Psycho Essays & Research Papers

Best Psycho Essays

  • Psycho, the Movie - 2387 Words
    From the site: http://geocities.com/Hollywood/Lot/7145/ By Esteban Mejia Mesa (2001) Psycho (1960) Perhaps no other film changed so drastically Hollywood's perception of the horror film as did PSYCHO. More surprising is the fact that this still unnerving horror classic was directed by Alfred Hitchcock, a filmmaker who never relied upon shock values until this film. Here Hitchcock indulged in nudity, bloodbaths, necrophilia, transvestism, schizophrenia, and a host of other taboos and got...
    2,387 Words | 6 Pages
  • Imagery in Psycho - 1891 Words
    Subtlety Jillian Miller The Alfred Hitchcock classic Psycho broke box-office records when first introduced in 1960. Hitchcock’s cinematography involving the skillful use of black and white film enabled him to effectively play with shadows and silhouettes. These devices are used throughout this movie to influence and manipulate the audience into various states of comfort and terror throughout the film. It...
    1,891 Words | 5 Pages
  • Essay on psycho - 1595 Words
     Reading & Writing Effectively Essay Assignment Maryam Malik AHSS*1210 F13 (01) November 26th, 2013. Norman Bate’s Personality disorder It is often said we are who we chose to be and that our actions shape our personalities, but what would you do if you were no longer in control of yourself? In the movie Psycho, by Alfred Hitchcock the antagonist suffered from childhood isolation and was triggered by an oedipal complex, which caused him to become...
    1,595 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psycho Analysis - 1143 Words
    Choose From a Film an Important Sequence in which Excitement is created as much by Technique as by Action/Dialogue The Shower Scene from Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho is a crucial scene in the plot of the film. The scene itself shows the death of the main Protagonist, Marion. In this essay I am going to explore the Shower Scene in detail and show how Alfred Hitchcock created the excitement present in the scene as much by Technique as by Action and I will show how the scene is so important to...
    1,143 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Psycho Essays

  • Psycho Analysis - 290 Words
    ysisPsycho Final Analysis Joel Schain Film and Literature Period 3 10/2/12 Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho has been ranked as one of the top 10 best horror/suspense films of all time because of his unique way of filmmaking. Some of the many significant cinematic elements uses include internal diegetic sound, and dissolving. Internal diegetic sound was used throughout Hitchcock’s Psycho to create the illusion that Norman Bate’s mother was still alive. Only at the very end of the film do you...
    290 Words | 1 Page
  • Psycho Analysis - 1938 Words
    Psycho Analysis Psycho was directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The horror film was made in the 1960s based on the novel Psycho by Robert Bloch. The film was distributed by Paramount Pictures in 1960 to 1968 and then by Universal studios 1968 to present. The thriller illustrates the encounter of secretary Marian Crane played by Janet Leigh who is hiding in an abandoned motel and the motels owner Norman Bates played by Anthony Perkins, it then proceeds to describe the aftermath of their encounter....
    1,938 Words | 5 Pages
  • Making of Psycho - 600 Words
    Hitchcock and “Psycho” Sir Alfred Hitchcock was an English film director and producer. He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres. Hitchchock remains one of the most famous directors in movie history, not only because of his droll public image, but also because of the enduring appeal of so many of his films. His very name inspires fond grins from many viewers and how even some of his less famous works undeniably hold their attention. “He knew something...
    600 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psycho Speech - 342 Words
    Speech Transcript Good morning/afternoon Youth forum. I am here today, to speak to you about Alfred Hitchcock’s 1960 film, ‘Psycho’ and why it was and to this day, is a classic film. Now I know you have heard this too many times before, but I will only take a few minutes of your time. Today, I am going to tell you all why I believe ‘Psycho’ by Alfred Hitchcock was a revolutionary film for its time. Not only was it revolutionary, but it changed the horror genre forever with the use of sudden...
    342 Words | 1 Page
  • Psycho Analysis - 1163 Words
    Binta Balajo Nicki Yarber English 111-08 7th March 2013 Psycho Psycho is a horror movie directed and produced by Alfred Hitchcock. The movie was inspired by a novel “Psycho” by Robert Bloch and is considered to be one of the best films done by Hitchcock. The film is about Marion Crane, a secretary who steals $40,000 from her employer to help out her boyfriend Sam Loomis who is going through a divorce, and Norman Bates, a young man who is running his family business, a motel that Marion...
    1,163 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psycho essay - 739 Words
    How is meaning create by the use of editing, sound and camera angles in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho? Psycho was directed by Alfred Hitchcock in the 1960’s. Roger Ebert believes “it wasn’t a message that stirred the audience, nor was it a great performance…they were aroused by pure film”. The scene of the film I am focusing on is the shower scene where Marian gets brutally murdered; this scene is famous for Hitchcock’s use of editing and sounds as cinematic manipulation to create a carefully...
    739 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psycho and Marion - 529 Words
    Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho utilizes some innovative editing techniques, especially for its time. Particularly, the scene where Marion Crane drives her newly purchased 1957 Ford contains many edits that help drive the story. The approximately three-minute scene is comprised of 36 shots; however, there are only two distinctive shots throughout the entire sequence. As Marion drives, her mind begins to drift as she starts thinking about how her boss and others back home may suspect her...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Duality in Psycho 1960 - 1243 Words
    Psycho Psycho is a 1960 horror film directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles and John Gavin. The film is based on the 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The main theme that Hitchcock tries to express to the audience is dual or split personalities. Everyone has a subconscious battle with good and evil; he shows this in many different ways using lighting, different camera techniques, mise-en-scene and silence. Also he used a string orchestra to...
    1,243 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rhetorical Analysis on Psycho - 1776 Words
    Psycho Rhetorical Analysis There are many factors that contribute to making a film as a frightening as Alfred Hitchcock’s classic horror film Psycho, without all of the typical gruesome scenes moviegoers are used to seeing. The timeless movie Psycho is a 1960 American psychological thriller about the encounter between Marion Crane, a secretary hiding out after stealing a large amount of money, and the schizophrenic motel owner Norman Bates, both of whom must deal with the guilt and...
    1,776 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Role of Sound in Psycho - 1202 Words
     The Role of Sound in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho Alfred Hitchcock’s well-known 1960 horror film Psycho, starring Janet Leigh, is an example of the director’s innovative vision for cinematic technology and subject matter. Although the film is considered one of the greatest films of all time, and is analysed still by contemporary audiences, it would not be as famous as it is today without the help of Bernard Herrmann’s chilling strings-only score. Music and sound play an integral part in...
    1,202 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psycho Movie Paper - 903 Words
    Stephon Rudicil ELC-7 889 1/6/12 7TH hour Psycho Critique With screeching violin music blasting rhythmically in the background, Arbogast is slashed to death by a psychotic murderer who seemingly appears out of nowhere. The fact that this scene made me, a connoisseur of modern day horror movies, jump, proves the fact that this 1960`s classic, Psycho is a home-run. Alfred Hitchcock is and should be recognized as a movie making genius with his excellent development of the horror movie...
    903 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock - 586 Words
    Psycho was directed in 1960 by Alfred Hitchcock and is now known best for its different uses of media in the film. The move is in black and white, and it appears that the reason for this is to not draw attention away from the focal point of the scenes, causing less visual distraction. Alfred Hitchcock uses black and white as a way to tame violence in a way that the audience will not be robbed of the experience. With limited violence, it forces the viewer to think for themselves and use their...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Norman Bates: the First Psycho
    Although Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller “Psycho” was only created in the early 1960s, his ability to express the psychological battle between good and evil in cinema makes this masterpiece one of the greatest films of all time. With very precise costume design and suspenseful sound, Hitchcock is able to show his audience how the mind can be a weapon to any man or woman who uses it with negative intention. Tim Durks of AMC FilmSite.org wrote that “Hitchcock's techniques voyeuristically implicate...
    804 Words | 2 Pages
  • Abnormal Psychology in Film: Psycho
    The film I chose to watch is the original Psycho, filmed in 1960 and directed by Alfred Hitchcock. The stars of the cast included Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, Vera Miles, John Gavin, and Martin Balsam. (IMDB.com, 2006) The story begins about a young woman named Marion Crane from Arizona who is fed up with her life and longs to marry her boyfriend, Sam. Unfortunately, the couple has little money and cannot marry. One Friday afternoon, she is asked to deposit forty-thousand dollars for her boss....
    1,069 Words | 3 Pages
  • Character Analysis in Psycho - 1040 Words
    Professor Smith ! Intro to Film ! March 7, 2014 ! Symbolic Character Development in Psycho! ! ! The film Psycho has two main characters, one being Marion and the other being ! Norman Bates. Marion is the main character for the first half of the film and Norman Bates ! assumes the role of main character after Marion is murdered. In order to enhance Marion’s ! character, the Alfred Hitchcock uses mise-en-scene to symbolize Marion’s character change ! and indecisive choice to steal $40,000...
    1,040 Words | 5 Pages
  • "Psycho" Parlour Scene Analysis
    Everyone has as a good and evil side to him or her. In this scene of Psycho it shows the both sides of Marion and Norman. Through the use of camera angles, film techniques, dialogue, and sound effects, the film portrays the main characters, as they are being trapped, unable to escape their state of mind, the guilt of their actions. These sides are shown mostly through the lighting. Certain conflicts and how the characters deal with them and each other are what shape the structure of the...
    788 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alfred Hitchcock-Psycho - 403 Words
    Psycho Thesis I'm still scared of the shower... I believe that Norman bates displayed sinister nature threw his attitude, the camera angels of when he is being filmed and the lighting. Everything is put together to portray Norman bates and a very evil and sinister Character. This adds a lot of suspense to the movie. Norman bates has a very evil attitude whenever he is alone with his mother and he thinks that it is ok because no one has told him otherwise. When his mother died he tried to...
    403 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psycho (1960) Essay - 873 Words
    Psycho was a film directed by Alfred Hitchcock that starred Anthony Perkins and Janet Leigh. Although Hitchcock made various other successful and well-known films, the 1960 thriller was his most successful. Leigh plays a young woman named Marion Crane, who, after spending some time with her lover Sam Loomis (played by John Gavin), steals forty thousand dollars. She stays at a small motel, the Bates Motel, owned by Norman Bates (Perkins), and is murdered in the shower by a shadowy but...
    873 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock - 1476 Words
    Hitchcock and Dualism in Psycho The characters in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) each have a dual nature that is masterfully portrayed through character development and use of mirrors throughout the film. The very first shot in Psycho is zooming in from an open view of the city where it is a bright and sunny day. As the shot zooms in further and further it comes into a dark and shaded room that shows Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) and Sam Loomis (John Gavin) having an affair in a undisclosed...
    1,476 Words | 4 Pages
  • Movie Evaluation on Psycho 1960
    Sellars 1 Emma Sellars December 2, 2012 English 1111 sec 1 Movie Evaluation on the 1960’s Classic Psycho A good movie starts with the setting; in a horror movie the setting is key. In Psycho the setting is a small motel right off the highway. Behind the motel is a big, old, eerie house that Norman Bates and his mother live in. One of the main characters, Marion Crane is a young woman who is working for her boss, who sells houses. When Marion goes into work she does not feel well, and...
    1,399 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psycho Movie Reveiw - 640 Words
    Erowynn Maul­Latham Period 1 Psycho Movie Review The film Psycho by Alfred Hitchcock is a horror film made in 1960. The film Psycho caused a huge amount of commotion in 1960 when it was released, it was a movie unlike any other that had ever been made, people were outraged and mind­blown by this movie for many reasons. In the movie Psycho a young female takes a large amount of cash from her job and ...
    640 Words | 1 Page
  • Reaction About Psycho Movie
    In Phoenix, Arizona, Marion Crane (Janet Leigh) steals $40,000 from her employer to marry her boyfriend Sam Loomis (John Gavin), and then tries to flee to Sam's house, in Fairvale, with the money. Along the way, she trades in her car to evade authorities, and during a storm on the trip, she checks into the isolated Bates Motel, not far from Fairvale. The proprietor, Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins), invites her to dinner at his family house on the hill overlooking the motel. When he leaves to...
    894 Words | 3 Pages
  • "Shower Scene" Psycho 1960
    The infamous shower scene in the 1960 film ‘Psycho’ For it being made in 1960, this film is edited very well. There is perfect transitions into the story and what is going on. It definitely draws you in, whether you like classic movies or not. The editing goes at a slower pace and then builds up as the stabbing starts to happen. The editing creates super suspense. The shot being utilized in this scene is the direct cut. The editing in this clip is quite good. The editing builds up the...
    395 Words | 1 Page
  • Psycho: Hitchcock's Schizoid Masterpiece
    Julianne Campbell ENG 4U (Hachey) October 1st 2010 Alfred Hitchcock's schizoid masterpiece Psycho cleverly portrays the theme of personality switching through characterization, setting and cinematography. There are two main examples of characters who show the sign of multiple identities. Norman Bates is a prime example of sort of personality switching, we see a major transition of his throughout this film. A not as obvious change is that of Marion Crane from a so-called good to evil...
    853 Words | 3 Pages
  • Good vs. Evil in Psycho
    Psycho “Psycho” is a classic suspense film directed by Alfred Hitchcock which features a central female protagonist, a seemingly ordinary young woman named Marion Crane, who crosses paths with a dangerous mentally ill motel owner, Norman Bates. As their strange relationship develops, a dominant theme of good versus evil is introduced to the audience through the use of characterisation, editing, mise-en-scene and various other media techniques. From the outset, Hitchcock introduces an...
    2,101 Words | 5 Pages
  • Freud's Psychoanalysis of the Film "Psycho"
    Alfred Hitchcock was one of the most outstanding filmmakers of the 20th century. He was born in 1899 in Leytonstone, East London. In 1920, Hitchcock obtained a full-time job designing film titles. While working, he endeavored to learn as much as he could about the film business. Within 3 years of starting his job at the studio, Hitchcock became an assistant director and, in 1925, a director. In a career spanning six decades, Hitchcock made 53 films, the best of which are at once suspenseful,...
    3,035 Words | 8 Pages
  • Psycho Shower Scene Analysi
    Alfred Hitchcock is known as the ‘master of suspense’ this title is blatantly visible in the shower scene of the film “Psycho” The use of cinematic elements at such a critical moment helps to heighten the suspense of the scene. Consider the use of cinematography, editing, and musical score in the most intense of moments and one sees how the mood of suspense is evident At the start of the shower scene the audience follows Marion into the bathroom. We see her undressing to have a shower. It is...
    515 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psycho Film Essay - 1083 Words
    Psycho Film Essay Psycho was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and was made 1960. Hitchcock was known as the master of suspense because the way he incorporates the mise-en-scene into his cinematic masterpiece, Psycho through his use of lighting, colour, set decoration, rear projection, space within the frame frontality and the typage and talent of his gifted cast. Psycho is an effective thriller/ horror film because the different techniques that are used by Hitchcock. The film was shot in black...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • Use of Birds in Psycho - 746 Words
    Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho In this literary research project, I will delve into this movie to show that Alfred Hitchcock drew many of the elements in this work from birds. (Hitchcock, Alfred Joseph. Psycho. 1960.) I picked this topic because I watched Alfred Hitchcock’s movies The Birds and Psycho when I was in high school and I was fascinated by the ideas that he presented in those films. I was fascinated at how he used birds as antagonists in The Birds. I watched Psycho after watching...
    746 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflection on Film: Psycho - 349 Words
    Sophia Grzeskiewicz Understanding Film Reflection #1 Psycho In the movie Psycho, we see a character that is the one at fault but is so sweet she is obviously the victim here. When the $40,000 is no longer what we see from Marion Crane, it is because she was murdered, she is now the victim. Robert Ebert, from the Chicago Sun Times states “Marion Crane does steal $40,000, but still she fits the Hitchcock mold of an innocent to crime.” She was originally at fault here, and then she is...
    349 Words | 1 Page
  • Psycho Persuasive Essay - 1101 Words
    PsychoWouldn’t you expect it to be really hard to change the audiences’ perception of a character within moments of the character’s introduction? Alfred Hitchcock made it seem almost easy in the movie, Psycho. The sinister nature of Norman Bates was revealed and enhanced through the use of symbolism to set the mood, foreshadowing in regards to Norman’s mindset and lighting to establish Norman’s darker aspects. In scenes where Norman Bates was present, symbolism was an important aspect used...
    1,101 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psycho Original and Remake - 1200 Words
    The original Psycho film (1960), and the remake (1998), have a considerable amount of similarities and differences. Also discussed will be the improvements and deficiencies between each film. Key factors like the plot, theme, and genre will also be addressed. The 1960 original was directed by Alfred Hitchcock and was filmed in black and white, whereas the 1998 version was directed by Gus Van Sant. The remake was remade shot-by-shot, but with a different cast members. Norman Bates, which was...
    1,200 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psycho - the Role of the Director, Alfred Hitchcock
    PSYCHO In the film Psycho director Alfred Hitchcock successfully uses a variety of different film techniques that enhance the understanding of significant themes that engage the audience. The major themes in Psycho are the notion of a dual personality, women’s role in the 1960’s and the idea of voyeurism and how that joins into the concept of the gaze. All of these underlying themes link into the central theme of Psycho, which is identity. Psycho is set in the year 1960. The dominant ideology...
    1,156 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Gothic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho
    If today’s idea of what Gothic means matched what it originally meant, society might think twice before they call that kid with black lipstick and eyeliner who sits in the back of the class Gothic. Gothic hasn’t always been a jest towards a group of people that dresses differently; it used to be something that people terrorized each other with¾much like “horror” is today. Gothic literature is an expression of the morbid nature of humanity in its quest to quench humankind’s intrinsic thirst for...
    1,325 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psycho (Movie) Shower Scene Essay
    The 1960 psychological thriller, Psycho, directed by Alfred Hitchcock, challenge of social, film conventions and audience expectations at the time. The scene reveals an underlying uneasiness in the character of Norman Bates. The extract, the parlour scene, shows how Hitchcock uses cinematography and mise-en-scene to reveal the many layers of meaning to the audience. The film technique contribute to the themes, issues of duality of human nature, family. The context of the parlour scene is when...
    334 Words | 1 Page
  • Psycho Shower Scene Symbolic Analysis
    PSYCHO SHOWER SCENE ESSAY by ------- ------- ## English ## Psycho has many memorable scenes and objects, from the skeleton in the basement, the dark and creepy house to the first horrific murder in fictional movie history which takes place in the infamous shower scene. The shower scene of Psycho was one of the most controversial scenes in the movie, the era and possibly of all time. The point of the scene begins as the protagonist, Marion Crane, decides to return the money the has stolen...
    892 Words | 3 Pages
  • Film Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's 'Psycho'
    Film Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Psycho” Introduction “Psycho” (1960) is based on a novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The film was directed by Hollywood legend, Alfred Hitchcock. The screen play was written by Joseph Stephano and based on the real life crimes of serial killer, Ed Gein. The film stars Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins, John Gavin and Vera Miles. The film garnered four academy award nominations and widely regarded as one of Hitchcock’s best films. It spawned two...
    2,262 Words | 7 Pages
  • Psycho- definition of modern horror films
    Alfred Hitchcock’s amazingly directed film, Psycho is known as the “mother” of all modern horror suspense film. This film makes as there were not much progression of the horror movies since 1960s, when Psycho was produced. Before when Psycho was produced, horror movies generally produced with fictional creatures such as Dracula and Godzilla. Hitchcock was also well known for breaking the conservative way of producing the horror film and he produced new subgenre of horror film called ‘Slashers...
    987 Words | 3 Pages
  • Movies: a Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho
    Movies: A Thematic Analysis of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho has been commended for forming the archetypical basis of all horror films that followed its 1960 release. The mass appeal that Psycho has maintained for over three decades can undoubtedly be attributed to its universality. In Psycho, Hitchcock allows the audience to become a subjective character within the plot to enhance the film's psychological effects for an audience that is forced to recognise its own...
    1,501 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Dynamics in Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window and Psycho
    From the creative mind of Alfred Hitchcock came many a classic film, but two that stand out are the thrillers Rear Window and Psycho. These films capture the viewer and create an atmosphere so unique and fresh that you feel as though you personally know the characters; sometimes you even feel like you're becoming the characters. Although the films have many similarities they both have completely different moods and themes. Most importantly the films can still hold up against today's incredibly...
    696 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Does Hitchcock Exceed Audience Expectations in Psycho?
    How does Hitchcock exceed audience expectations in Psycho? The director of the 1960 film Psycho was directed by Alfred Hitchcock, born 13th August 1899, in London. He died 29th April 1980 aged 80. He was a British filmmaker and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres. After a successful career in the United Kingdom in both silent films and early sound films, Hitchcock moved to Hollywood. In 1956 he became an American citizen while retaining his...
    931 Words | 3 Pages
  • "How does Alfred Hitchcock explore the duality of human nature in the film Psycho?"
    Alfred Hitchcock uses many ways to explore the duality of human nature in his films, especially in the 1960 horror thriller Psycho. The duality of human nature represents our inner self, aspects that are mainly opposites, the light showing good, the dark showing evil, the natural and the unnatural, are just some examples of human nature. Hitchcock explored the duality of human nature using ways such as lighting, dialogue, camera angles, music, comparing and contrasting what different characters...
    1,765 Words | 5 Pages
  • Media Studies Analysis of Psycho(Hitchcock 1960)Shower Scene)
    Film studies Analysis of Psycho Alfred Hitchcock movie psycho starring Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins starts with a shower scene. The scene opens with a middle shot of lady wearing a bathing robe sitting at her desk in her home. It looks like Janet Leigh is home alone with the scene following with a low key non-diegetic sound playing at the background creating suspense which co notates a Thriller genre. She looks tired and she signs bowing her head downwards whiles writing in the book. In...
    598 Words | 2 Pages
  • Thesis - 419 Words
    Jeremy Windisch Mr. Bessey RoC 18 September 2014 The symbolism of birds from the film Psycho Psycho (Paramount Pictures 1960) is Alfred Hitchcock’s introduction in what would begin horror films to come. After Psycho came out, Psycho set a new level of acceptability of violence, deviant behavior and sexuality in American films. Critical symbolisms of birds between Marian Crane (Janet Leigh) and Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins) foreshadowed tension between the two throughout the film....
    419 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ideology Genre Auteur - 552 Words
    Summary of Ideology, Genre, Auteur By Robin Wood In Robin Wood’s essay: Ideology, Genre, Auteur, Wood revisits Hitchcock’s films and analyses the different characteristics in the films. Wood focuses mostly on Shadow of a Doubt and It’s a Wonderful Life in which he compares and describes the different values of Hollywood cinema. One of Wood’s major points to hear two opposing views. Wood stresses that a critics job should be to look at a piece as a whole rather than at the particular aspects of...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • pggg - 844 Words
    hg h yhjgygjhnghfhgghngbyhyugynbtyfbrftvdetfbntumhuihmnygrtnbmjm,nhnbvrtbdcfvnghunm,jbuhrtgbfghxvbgctyhumn,jmknbkhytgfvhu mij,ml Movie Info Independent film director Gus Van Sant attempts a first in American film history: a shot-by-shot remake of the classic 1960 Alfred Hitchcock film Psycho. With a few minor, modern-day changes (including filming it in color), his version is essentially the same film with a different cast and the same Bernard Hermann music. Psycho was and still is the story...
    844 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Truth About Ed Gein.
    Edward Theodore Gein My biography is on Ed Gein. What he did inspired movies and books such as: Psycho, Silence of The Lambs, and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. He is known as "The Ghoul of Plainfield." Ed lived a troubled life and was never what we would consider "normal". He was one of the smartest and most troubled minds of his time. Ed Gein I believe had a large difficult situation know as his everyday life growing up. His father was an alcoholic always coming home smelling of booze....
    544 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alfred Hitchcock - Double or Nothing
    DOUBLE OR NOTHING “A glimpse into the world proves that horror is nothing other than reality.” ― Alfred Hitchcock The reality is this -- all humans are flawed. Some have repressed personality traits that are recessive until they come to the forefront because of an unusual challenges or unexpected event. Some struggles bring out the best in us, while other challenges force us to show our “dark side.” When pushed there, most humans are capable of doing things that would normally seem...
    1,851 Words | 5 Pages
  • Poetry Assignment - 2394 Words
    Poetry Assignment In this assignment I will gracefully compare and contrast two short poems. In my selection for the poems, I kept in mind that the two poems needed to have something in common metaphorically or thematically. After many hours of browsing I came upon two poems that contained an ultimately strange connection metaphorically and in content. Interestingly, the two also had numerous differences. The first poem I encountered was "The Sick Rose" written by William Blake in 1794. Soon...
    2,394 Words | 7 Pages
  • Night of the Living Dead - 994 Words
    Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent black-and-white horror film and cult film directed by George A. Romero Night of the Living Dead was heavily criticized during its release because of its explicit content, but received critical acclaim and was selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the National Film Registry as a film deemed "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant. reviewers cited the film as groundbreaking. Pauline Kael called the film...
    994 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Rear Window - Sequence Analysis
    Sequence Analysis 1 – The Rear Window Although many realist films tend to realize that the viewer is an observer, there is a theme that is clearly established in the first few minutes of Rear Window (Alfred Hitchcock, 1954) with a variety of long shots that clearly show the setting; complimenting this Hitchcock also utilizes pan and dolly as well as transitioning angles so we can observe every apartment and tenant. Sound and different camera distance also contributes to the mise en scene that...
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hitchcock's Artistry - 1541 Words
    Hitchcock’s Artistry: A Result From His Three-Act Structure Deviation “The three act structure is nothing less than a cheap security blanket for the most insecure industry in the world” (StoryDept). The quote above expresses the limitations of storytelling and creativity in film as a result of the tendency to follow the three-act story structure. Briefly, the three-act structure consists of an act I, act II, and act III in which there is a conflict created through an inciting incident,...
    1,541 Words | 4 Pages
  • Alfred Hitchcock: 50 Years of Movie Magic
    Alfred Hitchcock: 50 Years of Movie Magic Alfred Hitchcock is among the few directors to combine a strong reputation for high-art film-making with great audience popularity. Throughout his career he gave his audiences more pleasure than could be asked for. The consistency of quality plot-lines and technical ingenuity earned him the recognition of being one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. His films earned him the reputation of being the "master of suspense", and after viewing two of...
    2,544 Words | 7 Pages
  • Main Character - 345 Words
    This book takes place in the town of Toronto, Canada. A delinquent teen named Duncan is troubled teen that does crimes with his friends and has a job at the lost and found. During one of his days on his job at the lost and found he stumbles upon a mysterious diary lurking around while cleaning the lost and found area. This diary belongs to a serial killer who stalks some women that he sees and his targets may soon be hunted. Duncan takes action by reading the diary to find out who can this...
    345 Words | 1 Page
  • Achievements of Alfred Hitchcock - 1174 Words
    The Achievements of Alfred Hitchcock Alfred Hitchcock, born in 1899 in England, remains a prominent figure in the world of cinema. Hitchcock’s passion for film began in his childhood with his first job as writer of the title cards for silent films and, later on, becoming a director. Influenced by his Catholic upbringing, Hitchcock developed a sense of guilt and sin throughout his life with which he portrays in his work (Kehoe N.P.). As the leading director in the 1930’s, Hitchcock set the...
    1,174 Words | 4 Pages
  • Film Analysis - 669 Words
     Code and convention of horror film: A horror film follows certain code and convection to achieve its purpose of scaring and alarming the audience. The following are some of them: Setting/location: The location used for this genre of a film is isolated and lonely area that has been abandoned or an area where the victim will feel vulnerable. For example small communities, dark streets, narrow alleyways, roads, woods, haunted places, farms, country sides and cities etc… sometimes places with...
    669 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cinematography and mise en scene in 'Disturbia'
    At the start of the ‘living in peace’ scene from the film ‘Disturbia’ we know we are in the character’s (Kale) house as we can see he is in his bedroom with household props such as a table, bed, lamp etc. We can also tell they are in their home as they look fairly comfortable. There is also a shot of outside the house which lets us know it is set in a normal suburban location with large houses and with large houses there are normally basements which killers are typically known to keep their...
    811 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cinema Originality, Where Did It Go?
    Cinema Originality, Where did it go? In the recent years, I feel as though I have not seen an original movie. I am constantly frustrated with the obscene number of remakes, sequels, prequels, spin-offs, and movies based on other things like video games. I think the worst kind of unoriginal movie is the remake. It literally takes a pinkie’s worth of thought to remake a movie. The movie company also has less to worry about money-wise because there is already a built in audience with people...
    328 Words | 1 Page
  • Ed Gein - 1788 Words
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