Nineteen Eighty-Four Essays & Research Papers

Best Nineteen Eighty-Four Essays

  • Nineteen Eighty-Four - 1334 Words
    Nineteen Eighty-Four “Government, is not reason; it is not eloquent; it is force. Like fire, it is a dangerous servant and a fearful master.”, this famous quote was stated by George Washington. The thesis of Nineteen Eighty-Four is how giving government too much control destroys freedom. The quote from George Washington explains exactly what the Party is, in the book Nineteen Eighty-Four. Nineteen Eighty-Four is written by George Orwell which was one of Eric Arthur Blair’s two pen names,...
    1,334 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty Four - 792 Words
    Nineteen eighty four What techniques did the party Ingsoc implement to create order and control throughout the nation of Oceania? The big brother concept is used in today’s day and age for entertainment use only, But imagine if that was how a nation lived there lives, under the constant watchful eye that is big brother, controlling your every move and killing who doesn’t do so. The novel nineteen eighty four is based around this very same complex concept. Big Brother is the leader of the...
    792 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four Essay
    Totalitarian Government’s Misuse of Technology Will Lim A totalitarian government seeks to control not only all economic and political matters, but the attitudes, values, and beliefs of its population, erasing the distinction between state and society. The theme of technology has been a significant subject throughout the whole history of totalitarianism. In George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, the totalitarian government abuses technology for its own ends instead of exploiting its...
    1,107 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-four and Winston
    In 1984, George Orwell uses symbolism to illustrate how a totalitarian government that controls the past will rob its citizens of their humanity in both the present and the future, through the coral paperweight. Winston’s purchase of the coral paperweight represents the beginning of his and Julia’s special relationship which he describes as “a beautiful thing… not like any glass he had ever seen” (80-81). The description of the glass paperweight as “ a beautiful thing” yet “not like any glass he...
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Nineteen Eighty-Four Essays

  • Nineteen Eighty-four and Book
    In the book 1984, Winston Smith faced many obstacles throughout the story. There are many conflicts in the story, but there are three that I thought were the main conflicts. One of the conflicts is that Winston is trying not be like the others in believing what the party has to say. Individualism is what he is searching for. The second conflict was “big brother is watching you” page 5. Lastly, the last conflict would be thoughtcrime. I choose this three because throughout the whole book they...
    581 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Marxist Analysis of Nineteen Eighty-Four
    A Marxist Analysis of Nineteen Eighty-Four When reading George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four from a Marxist perspective, one can see various classic Marxist themes in the narrative. It describes a society called Oceania which lacks equality among its citizens, who are oppressed by their dictator leader known as Big Brother and are stuck in very defined social classes. The main character, Winston shows potential for resistance against this injustice, yet he never manages to spark a...
    1,336 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Loss of Individuality in Nineteen Eighty-Four
    The Loss of Individuality in Nineteen Eighty-Four In the world of Nineteen Eighty-Four, individuality is an offence punishable by death, and the people live under constant supervision. The main character, Winston, lives in the totalitarian state of Oceania, where a figurehead known only as Big Brother is revered by the majority of the populace. In this state, those in positions of power are members of the Inner Party, while the rest of the people are either members of the Outer Party or part...
    1,816 Words | 5 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-four and Psychological Manipulation
    The Party's Psychological Manipulation Throughout the novel "1984" written by George Orwell, the party is able to maintain power over the citizens through psychological manipulation. The party's strategies were very effective in keeping them in power. In the novel we see them deploy surveillance, doublethink, and newspeak as tactics to manipulate the population and eliminate the freedom to think for themselves. The first example of psychological manipulation in the novel is...
    994 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984: Nineteen Eighty-four and People
    Bethany Rubaker April 30, 2013 Ms. Schulte Honors English 10, Period 8 Totalitarianism Takes Control Imagine living in a world where politics are everything and all forms of individuality and personal identities are shattered. A world where everybody is stripped of their rights to talk, act, think, or even form their own opinions, simply because they do not agree with the government’s beliefs. These aspects are just a few of the examples of things dictators would have control over in a...
    1,645 Words | 5 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-four and Treasure Chest
    We came up with some good things for the treasure chest this morning (our most clever Stasiland ideas), but I keep thinking of more! These are the kind of things that I would put in my treasure chest. * Anna’s interest in understanding WHY people might choose to work for the Stasi (and by default what she learns by interviewing Stasi men). She needs to gain insight and make sense of it – and thus we go on this journey with her. * The sense that everyone has a story and was impacting by...
    293 Words | 1 Page
  • A Marxist Analysis of Nineteen Eighty-Four
    International Socialist Review Issue 32, November–December 2003 The Orwell we never knew By LEE WENGRAF *** BIG BROTHER, double-think, thought police: George Orwell’s 1984–his bleak portrait of a futuristic, totalitarian society–is as powerful today as ever. Though it has often been used as a cautionary tale about the terrors of socialism, its portrayal of government deception, lying and thought-control has a familiar ring in today’s post 9-11 world. His Animal Farm and 1984 are among...
    3,625 Words | 11 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty Four - Dystopian Society
    Dystopian Society- “Nineteen Eighty-Four” In the novel “Nineteen Eighty-Four” George Orwell created the dystopian society of Oceania, where the government has complete control of the language used by citizens. Aside from individuals of lower social class called the “Proles,” the “Party” constantly watches everyone. In an attempt to eliminate any chances of rebellion against the Party, they created the new language of “Newspeak.” Newspeak eliminates any controversial words along with all...
    346 Words | 1 Page
  • A Rhetorical Analysis on Nineteen Eighty-Four
    Running Head: NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR Nineteen Eighty Four: A Critical Essay on Rhetoric Bereket Kifle Composition 12 Honors Abstract George Orwell employs the usage of different rhetoric throughout 1984. The rhetoric differs from describing the human body and its struggle to survive to the different crimes and how the citizens felt about them. Also, within 1984 lies a warning from Orwell: to eliminate the caustic consequences of a communist government. While...
    1,057 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty Four - George Orwell
    Nineteen Eighty-Four – George Orwell In part 1 of Nineteen Eighty-Four Orwell introduces us to the many means of control used by the Party to maintain power over the people. These tools of power are of many kinds and are extremely effective. For example some use technology, some come under the category of propaganda and some can be discussed in relation to structure of government. All these systems combine into a brutally effective machine for dominating the population, as the book’s main...
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell
    NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR Essay Topic 1: What warning does the novel carry for readers at this point in time about where their society is heading? Introduction NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR's society carries a warning to our society about where we might be heading. However I believe that we are already at a parallel with the society in NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR . Taking the focus of the media it becomes very clear that our society is very similar to the one in NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR if to a lesser extent....
    1,552 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty Four Essay - Power
    Individual power is the control held within the hierarchy of ascendancy over others. Although it does take into account the ability to have command over one’s self, with regard to the freedom of influence and authority. In George Orwell’s didactic Nineteen Eighty Four¸ the autonomy of the individual is suppressed. His dystopic, totalitarian society depicts a world where the supremacy of the corporation is maintained through the deprivation of self-expression and the ever present threat of...
    1,099 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-four and Animal Farm
    Animal Farm is a dystopian allegorical novella by George Orwell. The novel addresses not only the corruption of the revolution by its leaders but also how wickedness, indifference, ignorance, greed and myopia destroy any possibility of a Utopia. While this novel portrays corrupt leadership as the flaw in revolution (and not the act of revolution itself), it also shows how potential ignorance and indifference to problems within a revolution could allow horrors to happen if smooth transition to a...
    2,315 Words | 6 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell: Totalitarianism
    Madison Enes No Hope Here “Totalitarianism is not only hell, but all the dream of paradise-- the age-old dream of a world where everybody would live in harmony, united by a single common will and faith, without secrets from one another.” (Milan Kundera). In the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell, Orwell creates a dystopian world due to his “special way of looking at things” by using his “unmistakable signature on everything he writes” (On Writing 1607). Orwell creates this world by...
    1,348 Words | 4 Pages
  • George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four: Modernist Fable
    GEORGE ORWELL’S NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR: MODERNIST FABLE If thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.[1] The world that Orwell presents in Nineteen Eighty-four has often been called a nightmare vision of the future. Writing sixteen years into that future, we can see that not all of Orwell’s predictions have been fulfilled in their entirety! Yet, “1984 expresses man’s fears of isolation and disintegration, cruelty and dehumanisation…Orwell’s repetition of...
    1,759 Words | 5 Pages
  • 1984: Nineteen eighty-four and Ancient Publication Date
    Big Brother is Watching You John F. Kennedy once said, "conformity is the jailer of freedom and the enemy of growth." 1984, a dystopian novel, was written by George Orwell. Remarkably ahead of its time with an ancient publication date of 1949, the novel deals with very modern ideas such as the government overreaching its power, and the rise of technology. The author utilizes the backdrop of an extremely oppressive, totalitarian government named Big Brother to demonstrate that humanity...
    922 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984: Nineteen Eighty-four and Big Brother
    Kaleb Padgett Mrs. Koener English IV 27 November 2012 Dystopian Government’s Intentions are not Benevolent, but Self-serving A society in which independent thinking is a crime punishable by death, the government does not think of the common good by which all of the society will benefit, and the leaders are self-serving. Big Brother doesn't need to justify its ways because it holds all of the power in society through its ministries. In the novel, 1984 by George Orwell,...
    1,320 Words | 4 Pages
  • George Orwell’s Book Nineteen Eighty-Four
    George Orwell’s book Nineteen Eighty-Four presents a negative picture, a society that is ruled by totalitarianism. The government that is created in the novel is ruled by Big Brother and that consist of three branches. “The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which is responsible for economic...
    1,536 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four: an Examination of Totalitarian Rule in Oceania
    Having studied George Orwell's 'Nineteen Eighty-Four', I intend to discuss the type of Government envisaged by Orwell and to what extent his totalitarian Party, 'Ingsoc', satirises past regimes. I will also discuss Orwell's motive in writing such a piece and how his writing style helps it become clear.

    The main theme of Nineteen Eighty-Four concerns the restrictions imposed on individual freedom by a totalitarian regime. Orwell shows how such a system can impose its will on the people...
    1,365 Words | 4 Pages
  • Postman: Nineteen eighty-four and Instant Gratification
    Society Easily Influenced The contemporary critic Neil Postman contrasts George Orwell’s vision of the future, as expressed in the novel 1984, as well as Aldous Huxley’s in the Brave New World. Orwell makes assumptions about society as a whole, that by the year 1984 a totalitarian government would take over the country. In Orwell’s novel, society is revealed as a dark vision of the future “controlled by inflicting pain”. On the other hand in Huxley’s novel, Huxley fears that what we love...
    618 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1984: Nineteen Eighty-four and Big Brother
    8/17/13 1 Winston is restless, and concerned. Hes afraid of getting taught by the Thought Police if they ever found out about him and Julia. Julia is a young, beautiful girl who lives the moment and makes best of life. She is more concerned on having fun than being being in trouble, caught, by the party. In the beginning, Winston didn't like this girl names Julia. She was "a bold-looking girl" about 27 years old, with thick dark hair, a freckled face. At first Winston didn’t like...
    1,928 Words | 5 Pages
  • Test on George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four
    1984 Test Multiple Choice 1. In 1939 what broadcasting company did author George Orwell work for? a. British Broadcasting Company b. English Broadcasting Company c. Spain Broadcasting Company d. London Broadcasting Company 2. Where did author George Orwell relocate too when composing 1984? a. America b. Scotland c. Scottish island of Jura d. England 3. Where was George Orwell born? a. Scottish island of Jura b. Britain c. India d. Russia 4. The Quote “War is peace, freedom...
    838 Words | 5 Pages
  • 1984: Nineteen Eighty-four and Big Brother
    1984 I think that today's society is a "half version" of George Owell's novel, 1984, in some ways it is similar and in others, uniquely different. The closest we come today to a "Big Brother" is the mob. The people are also controlled by watchful security cameras and subliminal messages. However, something in life today is very different from that of 1984, it is the people. In the words of the famous lyricist, "Power to the People." In analyzing "Big Brother," there are similarities between...
    508 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four: a Response to Totalitarian Rule
    Nineteen Eighty-Four: A Response to Totalitarian Rule “The great strength of the totalitarian state is that it forces those who fear it to imitate it,” – Adolf Hitler. The concept of totalitarianism is a political system where the government ceases to recognize any limits to its authority, and in turn, successfully regulates every aspect of public and private life of the population. This type of regime is considered extremely undemocratic and fundamentally a dictatorship, where a sole party or...
    2,049 Words | 6 Pages
  • Euphemisms: Nineteen Eighty-four and Politically Correct Language
    Euphemisms Euphemisms are everywhere in today’s society. They are a daily accessory used in today’s language and are such a normalcy that one does not notice them as strange. For hundreds of years people have used language to persuade people or even nations. With the more advanced society gets so does the language and thus this persuasion gets even more convincing. Many novels show examples of euphemisms. Among those novels includes 1984 by George Orwell. Euphemisms can range from being used...
    818 Words | 3 Pages
  • Doublespeak: Nineteen Eighty-four and George Orwell
    The definition of language is expressing our wants or needs to other people. Whether we realize it or not, language is a very important part of our everyday lives. Through our body language, eyes, tone or volume of our voice, words, or appearance, we can communicate things that we want (or sometimes not want) to other people. Unfortunately, language can sometimes be confusing and open to misinterpretation. One instance of this is doublespeak, a vague type of speaking that deliberately shields...
    816 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Comparison between Nineteen Eighty-Four and Brave New World
    1984 And Brave New World In Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four and Huxley's Brave New World, the authoritative figures strive for freedom, peace, and stability for all, to develop a utopian society. The Utopian society strives for a perfect state of well-being for all persons in the community, and over-emphasizes this factor, where no person is exposed to the reality of the world. As each novel progresses we see that neither society possesses family values nor attempts to...
    2,451 Words | 6 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four, a Dystopian Novel about Winston Smith
    Nineteen Eighty-Four: INGSOC Nineteen Eighty-Four is a dystopian novel about the life of a man named Winston Smith. Winston Smith is living under the totalitarian government, the Inner Party, in a land called Oceania. This totalitarian government has ideology called INGSOC, which it uses to obtain complete power. Within this ideology there are the Four Sacred Principles. They are: the mutability of the past, doublethink, newspeak, and the denial of objective reality. All four of these methods...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Brave New World vs Nineteen Eighty Four vs Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
    "For the Sake of Humanity" Comparative Essay : Brave New World to Nineteen Eighty-Four and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? The term "dystopia" aptly applies to all three of these novels in that each story is set in a future where society is less attractive than it is now. All three books are prefaced with a cataclysmic event that results in a dramatic change in society to address and avoid the perceived problems of present-day. Although each author takes a different approach to the...
    2,269 Words | 7 Pages
  • Nineteen Eighty-Four - George Orwell ''If There is Hope,…it Lies in the Proles'' How Much Hope do You as a Reader Place in the Proles?
    Winstons statement is vague and must be properly addressed before we can access its validity. The word hope in itself is deliberately ambiguous as Winston fails to mention what this hope is for. Winston may be talking about hope of revolution and the overthrow of government as a horse shaking flies. For this there is ultimately almost no hope in the proles due to the futility expressed in the novels ending as even our socially aware narrator succumbs to the guile of Big Brother. However, much...
    1,525 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Does the Reader Learn About the Characters of Winston and Julia in Chapters 1-5 in the Book Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell
    The reader can learn a lot about the characters of Winston and Julia from Part 2 Chapters 1 to 5. Part two Chapters one to five present to the reader a lot of background knowledge about the characters, how they feel about the Party, their approach to life and what means more to them. In chapter three Julia is described as ‘Businesslike’. We can see this when she is constructing the route that they will both take on their way home. It shows that she is organised and knows how to handle...
    1,028 Words | 3 Pages
  • Society in 1984 - 945 Words
    Imagine living inside a society where every single one of your movements, thoughts and desires are closely examined by the government. In George Orwell’s novel 1984 Winston Smith’s feelings of rebellion for an escape of “Big Brother’s” watchful eye jeopardizes his life and satisfied intimate relationship with Julia. An individual’s responsibility to society is to pursue happiness for them and others to the best of their ability despite the consequences. Throughout many months Julia spent her...
    945 Words | 3 Pages
  • Telescreens and Technology in 1984 - 499 Words
    Through out George Orwells 1984, the use of telescreens is very efficient and effective for the Party. On the other hand it plays a very hard role on our main character, Winston. Through out the novel, he lives in fear of the telescreen and is ultimately taken by the mighty power that is the Party, all in help by the telescreen. The watchful eye of the telescreen is not totally fiction though, in many places it all ready exists.

    Winston is a worker who's job is to change history to make...
    499 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oceania Citizen in 1984 - 751 Words
    A Utopia turned wrong would cause suspicion, discomfort, curiosity, anger, malevolent behavior and all loss for true love. Riots would occur turning civilized people to become savages and barbarians. Half of this is true for the country of Oceania. A Utopia that is not so perfect is depicted in George Orwell's famous novel, 1984. Some citizens are turned against the government and its officials when they discover the falsehoods and corrupt ideas of their Utopian government. Oceania citizen...
    751 Words | 2 Pages
  • Symbolism of the Paperweight in 1984 - 623 Words
    Symbolism Of The Paperweight in 1984 George Orwell’s 1984 is overflowing with a great deal of symbolism. The use of objects such as big brother, telescreens, red-armed prole, and the paperweight are just a few of many symbols found throughout the novel. Sometimes characters and other objects are used as symbols to aid in communicate the underlying meaning of the novel. For example, the use of the glass paperweight in George Orwell’s 1984 represents the many aspects of Winston’s rebellion and...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Aldous Huxley's Brave New World and George Orwell's 1984
    Aldous Huxley's Brave New World, and George Orwell's 1984 and Animal Farm each make commentary regarding the governing of society. Each story involves a so called perfect society, or Utopia. The people are given what they want, only to discover it wasn't really what they desired. It seems that both authors are telling us their idea of what's wrong with society, and how extreme these wrongs could become if we government to think for us. The way in which each story gives its warning is...
    1,375 Words | 4 Pages
  • 1984 - 1521 Words
    Kayla Davis Davis 1 Mrs.Warford English 12 Honors April 6, 2014 1984 In the novel 1984 by George Orwell, the party is guaranteed full control over everybody because of the many advancements in technology. Orwell is sure to make it clear how a totalitarianism government can completely destroy a society. This form of government is used to make sure the government has the unfair advantage over the people. The use of technology allowing nobody privacy also helps make a...
    1,521 Words | 4 Pages
  • Which writer creates the most disturbing dystopian vision of the future- Orwell or Atwood?’
    ‘Which writer creates the most disturbing dystopian vision of the future- Orwell or Atwood?’ We perceive the idea of dystopia as a state or place in which there is oppression, dehumanisation and a totalitarian force: in 1984 and the Handmaid’s Tale this is true. However, both writers create this sense of dystopia in different ways. Orwell creates the civilisation of Oceania which governed by the looming totalitarian figure of Big Brother: whose society is under constant surveillance and...
    2,043 Words | 5 Pages
  • Oppression and Dehumanization in George Orwell's 1984
    Jonah Faulkner Mr. Mikalaitis English 9 12 April 2012 Oppression and Dehumanization of Society in George Orwell’s 1984: The Manipulation of Technology, Language, Media and History George Orwell uses his novel 1984 to convey that human beings, as a species, are extremely susceptible to dehumanization and oppression in society. Orwell demonstrates how a government’s manipulation of technology, language, media, and history can oppress and degrade its citizens. In 1984 the...
    1,615 Words | 5 Pages
  • Setting and Characters of George Orwell's 1984
    Controlling idea Orwell’s purpose in writing 1984 and the understanding of the writer’s thoughts through a thematic analysis of characterization and symbolism Good morning Mr Caruso and good morning students. 1984 has been heralded an influential piece of literature upon its publishing. This speech will be a deconstruction of the novel 1984 and what the author, George Orwell, intended in it’s writing. Many of Orwell’s personal values and political viewpoints have been integrated within the...
    942 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984 English Study Guide
    English Study Guide 1. Describe the totalitarian regime of the party in 1984. George Orwell spoke out against it in 1949 by warning people in his novel 1984 that the spread of Communism would affect the country negatively. In this book, he portrays how a totalitarian dictatorship corrupts and has the power over citizens through technology, psychological manipulation and mind control, physical control, and the alteration of facts about history. Big Brother, the head of the Inner Party in...
    2,341 Words | 6 Pages
  • On 1984 - 731 Words
    1984, by George Orwell, comes off as very bleak and grey, as it was intended to be portrayed to the reader. This helps us to understand that the world Winston Smith is living in is grey, depressing and overall quite commonplace. A place where he always has to look over his shoulder to make sure that the omnipotent Big Brother won't catch a minor slip of a few choice words or see him flirt with the woman across the way. Orwell successfully accomplishes this through his use of literary methods....
    731 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1984 - 1226 Words
    The Themes of Hope and Betray in the Novel Nineteen Eighty-four Betrayal is a concept of one losing hope and trust in another. Unknowingly, one can be misled by individuals closest to them, allowing them to lose hope. For example, one can be a victim of deception by the disloyalty of a close friend they trust. Similarly, George Orwell’s novel Nineteen Eighty-four demonstrates one losing hope in the individuals they meet. The interwoven themes of hope and betrayal are evident through O’Brien,...
    1,226 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gattaca and 1984 - 536 Words
    Gattaca, directed by Andrew Niccol, shows a story of a society where life is controlled by genetics, rather than education or experiences. Based on your DNA, society determines where you belong, and your future. This allows no room for people to gain experiences and to grow, as they are confined to a specific lifestyle. It is evident however in the film that Vincent tries to violate societies’ structure, by playing the role of a navigator, using his blood samples and urine. George Orwell, the...
    536 Words | 2 Pages
  • Obrien Essay (1984) - 823 Words
    O'Brien is a character that the reader never really understands completely. Early in the book, Winston notices O'Brien, and believes that he has the same level of abhorrence and hate towards the Party by noticing what he looks like and acts like during certain times. This led Winston to believe that O'Brien could potentially be a friend or a co-conspirator in the fight against Big Brother. Later in the book however, Winston begins to realize that O'Brien is not his friend at all, but actually a...
    823 Words | 3 Pages
  • Stereotyped Women in George Orwell's 1984
    Orwell only succeeds in creating stereotyped representations of women in his novel ‘1984’. Discuss. In George Orwell’s ‘1984’ he patronises the women he creates as we see an insight into the weaker sex who are often degraded with humiliating names and vulnerability. Orwell stereotypes the female characters, which reflects his somewhat limited view of women and their important role ion society. He creates a problem in the way that masculinity and femininity lose all value in the totalitarian...
    1,245 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984 question on chapter 4 and 5
    PART 1: Chapter IV 2) On page 43, Winston states that “it was not even forgery. It was merely the substitution of one piece of nonsense for another.” Explain what he means by this. He means that because there was no laws in oceania, Forgery did not exisit he was just simpily changing the words into a new language or a different language. 3) What does “vaporized” mean? What is an “unperson.” Vaporised means to disappear into thin air. In 1984 when you are vaporised you are killed and...
    392 Words | 2 Pages
  • George Orwell's 1984 - 1983 Words
    Andre Diggs English 4 Quarter 4 Assignment Period 5-8 May 5, 2013 George Orwell 1984 In George Orwell's novel 1984, there were many issues in the government, sex /marriage and privacy that shows an uncanny resemblance to the world we live in today. I found many comparisons in the government, in Orwell's novel he wrote that the slogan of the party was “WAR IS PEACE, FREEDOM IS SLAVERY, IGNORANCE IS STRENGTH”; this slogan is contradictory to everything that we are trying to escape. It is...
    1,983 Words | 5 Pages
  • Themes in 1984 - 580 Words
    English 2 Honors 11 August 2014 Existing Themes of 1984 and the Relevant World The world created by George Orwell in the book 1984 is an extreme vision of a totalitarian government in a dystopian society. The use of propaganda, surveillance, and strict conformities keep the citizens in check. George Orwell’s Oceania is a complete representation of a totalitarian society. A dystopian society is a futuristic, imagined universe in which oppressive societal control and illusion of a perfect...
    580 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1984 Anthem comparison - 335 Words
    The novel 1984 takes place in a dystopian society in which everyone is treated equal, and the government has complete control over every aspect of a person’s life. This is much like the novel Anthem. In both books, all the citizens of the societies are equal, punishments are very strict, and the government has absolute power over all people. In 1984, every is treated equal. People in the country of Oceania cannot have friends, they have comrades, because everyone is equal in the eyes of big...
    335 Words | 1 Page
  • Orwell Dystopia essay - 1231 Words
     A.P Literature Ms. Maxwell February 26, 2014 George Orwell 1984 novel demonstrates a dystopia futuristic world call Oceania where the government seeks total control of its citizen by using power, manipulation of the memory and the past and by putting fear into their citizen. Orwell achieved his goals but showing us the value system of the protagonist versus the antagonist The value system of Winston and the other characters in 1984 is that they all want to rebel while others wants to...
    1,231 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1984: Oppression of Truth - 1597 Words
    In the novel 1984, Orwell produced a social critique on totalitarianism and a future dystopia that made the world pause and think about our past, present and future. When reading this novel we all must take the time to think of the possibility that Orwell's world could come to pass. Orwell presents the concepts of power, marginalization, and resistance through physical, psychological, sexual and political control of the people of Oceania. The reader experiences the emotional ride through the...
    1,597 Words | 5 Pages
  • 1984 Essay - 828 Words
    Winston: Oceania Hero Or Not? “George Orwell once offered this definition of heroism: ordinary people doing whatever they can to change social systems that do not respect human decency, even with the knowledge that they can’t possibly succeed.” In George Orwell’s novel, 1984, the protagonist, Winston Smith is described in words of being the ordinary, everyday man to the dystopian society that Orwell envisions to us through Winston’s eyes. the life of a Oceanian citizen. However, in the closing...
    828 Words | 2 Pages
  • "1984" - 394 Words
     “1984” Essay “Nineteen eighty four” (1984) by George Orwell is a dystopian novel published in 1949. Dystopia is a futuristic, imagined universe in which oppressive societal control and the illusion of a perfect society are maintained through corporate, bureaucratic, technological, moral, or totalitarian control. In other words, it is a dystopian world that is restricted by a government that can do no immoral. They prepare certain groups that have the thought or aiming to obligate their...
    394 Words | 1 Page
  • Critical Lens Essay with 1984 and Snow Falling on Cedars
    Martin Luther King Junior stated that, “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” In other words you never really know a true person until they are put in an unwanted, hard situation. A person could state their values and opinions, but you can never really truly know how they feel until they are put in a hard “live or death,” situation. If a man stays true to his values in a time of...
    1,506 Words | 4 Pages
  • Podcast on Power and Control in the Book One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and the Film 1984
    Good Afternoon Ladies and Gentlemen and Welcome to Connections in English. I am Frank Weng your host for this podcast series. Today’s topic we discuss the relationship of Power and Control between the novel of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and the film 1984. Power and Control is a strong element within everyday life and is also deeply touched on in the novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and the film 1984. Power and Control is defined as being able to perform and act efficiently with a...
    1,072 Words | 3 Pages
  • Conflict in 1984 George Orwell
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  • 1984 Questions - 3701 Words
    Chapter 1 Questions Sections I-II 1. Describe Victory Mansions. Why is the name ironic? Victory Mansions, Winston’s home, is a smelly, run-down place with no electricity in the daytime and an inoperable elevatior. It is certainly no mansion. 2. Describe Winston Smith. Frail, blonde, 39, blue overalls, nervous, depressed 3. What kind of invasion of privacy exist in Oceania? The two-way telescreen, the Police Patrol swooping down in helicopters to peer in people’s windows, the...
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  • 1984: Description of the Ingsoc-Totalitarian Government
    Ana Ortiz Honors English 10 Per.5 February 27, 2013 Ingsoc - Totalitarian Government: 1984 Communism has been a part of the world for a very long time causing the harsh suffering of people in regions, such as Cuba. Rather than help a nation, Communism harms the inhabitants who live in the nation through the effect that it bring, by lending itself to becoming a communist-totalitarian government. A Communist government has a high chance of becoming totalitarian and being overruled by a...
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  • Book Review of Gene Fant "God as Author"
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  • In a Five Paragraph Essay , Explain What Kind of Personal Freedom 1984 Urges to Protect .
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  • 1984 passage analysis - 543 Words
     George Orwell in his dystopian novel 1984 manifestly reveals the oppressive nature of society, and Winston’s attitude toward it. He uses both the setting of life and Winston’s general thoughts about that era as a tool to express the true nature of society, and to show that it hasn’t always been that way, and that it is not the natural order of things. The society that Orwell describes in this passage is portrayed as a dark, crowded and gruesome place. He quotes, “A low ceilinged, crowded...
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  • Winston Smith: a Free Thinker in the Most Oppressive of Circumstances
    Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell’s novel 1984, is a classic example of a tragic hero fighting for a lost cause. Oceania’s entire population is under totalitarian rule and is completely unknown to the ideas of freedom of speech, action and thought. Winston’s rebellion in search for freedom ultimately ended in failure. Why, however, did Winston decide to Rebel? Early in the book, it becomes apparent that Winston is more intelligent than most residents of Oceania; he refused to...
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  • 1984 - Bleak Essay - 972 Words
    “The bleak setting of ‘1984’ reflects the bleak lives of the characters.” Discuss. There is no doubt that the setting of ‘1984’ is bleak – it just simply cannot get any more miserable and dreary. The entire concept of ‘Big Brother’, the reeking smell of “boiled cabbage and old rag mats” and the totalitarianism of the Party, almost forces the whole of Oceania into bleakness. In fact, the only characters who seem to be unaffected are the proles and Julia. Julia’s youthful personality and...
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  • Analysis of 1984 - 1390 Words
    Analysis of 1984 In 1949, an Englishman named Eric Blair published the novel 1984. Under the pseudonym, George Orwell, this author became one of the most respected and notable political writers for his time. 1984 was Orwell's prophetic vision of the world to come. This creation of "Negative Utopia" was thoroughly convincing through Orwell's use of setting and characterization. The theme conveyed by Orwell is that no matter how strong an individual a communist society would destroy any...
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  • Sdf Dsdf - 376 Words
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  • 1984 Analysis - 414 Words
    Passage analysis: page 221 This passage occurs after Winston and Julia talk about the song of the birds. Orwell’s main idea behind this passage is the hope for freedom under a totalitarian government. By using numerous juxtapositions, Orwell shows the difference between freedom and captivity. To Winston, the bird’s freedom is what Winston longs for in life: the ability to be carefree and “spread his wings”. The passage begins with juxtaposition between the birds and the Party when the...
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  • Propaganda S Effects On - 2803 Words
    Propaganda’s Effects on Society in 1984 and Minority Report Literary Essay George Orwell stated; "One of the most horrible features of war is that all the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting” (“Orwell Diaries 1981-942”). Orwell asserts that all the propaganda used is created by the ones who have nothing to do with issue discussed, but who want people to believe so. Propaganda is the biased information whose purpose is to...
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  • A Literary Analysis of 1984 and Fahrenheit 451
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  • George Orwell 1984 Anaylsis
    Part of being human is a search to find someone who you share a personal bond with through physical attraction and similar interests and personality traits. Once this type of relationship is found both of the people involved grow together formulating opinions on certain topics learning from each other and sharing an outlook on life that is altogether their own. If a person does not know who they are and has no freedom to find out then he will never know what to look for in a partner. Intimate...
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  • 1984, George Orwell Two Main Characters
    In 1984, George Orwell has demonstrated the possibilities of two main characters who have contradicting traits can fall deeply in love. Although they are both secret rebels of the party and they both hate the Party's totalitarian power in Oceania, Winston and Julia still bear a striking difference from each other. They are different in physical appearances, their views upon life, and their motivation towards the rebellion. Despite their contrasting beliefs and traits, the couple still manages to...
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  • 1984 - 533 Words
    Kassidy Young Critical Reflection In "1984", Orwell portrays a totalitarian dystopian world, where there is no freedom and citizens are constantly brainwashed. Without thought, the citizens just work for the party. In order to insure the citizen will always listen to the government, they make sure the citizen have no recollection of the past. The party also does a very good job with creating fear with propaganda, taking away freedom, in forcing strict rules and having everyone under...
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  • George orwell, "1984" - 1473 Words
    In George Orwell's "1984", Winston Smith and Julia live in Oceania, where their actions become a subversive force that the "Party" must control. Oceania, located in Europe, represents a totalitarian society in its purest form during the 1940s. Many aspects of Wilson's and Julia's daily life in Oceania are monitored and controlled by the "Party." From the telescreen to the thought police, every action is under constant surveillance. In order to rebel against Big Brother, Winston and Julia commit...
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  • Net Widening: Big Brother Is Watching You
    Privacy is a right that many Americans take for granted. Americans, for the most part, feel that they have privacy. But do they really? In order for one to achieve individuality and autonomy one must have privacy, which is the key factor. For the rapid advances in technology, however, one exchanges their privacy. Should one happen to use a computer to use the Internet, for example, their level of privacy is decreased substantially as you open the door to social control. As Orwell says in...
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  • 1984 essay - 1242 Words
    What does one think of when the word “hero” comes up? The definition of a hero is afflicted with the main character in a book, play, or movie, which is typically identified with good qualities. But what if that is not the case? What if our hero is a cowardly man with a varicose ulcer on his right ankle and is physically unfit? Meet Winston Smith, the main character in George Orwell’s book, “1984”. Winston is a member of the Outer Party, and is under the ruling of the Inner Party, living under a...
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  • 1984 Essay - 905 Words
    Roy Kim May 10, 2013 Winston: A Hero or Coward? The main protagonist in fictional books or films is often labeled as a hero. In 1984 by George Orwell, the plot follows a man named Winston who is trying to rebel against the totalitarian government called Ingsoc. Ingsoc, also known as the Party, defeats Winston and because he is defeated he does not remain a hero in the reader’s eyes. Winston’s lack of cunning, lack of courage, and lack of effort to defeat the Party shows that he does not...
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  • Essay on 1984 - 1343 Words
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  • Totalitarianism In 1984 And Joseph Stalin S USSR
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  • Outline For Orwell - 636 Words
    I: General Introduction II: Biography III: George Orwell is distinguished as one of the most influential writers to the English Culture in the 20th century. Notorious for having written satirical fiction and societal criticism, Orwell is best known for his works of Animal Farm (1945) and 1984 (1949). Within his novels Orwell echoes the presence of a struggle for freedom in a society that refuses it, the similarities of the characters, and a reoccurring theme of a fear of corruption of...
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  • Criticism on George Orwell's 1984
    Sydney Muscat Mrs. Kimber ENG 4U 6 May 2013 The Madness of the Last Man Madness is a label created by society in order to imprison its dreamers. It is often usual to lock up critics of cruel commands, because creative people can be dangerous to totalitarian control. The critical essay “George Orwell and the Mad World: The Anti-Universe of 1984” by Ralph A. Ranald discusses the theme of controlled madness and of a reverse society in George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four....
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  • 1984 book I - 331 Words
    Book I Reading Log · The · In Orwell's novel Ninteen Twenty- four, Winston Smith the protagonist who lives in a totalatarian government works as an officer in Victory Mansions in The minis located in Oceanian. In book I of Orwell's novel the setting of this totalatarian government is characterized as harsh and opressive where the past is constantly being made up and accepted as the truth. The story is told in third person omniscent and begins by telling of the past; one significant event...
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  • 1984 Harkness Table - 459 Words
    e * 1984 : The red sash of the Junior Anti-Sex League Now : The red ribbon of the Anti-Aids celibacy league * 1984 : Telescreens in all public and private places, so the populace could be watched to prevent thoughtcrime. Now : Surveillance cameras in most buildings (operated by businesses), and in some public streets (operated by police) to prevent crime. Although most of these cameras are operated by private businesses instead of our intrusive government, the end result is the same....
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  • “1984” by George Orwell
    Do you think you can be brainwashed? Most people will tell you that they could not be brainwashed or manipulated into doing something against their will, but in reality most of us can be convinced into doing something we would not normally do. George Orwell, in his novel “1984”, shows how mind power can influence people and society. The group that controls the mind power is known as the Party, and the state where this society lives is called Oceania. The only way the Party can maintain total...
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  • A Succesful Conclusion to 1984 - 934 Words
    A novel’s ending plays a very important role on the way it is perceived; for example, a novel could have a great plot and character development but having a dissatisfying ending will just make the reader want to toss it directly into the trash can. In his novel 1984, George Orwell manages to link the events throughout the novel into the most satisfactory ending I’ve read so far: Winston’s death. When reading the novel for the first time I thought O’Brien actually belonged to the brotherhood and...
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  • 1984 - 304 Words
     ANALYZE WINSTON’S EXPERIENCE AT THE MINISTRY OF LOVE Winston the protagonist of 1984 by George orwells, is portrayed as a man that reverence h words, stick to it and ultimately reverence it. But along the storyline winston degressed and became a slave to his own weakness. Winston indulged in a secret relationship with a party member Julia, they lasted quite a while in the relationship thinking they were not going to be caught, this became history the moment they were...
    304 Words | 1 Page
  • Gattaca & 1984 Draft Essay
    In both set text the film, Gattaca Is a 1996 science fiction film written and directed by Andrew Niccol and The book 1984 written by George Orwell share many similarities although have a vast majority of differences. Gattaca is set in a technologically advanced future, which has a dystopian society that strives for a utopian society by using genetic engineering. This is similarly shown in 1984 by the totalitarian party by having complete supreme control over the people’s lives. I today’s society...
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  • 1984 : a Political Parable
    1984 is a political parable. George Orwell wrote the novel to show society what it could become if things kept getting worse. The first paragraph of the book tells the reader of the "swirl of gritty dust....The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats." Just from these few lines Orwell makes it clear that there was absolutely nothing victorious abuot Victory Mansions. Every image the reader receives from Winston Smith is pessimistic. Hate week, for example, is a big event in Oceania....
    438 Words | 2 Pages
  • Big Brother Today - 531 Words
    A Block Big Brother Today In 1984, George Orwell created a world so undesirable that one could not even imagine living in it. A world where even a thought against the “party” is considered the gravest of crimes. Orwell’s vivid portrayal of the extreme effects the government can impress on its’ citizens may seem unbelievable but Big Brother and the Party is still evident today. The similarity from Orwell’s imaginary world and the present time is astonishing. Oceania’s citizens were...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Children of Men and 1984 Comparison
    The 1984 novel by George Orwell and the film Children of Men have very different storylines but both share a similar dystopic view of Britain. They create a scary future where the state of life is poor and people lack freedom and happiness. To help create this dystopian view, they use the ideas of propaganda and loss of individuality. Propaganda is a method of communication that is used to sway the attitude of a population. Propaganda is a major theme in both the book and the movie. In 1984,...
    372 Words | 1 Page
  • 1984: Totalitarianism - 728 Words
    1984, George Orwell Totalitarianism is a word that has many definitions that are true to their own time and their own society. One of the most common definitions used world wide is very complex, but very understandable when you are done reading the book 1984 by George Orwell. Totalitarianism is a system of government and ideology in which all social, political, economic, intellectual, cultural and spiritual activities are subordinated to the purpose of the rules of the rulers of a state....
    728 Words | 2 Pages
  • How the Characters in 1984 Rebel Against Oppression
    There are many characters in the novel 1984. These characters all rebel in separate and distinctive ways from each other. In George Owell's not so sanguine vision of the year 1984 from his standpoint in 1949, he tells of a dreary future of what the world was becoming. In this future, no one has the right to anything, including free speech, freedom of press or even freedom of thought. Even the details like the history of the known world are changed by a corrupt and ever growing political party,...
    821 Words | 2 Pages
  • Individuals and Society - 1070 Words
    The relationship between individuals and society has been a topic of debates for generations. In these debates, individuality has been given various definitions which can be grossly summarised as “The aggregate of qualities and characteristics that distinguish one person or thing from others” (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/individuality). It has been also argued that “The irony of individuality is that sometimes it is a luxury that can only be achieved by contributing something special to the...
    1,070 Words | 3 Pages
  • Theme of Betrayal in the Novel “1984” by George Orwell
    Spencer Aksland Mr. Dunne English 12 October 4, 2012 In the novel “1984” by George Orwell the theme of betrayal is reoccurring throughout. We see different elements of betrayal in each part of this book. From the reader’s introduction into the society of Oceania. To the events leading up to the ultimate betrayal. The character that we see this world through is Winston Smith. His experience is meant to be that of the average party member. What he goes through could be the same as many...
    632 Words | 2 Pages
  • Maintaining Pure Power Through Annihilating Relationships
    A relationship is an emotional connection between two people. It is an expression of intimacy which is expressed through trust and a free expression of feelings. In George Orwell’s 1984, The Party severs the connection because relationship’s threaten their power. By maintaining it’s citizens, the Party can utilize it’s populace as spies, and turn people against each other. All relationships must be developed in isolation, for fear of immediate vaporization if caught. Winston hates The Party’s...
    1,457 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Serious Danger of Totalitarianism - 701 Words
    In writing 1984, Orwell's main goal was to warn of the serious danger totalitarianism poses to society. He goes to great lengths to demonstrate the terrifying degree of power and control a totalitarian regime can acquire and maintain. In such regimes, notions of personal rights and freedoms and individual thought are pulverized under the all-powerful hand of the government. Orwell was a Socialist and believed strongly in the potential for rebellion to advance society, yet too often he witnessed...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1984 - Character Development Requires a Conflict
    1984 Essay – by Len Farag In “1984” by George Orwell, the main character, Winston is in conflict in nearly every page of the book. He is in constant surveillance by the Party. He has also, as the text describes, had problems with his relationship with Katherine, in the past. With the rule of the Party, comes the constant control of the omnipresent, Big Brother. He controls everything, from living conditions to how much chocolate is allowed to be given to any member of Oceania. There is also the...
    2,283 Words | 6 Pages


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