Poetics Essays & Research Papers

Best Poetics Essays

  • Aristotle's Poetics - 683 Words
    Aristotle's Poetics is not one of his major works, although it has exercised a great deal of influence upon subsequent literary studies and criticism. In this work Aristotle outlines and discusses many basic elements that an author should adhere to in order to write a great tragedies and/or poetry. Two important topics that Aristotle addresses and believes to be crucial to the art work is the mimesis, or imitation of life, and that the audience has an emotional response from the work of art,...
    683 Words | 2 Pages
  • Poetics by Aristotle - 741 Words
    Poetics by Aristotle Aristotle's Poetics is the earliest-surviving work of dramatic theory and the first extant philosophical treatise to focus on literary theory 6 Constituent Parts * plot (mythos) Refers to the "structure of incidents" (actions). Key elements of the plot are reversals, recognitions, and suffering. The best plot should be "complex" (i.e. involve a change of fortune). It should imitate actions arousing fear and pity. Thus it should proceed from good fortune to bad...
    741 Words | 3 Pages
  • Aristotle's Poetics: Theme Analysis
    Poetry as Mimesis (Imitation) Aristotle defines all poetry as mimesis (imitation). In other words, poetry imitates nature, which is to say it imitates life, whether natural objects or human actions. For Aristotle, tragedy is an imitation of human action. The concept of art as imitation proved vastly influential in Western literature right up until the eighteenth century, when the Romantic age gave birth to the expressive theory, that poetry arises from the emotions, feelings and impressions...
    656 Words | 2 Pages
  • Aristotle's Theory of Poetics - 778 Words
    Aristotle’s Theory of Poetics Research Assignment Aristotle bases his theory of poetics on greek tragedy. He defines tragedy as "the imitation of an action that is serious and also as having magnitude, complete in itself." (Melani, 2009) He views that, "Tragedy is a form of drama exciting the emotions of pity and fear. Its action should be single and complete, presenting a reversal of fortune, involving persons renowned and of superior attainments,and it should be written in poetry...
    778 Words | 3 Pages
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  • The Glass Menagerie and Aristotle's Poetics
    Madeline Caughey 4 April 2013 Professor Wivlagg English 102 “The Relationship of Aristotle's Poetics to Modern Dramatic Tragedy as Exhibited in Tennessee William's The Glass Menagerie” Aristotle's poetics were created by Aristotle himself and they were a literary work of his dramatic theory. “The Glass Menagerie” is a play written by, Tennessee Williams, that exemplifies Aristotle's opinion of poetry being an imitation of life or a mythos. It is also a tragedy because...
    1,113 Words | 6 Pages
  • Poetic Diction in Shakespearean Tragedies
    Aristotle's Poetics defines the nature of tragic drama, discusses the six essential elements of drama, states his opinion on the best type of tragic plot, and suggests the most effective means to arouse essential emotions such as pity and fear. He presents here the elaborate structure of justice of virtue rewarded and villain punished, broadly speaking the poetic justice. Now since in the finest kind of tragedy the structure should be complex and not simple, and since it should also be a...
    758 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ibsen's Ghosts vs. Aristotle's Poetics
    Ibsen's Ghosts, although a relatively modern drama, maintains many classical elements of tragedy as defined by Aristotle and championed by the ancient Greek playwrights and poets. One element of displayed prominently in this case is character. Aristotle believed that there were four main elements to a good tragic hero: 1) the character must be good, 2) decorum, 3) the character must be true to life, and 4) constancy within the characters demeanor and actions. The tragic hero in Ibsen's...
    762 Words | 2 Pages
  • Aristotle’s Poetics Might Offers Insights Into Discussing Classical Greek Tragedy, but Is Less Applicable to Later Drama. How Far Do You Agree?
    Aristotle’s Poetics might offers insights into discussing classical Greek tragedy, but Is less applicable to later drama. How far do you agree? I do not agree that Aristotle’s Poetics is less applicable to later drama. Aristotle’s rules for tragedy from Poetics states a formula which most modern language tragedy follows. Aristotle writes; “Tragedy, then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic...
    1,913 Words | 6 Pages
  • Prometheus Bound as Tragedy - 830 Words
    Aeschylus’ tragedy, Prometheus Bound, is an interesting example of Aristotle’s tragedy because it encompasses a god’s own reversal leading to suffering brought upon his fellow gods. Prometheus Bound is the story of the god Prometheus and the events that follow after he disobeys the new ruler, Zeus, by granting gifts of survival, namely fire, to humankind. Catharsis is found in the play because the audience pities Prometheus for having to suffer for an act of kindness. Prometheus Bound combines...
    830 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hubris as a Major Element in Aeschylus
    Hubris as a Major Element in Aeschylus’s Prometheus Bound Aristotle created the basis for many different subjects including drama, politics and philosophy. Today, many of his works are constantly studied and his modern ideas are still prevalent in society. In Poetics, Aristotle focuses on the best kinds of tragic plot (Aristotle 20). One of the most important aspects of a perfect tragedy is hamartia, sometimes misinterpreted as tragic flaw. The true definition of hamartia is a fatal error...
    1,455 Words | 4 Pages
  • Modern Day Tragic Hero - Ben Johnson
    Tragic Greek dramas featured tragic heroes. A tragic hero is defined as a character who makes an error of judgment or has a fatal flaw that, combined with fate and external forces, brings on a tragedy. Of all the tragic heroes in Greek literature, Sophocles believed that Oedipus was the truest. Sophocles was correct, for based on analysis of Aristotle’s Poetics; it is obvious that Oedipus is indeed far more of a tragic hero than any other hero of ancient Greek literature. According to...
    967 Words | 3 Pages
  • Michael Jordan - 315 Words
    The Characteristics of an Archetypal Tragic Hero 1. Noble stature Tragedy involves the “fall” of a tragic hero. One theory suggests that the tragic hero must have a desirable/higher/lofty position to fall on, or else there is no tragedy (just pathos). Another explanation of this characteristic is that tragedies involving people of stature affect the lives of others. For example, in the case of a king, the tragedy would not only involve the individual and his family, but it would involve the...
    315 Words | 1 Page
  • Othello as a Tragic Hero - 631 Words
    Shakespeare uses techniques, characters, language, structure and form to present Othello as tragic hero. He exposes his tragic flaw, which consequently leads to his downfall. Othello conforms to the Aristotelian principles of tragedy, of the noble protagonist who undergoes ceaseless manipulation and endures suffering, resulting in his ultimate downfall due to hamartia. All of these techniques combine to provide a different perception of the protagonist, as more of an atypical victim, exposed to...
    631 Words | 2 Pages
  • pragmatics - 747 Words
    Aristotle :(384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher and polymath, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. His writings cover many subjects including physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, rhetoric, linguistics,politics, government, ethics, biology, and zoology Aristotle's scientific method :Like his teacher Plato Aristotle's philosophy aims at the universal . Aristotle however found the universal in particular things , which he called the essence of things , while...
    747 Words | 2 Pages
  • Antigone Tragic Characters - 1072 Words
    Gonzalez 1 English Honors 22 November 2011 In the story “Antigone” both characters, Antigone and Creon are examples of tragic characters. The tragic character is a man of noble stature. He is not an ordinary man, but a man with outstanding quality and greatness about him. This character causes his own downfall due to his own tragic flaw. Creon is a tragic character in the story because of his tragic flaw, his pride and failure to understand when he is wrong. This flaw causes the...
    1,072 Words | 3 Pages
  • Aristotle's Tragedy - 1152 Words
    The Iliad is Aristotle’s Tragedy; an “Imitation of Action” Humans tend to take comfort in the idea that their lives are not the most unfortunate, this makes tragedy a popular theme for many well written pieces. Although The Iliad is not considered a tragedy, according to Joe Sachs it still follows Aristotle’s definition of one in “The Poetics”. Which is, tragedy is the use of “imitation of action” to arouse pity and fear, leading to catharsis from the audience in a piece of literature. There...
    1,152 Words | 3 Pages
  • Agamemnon, Hamlet and ALfred prufrock compasion essay
    Title: A Comparison of the Element of Hamartia in “Hamlet”, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”, and “Agamemnon” Thesis: One of the elements that can be compared in the plays “Hamlet”, “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”, and “Agamemnon” is hamartia. Attempt has been made to analyse the main characters’ personality traits and provide the reader with specific examples that help to clarify how hamartia is present in each of the three plays. In order to analyse all the three characters’...
    1,618 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Tragic Hero Victor Frankenstein Essay Example
    Aristotle's ideas about tragedy were recorded in his book of literary theory titled Poetics. In it, he has a great deal to say about the structure, purpose, and intended effect of tragedy. His ideas have been adopted, disputed, expanded, and discussed for several centuries now. The following is a summary of his basic ideas regarding the tragic hero: 1. The tragic hero is a character of noble stature and has greatness. This should be readily evident in the play. The character must...
    408 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tragic Hero Antingone Essay
    Initially, a tragic hero is the true hero in a tragedy, in which his or her fatal flaws determine the outcome of the story. In addition to the hero’s flaw, fate and other external forces such as people and the environment also have an effect on the tragedy. In “Antigone”, Creon best represents the true tragic hero based on Aristotle’s Theory of Tragedy. His contributions to the events of tragedy are shown through the sequential structures of inciting incident- beginning of the problem, Hamartia-...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • King Lear - 1159 Words
    King Lear: To be the Cause of One’s Own Tragedy Robert Silverstein Grade 12 English, ENG4U Mr. Fuller July 10th, 2009 To be the Cause of One’s Own Tragedy William Shakespeare’s tragic works are notably characterized by the hamartia of their protagonists. This tragic flaw is a defect in character that brings about an error in action, eventually leading to the characters imminent downfall. In Shakespeare’s King Lear, written in 1606, the...
    1,159 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oedipus and Aristotle - 392 Words
    Oedipus and Aristotle In his Poetics, Aristotle outlined the ingredients necessary for a good tragedy, and based his formula on what he considered to be the perfect tragedy, Sophocles's Oedipusthe King. According to Aristotle, a tragedy must be an imitation of life in the form of a serious story that is complete in itself; in other words, the story must be realistic and narrow in focus. A good tragedy will evoke pity and fear in its viewers, causing the viewers to experience a feeling of...
    392 Words | 1 Page
  • Tragic Hero - 579 Words
    A pathetic character is someone who is regarded unfortunate and turns out to be weak or useless. Tragic Character as: a literary character who makes an error of judgment or has a fatal flaw that, combined with fate and external conflicts, brings on a tragedy. The major flaw of Willy is that he fails to achieve self-acknowledge or self – realization. He fails to realize his personal failure. He merely attributes his unwelcome personality to his “fat ”and “foolish to look at”...
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • Frankenstein: One of the Most Popularized Monsters in History
    For all these years, the name “Frankenstein” has become one of the most popularized monsters in history. He epitomizes everything but happiness and joy, and moreover portrays all things evil, wreaking havoc and tragedy. But what makes tragedy, tragedy? According to Aristotle in his Poetics, “Tragedy, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; [it is portrayed] in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in...
    1,253 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Tragic Hero in Antigone - 1003 Words
    Aristotle’s theories on tragedy were first established during the fourth century in the Poetics, where he defines what makes a tragic hero. Aristotle suggests that a tragic hero is a character who has a high social standing and embodies great nobility in his/her personality. They are neither a villain nor are they entirely good, but a person somewhat like us, raised to a higher position in society. In addition, the downfall of a tragic hero is caused by fault of their own, often...
    1,003 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tragedy and Antigone Essay - 641 Words
    Freshman English 4 November 2013 Antigone Essay In the classic Greek Tragedy, Antigone, by Sophocles, Creon portrays the characteristics of a tragic protagonist. Some of these characteristics include hamartia and hubris which are essential to fulfilling the role of tragic hero. Creon also experiences different events that classify him as the tragic protagonist. These events are known as moments of anagnorisis and peripeteia in which Creon realizes what he has done, but his action’s results...
    641 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hamartia with Respect to Oedipus in the Play ''Oedipus Rex''.
    Hamartia with respect to Oedipus in the play Oedipus Rex. The tragedy must not be a spectacle of a virtuous man brought from prosperity to adversity: for this moves neither pity nor fear; it merely shocks us; nor again, that of a bad man passing from adversity to prosperity…It must concern a man who is not eminently good and just, yet whose misfortune is brought about not by vice or depravity, but by some error or frailty. (The Poetics) In Oedipus Rex, the character of Oedipus is a victim of...
    1,182 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Did Willy Loman Die?
    To come to a true conclusion as to whether Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman can be considered a tragedy in the truest sense of the word, it must first be understood what this sense is. In ‘The Poetics’, which is the earliest work of dramatic theory on record, Aristotle shows his belief that tragedy relies on the relationship between plot, audience and character. The key ideas of this, are that for a tragedy to be a tragedy, there must be a tragic hero, a ‘man who enjoys prosperity and a high...
    276 Words | 1 Page
  • Essay Cct - 1525 Words
    TRAGIC FLAW IN PADA SEBUAH KAPAL BY NH. DINI There have been various attempts to define literature. We can define it, for example, as 'imaginative' writing in the sense of fiction writing which is not literally true. But even the briefest reflection on what people commonly include under the heading of literature suggests that this will not do. Literature is not a way of knowing reality but a kind of collective utopian dreaming which has gone throughout history, an expression of those...
    1,525 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hamlet's Tragic Flaws - 1120 Words
    Is Hamlet's distress understandable? Why does he fail to act until too late? Is his inaction due to a tragic flaw? Until relatively recently, critics tended to assume that the causes of tragic misfortune resided in some moral defect of the protagonist. Aristotle’s term hamartia (derived from “fault,” “failure,” guilt” but literally meaning to “miss the mark”) was often translated as “tragic flaw,” leading critics to seek the chink in the hero’s armour (such as pride or ambition) which leads...
    1,120 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sophocle's Antigone - 496 Words
    In the Sophocle’s play, Antigone, there are a many tragic characters in which some face death, and others watch as their loves ones die all around them. There is nothing more tragic than to be surrounded by the dead, especially when it may be one’s own fault. Therefore, Creon is the most tragic character of this play. Aristotle would agree that Creon is the main tragic character, as he makes many decisions which could have led him either towards his tragedy or away from it, but ultimately he...
    496 Words | 2 Pages
  • Julius Ceasar Theme - 583 Words
    Thesis: Which Character, Brutus or Cassius, would best fit Aristotle’s description of a tragic hero? Outline Introduction. Thesis, Point of Theme article. What is a Tragic Hero? Definition of a Tragic Hero N; a literary character who makes an error of judgment or has a fatal flaw that, combined with fate and external forces, brings on a tragedy. Explanation of Tragic Flaw N; the character defect that causes the downfall of the protagonist of a tragedy; hamartia. How Cassius could...
    583 Words | 2 Pages
  • Aristotelian's Concept - 334 Words
    “Aristotelian’s Concept / Process of Tragedy as Presented to Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex” Oedipus Rex had passed from the process and concept on Aristotelian’s tragic hero. Because tragic hero was a noble by birth, he shows human errors, and he sets as warning to humanity. Oedipus was hubris so proud of his own intelligence, hamartia he thinks that he can escape a horrendous fate, catharsis he does not kill himself because he will not suffer and peripeteia Oedipus realizes that he is the son and...
    334 Words | 1 Page
  • Aristotle's Definition of Tragedy - 382 Words
    Aristotle’s definition of tragedy Aristotle It’s not all about beauty, art and nature Accounts for tragedy as a scientific phenomena “Everything unfolding on the stage should have a specific psychological effect on the audience” Literary theory: a theorist accounting for a complex piece of literature, labeling parts explaining notably what does happen in the literature but what should happen in the literature. Tragic hero: function of literature Characteristics of a tragic hero...
    382 Words | 2 Pages
  • Othello - the Greatest Tragedy
    A Shakespearean tragedy is one that encompasses many different elements. Shakespeare presents all of these elements spectacularly in Othello. For a tragedy to occur there are five conditions. The protagonist, Othello in this case, must experience a death or a total loss of ranking in society. The audience must also be captured by the actors and feel some sort of connection to them. This is known as catharsis. In Shakespearean tragedies the protagonist always has a character defect or a tragic...
    1,109 Words | 3 Pages
  • hello my name is peter
    tragedy www.uvm.edu/~lschnell/eng121/tragedy.html‎ Traducir esta página Or, to put it another way, it is not precisely the death(s) that makes the play tragic. A great deal of ink has been spilled by critics trying to theorize the experience ... How to Write a Tragedy: 6 Steps (with Pictures) - wikiHow www.wikihow.com › ... › Writing › Works › Fiction‎ Traducir esta página Tragedies are, just as they are called, tragic. A good tragedy will make the audience cry, but achieve catharsis at...
    507 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oedipus Tragic Flaw - 281 Words
    A man cannot become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall.” Aristotle A tragic hero is someone great, but not perfect. He or she walks towards his or her own death. The Heroes downfall is a result of the hero’s actions and decisions. However, his misfortune is usually is not deserved and is brought about not by vice or depravity, but by some error or frailty. This error or frailty can be illustrated as his tragic flaw, or his hamaratia. The tragic heroes own destruction is...
    281 Words | 1 Page
  • Aristotle s theory of the Tragic Hero
    Aristotle’s theory of the Tragic Hero: “A man doesn’t become a hero until he can see the root of his own downfall” Tragic hero’s who fit under Aristotle’s depiction are known as ‘Aristotelian Tragic Hero’s’ and possess five specific characteristics; 1) A flaw or error of judgment (also known as ‘hamartia’ which is a fatal flaw leading to the downfall of a tragic hero or heroine) 2) A reversal of fortune due to the error of judgment (also known as ‘peripeteia’, which is a sudden reversal of...
    1,899 Words | 5 Pages
  • oedipus the king - 1706 Words
    Aristotelian philosophy teaches that knowing material reality can be achieved by properly identifying the essential traits of things and distinguishing things from other things by forming classification schemes based on those traits. The theory's great power is that it canproduce useful, independently verifiable categories of analysis--if we all can agree on the epic's essential traits, then we can conduct reasonable scholarly discussions about epics. Since Aristotle also was interested (like...
    1,706 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Tragic Hero & the Oedipus
    The Tragic hero & The Oedipus 1. Oedipus Rex is not only the greatest play of Sophocles but also the greatest Greek play. Aristotle, in the poetics, gives very high praise to the play. According to Aristotle, the tragic hero is a highly esteemed and prosperous man who falls into misfortune because of some serious hamartia. He particularly gives the example of Oedipus. Oedipus is closely the intermediate kind of person stipulated by Aristotle, not much wicked, not much virtuous. The complete...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Vocabs - 365 Words
    A GLOSSARY OF DRAMATIC TERMS • Act: acting happens in plays or movies and it’s carried out by actors. • Antagonist: a character who is the main enemy of the protagonist. • Anti-climax: a sudden, unexpected falling action that leads the audience to feel bored and disappointed. • Catharsis: A release of emotional tension, as after an overwhelming experience, that restores or refreshes the spirit. • Climax: when the progression of the story reaches its greatest...
    365 Words | 2 Pages
  • Othello: A Tragic Hero
    Othello: A Tragic Hero? Considered by some to be one of the finest tragedies ever written, Shakespeare’s Othello tells the story of one man’s fall from happiness to utter despair. This is achieved by Othello’s fatal flaws – his jealousy and pride. Othello’s own fatal flaws lead him to his demise not Iago’s manipulation. This view point is supported in Professor Crawford’s article “Othello as a Tragic Hero.” In his article, Crawford conveys the idea that the misfortunes that befall Othello...
    965 Words | 3 Pages
  • trgedy - 1697 Words
    In essence, tragedy is the mirror image or negative of comedy. For instead of depicting the rise in circumstances of a dejected or outcast underdog, tragedy shows us the downfall of a once prominent and powerful hero. The most influential theorist of the genre is Aristotle, whose Poetics has guided the composition and critical interpretation of tragedy for more than two millennia. Distilling the many penetrating remarks contained in this commentary,...
    1,697 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oedipus Research Paper - 1538 Words
    Abstract According to Aristotle, Sophocles play, Oedipus, was the perfect tragedy. It contained the elements of a hero of noble birth or rank, a fall for the hero based on a “tragic flaw” and evoked pity for the main character, King Oedipus. This essay will attempt to reflect how Oedipus is a prime example of Aristotle’s tragic hero. Thesis Oedipus illustrates Aristotle’s definition of the tragic hero through the esteem of the king, the fatal flaw the brings about the fall of the kind and...
    1,538 Words | 6 Pages
  • To what extent does Othello meet the criteria of a tragic hero?
    To what extent does Othello meet the criteria of a tragic hero? The characteristics of a tragic hero are explained in Aristotle’s theory. Aristotle said that a tragic hero must go through four stages. These are Peripateia, which is an utter and complete downfall from a very high status such as a king, prince etc… to catastrophe and misery. Hamartia, which is a fatal or tragic flaw in the hero. Anagnorisis, which is recognition of the hero’s mistakes, and Catharsis, which is when the audience...
    2,043 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Crucible - 1211 Words
    A tragedy is said to be "a representation of serious people"(Aristotle 94) . I n The Crucible, tragedy was used all throughout the story. For example, the characters lost dozens of their neighbors all because of one group of girl’s ability to lie. Through Aristotle’s definition of what a tragedy is; The Crucible can be easily defined as being a one with its tragic hero being portrayed through John Proctor and the seriousness of the overall play. John comes from a high position in society because...
    1,211 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tragic Flaw - 1322 Words
    and The Flaw By Phanit Asavanamaung 10B Stories are told in many styles, through different medias; all which are to entertain or educate its audience. Christopher Booker, the author of the book 'The Seven Basic Plots', introduces the idea of the seven basics categories of any story told. The seven basic archetypes are Over Coming the Monster, Rags to Riches, The Quest, Voyage and Return, Comedy, Rebirth and Tragedy. Tragedy as one of the seven archetypes, are found in any type of stories; from...
    1,322 Words | 3 Pages
  • Explain why Willy Loman is or is not a tragic hero
    Throughout the course of the drama, Willy Loman, a delusional salesman sinks lower into his depression and confusion, until he eventually ends his life. There has been much discussion on whether 'Death of a Salesman' is a tragedy, and if Willy is a tragic hero. Many critics question the supposedly tragic elements of the drama, citing Aristotle's definition of tragedy, and Shakespearean examples. Willy is often compared to King Lear, however it is often suggested that his misfortune pales in...
    919 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oleana as a Tragedy - 566 Words
    Oleana presents many definitive traits that could categorise it as a ‘tragedy’. The most prominent is the presence of a ‘harnartia’, executed by John. Harnartia is Greek terminology that translates literally to “missing the mark”, and was often used to depict the ‘Hero’s fatal flaw’. In the case of Oleana, it could be argued that John committed the ‘fatal error’ of breaching the lawful gap between teacher and student by “placing his arm around” Carol while trying to soothe her. This sentimental...
    566 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Character of Doctor Faustus - 312 Words
    Character of Doctor Faustus The character of Dr. Faustus conceptualises the Aristotelian parameters of a tragic hero that embodies a ‘tragic flaw’ within a frame that is dazzling to such proportion as to pale other characters into insignificance. Faustus is a man of great scholarship and vast knowledge but with an intrinsic quality—an unquenchable thirst for knowledge that is beyond human whatever he has mastered seems pitifully inadequate: “Yet art thou still but Faustus and a Man.” His...
    312 Words | 1 Page
  • Tragedy Notes - 463 Words
    TRAGEDY Simple definition: A hero’s fall in a world of good and evil Classical definition: Aristotle – Ars Poetica (Poetic Arts) * Tragedy is serious * Hero is engaged in a conflict * Hero experiences great suffering * Hero is defeated and dies Tragedies involve… * A faulty or corrupt society * Tragic hero * Tragic flaw * Mistaken choice of action * Catastrophe * Discovery Tragedy arouses in the audience the emotions of pity and...
    463 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Tragic Hero and Hamartia - 571 Words
    3. Tragic Hero & Hamartia :- Aristotle in his ‘Poetics’ has given an ideal concept of tragic hero. According to Aristotle tragic hero in a tragic drama should neither be too good or perfect hero nor be too wicked or bad. Fall of a perfect good man would not arouse pity but it may shock us or disgust us. In the same way, utterly wicked person passing from happiness to misery is lacking in proper tragic qualities, nevertheless satisfying our moral sense. Thus in the view of Aristotle, totally...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oedipus - 865 Words
    Oedipus Tyrannous When half human monsters walked the Earth and mythical Gods ruled all of creation, one man was destined to suffer the worst fate ever imaginable. Oedipus Tyrannous is a classic Greek tragedy written by Sophocles around 470 BC. According to Aristotle's Poetics, Greek tragedies should follow certain guidelines in order to be effective tragic drama. Many of Oedipus' character traits ultimately justify his place as a perfect specimen of Aristotle's tragic hero....
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • Antigone - Essay 9 - 1117 Words
    Aristotle defines a tragic hero as “having high estate, nobility of soul, ability to have free will, having tragic flaw, also somebody we are able to empathize with, a person who suffers from reversal of fortune, achieving enlightenment, accepting responsibility for his/her fall and being able to die bravely.” I am going to use Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero to support evidence to the character Antigone, in the play Antigone. To me, the tragic hero in the play is Antigone. Antigone,...
    1,117 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparing Antony & Cleopatra to Antigone
    10 December 2012 Tension in Tragedy Tragedy is a form of dramatic expression based on human suffering, which causes an audience to have catharsis or to feel strong emotional relief. The Greeks and the Elizabethans are notorious for writing many tragedies. Two prime examples from these eras are Sophocles’ Antigone and William Shakespeare’s Antony and Cleopatra. Antigone is the tragedy of a brave sister who tries to honor her brother, while Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy based on love...
    888 Words | 3 Pages
  • Antigone Notes - 1101 Words
    Women Vs. Men * Ismene is for the submissive role of women, quote on page 4 * On page 13 Creon talks about taming Antigone. Antigone needs to be tamed because women are supposed to be submissive and Creon’s ability to rule is in his ability to have everyone, especially women submissive. * On page 14, Creon’s comment about snakes suggests that women are snake like in nature, with a manipulative duplicity to their nature. He suggests that women hide their evil qualities behind...
    1,101 Words | 3 Pages
  • What Is a Tragic Hero?
    Ivan Larios English III - H Mrs. Dougherty 18 November 2012 What is a tragedy? It is an event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress, such as a serious accident, crime, or natural catastrophe. Aristotle wrote down explained what is the "tragic hero" and gave the qualifications and details to seek for when trying to identify one. Arthur Miller explains in his essay, Tragedy and the Common Man, what tragedy and the common have does and does not have in common. Aristotle...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tragic flaw in Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark”
     An expository essay: Tragic flaw in Hawthorne’s “The Birthmark” In literature a tragic flaw refers in plain words when the main character ends up dead or defeated a characteristic feature of the heroes of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short stories, “Young Goodman Brown,” “The Minister’s Black Veil”, and “The Birthmark”. However this concept is even more extensive and best explained in terms of “Hamartia”. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica that word can be understood as an inherent...
    1,209 Words | 4 Pages
  • Aristotles concept of catharsis - 5892 Words
    Mimesis, Catharsis, and Pleasure: An Investigation into Aristotle’s Tragic Pleasure Bradley Elicker Temple University Abstract: Aristotle writes the Poetics as an investigation into representational art and, more specifically, as an investigation into the art form of tragedy. While Aristotle goes into great detail regarding the technical aspects of creating and appreciating a work of tragedy, he is somewhat lacking in his descriptions of how tragedy is enjoyed by an audience. Aristotle...
    5,892 Words | 20 Pages
  • Hedda Gabler - a Tragic Hero?
    What makes a play a tragedy? Generally defined, a Greek tragedy is “a drama of a serious and dignified character that typically describes the development of a conflict between the protagonist and a superior force (such as destiny, circumstance or society) and reaches a sorrowful or disastrous conclusion” (Merriam). The themes of the literary piece revolve around the main character and their actions, reactions, emotions and sufferings. This main figure is the tragic hero, who also acts as the...
    1,253 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sophocles' Oedipus Rex as Modern Tragedy
    Oedipus Rex and Tragedy Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex is, in short, the story of a man who unknowingly kills his father and marries his mother. It certainly sounds like a tragedy, doesn’t it? But the classification and definition of ‘tragedy’ are one of the many things widely disputed in the realm of literary studies. So, for the purposes here we’ll use Aristotle’s five criteria of a tragedy: a tragic hero of noble birth, a tragic flaw or mistake, a fall from grace, a moment of remorse, and...
    1,194 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hamartia: Oedipus' Tragic Flaw Essay Example
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  • Research Paper Finalexampleothello - 1523 Words
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  • Essay Assignment About " Antigone "
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    Tragedy and the Common Man is an article written after Death of a Salesman. Having received some criticism for using a common character in a tragedy, Arthur Miller wrote a rebuttal. In it he attempts to prove that tragedy can use a common man rather than a hero or a noble. First, let us analyze traditional tragedy. From the Aristotle, a tragedy is when a courageous hero battles a greater force and suffers a irreparable loss. Additionally, tragedy should involve a character who is of high...
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  • Tragedy and Pagan Women - 1414 Words
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  • semester 1 finals review
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  • Greek Theory of Tragedy - 1902 Words
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  • Magic - 800 Words
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  • Comparison of Dollhouse to Aristotelian Views
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  • Muthos - 1667 Words
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  • Is Eddie Carbone a Tragic Hero?
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  • Oscar Wilde Fairy Tales
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  • The Importance of Alfieri's role in A View From The Bridge
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  • A Streetcar Named Desire-A Tragic Hero
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  • Oedipus Rex - 713 Words
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  • Plato & Aristotle Comparison - 1805 Words
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  • Character and Tragic Hero - 255 Words
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  • Explore the Construction of Identiy in Hamlet and Beowulf
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  • Death of a Salesman Argumentative Essay
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  • Explore the Significance of Shakespeare’s Use of Soliloquies in Hamlet.
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  • Medea as a Tragedy - 454 Words
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  • Death of a Salesman - 1361 Words
    GE Yang Kelly Donohue English 1022.13 4 February 2013 A Tragedy Life I have read Death of a Salesman – the play that was wrote by Arthur Miller, and I have found out that many people have responded differently toward it. Some viewed it as a comedy play, some viewed as a tragedy, and some viewed it as a psychological study. For my personally opinion, I view it as a tragedy play. Why was it a tragedy? To answer this question, let’s have a quick review on the definition of tragedy. tragedy is...
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  • Essay on cuckoo's nest - 711 Words
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  • John Proctor: Tragic Hero or Pompous Malefactor?
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  • Notes - 1389 Words
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  • King Lear as a Tragic Hero
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