Populist Party Essays & Research Papers

Best Populist Party Essays

  • Populist Party - 831 Words
    The Populist Party was a short-lived political party in the United States in the late 19th century. It flourished particularly among western farmers, based largely on its opposition to the gold standard. Although the party did not remain a lasting feature of the political landscape, many of its positions have become adopted over the course of the following decades. The very term "populist" has since become a generic term in U.S. politics for politics which appeals to the common person in...
    831 Words | 3 Pages
  • Populist Party - 761 Words
    The Populist Party Platform, 1892 After the Panic of 1873 and the collapse of agriculture prices, the farmers' revolt rose. The Populist party grew out from this revolt and through the collective economic actions that they promoted, the party became popular in the South states. In this excerpt from the Populist Party Platform, also known as the Omaha Platform, the Populists propose many different economic reforms that would help relaunching the economy especially in the agrarian...
    761 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Populist Party - 1498 Words
    Populist party in U.S. history, political party formed primarily to express the agrarian protest of the late 19th cent. In some states the party was known as the People's party. Formation of the Party During the Panic of 1873 agricultural prices in the United States began to decline. The economic welfare of farmers suffered badly; many believed that the management of currency was at fault and that the government's currency policy was determined by Eastern bankers and industrialists....
    1,498 Words | 4 Pages
  • Populist Party - 1664 Words
    The Populist Party, a third political party that originated in America in the latter part of the nineteenth century, derived as a result of farmer discontent and economic distress. This was caused by the country's shift from an agricultural American life to one in which industrialists dominated the nation's development. The public felt as if they were being cheated by these "robber barons," a term given to those who took advantage of the middle and lower classes by "boldly stealing the fruits of...
    1,664 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Populist Party Essays

  • Populist Party - 754 Words
    Populist Party Also known as the ‘People’s Party’, the Populist Party was born out of frustration with the answers given by the Republicans and Democrats. This party was made for the individuals in the South and Great Plains, who wanted new laws concerning the way in which farmers were being treated and the price rates of the crops they were producing. As a result, this party came up in Kansas, Nebraska, and in the Dakotas, which were states that formerly had Republican majorities. In turn,...
    754 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Rise of the Populist Party - 558 Words
    Chapter 17: Reform Writing Assignment Directions: Below are two documents related to the rise of the Populist Party and the Democratic Party’s response. Read both documents and analyze the 1896 presidential election map that follows. Write one paragraph in which you describe the impact of William Jennings Bryan’s views on the election of 1896. 1892 Populist Platform We meet in the midst of a nation brought to the verge of moral, political and material ruin. Corruption dominates the...
    558 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Populist Movement The Value Of Third Parties
    In which presidential campaign did the Populists first appear? The Populists wrote the Omaha Platform in 1892. 3.What groups made up the Populist movement? Populists included farmers, laborers, and socialists. 4.In what sections of the country did the Populists gain their greatest support? Most populists came from the west or the south 5.List ten political and economic reforms the Populists proposed in their platform:...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare/Contrast of Political Parties: American Independent Party and the Populist Party
    INDEPENDENT PARTY 1) Values and Beliefs -Protect the right to life of the innocent unborn; -Stop the undeclared wars which are daily costing American lives and billions of tax dollars; -Stop reckless spending, including foreign aid, and take care of America's domestic needs -End debt financing of both Federal and State governments; -End the Federal income tax, and restore a tariff based revenue system; -Immediately terminate international trade agreements such as NAFTA, WTO, and the...
    796 Words | 4 Pages
  • Explain How and Why the Populist Party Was Created
    The Populist Party was a way for Americans to resolve issues without going Democrat or Republican. The Party was founded mostly by farmers, and laborers already in organizations, who wanted to see reform in railroad regulation and tax reform. The goal of the populists in 1892 was to replace the second party (democrats) by forming an alliance of eastern and western farmers. The Populist Party was formed because farmers and laborers called for the abolition of national banks, a graduated income...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Populist and Progressives - 527 Words
    Populist And Progressives The Populists and Progressive were form of movement that occurred during the outbreaks of the workers union after the civil war. The populists began during the late 1800s.The progressive began during the 1900s. There are many differences between these two movements, but yet these movements have many things that are similar. Farmers united to protect their interests, even creating a major political party. The party was called the peoples party which became known...
    527 Words | 2 Pages
  • Emergence of Populist Movement - 461 Words
    In the political landscape of the late nineteenth century, the Populist party was recognized even by its critics as being ahead of its time. Its members saw themselves as bearers of a reform message vital to the nation, reflecting agrarian America's anxiety that the country was moving toward a new form of slavery in the face of changes brought about by the Industrial Revolution. These issues were for many Americans the "Crisis of the Nineties," and Populists met that crisis with a stand against...
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • Populist Movement Thesis and Conclusion
    Lianne Aratea Mr. Dawson APUSH Period 6 February 3, 2013 Written Assessment: CH 19- From Stalemate to Crisis Thesis: Populism was one of the few phenomena to gain real national influence, thus creating many arguments between historians. Populism didn’t start off as an influential political movement. It started out with ranges getting together to try and change their local governments. This evolved into farmers trying to get the attention of the government, and finally the Populist group...
    295 Words | 1 Page
  • The Populist Movement's Failure - 2231 Words
    The Populist Movement ultimately failed to survive because of their desire for inflation and the support for the coinage of silver, as well as the fact that they merged with the Democratic Party to combat the Republicans. The 1896 election undermined agrarian insurgency, and a period of rapidly rising farm prices helped to bring about the dissolution of the Populist Party. Another important factor in the failure of the party was its inability to affect a genuine urban-rural coalition; its...
    2,231 Words | 6 Pages
  • Populist and Progressive Reform in American History
    Populist and Progressive Reform in American History Throughout American history, reform was common among people of a particular, race, gender, or class used to accomplish change. The emergence of the populist and progressive movements were a response to the changing climate in American society due to rapid industrialization, an ethnically diverse personality of a young nation, and birth of American imperialism. Disgruntled American farmers that wished to advance their economic position...
    1,763 Words | 5 Pages
  • Reconstruction: Populism and Populists Presidential Candidate
    Reconstruction By: 9/9/2013 1. Columbian historian Eric Foner (1983) quotes W. E. B. Dubois in calling reconstruction a “splendid failure (p.16).” After studying the events of late 19th century, defend whether or not you agree with his position. What are the long-term implications? In my opinion the one of the largest mistakes that was made was the amount of racism that still continued in America. Still to this day there is a large amount of racism in America, the only difference is...
    944 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Analysis of the Populist Party's Premature Fall into Obscurity.
    An Analysis of the Populist Party's Premature Fall into Obscurity Question: After its startling successes of the late 1880's and early 1890's, why did the Populist Party quickly fade into oblivion after 1896? Key Words: Analyze - examine the motives; answer the question Time Period: 1880's-1900 Geography: United States of America, specifically the Midwest Type of History: Political, Economical Thesis: While a number of factors contributed to the demise of the Populist Party, the failed...
    950 Words | 4 Pages
  • Farmers Discontent Ap Essay
    The United States from the beginning was a nation of farmers. But by the late nineteenth century, people were leaving the farm and moving into the city. It was around this time that the farmers saw threats to their way of life. The farmers were being pushed around by the banks, railroads companies. They had good reasons for agrarian discontent. The documents show the validity of the farmer's complaints, especially on bank mortgage rates and the gold standard. The Populist Party or People's...
    781 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Rise and Fall of Populism - 2102 Words
    The Rise and Fall of Populism The Farmer’s Alliance In the 1880s, as drought hit the wheat-growing areas of the Great Plains and prices for Southern cotton sunk to new lows, many tenant farmers fell into deep debt. Lenders, grain-elevator owners, and others with whom farmers did business were angered. Depression worsened in the early 1890s, and some industrial workers shared different views on labor, trust, and monopolies. If the various alliances between the...
    2,102 Words | 7 Pages
  • Farmers Revolt - 918 Words
    From the early beginnings of America to well into the nineteenth century, America has been dominantly an agricultural country. Farming and the country life have always been a great part of the American culture. Thomas Jefferson even expressed his gratitude for the farming class by saying Those who labor in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever He had a chosen people, whose breasts He, has made His peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. The American culture was...
    918 Words | 3 Pages
  • lab exam 2 - 275 Words
    Essay #2 Tina Taylor William Jennings Bryan argues against the gold standard. What arguments does he give against the gold standard and why does it oppress the common people? William Jennings Bryan was against the Gold Standard because it artificially lowered inflation. In today's times the Federal Reserve can print as much money as it wants and also control how the money circulates in the economy by buying and selling bonds. With the gold standard there was an infinite amount of gold...
    275 Words | 1 Page
  • Farmers of the 19th Century - 1255 Words
    Farmers of the Late Nineteenth Century The period between 1880 and 1900 was a boom time for American Politics. The country was finally free of the threat of war, and many of its citizens were living comfortably. However, as these two decades went by, the American farmer found it harder and harder to live comfortably. Crops such as cotton and wheat, once the sustenance of the agriculture industry, were selling at prices so low that it was nearly impossible for farmers to make a profit off them....
    1,255 Words | 4 Pages
  • Historical Roots of Populism - 509 Words
    Essay ? 1 Describe the historical roots of populism. What actions did farmers take to try improve their economic situation? What political demands and actions did populist pursue? Do you consider the populist movement to be a success or failure and why? In the 1890’s disaster struck for farmers economically. First there were dry years and poor harvest along with the competition from overseas farmers who took advantage of the improved transportation system. This caused the price of...
    509 Words | 2 Pages
  • Farmers - 3509 Words
    Farmers and the Populist Movement MAIN IDEA Farmers united to address their economic problems, giving rise to the Populist movement. Terms & Names WHY IT MATTERS NOW •Oliver Hudson Kelley •Grange •Farmers’ Alliances •Populism Many of the Populist reform issues, such as income tax and legally protected rights of workers, are now taken for granted. •bimetallism •gold standard •William McKinley •William Jennings Bryan One American's Story As a young adult in...
    3,509 Words | 18 Pages
  • Journals - 1924 Words
    JOURNALS 2nd Semester Week 19 #11. Research one of the battles during the Indian Wars with the Americans during the late 1800s. Create an annotated bibliography of two images and two written sources you would use if you were going to give a presentation. Each annotation will include 2-3 sentences about how the source would be used and why it is important. Must use MLA citation of your sources. Refer to page 457 in your text for reference. All references must come from different sources;...
    1,924 Words | 6 Pages
  • Why Was Free Silver the Hot Topic of the 1896 Election?
    It would be hard to imagine American voters today getting excited about the money supply. So why was free silver the hot topic of the 1896 election? At that point in time, social unrest, political ambitions, and unconditional economic interests came together to cause a power push to increase the money supply. (1). On July 14, 1890, Senator John Sherman of Ohio passed the Sherman Silver Purchase Act. This act provided for the issuance of legal tender notes sufficient in amount to pay for...
    250 Words | 1 Page
  • Ap Dbq 2007 - 1455 Words
    American agriculture greatly changed during 1865 to 1900 through technological advances and railroads spreading across the nation, both modernizing agriculture. New technological advances made farming easier with new inventions such as barbed wire and reapers. However, new technology advancements became too expensive for average American farmers to afford. Economic conditions became intolerable for farmers as railroad companies charged high shipping rates. In the government, policies were made...
    1,455 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sherman Act - 415 Words
    Instructions: Dorothy|I represent the American people at their best. I am loyal, determined and resourceful. You could say I represent the way Americans wish to see themselves. I have a big heart, I am daring and I am an example of the kind of woman the suffragettes wanted to promote their cause. I am from Kansas which was popular with the Populist Party in the 19th century| Wizard|I represent the president of the United States. In the movie, I am seen differently through the eyes of each...
    415 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare Contrast - 1294 Words
    Priscilla Solis History 108 CRN 25469 A Women’s Journey Despite the growth of industry, urban centers, and immigration, America in the 19th century was still very rural. The “Cult of Domesticity” first named and identified in the early part of the century, the beliefs embodied in this “cult” gave women a central role in the family. Women’s god given role, it stated was a wife and mother. Pulling against these “beliefs” was the sense of urgency, movement, and progress in the industrial and...
    1,294 Words | 4 Pages
  • American History Study Guide Ch. 15-18
    Chapter 15 Elizabeth Cady Stanton: One of the most prominent leaders of the 19th century and leading figure of the early woman’s body; social activist/abolitionist Opposed the 14th and 15th amendment because it did nothing to enfranchise women Leader of the National Suffrage Association Crop-lien/Sharecropping: Growing of cotton and pledge a part of the crop as collateral Sharecropping: initially arose as a compromise between blacks’ desire for land and planters’ demand for labor...
    1,460 Words | 6 Pages
  • Document Analysis: “Cross of Gold”
    Document Analysis: “Cross of Gold” In 1896, three years after the “Panic of 1893”, a man by the name of William Jennings Bryan delivered one of the most historical speeches to this day. In the late 1800’s a populist movement was happening and people were starting to take notice. Political corruption and big business practices hurt not only laborers, but also farmers. When farmers organized into alliances, and eventually into the Populist Party, they posed a challenge to the reigning two-party...
    1,203 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Election of 1896 Essay - 1363 Words
    A watershed Election is one that changes history. The candidate has a campaign that decides the course of politics for decades; one that is especially memorable, or that proves to be a dividing line between historical periods. The election of 1896 was just that. The depression of the 1890s, and President Cleveland’s unwillingness to use federal resources to assist the unemployed, alienated irate farmers and workers from the Democratic Party. During the 1892 and 1894 elections, Democrats...
    1,363 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chapter 11 Zinn - 839 Words
    Zinn: Chapter 11 Courtney Sever Period 2 Chapter 11: Robber Barons and Rebels Main Ideas - Businessmen monopolized the markets (railroads and steel are two good examples) in exchange for “economic stability” to ensure that they had control over the full market. They would then change prices as they pleased to drive out their competition. - Many workers in the South organized strikes, asking for higher wages. Most of these workers were black or members of the Knights of Labor. These strikes...
    839 Words | 3 Pages
  • Unit 2 Us History Study Guide
    Unit 2 Study Guide Industrialization/Immigration 1. Importance of Steel 2. John D. Rockefeller 3. Andrew Carnegie 4. Mass production 5. Thomas Edison 6. Monopolies 7. Horizontal/vertical integration 8. Entrepreneur 9. Corporation 10. American Federation of Labor 11. Haymarket Riot 12. Pullman Strike 13. International Commerce Commission (ICC) 14. Steerage 15. Sweatshop 16. Sherman Anti-Trust Act 17....
    309 Words | 4 Pages
  • The 1870s-1900s Was a Great Era for the Government and as Well as the People.
    The 1870s-1900s was a great era for the government and as well as the people. The farmers, however, did not have well-running businesses due to manufacturers hitting a huge growth rate, railroad companies and banks abusing them, as well as overproduction. There was, in a way, agricultural depression. Farmers began to over come this by forming the Populist Party. Farmers were seeing monopolization and a shortage in money becaue of the government's decisions. In document G Leading...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Farmers Dbq - 624 Words
    Farmer’s discontent during the period 1870 – 1900 had an impact on their attitudes and actions towards national politics. During this time period manufacturing had a huge growth spurt and agricultural began to decline. This made it harder for farmers to make a living. Document G shows how much manufacturing increased between the years 1849 – 1899. America could no longer aspire to be a nation of small freehold farms. Manufacturers and people living in big cities depended on farmers to pretty...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • Farmers dbq - 435 Words
     October 17, 2013 Farmers DBQ In the late nineteenth century, twenty years after the Homestead Act, farmers used their land in the western plains to produce both crops and profits. The farmers of this time struggled in the agricultural way of life by facing economic and political obstacles that were impossible to avoid, requiring them to do something about their complaints. Although the farmers had plausible arguments for most of their criticisms, their beliefs of the silver...
    435 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bryan's Cross of Gold Speech vs. the Ocala Platform
    Although Bryan is discussing bimetallism and the Ocala Platform is discussing laws for farmers, they are in fact quite similar in their demands. Neither of the two parties wants national banks; they both would rather have smaller local banks to run the money in the country. Also they both believe income tax is a good thing and that it should not be removed. In William Jennings Bryan’s speech before the Democratic National Convention, he stated that “we are opposing the national bank” (Bryan)....
    260 Words | 1 Page
  • 1983 American History Dbq
    From 1880 to 1890 farmers had to endure many hardships. For example, food prices were decreasing, which meant farmers had to produce more crops and borrow more money from the banks. The banks then charged high interest rates for loans to farmers. In addition, rail road shipping rates were increasing, farm machinery was every expensive, the farmer's were isolated from the rest of the country, and they felt that they had an unresponsive government. The farmers believed that the deflating currency...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • Populism DBQ - 699 Words
    In the late nineteenth century, around 1880-1900, many farmers were experiencing problems and threats to their way of life. The valid complaints of the farmers dealt with the money supply system in America and the large railroad companies. In 1892, the platform for the Populist Party was laid down. In this platform it is stated that “the national power to create money is appropriated to enrich bondholders ... thereby adding millions to the burdens of the people.” This is discussing the...
    699 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wizard of Oz - 380 Words
    The author’s primary argument was to show that the famous story “The Wizard of Oz” was an allegory according to an English teacher who wrote an essay. The essay became famous and more and more people started to believe all the accusations. His name was Henry M. Littlefield and he wanted to show the discrepancies throughout the book to give people an understanding to why he said the things he did. He made it seem like it was a full blown parable on populism. The evidence the author has to...
    380 Words | 1 Page
  • Late 19th Century - 1130 Words
    C 20 Notes What two issues dominated national politics in the 1870s and 1880s? The money supply and civil-service reform What happened to James Garfield's presidency? It never really got started because he was assassinated soon after coming to office. Describe voter participation during the late nineteenth century. It was generally very high––usually from 80 percent up to 95 percent. Why did the federal government tend to ignore the social consequences of...
    1,130 Words | 8 Pages
  • Ap Dbq List - 5047 Words
    A.P. United States History 2. Name___________________________Date________ ➢ Chapter 26. The Great West and the Agricultural Revolution, 1865-1896. Theme 1: After the Civil War, whites overcame the Plains Indians’ fierce resistance and settled the Great West, bringing to a close the long frontier phase of American history. Theme 2: The farmers who populated the West found themselves the...
    5,047 Words | 24 Pages
  • Ush Chapter 5-6
    Chapters 5-6 1869: Central Pacific and Union Pacific complete the transcontinental railroad 1870: Red Cloud, chief of the Oglala Sioux, states his people's case in Washington DC 1876: Alexander Graham invents the telephone 1877: Munn vs Illinois establishes government regulation of railroads 1877: Mother Jones supports the Great Strike of 1877 1879: Thomas A. Edison invents a workable light bulb 1880: James Garfield is elected president 1881: Garfield is assassinated....
    1,481 Words | 8 Pages
  • CH 20 AP US
    Chapter 20: Politics and Expansion in an Industrializing Age, 1877-1900 Contested Political Visions: Ignored the consequences of industrialization, and focused on economic growth: tariffs, money supply, and civil-service reform (officials get jobs for merit, not their political connections) Repubs said tariffs protected families; Dems said they threatened families and would cause economic disaster Both believed in laissez-faire—government should promote economic growth but can’t regulate...
    1,115 Words | 5 Pages
  • Big Business Dbq - 1214 Words
    Ryan Burgett Document A Source: Historical Statistics of the United States. Document Information • Food prices declined significantly between 1870 and 1899. • Fuel and lighting prices declined significantly between 1870 and 1899. • Cost of living declined slightly between 1870 and 1899. Document Inferences • Improved agricultural innovations led to reduced food prices. • Mining and lighting innovations reduced prices for fuel and lighting. • Falling prices for...
    1,214 Words | 9 Pages
  • Us History Industrial Age
    Chapter 17: Industrial Supremacy Industrial Technologies There was a rapid emergence of new technologies. Cyrus W. Field made the transatlantic telegraph cable in Europe. Alexander Graham Bell developed first telephone with commercial capacity. Guglielmo Marconi took the first steps in creating the radio. Among innovations, there was an introduction on electricity as a source of light and power. Technology such as ships and engines made trade more possible. The Technology of Iron and...
    6,343 Words | 20 Pages
  • Populism and Progressivism - 977 Words
    Populism and Progressivism I. The Populist Party A. Background: What changes were taking place in agriculture in the U.S. between 1870 and 1900? 1. Mechanization- machine were replacing people and animals of doing agricultural. Tractors being developed produced right after civil war. Problems: need money to own tractors, banks load money to farmer, interest. Upkeep and maintain it to keep tractors running. Money to paid mechanic Added to the financial risk of farming,...
    977 Words | 4 Pages
  • Victorian Era Outline - 771 Words
    Corruption and Reform in the Gilded Age of American Politics Thesis: The Gilded Age of American politics was the most corrupt and lowest point of our government. Although power was ripped from the hands of the people, it eventually led to much-needed reforms during the progressive-era. I. Politics existed to benefit interest groups during this time-period. A. Conservative presidents attempted to avoid controversy and practiced laissez-faire policies. This allowed businesses to get...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • CHAPTER 5 Textbook PowerPoint
    The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier The culture of the Plains Indians declines as white settlers transform the Great Plains. Meanwhile, farmers form the Populist movement to address their economic concerns. Next Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier SECTION 1 Cultures Clash on the Prairie SECTION 2 Settling on the Great...
    2,109 Words | 19 Pages
  • Give Me Liberty: Chapter 17 Outline
    6 January 2013 Mr. Olsen Identify the sources and significance of Populism: Populists or people’s party members were part of this era’s greatest political insurgency. It evolved from the Farmers’ Alliance, where farmers across forty-three states banded together to remedy their condition. The people’s party not only attracted farmers but also included all the “producing classes.” Their lasting legacy comes from the populist platform of 1892 and also from the fact that populism came close to...
    1,693 Words | 6 Pages
  • Apush Gilded Age - 2856 Words
    The Gilded Age * During the Gilded Age, American businesses were transformed: * Massive corporations replaced small, family businesses * New technology, transportation, marketing, labor relations, & efficient mass-production * By 1900, the U.S. was the most industrialized country in the world * 19th-century inventors led to an “Age of Invention”: * Cyrus Field’s telegraph cable * Business typewriters, cash registers, adding machines * High-speed...
    2,856 Words | 11 Pages
  • American Pageant DBQ 8
    Farming in the late 19th century was financially binding; most farming families relied on merchants to supply them with food, with interest being added for every dollar’s worth of provisions. Over the course of the year, the total added up to amounts that couldn’t possibly be paid with the amount of income farmers had. Essentially, farming families would “take one step forward and two steps backward”, causing farmers to contend with their poor financial situations, which in turn, changed...
    691 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay in Support of the Electoral College
    Govt 2305, 09/20/13 Argument Against Abolishing the Electoral College I must say that when starting this semester I was staunchly for the abolishment of the Electoral College, believing that it was inherently unfair, went against the best interests of the people, and favored the power-elite; however, that opinion has recently changed due to my learning more historical facts, which, in turn, led to the ability of making a better-informed decision. My change of opinion started when...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • How did government policty, technology, and economic conditions affect agriculture.
    The period of 1865-1900 was classified as an era of Republicans, where laissez-fare governments favored big businesses. Technology was significantly evolving, focusing mainly on urban manufacturing. New technological advancements in farming were sold to the farmers at high prices and shipped at high freight rates. Also, the prices of cash crops dropped during this period, causing many farmers to live in poor conditions. In government, the power of urban industry and big businesses overcame that...
    1,028 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Did Farmers Express Discontent During 1870-1900 and What Impact Did Their Attitudes and Actions Have on National Politics.
    Why did farmers express discontent during 1870-1900 and what impact did their attitudes and actions have on national politics. Manufacturing hit a huge growth rate during this period which cause agriculture to decline, and cause farmers to struggle to make a living. The farmers were now being abused by the railroad companies and banks. The documents in DBQ 8 show rationality for the farmer’s protests, exclusively on bank mortgage tariffs and the gold standard. Two particular groups became...
    2,488 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Farmers' Movement, 1870-1900 DBQ
    Farming around the thirty year period of 1870 to 1900 was not a fair or successful one. One demographic that suffered immensely was the black population. Fresh out of the civil war, African Americans tried to acquire land, but had a difficult time paying off loans, which had high interest rates and took property as collateral. Black land owners were then forced to take out more loans, which thrust them into a spiraling debt (Document B). As seen in The Farmers Grievances, a skillful farmer,...
    465 Words | 2 Pages
  • William Jennings Bryan's Political Campaign
    Much like the Republican problems during the 1892 election, in which Grover Cleveland won his second term of office, the Democratic Party faced problems in the 1896 election. Cleveland, who had won on the strength of labor unions and his policy on monetary policy, lost on both of his signature issues. His use of the military during a railroad strike in 1894 and his comment that he would he would commission the military to do government services if the postal service struck did not endear himself...
    760 Words | 2 Pages