the concept of the physical journey and specifically that it is the journey, not the destination that matters. Noyce has used a number of filimic and literary techniques thoughout “Rabbit Proof Fence” to ddo this. The use of symbolism, lighting, characterisation and camera angles all enable Noyce to express the physical journey being explored. The cover of Kellehers’ novel ______ uses visual...
    722 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 845 Words
    In “Rabbit Proof Fence” directed by Phillip Noyce, the main themes in the film are the loss of a home and family and the strong bond with family. From the scene depicting Molly, Gracie and Daisy’s journey back home, the audience observes the struggle they face as they travel 1500 miles through unfamiliar territory to return to their land, their homes and families. It reveals Molly’s ambition to return to her Mother. Phillip Noyce conveys this to the viewers by the use of camera angles and...
    845 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Rabbit-Proof Fence Essays

  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 376 Words
    Rabbit Proof Fence A contemporary Australian feature film released in 2002 and direct by Phillip Noyce. Child characters: Molly (14), Daisy (8) and Gracie (10) walk 1600km home to their desert home in Jigalong from the mission called the Moore River Native Settlement north of Perth * Noyce uses oral and written historical methods to tell the story * He uses real and fictional characters to present an emotive and supportive narrative of the girl’s journey, showing the white authorities...
    376 Words | 1 Page
  • Rabbit-Proof Fence - 432 Words
    Characters: Molly – oldest girl captured leads the others in an attempt to escape (14 years old) leader, strong, courage Daisy – Molly’s younger sister (8 years old) Gracie – Molly and Daisy’s cousin, gets recaptured by the government at the train station (10 years old) Neville – Keeping surveillance with all the Aboriginals in WA and sees nothing wrong with taking the half castes from their families. Setting: Time – 1931 Location – WA, Moore River Native Settlement, Jigalong Plot: 3...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging: Rabbit Proof Fence
    Belonging essay “A sense of belonging comes from having connections with people and place”/ Compare how the texts you have studied convey these ideas. Who am I? Where do I belong? ‘A person’s identity is shaped by their sense of belonging and/or not belonging’. This concept is clearly explored in the touching movie “Rabbit proof fence” of three girls running away to find way home, to where they belong to. Whereas, Peter Skrzynecki’s poems “Postcard” and “10 Marry Street” focus on the...
    1,644 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 511 Words
    Rabbit Proof Fence An Australian film Rabbit Proof Fence directed by Philip Noyce is reliable to an historian studying the Protection policies of the Australian Government during the 1930's in that it tells a true story about three Aboriginal children who were taken away from their families because they were half-castes. However, it is not reliable in that it only tells us about the effect of Protection policy in Western Australia, not the whole country. This film outlines the...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Essay
    Rabbit Proof Fence Good Morning/Afternoon Class Mates, Today I will show and discuss the extract “Rabbit Proof Fence” by Phillip Noyce. To present how the aboriginal culture was taken away and how it was treated. The viewer is also able to visualise our past. The stolen generation is an issue that is a part of our past and through the use of evaluative language and emotive language. The viewer is able to develop their understanding and acceptance of the human experience of the aboriginal...
    358 Words | 1 Page
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Review
    The Book Rabbit Proof Fence is the true account of Molly Craig as told to her daughter Doris Pilkington, who, as a child was forcibly removed along with two cousins from their families. It was 1931 when Molly 14, Gracie 11 and Daisy 8 were taken from their families at Jigalong in Western Australia, because of their part Aboriginal, and part European heritage. The story tells of the girls’ escape from the Moore River Native Settlement and their incredible journey to make it home. The book...
    1,020 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 617 Words
    Question: "Once we learn to walk in someone else's shoes we can truly understand the meaning of freedom" How have the set texts explored the idea of freedom? You should refer to examples from all three texts in detail, as well the techniques used by each composer to communicate their ideas. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Rabbit Proof Fence by Doris Pilkington Garimari and I have a Dream (speech) by Martin Luther King Jr. all explore the idea of freedom. Freedom is being able to act...
    617 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 1822 Words
    “The journey not the arrival matters” Discuss this statement focusing on HOW the composers of your prescribed text and two related texts represent the concept of journey. A physical journey involves both a beginning and ending. The beginning and ending is not what is important, in fact the journey itself is important. Physical journeys involve movement to new places whilst incurring obstacles. A physical journey has many opportunities for its travellers, these allow for physical,...
    1,822 Words | 5 Pages
  • Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence
    Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence The book ‘Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence’ that is written by Doris Pilkington is about three aboriginal half-cast girls that run away from The Moore River Native Settlement. At the settlement aboriginal half-cast children are kept and tried to be changed into white people so they can be respected in the community. The book is set in Western Australia in the early 1900’s. ‘This free-Spirited girl knew that she and her sisters must escape from this place,’ is true,...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Summary
    Rabbit proof fence An Australian drama movie 2002 Book: “Follow the rabbit proof fence” by Doris Pilkington Garimara. Which is the true story of her mother, Molly. The movie takes place in Western Australia during the 1930´s the story begins in a remote town of Jigalong where three children live with their mother and grandmother. 14 yr old Molly 8 yr old Daisy 10 yr old Gracie The town lies along the rabbit proof fence, which runs for several thousand miles. The...
    332 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 846 Words
    Physical journeys involve the movement of a person from one place to another. They provide opportunities for travellers to extend themselves physically, intellectually and emotionally as they respond to challenges and learn more about the world around them. This concept of physical journeys can be clearly seen in the texts “Rabbit-Proof Fence” by Phillip Noyce and “A Horse with No Name” by America. Both texts use a number of methods and technical features, to represent the journey and the impact...
    846 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 498 Words
    in Rabbit Proof Fence, Molly’s journey home to Jigalong is a journey from childhood to adulthood, which challenges her physically, emotionally and intellectually. Through the many obstacles Molly encounters and overcomes, she begins to understand her personal strength, allowing her the ability to mature and become independent. The geographical distance alone created a physical and emotional exhaustion and frustration which Molly tolerates with maturity and strength. The cinematic technique using...
    498 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 549 Words
    Journal: Photography, Rabbit Proof fence The film, Rabbit Proof Fence, directed by Phillip Noyce, takes place in 1931 and follows three aboriginal girls through the Australian outback on their journey back home. The three girls were taken from their home by the government because they were half-caste children. Half-caste was the name given to children in Australia who had one black parent and one white parent. The three girls were put into one of these camps but later escaped and began their...
    549 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Rabbit Proof Fence Essay
    Directed by Phillip Noyce, The Rabbit Proof Fence main message is determination. It is based on a true story about 3 half­caste girls who ran away from the Moore River Native Settlement to return to their Aboriginal families, after being placed there. The film follows the Aboriginal girls as they walk for nine weeks along 1,500 miles of the Australian rabbit­proof fence to return to their community at Jigalong in harsh conditions, while ...
    490 Words | 0 Page
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 833 Words
    The Rabbit Proof-fence The movie is an Australian drama film made in 2002. It shows the history of the Aboriginals during the 1930s. It was directed by Phillip Noyce based on the book written by Doris Pilkington Garimara, it is based on a true story told by the two girls who ran away for the More River Native Settlement as shown in the movie. In 100 years, Aborigines resisted the white settlers. Now a specific law is controlling them how to govern their lives down to the smallest detail. Mr....
    833 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 672 Words
    History Essay – Rabbit Proof Fence The film ‘Rabbit Proof Fence” by Phillip Noyce is based on a true story of three Aboriginal girls, who were taken away from their family in 1931. Noyce portrays the varying experiences of the stolen generations through the journey of the young girls as they try to escape and head back home to their family, home and land. Factors contributing to their experience include The Moore River Settlement institution, the challenges they occur through their journey, as...
    672 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Questions
    THE RABBIT-PROOF FENCE 1. How does the sound add to your understanding of the context? The sound sort of tells you that movie is set in a desert like place. 2. What is the effect of the Ariel shot of the desert landscape, followed by the distant shot The Ariel shot shows you that there is not a lot there, that there was people here for thousands of years and that they get by, by using their survival skills that have been passed down generation by generation. 3. How does Noyce...
    873 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 606 Words
    Rabbit Proof Fence – Notes * Rabbit-Proof Fence tells the true story of three Aboriginal girls who are forcibly removed from their families. Set in 1931, their removal was part of an official Australian government policy which removed ‘half caste’ children from their parents and placed them within institutions that trained these children to become domestic servants. The story centres on the three girls escape from the Moore River Settlement (the institution in which they are placed) and...
    606 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 1584 Words
    Essay- Journeys A journey is more than just movement from one place to another. It is about learning and growth. In this essay, it will attempt to discuss this statement with reference to the focus text, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn a novel by Mark Twain, Journeys over Land and Sea, Item 6 from the Stimulus Booklet, Rabbit Proof Fence a film by Phillip Noyce and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, a poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge. The focus text is a story of a boy's adventure down the...
    1,584 Words | 5 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 660 Words
    Though Philip Noyce’s 2002 movie “Rabbit Proof Fence” challenges cultural beliefs and social values, it is equally about finding a place in the belief system for Indigenous Australians. It mounts a very serious challenge to accepted notions of equality and fairness, but just as clearly demands that our traditional reverence for courage and the challenge in the face of adversity extends to marginalised groups traditionally ignored in the creation of our national value system. The qualities shown...
    660 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 679 Words
    Rabbit-Proof Fence Rabbit proof fence tells a true story of three young aboriginal girls, who are taken from their mothers and forced to be “re-educated” of the western ways at a remote settlement near Moore River. Molly, the oldest of the three, takes responsibility of the 2 younger girls, Gracie and Daisy. Molly, Gracie and daisy are taken away from their home in jigalong, they suffered a long journey to an education camp near Moore River, throughout their epic journey they attempt the...
    679 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 832 Words
    Q1. 'Rabbit Proof Fence' highlights how experiences change our point of view. Discuss. Can you imagine being an Aborigine? Living in the outback? Hunting for food? What would your point of view be if you were brought up that way? Or maybe you were a white person. What would your point of view be then? What would you think of the Aborigines and their way of living and the way they were brought up compared to you? All the different experiences people have such as how we are brought up, our...
    832 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 284 Words
    Related Material Analysis Rabbit Proof Fence- 2002 Phillip Noyce How does Rabbit-Proof Fence explore the concept of journeys? Introduction The Film Rabbit-Proof Fence directed by Phillip Noyce in 2002 explores the concept of journeys through the telling of the story of three girls as they are captured and sent to the Moore River Native Settlement in Outback Australia. The three girls dually escape and set off on a 1600km trek, guided by the Rabbit Proof Fence back to Jigalong to be reunited...
    284 Words | 1 Page
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Essay
    TEXTUAL RESPONSE ‘Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence’ ‘This free-spirited girl knew that she and her sisters must escape from this place’. What characteristics did Molly display which enabled the sisters to escape and return to their families? Not only is this book about how three little aboriginal girls travelled across half of Australia but is also teaches us how the aboriginals were treated. Throughout Doris Pilkington’s and Nugi Garimara’s novel, the protagonist Molly, has a set of...
    721 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Summary
    Rabbit proof fence Rabbit-Proof Fence is not fiction. It is the true story of three Aborigine children Molly and Daisy and their cousin, Gracie who in 1931 were taken forcibly from their mothers and their home in Jigalong in the north of Australia and moved to the Moore River Native Settlement over a thousand miles away. Rabbit-Proof Fence is the story of their remarkable escape from the settlement and their adventures on the journey home to Jigalong. It was government policy to remove...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 583 Words
    RABBIT PROOF FENCE INTRODUCTION 50, 000 half- cast aboriginal children were taken away from their families in the 20th century. Can you imagine being taken away from everything and everyone you ever loved or cared about to never see them in your life again? The film “The Rabbit Proof Fence” directed by Philip Noyce set in Western Australia highlights unfairness and the vulnerability of aboriginal people. The stolen generation is a devastating story. It is honestly hard to believe that...
    583 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Notes
    Summary Title: Rabbit Proof Fence Composer: Phillip Noyce Screen Play: Christine Olsen Year: 2002 Text Type: Film Genre: Adventure, Drama, History Appropriation: * Dorris Pilkington Garimara's book; Follow the Rabbit Proof Fence Audience: * Non-indigenous People * Possibly Internationally Purpose: * To inform responders of the injustices done to Aboriginal Australians * To persuade responders to empathise with victims of the stolen generations * To...
    499 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Speech
    Assessment Task- ) Good morning class, today I will tell you why it is extremely important for students to study texts that represent a variety of cultures. The films I have deconstructed to convey my points are “Bend it like Beckham”, directed by Gurinder Chadha and “Rabbit Proof Fence”, directed by Phillip Noyce. The cultural concepts explained in these movies are the early 1900s British culture and how dominant and cruel they were, the aboriginal Australians and how they were treated...
    649 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit-Proof Fence - 583 Words
    "Rabbit Proof Fence" What comes to your mind when you here the words "stolen generation." Maybe you think of the Holocaust when the Jews were unwilling taken to concentration camp's to suffer before their horrific death. Or you might think of the European settlers going to Africa to literally kidnap its people and bring them to the Americas for slave labor. Both are good assumptions but are far from what the "stolen generation" really is. Until watching the documentary "Rabbit Proof...
    583 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 685 Words
    "Rabbit-Proof Fence" Summary: An overview of the ways in which the film "Rabbit-Proof Fence" conveys the importance of home, family, and country to indigenous peoples. The film "Rabbit-Proof Fence" conveys the importance of home and country to indigenous peoples. The director Phillip Noyce refers to home in different ways. He has symbolised home by repeatedly showing images of the Spirit Bird and the Rabbit Proof Fence, since it is a connection to their home. The movie shows Molly's...
    685 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence Analysis
    In this essay I will be examining the movie ‘Rabbit Proof Fence' .I am here to talk to you about the movie Rabbit Proof Fence. The movie is set in a time that is vastly different from today. Europeans had only recently infiltrated Australian borders and it had not taken long for the Aboriginal people to be reduced to second-rate citizens and have rights taken away from them in a land that was once exclusively theirs. The year is 1931, and a new policy has been introduced by Mr. Neville who is...
    517 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 381 Words
    Rabbit-Proof Fence is a film directed by Phillip Noyce. It is about three mixed-race Aboriginal girls who ran away from the Moore River Native Settlement to return to their mothers. The girls walk for nine weeks and 1200 miles of the rabbit-proof fence in Australia to return to Jigalong, their hometown while being tracked down by a hunter and several others under Mr Neville’s orders. The film uses several effective production techniques such as a variety of camera shots to fulfill different...
    381 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit-Proof Fence Journal Entry
    Rabbit-Proof Fence Personal Response Dear diary, It had felt like an eternity but the day had finally given way to night. The departure of the daylight offered my sunbaked skin refuge from the dry heat that constantly pressed down on me. My weary muscles lent me just enough energy to lift my heavy head and scan the horizon to ensure that the Tracker was long gone. Occasionally, I glanced up and gazed upon the colorful specks of light that were interspersed within the inky black sky. It was...
    560 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Rabbit Proof Fence Study Notes
    Journeys notes Rabbit Proof Fence Film, Phillip Noyce director, 3 half caste girls taken from their family to be assimilated, 1200 mile journey home Journeys can be forced upon you by others Being forced into the car - reaction shots of girls and family, horror of force - close up facial shots of girls, distant family – filmed through glass to show separation Journeys can be intimidating and threatening Girls in cage- Molly looking up at guard. Point of view shot showing...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • English Rabbit Proof Fence Essay
     The term journey implies travel. It is a progression, either physical, mental or spiritual. In the classic Australian film, Rabbit Proof Fence, released in 2000, Phillip Noyce recreates the authentic story of three young Aboriginal girls, Molly, Daisy and Gracie, and their miraculous journey back home, after being forcibly removed from their families and home at Jigalong. Noyce suggests two distinct journeys through his film including the physical journey of the three girls finding their way...
    1,105 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence: Physical Journeys
    Physical Journeys The concept of physical journeys creates and shapes understanding by revealing that journeys are complex, entailing both physical and mental components in which travellers often embark on an exploration of themselves physically, intellectually and emotionally. The experience of journeys provides opportunity for obstacles and determination. Bystanders possess an important role in journeys as they maybe the facilitators, of change or be the audience who themselves have to go on...
    1,015 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - Help to Study
    Rabbit Proof Fence – Discussion Questions for English Class 1STTI While watching the movie, take notes and think about the following questions: 1. What is the history and context of the film? When is it set? In what genre is it? Is it based on a true story, a book? Is it fictional? True story. 2. How did the cameraman use specific angles, lighting and music in the film to indicate different moods? What did you notice about the camera angels as the girls became more threatened,...
    291 Words | 1 Page
  • Belonging: Family and Rabbit Proof Fence
    Belonging is a way of having acceptance, security, fulfilment and a connection in association to people, places, groups, communities, and the world itself. There are different notions of belonging, however, they are recognising in cultural, historical, personal and social contexts. New experiences and changes in relationships affect our sense of belonging, in which explored through family relationships, connections with land, and into a new society world. These themes can be seen in Alice...
    1,252 Words | 3 Pages
  • rabbit proof fence film techniques
    Rabbit Proof Fence Filming Techniques. At the start of the movie we are given Molly speaks to us in her traditional language, during this duration we are given beautiful shots of Jigalong, and after them we are shown Molly and her family I believe this was made for background information but also to keep the viewers at their seats at the same time. We are also given close ups o the main characters which obviously communicates to us that the character is the one being spoken about. Phillip Noyce...
    584 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof-Fence, an Idea of Power and Paternalism
    In the visual text ‘Rabbit Proof-Fence’ directed by Phillip Noyce, I see the interesting idea of power and paternalism. This is made interesting through cinematography, symbolism and verbal features. The film is about the Aborigines facing difficulties under the paternalistic policies of the whites who have power over them and the adventure of three Aborigine girls running away from the white control back to their mothers, across the Australian Outback. Firstly, I see how cinematography is...
    987 Words | 3 Pages
  • Film Review Notes Rabbit Proof Fence
    The Start of the Film The film begins with background information, powerful music and what appear to be abstract images. The vastness of the outback and the girls' daunting trip is highlighted by the opening aerial shots, and additional overhead shots confirm their tininess against the fence. Name a recurring theme throughout the film. Throughout the film, the girls are pictured as frightened rabbits trapped on the wrong side of the fence - wide-eyed as if caught in headlights, caged...
    981 Words | 5 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence & Peter Skyznecki Belonging
    The process of studying the concept of belonging has opened my eyes to the importance of one’s connection to their cultural heritage to a feeling of belonging. Phillip Noyce’s film Rabbit Proof Fence, Peter Skzynecki’s poems “Feliks Skrzynecki” and “Postcard” and ______________(the related text) all powerfully explore the concept of belonging and the centrality of culture through a variety of film, poetic and ___________ techniques. In particular, all four texts investigate how a sense of...
    1,012 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rabbit-Proof Fence: a Short Film Report.
    Rabbit-Proof Fence is an Australian-produced drama movie and semi-documentary, being based on a book and true story told by Doris Pilkington Garimara. Her book is called Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence, and by watching the movie we can easily see why it bears that name. The story takes place in 1931, a time quite different from ours, when the indigenous Aborigines were suppressed by the relatively newly arrived white Europeans. The Aborigines were reduced to "lower-caste" citizens, and had...
    392 Words | 1 Page
  • Rabbit Proof Film - 860 Words
    Title: Rabbit proof fence Director: Phillip Noyce Text: Film In Rabbit proof fence, I was shocked and disgusted at the treatment of half­caste children in Australia during the 1930s. In this text Molly a young half­caste child is snatched from her Aboriginal homeland, Jigalong and placed into the Moore river settlement. The characters that run the settlement constrict molly and her sisters of their identity and forcefully inject the ...
    860 Words | 1 Page
  • China Coin and Rabbit Proof
    China Coin and Rabbit Proof Fence Acceptance and understanding of ones get individuality are necessity for a sense of be. In order to feel a sense of inclusion in society, Individuals must have a deep understanding of their own identity. Without an acceptance of their close and belief, Individuals bath face a sense of exclusion from society. In the novel, The chinaware Coin by Allan Baillie, Leah the protagonist refuses to accept her true identity which results in her not feeling a sense of...
    355 Words | 1 Page
  • Integrated Essay - Rabbit Proof Fence, a Righteous Day, Journey to the Interior
    All journeys require a strong sense of ones humanity in order to be successful. In ken Watsons anthology “at the round Earth imagined corners” ‘A righteous day by Mudrooroo and Journey to the interior’ by Margret Atwood and as well as the film ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’ by Phillip Noyce have all expanded my understanding of journeys to myself individuals and the world. Through these texts we can observe different aspects of a journey. Journeys are essential in life because they teach us to overcome...
    739 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging, Rabbit Proof Fence, Immigrant Chronicle, Through Australian Eyes
    • The texts I will refer to are “Rabbit Proof Fence” (RPF), a film by Phillip Noyce, “immigrant chronicle” a collection of poems by Peter Skrzynecki, and documentary “Through Australia Eyes” (TAE) by William Fitzwater. • A sense of belonging arises from the connection and disconnection between people, culture and communities. In IC, the persona is confused about his cultural identity. He struggles to recognise his cultural identity, which is similar to Ellen Youie in TAE, who does not feel...
    1,522 Words | 5 Pages
  • Discuss the Symbolism and Motifs in the ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’. What Do They Represent and How Do They Contribute to the Story?
    Rabbit Proof Fence Discuss the symbolism and motifs in the ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’. What do they represent and how do they contribute to the story? The film ‘Rabbit Proof Fence’ conveys the importance of family, belonging and country to the Aboriginal people and provides the audience with an insight of the division between the Europeans and the Aboriginal people. The Director, Philip Noyce displays these themes by the use of symbolism and motifs. Symbolism is the use of one object to...
    972 Words | 3 Pages
  • Once We Learn to Walk in Someone Else's Shoes We Truly Understand the Meaning of Freedom to Kill a Mocking Bird Rabbit Proof Fence Martin Luther King I Have a Dream English Speech
    Nelson Mandela once said to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. Freedom is defined as the power or right to act, speak, or think as one, it is to not be imprisoned or enslaved but in all the text we have studied it is about people who do not have freedom and it shows the people who are on the quest to find it and the people who are trying to get it for them as some others may try to prevent them achieving it as in...
    289 Words | 1 Page
  • In the film Rabbit Proof Fence, We, as the viewer, are positioned to see Mr Neville as a mostly unsympathetic character. How has the director, Phillip Noyce used various techniques to achieve this?
    In the film "Rabbit Proof Fence", the character A.O. Neville is portrayed as a mostly unsympathetic character. The director, Phillip Noyce used the technique of camera angles to develop Neville's character as very authoritative and controlling of the other characters in the movie. The soundtrack, particularly the sound effects, are also used to develop Neville's character. He is shown to be very isolated from the suffering of Aborigines and only concerned for rules and regulations. The lighting...
    1,259 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sense of Belonging "China Coin"
    Relationship and experiences shapes an individual’s sense of belonging, at times to a greater or lesser extent can create a sense of marginalization or alienation. The following texts: A drama “Rabbit-Proof Fence” produced by Phillip Noyce. A novel “The China Coin” written by Allan Baillie explore this notion quite explicitly. All people strive to achieve a sense of belonging, however, this may impeded if their sense of identity fragile. For some, their sense of belonging may depend up...
    422 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging Essay - 1607 Words
    In what way has your study of concept of belonging broadened and deepened your understanding of yourself and the world? Belonging is a basic human need yet it is a constantly changing one. It is the result of understanding and making meaningful connections with a culture. However, a sense of belonging can only be altered or formed if the person actively chooses to understand that to which they would belong and adapt to it. By reading Peter Skrzynecki’s poetry ’10 Mary Street’ and ‘Feliks...
    1,607 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Sense of Belonging May Emerge from Connections to People and Places
    ‘A sense of belonging may emerge from connections to people and places’ Belonging to people or place is a fundamental human need. An individual’s sense of belonging can be enriched or hindered through disconnection and displacement. Three texts which illustrate the complexities of belonging, are the selected poems Feliks Skrzynecki and 10 Mary Street by Peter Skrzynecki, Phillip Noyce’s film Rabbit Proof Fence, and a vastly different film Into the Wild by Sean Penn. Feliks Skrzynecki A...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • Race: Social Construct - 654 Words
    Race as a Social Construct “Race dominates our personal lives” (192 López). Race is constantly a part of people’s lives and throughout the film Rabbit Proof Fence directed by Phillip Noyce and the Critical Race Theory written by Ian Lopez, we are able to see in what ways it affects people. The film depicts a group of three half caste Aborigine girls, who are taken from their family by a white man, Mr. Neville. The girls are taken to be trained as servants and also so they can assimilate to the...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • “a Sense of Belonging Can Emerge from the Connections Made with People, Places, Groups, Communities and the Larger World”
    “A sense of belonging can emerge from the connections made with people, places, groups, communities and the larger world” Discuss how this statement is true in relation to your prescribed texts and one other related text. More than anything else, the desire for individuals to belong to a community or group is an important part of a human being. A sense of belonging can emerge from the connections made with people, places, groups, communities and the larger world. These ideas can be...
    1,155 Words | 3 Pages
  • Belonging Essay - 1043 Words
    “A sense of belonging can emerge from connections with communities and people.” Stella Wu The concepts of belonging are primarily come from attachment with communities and individuals. In the novel “swallow the air” (Tara June Winch 2006) and the movie “Rabbit-Proof Fence” (Phillip Noyce 2002), authors use various language and visual techniques apply to writing and visual cohesion such as symbolism, motif, quotes and cycle to tell similar story about “the stolen generation”. “Rabbit-Proof...
    1,043 Words | 3 Pages
  • mingxiong - 596 Words
    ................................................ sdf gfd g sd fg sd Rabbit-proof Fence Summary & Study Guide Description Rabbit-proof Fence Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections: •Plot Summary •Chapters •Important People •Objects/Places...
    596 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mr Neville Was Only Doing His Job. He Cannot Be Blamed for His Actions. Discuss
    The film, “Rabbit Proof Fence,” directed by Phillip Noyce, explores the themes surrounding the actions of Chief Protector A.O. Neville. The film is set in the 1930s where racism towards Aborigines was rampant, both institutionally, and on a personal basis. A.O Neville’s actions caused Molly, Gracie, Daisy and their parents grief and anguish, however, he cannot solely be blamed for his actions. The Aboriginal act passed through Parliament in 1931 was the main reason for the hundreds of children...
    615 Words | 2 Pages
  • Journey Essay - 1814 Words
    Identify the significant challenges explored by the composers of the texts you have studied and discuss how they affected audience’s perceptions of such experiences. In your answer, refer to your TWO prescribed texts, ONE text from the prescribed stimulus booklet, Journeys, and at least ONE other related text of your own choosing. A word ‘travel’ suggests adventure and excitement. However, if one considers the origin of the word ‘travel’ – from the French word ‘travail’ which means work,...
    1,814 Words | 5 Pages
  • Plague - 714 Words
    Anna Hillot English The Rabbit-proof fence Capital Mr A.O. Neville, chief protector of aborigines -Also has the power to remove any aborigine in the state. During the 1930s, Molly, a 13 year- old aboriginal, is living in harsh, impoverished conditions with her family and other aborigines. Molly is outstandingly courageous, and is a great risk - taker. She lives in a hut made of twigs, logs and bramble also some grass,with her cousin, Gracie, younger sister, Daisy with her Mother and...
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  • Physical Journey - 2182 Words
    Section III: Essay Focus – Physical Journeys How do the texts that you have studied explore the assumptions underlying the concept of the physical journey? There are many assumptions about what a physical journey is. On one level, it is simply the movement from and origin to a new area known as the destination. The underlying concept however is much more detailed on a personal level. Physical journeys essentially begin with a catalyst, trigger, course that gives a person or people a...
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  • Peter Skrzynecki - 1008 Words
    An individual’s perception of belonging evolves in response to the passage of time and interaction with their world. To what extent is this view of belonging represented in your prescribed text and at least one related text. One’s attitude to belonging can be greatly influenced overtime, due to uncontrollable forces impacting on them. In Felik’s Skrzynecki’s, the father and the persona are slowly pushed away due to cultural differences. The notion of not belonging additionally, is illustrated...
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  • Belongin - 1422 Words
    ------------------------------------------------- Belonging is essential to developing an understanding of one’s identity. ------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------- Compare how the texts you have studied convey this idea. In your response refer to your TWO prescribed texts and ONE text of your own choosing. Belonging is essential to developing an understanding of one’s identity. Throughout childhood to adolescence, people...
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  • Belonging Essay - 777 Words
    How does Phillip Noyce use film techniques to create ideas about belonging in the scene? Belonging is feeling of security and support when there is a sense of acceptance, inclusion and identity to a member trying to fit into a certain group, place etc. It describes how an individual feels a sense of satisfaction and happiness, uniting many people together as one. The concept of belonging is clearly illustrated in the “Removal Scene” from the “Rabbit-Proof Fence” directed by Phillip Noyce. This...
    777 Words | 2 Pages
  • Walking in Someone Else's Shoes
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, Rabbit Proof Fence by Phillip Noyce, and Martin Luther King Jr’s speech I have a Dream, all explore the lesson that Atticus teaches Scout. The lesson of Walking in someone else’s shoes. The metaphor of walking in someone else’s shoes indicates the understanding of a person by seeing things from his or her perspective. These three texts are set in the 20th Century, during a time of great racial inequalities and discrimination in society. To Kill a Mockingbird...
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  • Belonging Essay - 1141 Words
    Belonging is a complex challenge that encompasses all aspects of our life including identity, relationships and connections to the greater world. An individual’s choice to either embrace or resist the challenge is heavily influenced by past experiences and the ramifications of these experiences on an individual’s sense of self-worth. Both genuine relationships and connection to a particular physical environment can also affect the response of an individual and encourage them to embrace the...
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  • Molly Craig Character Analysis
    Molly Craig Character Analysis- Rabbit Proof Fence Molly Craig is the main character in the film, Rabbit Proof Fence. Molly is introduced at the very start of the film and is the daughter of Maude, an Aboriginal woman. This story is shown in Molly’s perspective at the home; Jigalong and the Moore River Settlement where ‘half-castes children’, like Molly are forcibly taken from their homes. Molly is a ‘half-caste child’, meaning a child of mixed race. This film is trying to show the truth of the...
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  • Belonging Essay Guideline - 845 Words
    Belonging is central to how we define ourselves: our belonging to people, places and groups enables one to develop a distinct identity terminated by affiliation, acceptance and association. Martin Luther King’s speech ‘I have a Dream’, Charles Dickens novel ‘Oliver Twist’ and Peter Skzynecki’s poems ‘________’ and ‘________’ all powerfully explore the concept of belonging and the centrality of culture and identity through a variety of poetic, literary and persuasive language techniques. In...
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  • Theme Essay - 786 Words
    Justice is said to be the act of being just and fair. However, justice is defined less by words and more implicitly by the work and actions of those that strive for it, and the hardships they undergo to attain the aforementioned justice. History has shown to us that the path of true justice is paved by true sacrifice. In consequence, it is very true that achieving justice often comes at a price. Illustrated in real life tales from these three masterpieces ; ‘The Kite Runner’ by Khaled Hosseini,...
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  • 2011 Hsc Section 2 Belonging (2)
    2011 Higher School Certificate Examination Section II 20 marks Attempt Question 2 Allow about 40 minutes for this section Answer the question in a SEPARATE writing booklet. Extra writing booklets are available. In your answer you will be assessed on how well you: ■ demonstrate understanding of the ways language shapes and expresses perceptions ■ organise, develop and express ideas using language appropriate to audience, purpose and context Question 2 (20 marks) ‘A sense...
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  • Rivers - 6805 Words
    Riverside Girls High School Stage 4 English Rabbit-Proof Fence unit Rationale Students read and view several texts, including the film, screenplay and nonfiction versions of Rabbit-Proof Fence, in order to: 1. develop an appreciation of Aboriginal experience, especially the experience of the Stolen Generation 2. develop their understanding of how ideas are communicated through texts for a range of purposes, audiences and contexts. Resources |Fiction |Gracie...
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  • Belonging English Speech - 1505 Words
    Belonging English Speech INTRO Belonging is a fundamental part for all individuals in which we strive for acceptance and security through others. Understanding is a main part of feeling like you belonging. Individuals belong when they fell connected to others and the world. However to do this they must first have an understanding and acceptance of self which will nourish their sense of belonging. A lack of understanding of the concept of belonging and yourself leads to preventing your...
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  • Beneath Clouds - 693 Words
    Journey is the act of moving from one place to another, even though most journeys seem physical; many people who embark on a physical journey may also experience an inner journey themself. Ivan Sen’s Beneath Clouds is about two indigenous teenagers who embark on a journey to find more about themselves. Vaughn and Lena both embarks on a journey to find their parents. Vaughn and Lena goes a journey to find their parents. The main themes of Beneath Clouds are Family, friends and racism. Family...
    693 Words | 2 Pages