Ontology Essays & Research Papers

Best Ontology Essays

  • Ontology and Argument - 3295 Words
    An Outline of Descartes's Meditations on First Philosophy Descartes's Arguments for Universal Doubt and the "Cogito" Argument (An Outline of Meditations 1,2) The argument for universal doubt: A. The dream argument: 1. I often have perceptions very much like the ones I usually have in sensation while I am dreaming. 2. There are no definite signs to distinguish dream experience from waking experience. therefore, 3. It is possible that I am dreaming right now and that all of my perceptions...
    3,295 Words | 9 Pages
  • Ontology and God - 2617 Words
    * Descartes’ Proofs for God’s Existence * www.prshockley.org * In sum, 3 Arguments for God’s Existence are used by Descartes in Meditations: 1. The argument for the existence of God from the fact that I have an idea of Him (1st proof in Meditation 3). 2. The argument from my own existence. Here it is argued that a cause more perfect than myself must be assumed to explain my coming into being and my continued existence (2nd proof in Meditation 3). 3. The Ontological Argument for...
    2,617 Words | 8 Pages
  • Ontology and Yoga - 374 Words
    October 1, 2010 When we did yoga on Thursday during class time, it was so much fun. I had never done yoga before and I thought it was going to be hard, but it actually came very easy to me. It worked out every core in my body, especially in the abdominal area. I had imagined before I did yoga that I was going to be out of breathe a lot, but then again I didn’t really know what yoga consisted of. I think we did it, to work out our muscles and joints in our body. Every body is different, so...
    374 Words | 1 Page
  • Ontology/Epistemology - 314 Words
    Ontologically objective: The ontologically objective thing is the thing that does not depend on you of its existence, like the existence of a table or a tree. You can’t decide its physical existence. Means the existence of an object that you can’t deny by using reason. For example, there is a tree in the garden you can know it exists. Even it died, there is still a withered trunk. You can prove its existence physically. Ontologically subjective: The thing that’s existence depends on us is...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • All Ontology Essays

  • Metaphysics: Ontology and Universal Conceptions
    Metaphysics has been given many definitions over the years, Aristotle says that it is the science of being as being, or the study of everything that can be. Another definition given to metaphysics is the science of the most universal conceptions. My personal favorite would be metaphysics is the science of the most abstract conceptions. This, to me, is saying that metaphysics is the study of ideas real physics does not solve, things that cannot be measured by a gauge. Aristotle also said "The...
    277 Words | 1 Page
  • Realism, Idealism, Ontology - 1601 Words
    Realism Is reality dependent of us and our minds Beyond what our minds ascertain This position - connected to theory of meaning - meaning of propositions is what makes them true/false Depends on its truth conditions - what fact makes it true Anti-realists We need verification conditions -when truth conditions apply -and we are justified to hold them E.g. Past and present Past- can't be repeated -ways of getting hold of it is. fallible. Said statements about the past - verification...
    1,601 Words | 6 Pages
  • Philosopy of Education According to Ontologies
    Philosophies of Education according to Ontologies Ontological philosophy takes ontology to be a kind of explanation in which the causes are basic substances, and the effects are found in the world. Given the existence of certain kinds of basic substances and basic relationships, it explains the things found in the world by showing how their existence is constituted by such substances and relations among them. In dualism there are two kinds of things that are real: mind/thought , idealism,...
    265 Words | 1 Page
  • Ontology and Miriam S Strangeness
    Ghostly Stalker In the short story “Miriam”, by Truman Capote writes about a transformation that occurs within an old widow. The widow, Mrs. Miller always lived by an organized lifestyle until she encounters Miriam. As soon as Mrs. Miller befriends Miriam, she begins to stalk as well as make demands from Mrs. Miller. Soon her life begins to be manipulated by Miriam. Yet Mrs. Miller seems to be drawn to Miriam’s strangeness such as her inhumanness, possessive ability as well as her abnormal...
    498 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Theory of the Ideas and Plato’s Ontology
    I. THE THEORY OF THE IDEAS AND PLATO’S ONTOLOGY I. 1. The ontological dualism The theory of the Ideas is the base of Plato’s philosophy: the Ideas are not only the real objects ontologically speaking, but they are the authentically objects of knowledge epistemologically speaking. From the point of view of ethics and politics, they are the foundation of the right behaviour, and anthropologically speaking they are the base of Plato’s dualism and they even allow him demonstrate...
    2,087 Words | 6 Pages
  • Empiricism Semantics and Ontology Carn
     “Empiricism, Semantics and Ontology” by Rudolf Carnap I. The Problem of Abstract Entities Empiricists attempt to limit themselves to nominalistic language, a language not containing references to abstract entities such as properties, classes, relations, numbers, propositions, etc. They treat mathematics as a mere calculus wherein no interpretation is given or can be given. However, abstract entities are impossible to avoid for some scientific contexts. The theory of meaning and truth is the...
    1,861 Words | 6 Pages
  • Metaphysics: Ontology: Dualism vs. Materialism
    METAPHYSICS: ONTOLOGY: DUALISM VS. MATERIALISM The original idea of the word 'philosophy' was a 'love of wisdom' (Cowan 2). Philosophy is meant to explore the 'big questions' and try to find answers as best we can in the time we have been given. One of the areas of study in philosophy is metaphysics, which deals in the ideas of the nature of reality. "We look at the world, and we assume that it is the way it appears to be. It is not." (Carreira 7). There is much to reality that can be...
    2,086 Words | 6 Pages
  • African American Religion, Ontology and Stories - Essay
    African American religion, Ontology and stories Diane Alvarado History 110 Dr. Lehman Exam 1 African Americans have many values and believes. They have their own commonalities that are found in African religion and their ontology. Their commonalities and shared ontology tell us about the Africans worldview. Not only that but we get to learn about their creation stories that helps us understand their culture and values. There are different stories and myths that explain how humans...
    910 Words | 3 Pages
  • Choosing a BPMN 2.0 Compatible Upper Ontology
    eKNOW 2013 : The Fifth International Conference on Information, Process, and Knowledge Management Choosing a BPMN 2.0 Compatible Upper Ontology Ludmila Penicina Department of Systems Theory and Design Riga Technical University Riga, Latvia ludmila.penicina@rtu.lv Abstract — Nowadays, linkage of BPMN 2.0 business process models with ontologies to achieve consistency and semantic compatibility is still a challenge. This paper addresses a question of finding BPMN 2.0 meta-model...
    4,081 Words | 35 Pages
  • Descartes' Third Meditation - 639 Words
    Descartes' Third Meditation The Existence of God Summary of First Meditation He demolished everything he had learned, and started over again right from the foundations Disproves one aspect of every falsehood Tries to find a certain base of certitude for actions Explains a theory that madmen's behaviour is a personification of dreams States that all we know is truly a deception Summary of Second Meditation He questions himself, about the idea that he is a rational...
    639 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1. the Three Primary Divine Attributes
    1. The three primary divine attributes: Omnipotence: God has maximal powerful, is all powerful, capable of doing anything Omniscience: God is all seeing and all knowing Omnibenevolence: God does only good, God is morally perfect and is considered the source of morality Two secondary divine attributes: Omniprescence: God is present everywhere at the same time Incorporeal: God is not composed of matter, has no material...
    2,551 Words | 8 Pages
  • “Is Mathematics Discovered or Invented?”
    “Is mathematics discovered or invented?” To commence with this essay, we must first understand a few key words used in this statement and question. ‘Mathematics’ is generally believed to be the body of knowledge centered on concepts such as quantity, structure, space, and change, and also the academic discipline that studies them. Whereas ‘discover’ and ‘invent’ means to find information, a place or an object, especially for the first time and to design or create something which has never been...
    1,212 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Categories of Aristotle - 1465 Words
    SPIRITAN SCHOOL OF PHILOSOPHY ISIENU-NUSKKA AN AFFILIATE OF UNIVERSITY OF NIGERIA NSUKKA TOPIC THE CATEGORIES OF ARISTOTLE COURSE INTRODUCTION TO METAPHYSICS 1 NAME MABKWE NICHOLAS CHUKWUNWEIKE REG. NO 09/UN/SI/A/0826 LECTURER REV. FR. DR. B. ABANUKA C.S.Sp. DATE JANUARY 2011 INTRODUCTION Aristotle (384-322BC) is one of the most influential philosophers of the western tradition and had many philosophical works credited to him. In his treatise on logic...
    1,465 Words | 5 Pages
  • Essay 1: Leibniz' Principle of Pre-Established Harmony
    Essay 1: Leibniz' Principle of Pre-Established Harmony In his Monadology, Leibniz describes the existence and nature of "Monads" or substances. Leibniz believes that it is impossible for there to be any kind of causal interaction between the Monads. Yet, he also states that each Monad reflects the system as a whole, including any change in any other Monad. So then, to explain how it is that this "mirroring" takes place, without the existence of any causal interaction, Leibniz puts forth...
    770 Words | 2 Pages
  • Descartes Argument from Illusion
    Kevin Kim Prof. Bozicevic Intro to Philosophy 10/7/14 Argument from Illusion Decartes' was a very rigorous philosopher who introduced a new methodology of philosophy which states; anything that can be doubted to the slightest extent, is conceivably non­existent. All things perceived by his senses up to now, may not all be true, for he has been deceived by his senses prior to this enlightened acknowledgement of his skeptical doubts. He ...
    794 Words | 1 Page
  • Explain Anselm's ontological argument.
    a) Explain Anselm’s ontological argument (25) Saint Anselm, the author of the book The Proslogian came up with what is believed to be the first formulation of the ontological argument. The writings of the ontological argument in The Proslogian were Anselm’s reflections of the passage Psalm 14:1 “Fools say in their hearts ’There is no god’” and directs his argument at the ‘fools’ From this passage. Ontology means the study of being so therefore Anselm’s argument is formulated to prove the...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cosmological Argument - 350 Words
    The arguments presented from William Rowe in The Cosmological Argument conclude that although the Cosmological Argument might be a sound argument, it does not provide good rational grounds for believing that among those beings that exist there is one whose existence is accounted for by its own nature. Rowe reasons that it does not attempt to prove anything about the first cause or about God, except to argue that such a cause must exist. Defenders of the argument reply that the Principles of...
    350 Words | 1 Page
  • Anselms Ontological Argument - Introduction
    Introduction St Anselm (1033-1109) fame rests on his belief that faith is prior to reason: “I do not seek to understand that I may believe, but I believe in order to understand. For this I also believe- that unless I believed, I should not understand”. Anselm employed his powers of reason in order to establish, by rational argument, the existence of God (Ally 2010:62). Anselm’s ontological argument When we are really thinking of something (and not merely uttering the associated verbal...
    883 Words | 3 Pages
  • Explanation of the Objectoins to the Ontological Argument by Kant and Gaunilo
    Theology – Mr. Mayemba Kate Foote 12Ben - Explain the objections of Gaunilo and Kant to the ontological argument. Gaunilo and Kant both had objections to Anselms ontological argument. While Kant argued that the problem in the argument lay in it’s claim that existence is it’s predicate, Gaunilo argued that there must be something wrong with it even though he could not identify a specific fault. Kant argued that existence cannot be a predicate because it...
    500 Words | 2 Pages
  • Descartes: Meditation Iii Summary Essay
    Juliana Tabor Professor Webb Introduction to Philosophy 4/1/13 Descartes: Meditations 3 In Descartes’s Meditations III, the Meditator describes his idea of God as "a substance that is infinite, eternal, immutable, independent, supremely intelligent, supremely powerful, and which created both myself and everything else."(70) Thus, due to his opinion in regards to the idea of God, the Meditator views God containing a far more objective reality than a formal one. Due to the idea that of...
    836 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theological Arguments - 390 Words
    All the following arguments are theological arguments written to prove the existence of god. Cosmological argument- This argument says that the existence of the world or universe is strong evidence for the existence of the God who created it. 1) Everything that exists has a cause of its existence. (2) The universe exists. Therefore (3) The universe has a cause of its existence. (4) If the universe has a cause of its existence, then that cause is God. Therefore: (5) God exists. Plato and...
    390 Words | 2 Pages
  • Descartes and the Metaphysical Doubt - 1245 Words
    Descartes proves that God exists in his third meditation. He proves that God exists because he wants to be certain about things outside of himself. But, he cannot be certain of these things if he is ignorant about the existence of God. This is because if a supreme God exists, he could cause Descartes to be mistaken in the one avenue to certainty that he has. This avenue is known as clear and distinct perception, and, according to Descartes, it is what is necessary to be certain about a thing....
    1,245 Words | 3 Pages
  • Does God Exist? - 1086 Words
    Does God Exist ? 1. What role do arguments play in answering this question? I think arguments have played an important role in analyzing and understanding the depth of this question, for mankind. Although the question itself seems factual (either it does or it doesn't), yet no arguments have been able to answer this question conclusively, despite many debates going on for centuries. One possible reason for that inconclusiveness may lie in our intuition and the way, humans define God and...
    1,086 Words | 4 Pages
  • Modern Versions of the Ontological Argument
    Modern Versions of the Ontological Argument Norman Malcolm One influential attempt to ground the ontological argument in the notion of God as an unlimited being. As Malcolm describes this idea: “God is usually conceived of as an unlimited being. He is conceived of as a being who could not be limited, that is, as an absolutely unlimited being.… If God is conceived to be an absolutely unlimited being He must be conceived to be unlimited in regard to His existence as well as His operation. In...
    2,357 Words | 6 Pages
  • Ontological Argument - 999 Words
    Ontological Argument One of the most fascinating arguments for the existence of an all-perfect God is the ontological argument. Ontological arguments are arguments to prove the existence of God based on pure reason alone. They attempt to show that we can deduce God’s existence from, so to speak, the very definition of God. St. Anselm of Canterbury proposed the first and most well known ontological argument in 1078 in his Proslogion, but it was actually Immanuel Kant, an 18th century German...
    999 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Ontological Argument as Proposed by St. Anselm
    Explain the Ontological Argument as Proposed by Anselm Anselm’s Ontological Argument has for many hundreds of years been fiercely criticised and defended by a great number of religious and non-religious figures. Anselm forms his argument on reason and not evidence, making it an ‘a priori’ argument. This argument is formed on the idea that the premises lead you to a reliable conclusion. For example: 1. This is philosophy homework. 2. It is an essay. 3. This is a philosophy essay. As...
    421 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of Anselm's Ontological Argument and the Argument from Evil
    Roxx Alvarado Professor Aaron Wilson PHI2010 8 September 2011 Analysis to Anselm’s Ontological Argument and the Argument from Evil The debate of the existence of God had been active since before the first philosopher has pondered the question. Anselm’s Ontological Argument was introduced during the 11th century and had stood deductively valid until the 18th century. Then there are the arguments to aim disprove God, such as the Argument from Evil. The Ontological argument is an...
    1,434 Words | 4 Pages
  • Allegory of the Cave 29 - 1541 Words
    Human Freedom Freedom in mind, freedom in nature, and freedom in subjectivity of individual are three kinds of freedoms. However, freedom should be expressed within the limits of reason and morality. Having freedom equals having the power to think, to speak, and to act without externally imposed restrains. As a matter of fact, finding freedom in order to live free is the common idea in Plato with "The Allegory of the Cave"; Henry David Thoreau with " Where I lived and What I lived for"; and...
    1,541 Words | 4 Pages
  • Does god Exsist - 933 Words
    Does God Exist? It is one of the most asks questions around the world still to this day. A controversial topic which doesn’t have an answer. No way to prove, or disprove the concept that there is someone or something else that has created the universe we live in. But what is the definition of God? The definition of God is that He is omniscient (all knowing), omnipotent (all powerful), and omnibenevolent (morally perfect and all loving). This definition is most used in Philosophy of Religion and...
    933 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Flaws in Saint Anselm's Approach on the Ontological Argument
    Thanks to Saint Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury1, the ontological argument was born in the early 1100’s. The ontological point of view, according to St. Anselm, describes God as “a being than which no greater can be conceived”.2 St. Anselm concluded that if such being failed to exist, another even greater being could be conceived that does exist. This argument would be illogical, as no being can be greater than the greatest being. Therefore God must exist. As you can see, St. Anselm’s...
    1,199 Words | 3 Pages
  • (a) Explain the ontological argument from Anselm and Gaunilo's objections to it.
    One argument used to rationally support the existence of God is the ontological argument. There are many forms of ontological arguments, one of the main perspective of it comes from Anselm. The context of Anselm’s argument is that by logic, God must be an existing being hence nothing greater can be imagined. Anselm wrote his popular form of the argument in his ‘Proslogion’. He had 2 forms to the argument. The first form said that humans can define God’s being in their mind “That than which...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • Classical Theistic Conception - 751 Words
    The Classical Theistic Conception of God states that there is a unique intelligent being that created the universe and that being is wholly perfect, omnipotent, omniscient, and omni-benevolent. In connection with the question of whether belief in a being that satisfies this definition is ever grounded in evidence and argument there are three arguments to consider. These three arguments are the ontological argument, the cosmological argument, and the teleological argument. Each provides...
    751 Words | 3 Pages
  • Critical Analysis of Dualism, Monism, and Solipsism
    November 12, 2008 Intro to Philosophy Critical Analysis of Dualism, Monism, and Solipsism In this report I will give my critical analysis of the strengths, weaknesses, and clarity of dualism, monism, and solipsism. According to dualists, a human being is both a physical body, and a non-physical mind. We can easily determine properties that are physical. Anything that takes up space can be considered a physical property. However, it is nearly impossible to determine exactly what...
    1,106 Words | 3 Pages
  • Anshelm´s Proof of God´s Existence
    The question about the existence of God or, more generally speaking, of a supernatural entity that steers the course of the world, is probably as old as humanity itself. Many great philosophers were concerned with this basic and yet so important question which remains to be a controversial issue to this day! In the following I will commit myself to the above-mentioned question by firstly reconstructing Anselm´s proof of God´s existence and secondly considering his position in the light of the...
    1,477 Words | 4 Pages
  • Spinoza vs Descartes on God
    Abstract and Referential Ontology: Descartes Versus Spinoza on the Existence of God. The concept of God is central to the development of Cartesian and Spinozan philosophy. Although both philosophers employ an ontological argument for the existence and necessity of God the specific nature of God differs greatly with each account. While Descartes suggests a Judeo-Christian concept of God, Spinoza argues a more monistic deity similar to that of the Hindu tradition. The most significant...
    3,697 Words | 10 Pages
  • Explain Anselm's Ontological Argument
    Anselm’s ontological argument is an a priori proof of God’s existence. Anselm starts with an idea that depends on experience for their justification and then proceeds by purely logical means to the conclusion that God exists. His aim is to refute “the fool who says in his heart there is no God” (Psalms 14:1) this is showing that the ‘fool’ has important features which are; he understands the claim that God exists and he does not believe God exists. Anselm said “an atheist cannot consistently be...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Universality vs. Specificity in Top Girls and Medea
    Universality vs. Specificity Despite the fact that Top Girls was written in the fairly recent past, and Medea was written in the time of the ancient Greeks, the ability for an audience or readership to relate to the content is opposite of what may be expected. Universality makes the ancient Medea relatable to modern audiences, and specificity forces Top Girls into a role which illuminates feminism in the 1980s. The key elements of plot in Medea: the philandering husband, the woman scorned,...
    412 Words | 1 Page
  • Plato's and Aristotle's Worldviews - 505 Words
    Angela Antoine 7-03-2011 PHI 103 Intro to Philosophy and Ethics Professor Ted Rueter Plato’s and Aristotle’s Worldviews |Worldview Belief |Metaphysics |Epistemology |Ethics |Anthropology |God | |Plato |Dual realities. The lower |Knowledge is gained only by |If a human possesses a virtuous |Dual parts. The body and soul |The...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Letter to a philosopher - 773 Words
    Letter to a philosopher Jessica Liska October 2014 To Whom It May Concern, The statement “The world is absurd, in the sense that no ultimate explanation can be given for why it is the way it is” (Moore & Bruder, 2011, p. 152) intrigues me. I agree with this statement for many different reasons. One of which is the fact that it all comes down to one simple thing: there is no explanation. Maybe we are all a little crazy, but there are so many factors that have to be considered when even...
    773 Words | 2 Pages
  • Parmenides V Heraclitus - 731 Words
    Sanjog Bhatti Professor Lennox Philosophy has been present throughout time, even before the time of Socrates in Ancient Greece. This pre-Socratic philosophy was focused on the oldest branch of thinking, metaphysics. Philosophers, such as Parmenides and Herclitus, basically wanted to answer the fundamental question: what? These two philosophers mainly focused on the nature of reality and why it exists. Although they agreed on the idea that the world could be reduced to one thing, Parmenides and...
    731 Words | 2 Pages
  • Existence of God Arguments - 7756 Words
    Aquinas' Five Proofs What real evidence can be supplied for God's existence? St. Thomas, in his Summa Theologica, sets forth five separate proofs for the existence of God, Unlike St. Anselm's proof, which deals with pure concepts, St. Thomas' proofs rely on the world of our experience-what we can see around us. In these proofs we can easily see the influence of Aristotle and his doctrine of the Four Causes. l) The Proof from Motion. We observe motion all around us. Whatever is in motion...
    7,756 Words | 19 Pages
  • White privilege - 382 Words
    The definition of White privilege in my eyes would be that privilege exists when one group has something of value that is denied to others simply because of the groups they belong to, rather than because of anything they’ve done or failed to do. Below I selected a few privileges that I found I could relate to and one of them that I could not connect to. For starters, I believe to some degree, most American's have a lot of these privileges in their everyday lives. With that being said for me...
    382 Words | 1 Page
  • "I think, therefore I am"
    "I think, therefore I am" The statement "I think, therefore I am" lays the groundwork for Renè Descartes' argument in the Meditations. To understand this expression, one must put themselves in Descartes' place. He started off trying to figure what he can know with certainty. He examined a large body of knowledge and figured out that he cannot be certain of any knowledge at all. Beginning in Meditation Two, Descartes searches for the something that must be true no matter what. This led to the...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • What are the strengths of the Ontological Argument for God's existence
    To asses the strengths of the Ontological Argument for Gods existence, we firstly need to understand what it entails. The Ontological Argument looks at proof 'A Priori', which is Analytical truth, reason based proof. This can be explained by saying 1+1=2. We know this to be true, as it is based on reasoning, and is a logical statement. This can be seen as a strength of the Ontological Argument, the fact that it is logical and rational. It deals with knowledge gained independently of experience,...
    470 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain Anselm’s Ontological Argument.
    Explain Anselm’s ontological argument. The ontological argument was put forth at first as a prayer by the eleventh century monk and philosopher Anselm of Canterbury. In his Proslogion, which means discourse, he presented this argument as a prayer for believers to substantiate their belief in god. Anselm uses ‘a priori’ (which means before experience) reasoning, which conveys that it does not rely or depend on experience and so an argument of this sort is more plausible and likely to intrigue...
    1,258 Words | 4 Pages
  • Does God Exist - 480 Words
    Does God Exist? Ever since the existence of man kind, we have been questioning the existence of God. How can we know God exists if we can't see him? The existence of God provides a convenient answer to unexplained questions, while never providing answers to the questions about God himself. Descartes states in Meditations on First Philosophy that he is going to “inquire whether there is a God.” (Page 71) Despite his doubts of the existence of bodily things, he believed that the idea of God...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Ship of Theseus - 1947 Words
    Jireh Batulan Endurantism, Perdurantism, and the Ship of Theseus ABSTRACT: Endurantism and perdurantism are theories that describe how objects can persist through time. These theories will be used in an effort to solve a puzzle that has been dated all the way back to the first century: the Ship of Theseus. It will be determined that the two theories fail in solving the Ship of Theseus puzzle. According to Brian Garrett of Australian National University, metaphysics is concerned...
    1,947 Words | 6 Pages
  • Aquinas' and Anselm's Arguments
    AQUINAS' AND ANSELM'S ARGUMENTS FOR THE EXISTENCE OF GOD IN SYLLOGISTIC FORM Aquinas [I] Aquinas' First Argument, Motion (1) Objects are in motion. (2) If something is in motion, then it must be caused to be in motion by something outside of itself. (3) There can be no infinite chain of movers/movees. (4) So there is a first, unmoved mover. (5) Therefore, God exists. [II] Aquinas' Second Argument, Causality (1) Some events cause other events. (2) If an event...
    404 Words | 2 Pages
  • An Argument for Mereological Nihilism - 989 Words
    Jacob Pierce Phil 330-001 Dr. Gregory Littman 10/16/08 An Argument for Mereological Nihilism According to mereological nihilism, quantum particles do not accumulate or connect in order to give rise to composite objects. For that reason, then there are no empirical objects whatsoever. Only quantum basic building blocks exist, and thus the world humans ordinarily experience in their daily life that is full of objects with parts is a product of human misperception. Mereological...
    989 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ontological Argument - 401 Words
    Explain Anselm’s Ontological argument (25 marks) Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury and a monk was the creator of the Ontological Argument. The main aspect behind the argument was that the existence of God was true, in simple words, God exists. The argument is deductive as it depends only on knowledge and logic, not on experience as experiencing God is impossible physically. It is also a priori for similar reasons; the argument relies on logic alone. Anselm put forward his ideas about the...
    401 Words | 1 Page
  • Outline Descartes Ontological Argument
    Outline Descartes’ Ontological Argument and explain the key objections that may be used against it. Descartes took the Ontological Argument as presented by Anselm and developed it in a different form. Descartes saw the argument in terms of necessary existence. For Descartes, the idea of God necessarily entails his existence. He established that our thoughts are evidence of our own existence (‘I think therefore I am’), and so wanted to see what else he could prove exists. He used the example of...
    676 Words | 2 Pages
  • Live and Let Live - 1636 Words
    While a prisoner of war in 1940/1941 Sartre read Martin Heidegger's Being and Time, an ontological investigation through the lens and method of Husserlian phenomenology (Husserl was Heidegger's teacher). Reading Being and Time initiated Sartre's own enquiry leading to the publication in 1943 of Being and Nothingness whose subtitle is 'A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology'. Sartre's essay is clearly influenced by Heidegger though Sartre was profoundly skeptical of any measure by which humanity...
    1,636 Words | 5 Pages
  • Descartes Meditation Paper - 1954 Words
    Rene Descartes’s Meditations Descartes, in his third Meditation, conveys a powerful argument regarding the existence of God. The first concept that he outlines is that since every idea must be caused, and if he has an idea that he isn’t the cause of, then something other than him must exist. The next step of Descartes’s argument states that all ideas of material reality could have only originated within him, but the idea of God, a perpetual and flawless being could not have originated from...
    1,954 Words | 5 Pages
  • My Learned Philosophy and the Afterlife Essay Topic
    In the beginning, I dreaded the fact of having to take a philosophy class. It all seemed preposterous to me. Then the final essay topic reflected several emotional responses in the beginning of the class. The Afterlife was only known to this student by means of religious teachings and not researched to the extent of whether or not the Afterlife matters in reference to how we live. How do we live if this unknown place actually exists? Initial readings in chapter assignments opened this...
    582 Words | 2 Pages
  • Self Reflection of My Existence
    I AM EXISTING I am existing not because of me or anyone in this universe but our creator our LORD, our CHRIST. He made me exist for a reason for a purpose in life he only knew.Only God can tell why i'm here, Only him can describe his own creation. Us as human being and other living and non-living things here in the universe. Our creator gives us handbook for life that explains why we exists; he gave us the bible which composed of laws,historical information,poetry,prophecy, and devide...
    1,006 Words | 3 Pages
  • ontological argument - 1340 Words
    Anselm’s most famous work was a book called the Proslogion in which he outlines his Ontological argument in the form of a prayer spoken directly to God. As a firm believer in God, Anselm wished to prove God’s existence and confirm his strong faith by using logic and reason. The Ontological argument is a priori and is based on deductive reasoning because it seeks to prove the existence of God from the understanding of the attributes of the God of classical theism. Chapter Two of the Proslogion...
    1,340 Words | 4 Pages
  • Metaphysics is the main philosophy in Minority Report
    There are several branches of philosophy found in Minority Report –ethics, truth and metaphysics. Ethics is the study of morality; truth is the study of what is true; metaphysics questions reality. The most prominent philosophy in the film is metaphysics, due to it being the underlying philosophy that created the problem and causes the plot to occur in the first place. Ethics and truth are branches of philosophy evident in the film. In Minority Report, the pre-cogs are 3 children who live in...
    627 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ontological argument - 1297 Words
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