Plymouth Colony Essays & Research Papers

Best Plymouth Colony Essays

  • Plymouth Colony and Massachusetts Bay Colony
    Jamestown Colony vs. Massachusetts Bay Colony Many colonies were made for very different reason but in some ways they have similar thing in common such as why they came and what they came for. The two colony Jamestown and Massachusetts colonies have similarities but also have difference in between them. First, the similarities between the two would be that first settle in the area they had a rough time settling in the place. Colonists at Jamestown weren't used to the hard labor they had to...
    431 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies
    Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies The Reformation was the driving force behind English Catholic dissenters, many of which would eventually form the base of groups heading for new lands to find religious freedom. These people would come to be called Puritans and their goal was to purify the Church of England. They wanted to do away with the “offensive” features such as Church hierarchy and traditional rituals of Catholic worship in order to promote a relationship between the individual...
    1,242 Words | 4 Pages
  • Plymouth Colony and Cape Cod Seacoast
    Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford 1. What do we find out about the Pilgrims’ experience in Europe? 2. What specific contrast does Bradford point out between the Pilgrims’ and the sailors’ behavior toward their sick? When everyone became ill and the sailors did not care to help, Bradford wrote, ."..if they die, let them die..." (32). Many who cared for the ill remained safe and unharmed because of God who spared their lives. Consequently the sailors who did not care for the ill...
    307 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plymouth Colony and Borderlands Virginia Company
    Brinkley Chapter 2: Transplantations and Borderlands Virginia Company ­ originally called the London company; 1609: charter from king that increased company’s power over colony and enlarged the area of land to which it had title; sold stock to “adventurers” for additional capital; 1621: charter revoked: bankrupt Jamestown ­ Virginia; in the middle of Powhatan territory; swampy, hot, humid; thick woods ...
    598 Words | 1 Page
  • All Plymouth Colony Essays

  • Mayflower: Plymouth Colony and Native Americans
    American history is so much more interesting now than it was when I was growing up! I have just finished reading Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War by Nathaniel Philbrick. First of all, I was surprised to see a book on this summers New York Times Best Seller List about a subject so long ago. I would have thought the story about the Pilgrims had been told enough times no one would bother writing another book. Philbrick has written an enlightening account of the 17th century events...
    935 Words | 3 Pages
  • Family Life in Plymouth Colony by John Demos: An Analysis
    While writing A Little Commonwealth: Family Life in Plymouth Colony, John Demos dealt with an unbelievably difficult task. Even though Plymouth Colony existed more than 300 years ago, he had to make his book relevant and appealing to those of his time during the 1960’s. In the past, many historians that have researched Plymouth and its inhabitants have fallen short when it came to appealing to a much newer audience. This was so because a lot of them were using the same bland sources; the ones...
    1,678 Words | 5 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast the Two Texts: "Instructions for the Virginia Colony" and William Bradford "Of Plymouth"
    Virginia Colony(what to do) • Choose a river bank on which to settle • To defend against Spanish florida, make a stoure at the end of the river with enough room for 10 men; leave a boat with them so that they cwarn you about an attack. • Stay away from the native Americans or they’ll side with your enemies • 3 parties-1 fortifies, another one takes care of the crops, and the last one goes on to discover more land and search for minerals. • Trade with the Indians • If you shoot, choose the...
    386 Words | 2 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation - 694 Words
    II. Of Plymouth Plantation: Summary and Commentary Bradford, William was one of the Pilgrim leaders and American colonial governor, born in Austerfield, Yorkshire, England. In 1606 he joined the Separatists, a dissident Protestant sect. Three years later, in search of freedom of worship, he went with them to Holland, where he became an apprentice to a silk manufacturer. Bradford sailed on the Mayflower in 1620, and after his arrival in America he helped found Plymouth Colony. In April 1621 he...
    694 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plymouth Plantation - 2964 Words
    Perhaps what we fail to realize is that the Puritan belief of Divine Providence consumed every single aspect of the Puritan lifestyle. From the moment they woke up, until the moment they crawled back into bed, the inhabitants of the first settlements of New England believed that the cause of every occurrence was the Christian God. Every action, and it's according reaction, was directly designed and destined to happen because God chose it to be so. William Bradford, one of these Puritans, was...
    2,964 Words | 8 Pages
  • Plymouth Plantation - 699 Words
    "My Current Knowledge" During my brief research on the passage, Of Plymouth Plantation, I've come to the understanding that it was written by the leader of Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, William Bradford. Bradford slowly wrote the passage in question over a twenty-one year time span allowing him to tell vivid stories of the life of Puritans and their Mayflower voyage, making them highly favored [which critics supports by referring to them as, "Spiritual ancestors of all Americans" (Samuel...
    699 Words | 3 Pages
  • Plymouth Plantation - 399 Words
    Raven Montgomery Title: Of Plymouth plantation In chapter one of the “Of Plymouth Plantation” written by William Bradford describes his well thought views of the Reformation, and the ancestries of the Pilgrims church in England. Bradford also communicates of the immigration of the Pilgrims and of how they were trying to escape the persecution of their emperors. Bradford brilliantly uses a quote from Socrates, discussing the treatment of those who would not observe and conform to the...
    399 Words | 2 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation - 923 Words
    Carpenter/Moll/Beard 4 Will Beard, Stephanie Carpenter, and Sydney Moll Ms. Henry American Literature I 26 October, 2014 "OF PLYMOUTH PLANTATION:" CHAPTERS 9 & 10 "Of Plymouth Plantation" is a manuscript of Bradford's history starting in 1620. The first book was copied into the church records and preserved, but unfortunately the second part was presumably lost. The manuscripts were found in the residence of the Bishop of London and were published together for the first time in 1856. There...
    923 Words | 4 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation - 1714 Words
    Of Plymouth Plantation William Bradford The book that I chose to write about is Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford. I chose to write about this book because I believe that what William Bradford did for the Pilgrims was very remarkable. Bradford was the governor of Plymouth for over thirty years after the previous governor, John Carver, had died. He was a very powerful leader in the Plymouth Plantation and all the Pilgrims looked at him not only as a leader, but also as a part of...
    1,714 Words | 5 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation - 712 Words
    Response Essay One William Bradford’s Of Plymouth Plantation gives a first-hand account of many of the various factors at play which ultimately led to the Separatist movement and their subsequent decision to leave their European confines for the freedom of the New World, to start afresh in “those vast and unpeopled countries of America,” Bradford writes. His narrative thus spans the years from the birth of the Separatist movement in 1607 to well into the settlement of Plymouth (1647). At...
    712 Words | 2 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation - 524 Words
    In historical accounts the first American stories derived from Puritan writings. Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford is important literature because it tells the story of immigrants, which is still common today. The American dream, American government, American values, and American ideologies were based on the Puritans beliefs and the struggles they went through for the American Dream. Convincing future generations of the struggles and achievements of Puritans was the purpose of William...
    524 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Plymouth Agreement - 571 Words
    Writing Assignment 1 PS 373 Plymouth Agreement The Plymouth Agreement appears as a Organic Act document resembling a pseudo preamble. The very first statement in the document contains a legal oath made between residents “ We, the associates of New-Plymouth”that found a people”(19) “Coming hither as freeborn” defines who they are as legal freeman who sworn an oath. “it creates a citizen with political rights and duties”(Lutz15) “subjects of the State of England” claims loyalty to there...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • English Colonies - 425 Words
    The English Colonies are Founded Between 1607and 1737 settlers from England established thirteen colonies on the Atlantic coast of North America. “The first colony is established in Virginia .In 1607 a joint stock company of London merchants financed a settlement of English colonist at James town in what is now Virginia. The colony was named after King James 1.England first permanent settlement in North America. The Virginia colonist hoped to make their fortunes by discovering gold or silver...
    425 Words | 2 Pages
  • The American Colonies - 1275 Words
    The American Colonies. Erik Martinez U.S. History, 2nd semester, 3rd block Coach Chatham March 12, 2013 Since the discovery of the “New World” many European super powers looked to colonize and expand their riches and trading powers throughout this new found continent. The British took great advantage of this with controlling everything on the east of the Appalachian Mountains and sea routes across the Atlantic. Upon their arrival the British had to encounter with many endeavors from the...
    1,275 Words | 3 Pages
  • Plymouth Thanksgiving Story - 1719 Words
    THE PLYMOUTH THANKSGIVING STORY By Chuck Larsen When the Pilgrims crossed the Atlantic Ocean in 1620, they landed on the rocky shores of a territory that was inhabited by the Wampanoag (Wam pa NO ag) Indians. The Wampanoags were part of the Algonkian-speaking peoples, a large group that was part of the Woodland Culture area. These Indians lived in villages along the coast of what is now Massachusetts and Rhode Island. They lived in round- roofed houses called wigwams. These were made of poles...
    1,719 Words | 4 Pages
  • Plymouth Colony's Mayflower Compact
    Dissatisfied with the Church of England, the Pilgrims, a group of poor, largely uneducated English religious separatists, had already relocated to Amsterdam and Leiden in Holland before deciding in 1617 to emigrate to the New World. On 16 September 1620, having secured an essential patent from the London Company, 102 passengers began their historic sixty-five-day voyage aboard a single ship, the 180-ton Mayflower. They were headed for Virginia but got blown off course and instead decided to...
    400 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jamestown and Plymouth Compare and Contrast
    Jamestown and Plymouth By: Arrow Krueger United State History II Mr. TR Smith NPHS 24 October 12 Jamestown and Plymouth were two separate voyages set for America with different ideas and goals thought out for each. One of these voyages was coming to America so that they could have a better life for themselves, by making a permanent settlement where they could start their lives and their children’s lives again. The other was for economic reasons from a company in London that just...
    899 Words | 3 Pages
  • Of Plymouth Plantation: A Xenophobic Perspective
    William Bradford's "Of Plymouth Plantation" offers a xenophobic perspective on the natives encountered upon arrival to the New World as seen in many descriptive passages. While Bradford initially purports that this unchartered land is festered with a community of uncivilized, even "barbaric" inhabitants, his view as well as the view of his fellow Puritan settlers seems to evolve into a more congenial, understanding perspective towards the end of the text. Bradford's piece gives great insight...
    742 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chesapeake Colonies Vs. New England Colonies
    Quinn Anderson Mr. Salmon APUSH 1st Period Chesapeake Colonies vs New England Colonies In 1607, the first permanent English colony was established in North America. This settlement was known as Jamestown, and it paved the way for future English colonies. Originally, the first settlements were established for monetary reasons, future colonies, namely the New England colonies, were established as religious havens for various groups. These first few settlements, Virginia and Maryland, also known...
    805 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jamestown vs. Plymouth - 1124 Words
    Although three of the European settlements in early 1600’s North America during the early 1600’s were founded by different people groups withfor different motives and on different principles, they held many similarities. in addition to their contrasts. Jamestown, Virginia, was founded in 1607 by a group of men and young boys as a commercial project while the settlements of Plymouth and Massachusetts were to be refuges for persecuted Separatists and Puritans. The goals, environments, and...
    1,124 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jamestown Colony vs. Chesapeake Bay Colony.
    In the early seventeenth century two separate groups founded two very different colonies. The first to be colonized was the settlement of Jamestown, located on the Chesapeake Bay which is in present day Virginia. Just over a decade later the colony of Plymouth was founded on what is now known as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Though both the Massachusetts Bay colony and the Jamestown colony were established in a similar historical timeframe, they developed distinctly different social views regarding...
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • Settling the Northern Colonies - 1102 Words
    Chapter 3 Settling the Northern Colonies 1619-1700 The Protestant Reformation Produces Puritanism Martin Luther . He declared that the Bible alone was the source of God's words. He started the "Protestant Reformation." John Calvin He spelled out his doctrine in 1536 called Institutes of the Christian Religion. He formed Calvinism. King Henry VIII formed the Protestant Church. There were a few people who wanted to see the process of taking Catholicism out of England occur more...
    1,102 Words | 4 Pages
  • New England and Chesapeake Colonies
    The New England and Chesapeake colonies were both settled by English colonists. Most colonists moving from Great Britain to New England were families searching for religious salvation, rather than mostly the single men that traveled to the Chesapeake area in search of wealth. The immigrants of the Chesapeake area were greeted with a climate and soil that were perfect for cultivating tobacco, cotton, indigo, and rice. Those settling in New England could not rely on farming to support themselves...
    1,064 Words | 3 Pages
  • Puritan Irony in Early Colonies
    Irony is when there is a situation that is strange because things happen in a way that seems to be the opposite of what you expected. A good example of the word ironic was when New England was settled. Two good examples of the irony during the settlement of New England were the religious and political repressions. The religious repression in New England was a great example of irony. This is so because Puritan separatist groups moved across an ocean to find religious freedom. Some went to...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • Virginia and Massachusetts Colonies - 590 Words
    This essay demonstrates and explains the differences between Virginia and Massachusetts in the terms of society and economy. Both colonies developed their own characteristics based upon the factors of: the economic motivation of the settlers, the political and religious motivation of the settlers, and the natural resources and climate of the region. Although located in different parts of the Americas they shared similarities and differences. In 1607, James I granted a charter for the...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Virginia and Massachusetts Bay Colonies
    Even though the Virginia and Massachusetts Bay colonies were the some of the oldest and most heavily populated of the English colonies, their differences in their economies, politics, religions and society set them apart. Some of the differences include the southern Virginia colony having a representative assembly, while Massachusetts Bay colony had a democratic assembly, and the main crop of Virginia being tobacco, while the Massachusetts economy revolved around lumbar, fishing and trade....
    437 Words | 2 Pages
  • Development of American Colonies - 771 Words
    The development of the American colonies had six different factors contributing to it. They were the Enlightenment, European population explosion, Glorious Revolution, Great Awakening, mercantilism, and Religious tolerance. The Enlightenment was a cultural movement that challenged the authority of the church in science and philosophy while elevating the power of human reason. One of the most influential Enlightenment writers was John Locke. He argued with the church that people were not...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony - 424 Words
    The Massachusetts Bay Colony was an English settlement on the east coast of North America (Massachusetts Bay) in the 17th century, in New England, situated around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston. The territory administered by the colony included much of present-day central New England, including portions of the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as...
    424 Words | 2 Pages
  • colonies take root - 4027 Words
    CHAPTER 3 COLONIES TAKE ROOT 1587-1752 Section 1: The First English Settlements I. England Seeks Colonies -Like most of Europe in the age of exploration, England was a monarchy. However, in England, the power of the king or queen was limited by law and by a lawmaking body called Parliament. -Ever since the 1200s, English law had limited the king’s power. The king could set new taxes only with Parliament’s consent. Still, the king’s powers were much greater than those...
    4,027 Words | 15 Pages
  • Thirteen Colonies and New England
    Textual Reading Guide for Module 1 ________________________________________ The Literature of Early America p. 1-5 1. The first Europeans to establish settlements on this continent did not call it America until the 18th century. What did these early settlers call it? The New World 2. The colonies that became the United States were - for the most part - inhabited by individuals from which European country? England 3. How much is known of the perspectives of the native inhabitants of this...
    1,566 Words | 4 Pages
  • Biblical Parallels with the Pilgrams in "Of Plymouth Plantation"
    The excerpts from Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford are a blend of fact and interpretation. Bradford’s journal records not only the events of the first 30 years but also the reactions of the colonists. Within Bradford’s Journals he makes many Biblical references that relate to the Pilgrim’s journey to America and their reactions to certain events. Bradford makes 4 specific references when describing what the Pilgrims encountered and how they reacted to them when they reached America...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast the Colonization of Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay
    HIST 1301: U.S. History to 1865 Fall 2012 Essay Assignment #1 Question: Compare and contrast the colonization of Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay. Be sure to discuss the settlers involved, the purpose of the colonies, the success or failure of the colony, important developments associated with colonization, and the role of religion in the colony. HIST-1301-009 - U.S. HISTORY TO 1865 Essay Assignment #1 Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay are all belong to English...
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • “of Plymouth Plantation“ and “the Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano”
    The writings of both authors, William Bradford and Olaudah Equiano, are very important, because they show us first and accounts of their ideas and horrors. In the story Of Plymouth Plantation, William Bradford showed how Puritans could overcome obstacles in many quotes in this story. "Being thus arrived in good harbor, and brought safe to land, they fell upon their knees and blessed the God of Heaven who brought them over the vast and furious ocean, and delivered them from all the perils and...
    412 Words | 2 Pages
  • La relacion and of plymouth plantation compare and contrast
     09/25/12 Compare/Contrast Essay La Relacion and Of Plymouth Plantation In the 1400's, 1500's, and 1600's explorers came from Europe to the New World. They came across some of the same challenges and accomplishments, but they also had different experiences as well. In the story La Relacion by Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca and Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford, you can catch a glimpse of these similarities and differences. Although the Pilgrims and Spaniards had differences they...
    543 Words | 2 Pages
  • Examination of Puritan Philosophy in Bradford's "On Plymouth Plantatio
    Examination of Puritan Philosophy in Bradford's "On Plymouth Plantation" The Puritan people first came to the New World to escape the religious persecution that hounded Non-Anglicans in England. They established the Plymouth Colony in 1620, in what is now Massachusetts. The colony was a reflection of the Puritans' beliefs. These beliefs, along with the experience of establishing a colony in "the middle of nowhere", affected the writings of all who were involved with the colony. In this...
    1,769 Words | 5 Pages
  • The History of Plymouth Plantation: God Essay Example
    The presence of God is evident in the passage from The History of Plymouth Plantation in every event significant or not. In his diary, William Bradford describes several occurrences in which God played a major role in deciding the outcome. According to Bradford, God can help or hurt according to His will.

    The first of these displays of God's will in this passage was of revenge toward a sailor. He was as Bradford described him "a proud and very profane young man... of a lusty, able...
    688 Words | 2 Pages
  • “General History of Virginia” vs. “of Plymouth Plantation”
    “General History of Virginia” vs. “Of Plymouth Plantation” Many people today are not aware of how the United States was started. Before the United States became a nation, it was just unknown land. It was only known of by the natives that lived there. Later it would be discovered by Europe, it quickly encouraged explorers to travel over to “The New World”. Some of these explorers, Captain John Smith and William Bradford, wrote about their experience of the new world. In Captain John Smith’s...
    564 Words | 2 Pages
  • William Bradford - of Plymouth Plantation Chapter 10
    On November 11, 1620 the pilgrims, aboard the Mayflower ship, dropped anchor at Cape Cod. They wanted to explore the new land with a shallop they brought with them from England, but it suffered damages during the voyage and needed mending. In this situation, while the shallop was being repaired, 16 well armed men, leaded by Captain Standish, were allowed to seek what seemed to be a nearby river. This was unknown land, so they took every precaution available to them. On the 15th of November...
    738 Words | 2 Pages
  • John Smith's Account of the Founding of Jamestown in 1607, John Winthrop's Vision for the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and the Portions of William Bradford's History of Plymouth That Regard the Colony's Early Years.
    The colony at Jamestown, the colonies at Plymouth, and the colony at Boston had different nature, goals, successes and failures. There was a cross of similarities and differences. One thing that remains obvious is each was looking for something that was lacking in their home land. There was a perception and a picture that each group had when they left their homelands. Arrival in the new would prove to be an alternate reality from that which was envisioned. The new reality still provided a...
    833 Words | 3 Pages
  • Impact on Development: New England and Middle Colonies
     New England and Middle Colonies developed differently because the Anglican Church was persecuting Protestants and Catholics. Therefore these groups settled in New England and not Virginia/Middle Colonies. This impacted political development because the Middle Colonies were for profit, and as a result they developed different politically. All of the Middle Colonies came to the new world for religious freedom. The separatists came to the new world to get away from the English Church. They...
    311 Words | 1 Page
  • English Colonies’ Distinct Developments -Chesapeake and New England
    English Colonies’ Distinct Developments -Chesapeake and New England The two pioneer colonies in the late 16th century into the 17th century were Chesapeake regions and New England areas, and were founded by numerous colonial groups from European nations in nearly the same time period. However, the two colonial areas were separate and diverse from the very beginnings. On account of divergences in politics, society, culture and economy, the developments of Chesapeake regions and New England...
    958 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chesapeake and New England Colonies, and Their Relationship with Natives
    It all depends on the region you look at. New England Colonies: Mass Bay viewed the indians as inferior and believed that because of this they were obligated to take the land. Several indian tribes over the 17th century attacked mass bay with the most infamous being King Phillips war (look it up in textbook index if you need more detail). In the Plymouth colony the pilgrims and the natives started off great (first thanksgiving remember?) an english speaking native named squanto was a big reason...
    367 Words | 1 Page
  • Comparative Settlement of New England and Chesapeake Colonies
    Reflective Essay (9/14/2014) Compare the early development of New England with the Chesapeake as depicted in Massachusetts and Virginia colonies. How do the governing structures differ and what do they tell us about the early challenges the two colonies faced? In 1606, King James I re-initiated England's efforts to establish a viable colony in the New World. The 1606 Charter was granted to the Virginia Company for the establishment of a colony in the Chesapeake region of North America. On...
    1,241 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Effects of Britan on the Colonies During 1607 to 1763
    Between the settlement of Jamestown in 1607 and the Treaty of Paris in 1763, the most important change that occurred in the colonies was the emergence of a society quite different from that in England. Changes in religion, economics, politics, and social structure illustrate this Americanization of the transplanted Europeans. By 1763 although some colonies still maintained established churches, other colonies had accomplished a virtual revolution for religious toleration and separation of...
    1,086 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Description of New England and Of Plymouth Plantation: Presentation of New England
    In the two literary works, "A Description of New England," by John Smith and “Of Plymouth Plantation," by William Bradford, the two authors represent New England differently. One way they represent New England differently is by the tone of how they tell their personal stories, varies noticeably. Both authors use certain tones to attract and persuade targeted audiences. John Smith wrote of what a wonderful place New England was, while on the other hand Bradford wrote about the difficulties and...
    290 Words | 1 Page
  • William bradfords "of plymouth plantation" related to his puritan beliefs
    The puritans came to America to fee religious persecution from the Non-Anglicans of England. They wanted to purify and simplify the Church. They thought all men were sinners and it was al because of the original sin of the apple from the forbidden tree. These beliefs affected the writing of the time including William Bradford "Of Plymouth Plantation". The puritans believed that the elite would go to heaven. The elite were the ones who did not sin. Therefore, whoever did sin would be "smited" by...
    610 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare and contrast 2 pieces of early american lit. (Plymouth Plantion and The General History of Virginia)
    Comparison of Early American Literature The two selections Of Plymouth Plantation by William Bradford and The General History of Virginia by John Smith are some of the earlier pieces of American literature. Although they were both written in the same time period the style and attitudes vary greatly. William Bradford had a very direct form of writing; commonly known as "plain puritan" style, whereas, John Smith had a somewhat confusing, more elaborate, writing style. Bradford's piece also...
    475 Words | 2 Pages
  • A compare and contrast paper about two short stories, "A Description of New England" by John Smith and "Of Plymouth Plantation" by William Bradford.
    In the writings "A Description of New England" by John Smith and "Of Plymouth Plantation" by William Bradford, the tone of these two selections vary noticeably. Both authors use certain tones to attract and persuade certain audiences. John Smith wrote of what a wonderful place the New World was, while on the other hand Bradford wrote about the difficulties and realities of the New World. Author John Smith, a pilgrim who arrived in the Americas, writes a description of the new land. In "A...
    730 Words | 2 Pages
  • Comparing description of New England in John Smith's "A Description of New England" and William Bradford's "Of Plymouth Plantation"
    In the two literary works, "A Description of New England," by John Smith and "Of Plymouth Plantation," by William Bradford, the two authors represent New England differently. One way they represent New England differently is by the tone of how they tell their personal stories, varies noticeably. Both authors use certain tones to attract and persuade targeted audiences. John Smith wrote of what a wonderful place New England was, while on the other hand Bradford wrote about the difficulties and...
    1,137 Words | 3 Pages
  • In What Ways Did Ideas and Values Held by Puritans Influence the Political, Economic, and Social Development of the New England Colonies from 1630 Through the 1660s?
    As we learn trough out history, many puritans and Calvinists flee England due to the monarch’s Catholic belief. Many of these migrants, called Puritans would move to New England, the North Eastern area of the United States in present day. The reason why Puritans would flee to America was simple: After the English government became a Catholic country, many puritans did not want to the Mayflower Compact. However, in 1630, John Winthrop along with hundreds of puritans would establish a government...
    275 Words | 1 Page
  • American history id groups
    . Evaluate the extent to which a sense of identity and unity contributed to maintaining continuity as well as fostered change within the American colonies from 1700 to 1776. (USE INFORMATION FROM PREVIOUS CHAPTER AS WELL) The American colonies had strong motivation as well as communication with each other that helped them stick together through all the hardships and changes they went through in the new world. An example of the colonists sticking together was while on the Mayflower all the...
    287 Words | 1 Page
  • After the Mayflower - 835 Words
    David Ventura Professor Atkinson History-1301 81201 29 Sep. 2015 We Shall Remain: After the Mayflower In March of 1621, in what is now southern Massachusetts, Massasoit, the leading sachem of the Wampanoag, sat down to negotiate with a ragged group of English colonist. Hungry, dirty, and sick, the pale-skinned foreigners were struggling to stay alive; they were in desperate need to help Native help. The film was called, “We Shall Remain: After the Mayflower,” it was release in April 13,...
    835 Words | 3 Pages
  • New England: a Matter of Perspective
    New England: A Matter of Perspective John Smith's A Description of New England and William Bradford's Of Plymouth Plantation both present a picture of the same pre-colonial land of New England. Mr. Smith's writing, out of necessity, painted a rosy picture of the new land, while Bradford's historical account shows early New England was not Heaven on Earth. Mr. Bradford and Mr. Smith are writing about one land, but they present two different accounts of the life in the land. John Smith's...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • Conflict William Bradford - 966 Words
    “Of Plymouth Plantation” by William Bradford is history about the founding of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and the lives of the Puritan colonists. He was a Puritan who sailed to Plymouth. He began to attend meetings of small group of Nonconformists and later, he joined them. The Nonconformists sailed to find land where they can be free to worship and live according to their own beliefs. After several years, William Bradford became governor of Plymouth Colony, and he was elected as a governor at...
    966 Words | 3 Pages
  • Clash of Cultures - 778 Words
     Clash of Cultures: Pilgrims and Native Americans in Massachusetts Karina Yanez HIS/110 October 23, 2013 Sarah Farenick Pilgrims and Native Americans in Massachusetts \In September of 1620 some 100 people ,mostly seeking religious freedom from the church of England set sail seeking the colony of Virginia. They traveled over on a ship known as the Mayflower where they were blown off their course. After a long voyage of 65 days, the refugees landed in cape- cod, present day...
    778 Words | 3 Pages
  • Morton vs Bradford - 925 Words
    Comparison Morton versus the Puritan view William Bradford was the leader of one of the earliest colonial settlements in the United States, of which Thomas Morton was a settler. Bradford documented his exploits in “Of Plymouth Plantation” to gain support from his home country and fellow colonists. Bradford’s work, however, differs from Morton’s “New English Canaan” which also describes the events which took place in the colonies and his views of the Cavaliers, the Indians, and the...
    925 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Little Commonwealth by John Demos
    A Little Commonwealth By John Demos Book Review By Jonathan Klakamp I’ve chosen to review “A Little Commonwealth” by John Demos. In this book, it’s obvious that Author, John Demos, is intent on developing his analysis with materials Indigenous to the Plymouth colonies. In the forward to “A Little Commonwealth” Demos states, “It was my wish to write a type of case study in early American life – a Study which, through sustained work on materials from one community, produces questions,...
    415 Words | 2 Pages
  • Apush Chapter 2 Notes
    ____________________________ Date _______________ Chapter #2 Review Questions Transplantations and Borderlands IDENTIFCATION Briefly identify the meaning and significance of the following terms: Anne Hutchinson James Oglethorpe Navigation Acts Theocracy Antinomianism John Smith Pequot War Virginia House of Burgesses Bacon’s Rebellion John Winthrop Plymouth Plantation William Bradford Dominion of New England King Philip’s War Powhatan William Penn George & Cecilius...
    851 Words | 4 Pages
  • Native and European Relations in Early America
    From the very first interaction, the social and political relations between the Native Americans and the Europeans had begun with much tension. Many Europeans came to the Americas with the intention of discovery. However, when it became apparent that these new lands were inhibited the motives changed, and then the natives were colonized, abused, and in many cases killed. From then and throughout the impending periods of time, the relations between the natives and the Europeans had a few...
    1,410 Words | 4 Pages
  • Comparison Between John Smith and William Bradford
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