Pompeii Essays & Research Papers

Best Pompeii Essays

  • pompeii - 3642 Words
     Classical Civilisation Pompeii Contents: The Original Site 2 The Destruction 3 – 5 Houses 5 – 10 The Forum 10 – 13 Government 13 – 15 Inns and Thermopolia 15 – 16 Theatre 16 – 18 Baths 18 – 19 The Amphitheatre 20 Classical Civilisation Pompeii The Original Site It was not until the 1st century BC that the Romans took full control of the town. There are some obvious reasons to why the site of Pompeii was so appealing to settlers: It was built on a lava spur Gave...
    3,642 Words | 15 Pages
  • Pompeii - 981 Words
    Winifred Mary Beard, The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found. Cambridge. Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2008. 360 pages. Maps, photographs, illustrations, bibliography, index. Born in England 1955, Winifred Mary Beard, after finishing an all-girls high school, attained both a Bachelors and Doctorate from King’s College, in Cambridge. She married historian Robin Cormack, with whom she had two children. Her many accolades include; Professor of Classics at Cambridge...
    981 Words | 3 Pages
  • pompeii - 1082 Words
    Dr. Carl James Grindley Art and Civilization I Art 201 12/21/13 Mosaic in Pompeii Pompeii is a city in Rome near modern Naples in the Italian region of Campania. Along with Herculaneum, its sister city, Pompeii was destroyed, and completely buried, during a catastrophic eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius. The eruption lasted two days on 24 August 79 AD. At the time of the eruption, the town could have had a population of about 20,000 people, and was located in an area in which Romans...
    1,082 Words | 3 Pages
  • Volcano and Pompeii - 1147 Words
     Within seconds thousands of people killed, a town buried, only later to be forgotten. By the end of this speech I hope that you will not only learn more about the significance of this great city but also understand about how the city of Pompeii fell. Pompeii is still a very big tourists site so maybe after this speech you might be interested enough to go check out the town yourself. I don’t know about you guys but I didn’t know much about this great city. Yes I knew the basics but I didn’t...
    1,147 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Pompeii Essays

  • The Forum Pompeii - 3379 Words
    The Forum Historians consider the Forum to be the ‘centre of Pompeian life’ therefore it is an important aspect to study as numerous buildings and many events occurred there. From the latest evidence, it is believed that the Pompeian Forum was undergoing a ‘comprehensive, vigorous and ambitious post-earthquake restoration.’ (Bradley. 2005, p.87). The Forum at Herculaneum, however, is still buried under the town of Resina and therefore there is not enough physical evidence to provide a great...
    3,379 Words | 9 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - 15712 Words
    Pompeii and Herculaneum Introduction to P and H Pompeii and Herculaneum were thriving cities in southern Italy until they were destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius in 79AD. The eruption had a devastating effect upon the economy, society and topography of the surrounding area, destroying towns, villages, villas and farms. The landscape, including the coastline and the course of the Sarnus river, were altered irrevocably. Pompeii and Herculaneum are situated along the coast in the bay of...
    15,712 Words | 49 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - 935 Words
    Pompeii and Herculaneum are unique and remarkable because of their extraordinary state of preservation. No other archaeological site gives us so much information about life in ancient Rome. Pompeii and Herculaneum were buried in the volcanic eruption in 79AD in different ways, effectively which preserved majority of both sites. These archaeological remains that were left behind, such as bakeries, food bars, brothels, fulleries, wine presses and the Garum industry reveal a great deal about...
    935 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Fall of Pompeii - 1610 Words
    Hopeless: The Missed Signs and Inaction that Led to Pompeii’s Demise Zack Galusha HON-152-001 September 11, 2012 Hopeless Rome was able to expand its empire across vast distances because of one important aspect—their superior engineering skills. However it is interesting that a society so involved with the advancement of science still took great interest into portents, both good and bad. Therefore, it could be said that the learned individuals of Roman society had the means to decipher...
    1,610 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - 785 Words
    Pompeii and Herculaneum Economy: Economy and Occupations The economy of Pompeii and Herculaneum was primarily agricultural with a smaller number of trade and crafts practiced. Pompeii has been perceived as a bustling commercial centre, a vestibule of a house reading, “Profit is joy.” The bigger wheel ruts seen in the streets of Pompeii compared to Herculaneum also suggest a busier economy with epigraphic evidence suggestive of trades and guilds around the walls of the town. Herculaneum was a...
    785 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii aqueducts - 1015 Words
    Water supply and sanitation Before connected to aqueduct: The atrium: Compluvium - a hole in the room, provides light and allows rain to fall through Impluvium - a shallow pool collects rainwater Water drained - from impluvium into a cistern below Water extracted - can be extracted from the cistern. ‘The typical entrance of these plush residences was a small street doorway with and entrance corridor (fauceis) that opened out into a large columned atrium with a rectangular pool of water...
    1,015 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pompeii Autosaved - 1277 Words
    The discovery of Pompeii in 1784 marked a monumental moment in history with the discovery of a covered town and its secrets of the ancient civilisation buried by the natural disaster, the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. Following the discovery the process of excavation began over the 19th Century there was an increase in the changing methods used by archaeologists in order to further develop our understanding of the ancient civilisation of Pompeii. Before the 19th Century archaeology was...
    1,277 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pompeii Ruins - 1286 Words
     I’ve heard the stories about what happened in the city of Pompeii but I never really researched the event. I was appalled at the information I discovered throughout my research. The city is in shambles and the parts of the site that have been excavated already are let go and are allowed to decay and turn to dust. It worries me that I may not be able to visit this site in the future for fear of it falling apart. I don’t have the money to save it and the Italian government doesn’t either but...
    1,286 Words | 5 Pages
  • Life in Pompeii - 951 Words
    Pompeii and Herculaneum Economic life: The amphitheatre: The amphitheatre was built in 70bc by the magistrates to provide entertainment for the people of Pompeii. The Pompeii amphitheatre is the oldest surviving amphitheatre in the Roman world. The capacity was 24000 and because seats were numbered, only the most important people of Pompeii would be allowed to sit at the front. The amphitheatre was mainly used for games that lasted a week and were funded by the magistrates. While entering...
    951 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pompeii Notes - 2379 Words
    the physical environment: the geographical setting, natural features and resources of Pompeii and Herculaneum | 1. Physical 1. P & H located in Bay of Naples (BoN) 1. Mt Vesuvius located above intercontinental fault line (African Eurasian) 2. H is 8km South of Naples 3. P is 22km south of Naples 4. Today further inland than in Antiquity 5. Ruins located on lava spur 6. Naturally occurring hot baths in H & P 7. Fertile soil due to underground lava Allowed for...
    2,379 Words | 7 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - 1854 Words
    Baths * There were 4 public baths in Pompeii: the Stabian, the Forum, the Central and the Amphitheatre Baths. Herculaneum had 2 sets of baths: one near the centre called the Forum Baths, and the other on the marina outside the walls by the sea, known as the Suburban Baths. * Apodyterium- a change room. Caldarium- a hot bath. Tepidarium- a warm steam room. Frigidarium- a cold bath. Thermae- a bath. * Public baths were a very social place where friends met not only to bathe, but...
    1,854 Words | 6 Pages
  • History of Pompeii - 538 Words
    HISTORY OF POMPEII In the early afternoon hours of August 24, 79 A.D. the summit of Mount Vesuvius exploded without warning. A black river of ash and lapilli ran from the crater of the volcano down through the city of Pompeii leaving death and destruction in its wake. The magnificent ancient city of Pompeii was left buried under about 20 feet of earth and ash. Pompeii was originally only 500 meters from the sea, but after the eruption the distance to the sea increased to two kilometers....
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - 5425 Words
    PLEASE don't steal! I worked on this really hard! And it can get you in trouble!! Pompeii Documentary -- 3/3/14 Why is Pompeii so important? It's a destroyed city of people who died, and we can only tell how they felt in the people's last moments of their lives. They were frozen in the last seconds of their lives. Everything there can tell us every detail of what happened when the town swarmed with life. Earthquakes. A massive eruption. Hail of pumice and ash. Technology...
    5,425 Words | 14 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - ‘Describe the Political Life in Pompeii and Herculaneum’
    ‘Describe the Political Life in Pompeii and Herculaneum’ Pompeii and Herculaneum, like all ancient Roman-styled towns, were self governing cities n local matters, but were subject to royal decrees from Rome by the Emperor. However, the ‘emperor’ rarely interfered except where the empires security or local order was at stake. After the revolt within the Amphitheatre between Pompeian’s and Nacerians in AD59, Emperor Nero dismissed and exiled the two chief magistrates, and had a law –governing...
    1,056 Words | 3 Pages
  • Commercial Life in Pompeii - 2271 Words
    Commercial Life in Pompeii and Herculaneum Historians have debated the nature of Pompeian economy – whether it was based on agriculture or trade. Some see the Roman empire in modern terms as one vast single market where demand drove up prices and productivity stimulated trade to a never before seen level (residue of pollution can be found in Greenland’s ice-cap and the many ship wrecks indicating the large volume of sea borne traffic). Other historians see Roman economy as ‘primitive’ based...
    2,271 Words | 7 Pages
  • 1 The Forum Of Pompeii - 744 Words
    The forum of Pompeii To identify the main structures of the Pompeii Forum To discuss how they contributed to Pompeii’s life Starter: • Look at the map of Pompeii • Find the forum The forum looking towards the Temple of Jupiter The temples in the forum Temple of Jupiter Council buildings Macellum (meat and fish market) We are going to study the Forum in detail This is an overall view of the Forum of Pompeii. Temple of Jupiter Horrea Weights and Measures Office Temple of...
    744 Words | 7 Pages
  • Religon in Pompeii and Herculaneum - 1142 Words
    RELIGION IN POMPEII AND HURCULANEUM Jessica Bush “The study of Pompeii and Herculaneum provides us with a wealth of sources – However we are faced with issues regarding their limitations, reliability and evaluation.” This report will assess the truth of the above statement referring to religious practices in Pompeii and Herculeuim such as local, state, household and foreign religion. Though the abundance of sources in Pompeii and Herculaneum archaeologists and researchers can gather and...
    1,142 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum Notes - 387 Words
    Questions Pompeii 1. The buildings in Herculaneum were only built to with stand rain and hail, and were not built to with stand the volcanic pumice. The volcanic eruption spewed rocks ash and pumice in the direction of Herculaneum, and many think layers of ash and pumice cause the collapse of many of the buildings. After the continual downfall, and a pyroclastic flow Herculaneum became buried. The surge that covered Herculaneum presevered many objects instead of destroying them such as...
    387 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of Robert Harris' Pompeii
    The Water Runs Through It Robert Harris? Pompeii is thoroughly researched, informative, and filled with suspense. Attilius, the Aquarius and of the Aqua Augusta, is the main character. Attilius overcomes many obstacles and survives several life and death situations. Through Attilius we learn the ineer workings, technical details, and pictorial descriptions of the Aqua Augusta. The novel begins on August 22, A.D 79 at 04:21 hours. The twilight overhead turns into blistering heat creating...
    1,506 Words | 4 Pages
  • Comparing Catalhoyuk, Pompeii, and Carcassonne
    Kyle Casiglio World Civilizations Adam Webster December 3rd 2010 Comparing Catalhoyuk, Pompeii, and Carcassonne Catalhoyuk provides a unique look into Neolithic civilization that cannot be found in such an urban setting elsewhere in the world. Because of its age, it offers a base from which to judge the sophistication of later civilizations. The Roman city of Pompeii and the French medieval city of Carcassonne mark two major eras in human history, and thus serve as great bodies to compare...
    1,783 Words | 5 Pages
  • Graffiti from Pompeii - 586 Words
    Graffiti from Pompeii Graffiti is found in public places and consists of writings and drawings that can range anywhere from simple written words to elaborate wall paintings. Graffiti has existed since ancient times, including the time of ancient Rome in the town of Pompeii. The graffiti of Pompeii was preserved by an eruption of Mt. Vesuvius and was later found on the walls of the houses and buildings following excavation. The graffiti found in ancient Rome suggests what life was like for the...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum Ethical Issues
    Pompeii and Herculaneum are undoubtedly two of the most prolific and valuable archaeological finds of the ancient world. Both sites, due to their preservation in the hardened volcanic tufa and undisturbed tonnes of ash expelled by Vesuvius in AD 79, have yielded an abundance of archaeological artefacts which include human remains. Archaeologists, historians and museum authorities now face a critically urgent question of ethics concerning the excavation, scientific study and display of human...
    319 Words | 1 Page
  • Ancient History Pompeii - 8784 Words
    Pompeii & Herculaneum 1. Geographical context Physical environment: geographical setting, natural features and resources of Pompeii and Herculaneum Geographical setting Pompeii and Herculaneum were located in Campania, southwest Italy near Bay of Naples. Herculaneum was a waterfront town situated on the coast of Bay of Naples 7km west of Mt Vesuvius, while Pompeii was slightly inland on the Sarno river, 9km southeast of Mt Vesuvius. Both towns were linked to Rome through sea...
    8,784 Words | 37 Pages
  • Ancient History of Pompeii and Herculaneum
     PLANS AND STREETSCAPES OF POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM  POMPEII: - 66 hectares in area. Only two-thirds of the site of Pompeii has been excavated. - Walls – 3.2 km of wall built from tufa. Some sections of the wall at the east of the town had been dismantled - Watch towers – some towers still remain in the wall, on the north side of Pompeii - Stepping stones were placed across streets to allow people to cross the street without getting wet or muddy (or worse). - Use of land: Temples,...
    697 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - Changing Methods
    There are various impacts of the changing methods of 19th and 20th century’s archaeologists in Pompeii and Herculaneum. Changes by archaeologists like Fiorelli, Spinazzoa and Maiuri have impacted and contributed to the discovery and knowledge of the past and attracted many archaeologists, historians, scientists and even tourists from around the world. Giuiseppe Fiorelli was an archaeologist who is known for the methods he used in the excavation at Pompeii. The top down excavation was one...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • Factors Affecting the Economy of Pompeii
    THE ECONOMY The economy of Pompeii owed much to two factors, the fertility of the Campanian soil and the town’s position as the harbour for the surrounding region. Wall paintings indicate that a wide range of fruits and vegetables were grown in the region. In these, as in grain the city would have been self-sufficient. The two most significant agricultural products were undoubtedly wine and olive oil. Both of these were widely exported and they must have contributed greatly to the wealth...
    299 Words | 1 Page
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum Unit 1
    HSC Unit 1: Pompeii and Herculaneum By the end of this unit, you will know about: • The early stages of occupation of P and H • A historical overview of P and H before the eruption • The physical environment (setting, natural features, resources) of P and H • Plans and streetscapes of both cities • What kind of sources are available (written and archeological) on P and H • The limitations and reliability of the sources, and...
    1,643 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cities of Vesuvius: Pompeii and Herculaneum
    CORE 1: CITIES OF VESUVIUS – POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM 1. Geographical content The physical environment: the geographical setting, natural features and resources of Pompeii and Herculaneum GEOGRAPHICAL SETTING/NATURAL FEATURES Located in the coastal plain known today as Campania – 200km south of Rome Known for its temperate climate and beautiful landscape Plain faces the Bay of Naples – Tyrrhenian sea to the west Mount Vesuvius dominates the Campania plain Pompeii and...
    2,254 Words | 9 Pages
  • Religion in Pompeii and Herculaneum - 1264 Words
    Religion was an important part of everyday life in Pompeii and Herculaneum. It defined the way in which society went about things, and had a large influence in both towns. There were many differing religions available to the people of Pompeii and Herculaneum, ranging from foreign cults like that of the Egyptian god Isis, to cults that believed the emperor himself to be a god. All of these differing religions seem to be openly accepted and therefore indicates a fairly open societal mind when it...
    1,264 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ancient History, Pompeii and Herc
    Part one: A. They worshipped them at regular hours in the many shrines and temples of the city, but they also devoted a time to them in the intimacy of their own homes. Hercules, Bacchus and Venus, based on the Greek gods Heracles, Dionysus and Aphrodite, were often found in the lararium, the shrine at which the head of the household would worship his ancestors, along with members of his family and his slaves. The lararia tend to feature paintings of Hercules, the legendary founder of...
    909 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ancient Pompeii and Herculaneum NGO's
    Good afternoon. There are many organisations that exist to keep the amazing cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum alive. They run continuous projects that aim at the restoration of these two sites to help keep them available for as long as possible for future generations to see and future archaeologists to excavate. Without these NGO’s, Pompeii and Herculaneum would most likely not be visible to us today. Excavations have been taking place in Pompeii and Herculaneum since before the 1800s. The...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Notes for Pompeii and Herc - 11977 Words
    POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM SYLLABUS NOTES 1) GEOGRAPHICAL CONTEXT The physical environment: the geographical setting, natural features and resources of Pompeii and Herculaneum Pompeii and Herculaneum are both located on the west coast of Italy, about 200 km south of Rome on the Bay of Naples. They were built on the plain of Campania, a fertile farming area around Mt. Vesuvius, which was 14 km away. The Bay of Naples was the playground of the rich, who built luxurious, sumptuously furnished...
    11,977 Words | 40 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum Streetsscapes - 587 Words
    HISTORY Herculaneum and Pompeii were built in the Campania area at the bottom of Mount Vesuvius. They were both quite small Herculaneum being smaller then Pompeii covering only 12 hectares while Pompeii covered 66 hectares. Many of the urban characteristics for both Pompeii and Herculaneum were very much Greek influenced especially with the architecture because they used the grid pattern of insulae’s, this would divide the city by narrow straight streets into 30-90 metre blocks (insulae’s.)...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum Notes - 1431 Words
    AD 79 covered Pompeii and Herculaneum in ash. It was like a snap shot in history. Pompeii is well preserved. Pre- Roman Pompeii 8th century BC – Greeks from Cumae colony establish a small but permanent settlement in the region of Pompeii. 7th century BC – Etruscan influences begins to influence the style of the early town of Pompeii as the northern tribe gains strength. 6th century BC- The 1st grandiose structures were constructed in Pompeii such as the Temples of Apollo. 5th century...
    1,431 Words | 6 Pages
  • Pompeii And Herculaneum Exam Responses
    Pompeii and Herculaneum Exam Responses Using Source C and your own knowledge, what were three important features 3 of household religion at Pompeii and Herculaneum? (3) Household religion pervaded Pompeii and Herculaneum, forming a significant component of citizens’ lives. The foremost feature of private worship was the lararium, demonstrated in Source C, an elaborate (as in the source) or basic shrine used to honour the lares, household gods. Secondly, the genius of the paterfamilias, the...
    5,031 Words | 14 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum -Technology - 404 Words
    Technology has helped archaeologists and historians to reconstruct the lives of people from Pompeii and Herculaneum. It has allowed artefacts and human remains to be deciphered and more knowledge to be gained. This is why the role of technology is important in reconstructing the lives of people from Pompeii and Herculaneum Estelle Lazer has worked on hundreds of disarticulated bones that were stored in the Sarno Baths in Pompeii. Her research was based on statistics and the use of techniques...
    404 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii Historical Paper - 1172 Words
    Over the summer, I read the book Pompeii written by Robert Harris. This book is about the cities around Mt. Vesuvius during the eruption. The book starts out in Pompeii during the eruption, but everyone assumes it’s just the weather heating up as summer ends. However, one man is curious to find out what is happening and after a few days of research, he finds out that the volcano and its ashes will destroy the Bay of Naples, Pompeii, and other cities surrounding Mt. Vesuvius. He and Pliny the...
    1,172 Words | 3 Pages
  • Public Buildings of Pompeii and Herculaneum
    The Baths, Paleastra, theatres and amphitheatres were the main public buildings of Pompeii and Herculaneum. They were places of leisure for men, women, slaves, citizens, ingenui, and libertini, and while the classes were clearly defined in these places, they were also a social event for all to attend. The Stabian Baths in Pompeii are situated on the intersection of the Via Stabian and the Via dell’Abbondanza. The oldest parts of the baths date back to the 4th Century BC during the Samnite...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pompeii: The Villa of the Mysteries
    Religion. WORSHIP OF DIONYSUS Evidence for the worship of Dionysus in [pic]Pompeii is found in the Villa of the Mysteries, where a triclinium (dining room) had all its walls painted with flamboyant scenes from the Dionysiac secret rites. The mistress of the house was probably initiated into the sect herself, satisfying her need for spirituality. This particular religion was adapted from the Greek's. TEMPLE OF JUPITER Pompeii's main temple, when the city fell under the Roman...
    1,374 Words | 5 Pages
  • Anicent History Pompeii- Trade & Commerce
    Trade and Commerce in Pompeii Before the tragic eruption on Pompeii it was a well established thriving market town situated right on the coast of Italy that was very advanced for its age. Evidence throughout the town suggests that Pompeii had a healthy commercial life but there has been little evidence of manufacturing and trade although still enough to show the importations and exportations of the town providing archaeologist with a sufficient amount to have a great knowledge and...
    899 Words | 3 Pages
  • Birmingham Museum of Art: Pompeii Exhibition
    Birmingham Museum of Art Presents: Pompeii: Tales From An Eruption "Many strange things happened to us there, and we had much to fear." –Pliny the Younger The quote above comes to us from one of the letters of Pliny the Younger, the namesake of the man who was the commander of the Roman Fleet in 79 A.D. Pliny the Elder was last seen by his nephew as he prepared to sail across the Bay of Naples to Pompeii; the older man would perish in an attempt to rescue citizens of a coastal Italian...
    1,901 Words | 6 Pages
  • Pompeii Write-Up Classical Ideas
    Slide One- Which areas did Vesuvius hit? Vesuvius entered the history of volcanology with the eruption of 79 AD burying towns and making history as one of the most fascinating natural disasters ever to hit this planet. The eruption destroyed the cities of Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplonti and Stabiae and caused the death of thousands of people, including Pliny the Elder. Earthquakes occurred frequently before the eruption in 79 AD but the locals disregarded them, as they were extremely common in...
    2,591 Words | 7 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum: Religion, Politics and Economy
    Through the analysis of archaeological evidence and sources, historians are now able to gain insight into how society functioned in Pompeii and Herculaneum. Though several factors made up these societies, this essay will only examine three; religion local politics and economy to create a picture of how society was. The citizens of Pompeii and Herculaneum were very religious and believed everything in their lives was controlled by the gods. We can see the importance placed on religion from the...
    1,545 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pompeii and Herculaneum - Display of Human Remains
    There are both positive and negative aspects concerning the study and display of human remains at Pompeii and Herculaneum. Though the problem lies in the determination of what is actually right or wrong, as attitudes vary between cultures and can change over time. So people have different ideas and opinions about it. Many think that displaying and studying human remains is further damaging the bodies and not having respect to deceased person but others also think that it is a gain rather than a...
    708 Words | 2 Pages
  • Usefulness and Reliability of Written and Archaeological Evidence in Pompeii and Herculaneum
    WHAT DO HISTORIANS NEED TO BE CAREFUL OF WHEN LOOKING AT USEFULNESS AND RELIABILITY OF WRITTEN AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVIDENCE IN POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM? There is a significant amount of evidence from Pompeii and Herculaneum, however, historians must be careful about the conclusions they come to from examining said evidence. There are many gaps in the evidence resulting not only from the nature of ancient societies, but also from the destruction caused by the eruption. Historians must also keep...
    713 Words | 2 Pages
  • What Archaeological Evidence Is There for Work and Business in Pompeii?
    What Archaeological Evidence is there for work and Business in Pompeii? Like many towns in the Roman Empire, there were many jobs in Pompeii, and due to the fact that very few people had kitchens, many people owned restaurants, bars and various other “food shops”. As well as food shops other popular businesses included Fishmongers, Merchants, Weapon Smiths, Farmers and many more, most of the workers were however slaves. Fishing: Due to the fact that Pompeii was so close to the sea, a...
    781 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Destruction of Pompeii (works cited throughout the essay).
    In the city of Pompeii on the morning of August 24, 79 CE, everyday life was commencing as usual. The stirrings of the mountain in the distance went unnoticed until an explosion rocked the streets. Panic broke out as people tried to flee the city and parents made vain efforts to protect their children from the falling ash and rocks that would cover the city. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius did not just demolish a city, it wiped out an entire civilization. Beginning in the year 62 CE, violent...
    714 Words | 2 Pages
  • Public and Private Uses of Water Varied in Pompeii and Herculaneum
    1) What is the Castellum. A castellum is a building that distributed water throughout Pompeii and Herculaneum. The task of the castellum was to spread water all over Rome for public and private use. In Source 1, it shows three lead pipes which transferred water all over the city of Pompeii. The bricks encompassing the water narrow the water allowing it to fit through the pipes. 2) Why does the engineer Vitruvius recommend a three part water distribution in a town? A three part water...
    1,217 Words | 4 Pages
  • Assess the issue involved in the display of human remains at Pompeii and Herculaneum.
    Archaeologists have excavated Pompeii and Herculaneum for many years consequently leading to the unearthing of air pockets in the solidified rock. Guiseppe Fiorelli an early 16th century archaeologist discovered these pockets of toxic air to be indentations of human remains that have decayed over many years leaving behind casts. Discovering this information had lead Fiorelli to develop a technique of preservation of these remains, plaster casts. This effective preservation technique has...
    391 Words | 1 Page
  • Understanding Pompeii and Herculaneum: Contributions by 19th and 20th Century Archaeologists
    Topic of study: changing (archaeological/scientific) methods and contributions of nineteenth and twentieth century archaeologists to our understanding of Pompeii and Herculaneum Since the discovery and beginning of excavations at the sites of Pompeii and Herculaneum from the early eighteenth century, archaeologists have made many constructive impacts on the site which have led to our understanding of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The first attempts to excavation methodology at the site of Pompeii...
    1,203 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ancient History Essay About the Impact of New Research on Our Understanding of Daily Life in Pompeii and Herculaneum.
    With reference to Source A and your own knowledge, describe the impact of new research on our understanding of daily life in Pompeii and Herculaneum. (10 marks) New research has immensely impacted on our understanding of daily life in both Pompeii and Herculaneum. Experts in archaeology, science and other fields have revealed copious amounts of information about people, buildings and food found in the two cities prior to the eruption in 62 AD. Experts such as Estelle Lazer and Sarah Bisel...
    800 Words | 3 Pages
  • Assess the Changing Methods and Contributions of Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Archaeologists to Our Understanding of Pompeii and Herculaneum
    Over the past centuries, since its discovery in 1749, many archaeologists have contributed to our understanding of Pompeii and Herculaneum. Archaeologists were initially focused on excavating, most of which were improperly done causing extensive damage. It wasn’t until the 19th century, when archaeologist Giuseppe Fiorelli introduced new excavation methods; those succeeded him include August Mau, Vittorio Spinazzola and Amendo Maiuri. Now attention has shifted towards conservations and...
    611 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gatsby - 426 Words
    Tragic of respected Naval Commander: Eruption causes terror and destruction in bay of Naples. A great explosions happened for an unknown reason about a week ago. The air became polluted and poisonous . The eruption caused the death of about 20,000 but most importantly the naval commander " Pliny the Elder". The bay of Naples is now a complete disaster. At the bay of Naples in Italy a tragic scene happened, the huge mount Vesuvius erupted. The reason for the eruption is unknown however...
    426 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hoyou - 793 Words
    QUESTION ONE A) Each morning ‘Clients would flock to their patron’s house to pay their respects’ B) Two features of the patron and client relationship were: 1- The client was to support his patron at political elections and do any favours that might be required. 2- The patron might assist in legal matters or give a small gift or free meal. C) Essentially in Pompeii and Herculaneum political life was bases around client patron relationship and often as a favour the clients of the...
    793 Words | 3 Pages
  • Vesuvius Report - 2765 Words
    AS91202: Demonstrate understanding of a significant event in the classical world THE BIG BANG The Eruption of Mount Vesuvius and it’s importance for our knowledge of Roman everyday life. Nazia Ahmed 12SO The eruption of Mt Vesuvius In the year of 79AD Mount Vesuvius violently erupted causing devastation in the surrounding area. Prior to the earthquake tremors were felt, however these warning signs were brushed off. Pliny the younger even wrote of these tremors as ”not particularly...
    2,765 Words | 9 Pages
  • Water and Daily Life - 1076 Words
    Robert Harris’ Pompeii: A Novel After reading the novel Pompeii by Robert Harris I notice many interesting topics and subtopics to be discussed and analyzed. I like digging deeper into the specific characters that I came across while reading and I really enjoy how they are portrayed depending on outside factors such as status (freedmen, slave, or individuals of a higher status such as Pliny) and their role and importance in the novel. Secondly, the importance of technology and more...
    1,076 Words | 3 Pages
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  • Pliny’s Accounts Are Better Than Fiorelli’s Methods. Do Agree with This Statement?
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  • Notes: Ancient History - 5547 Words
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  • House of the Vetti and House of the Fawn
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  • Pompei and Herculaneum Religious Archaeology
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  • The Ancient History - 618 Words
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  • The Contribution of Archaeologists to History - 1181 Words
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  • Life as a Roman Slave - 915 Words
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  • Forensic Science Section 6 LQ
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  • Unit 6 Lab Questions 3 24 15
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  • Forensic Human Remains - 395 Words
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  • Effects of Natural Disaster - 639 Words
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  • Paper - 1320 Words
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  • Suzanne Britt and Dave Barry
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  • Mt. Vesuvius - 867 Words
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  • Positive impacts of volcanic activity
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