Mental retardation Essays & Research Papers

Best Mental retardation Essays

  • Mental Retardation - 1964 Words
    SPED 2: Introduction to Special Education Mental Retardation(intellectual disability) Complex developmental disability It refers to substantial limitation in present functioning. It is characterized by significantly sub-average intellectual functioning, existing concurrently with related limitations in two or more of the following adaptive skills area. Substantial limitation in present functioning * Means that the person has difficulty in performing everyday activities. Significantly...
    1,964 Words | 7 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 810 Words
    Student name: Emanuel D. Mayola Instructor name: Prof. Cyril Belvis Course name: AB-Psychology Date: August 7, 2010 Mental Retardation In This Paper we will see and described the many social problems that mentally retarded people must deal on a daily basis, including intellectual disabilities how they will survive in their everyday lives if they are not capable to live because of their lack of knowledge. So there are so many disadvantages if you suffer a Mental Retardation. And...
    810 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 1682 Words
    Mental retardation: introduction: Mental retardation (MR) is a generalized disorder appearing before adulthood, characterized by significantly impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in two or more adaptive behaviors. It has historically been defined as an Intelligence Quotient score under 70.Once focused almost entirely on cognition, the definition now includes both a component relating to mental functioning and one relating to individuals' functional skills in their environment. As a...
    1,682 Words | 7 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 427 Words
    Mental retardation is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental functioning and in skills such as: communicating, taking care of him or herself, and social skills. These limitations will cause a child to learn and develop more slowly than a typical child. Children with this disability may take longer to learn to speak, walk, and take care of their personal needs such as dressing or eating. It is likely that they will to have trouble learning in school, but they will learn. It...
    427 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Mental retardation Essays

  • Mental Retardation - 443 Words
    American Association on Mental Retardation, Mental Retardation: Definition, Classification, and Systems of Support (1992). The definition of mental retardation is the below average level of intellectual functioning, usually defined by an IQ of below 70 to 75, combined with limitations in the skills necessary for daily living. Daily living skills include such things as communication, the ability to care for oneself, and the ability to work. The definition of mental retardation has evolved over...
    443 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 615 Words
    Summary What’s Eating Gilbert Grape is a story of a dysfunctional and father-less family which consists of five members who goes on living day to day trying to meet ends meet. One member of the household is Arnie, who is one of the main characters in this movie. Arnie is a seventeen year old boy who is shown to be having some sort of a mental retardation which is always causing trouble for Gilbert, the other main character. Aside from that, Arnie is anxiously waiting on the day of his...
    615 Words | 2 Pages
  • mental retardation - 1195 Words
     Mental Retardation February 14, 2013 Mental Retardation I. Set of Class A) Intelligence Quotient below 70 B) All class and Intelligence quotient II. Diagnosis A. Three criterion’s met 1.Iintellegence quotient below 70 2. Adaptive Behaviors a. Communications b. Self Help c. Functional Academic Skills d. Interpersonal Skills III. Genetic Screening A. Prenatal Testing 1. Increase...
    1,195 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 3463 Words
    Mental Retardation Liberty University Human Growth and Development Dr. James W. Eisenhower December 12, 2012 Abstract Mental retardation is generally understood as a condition that affects the mental and cognitive functioning of the individual and reduces social and learning skills. The prevalence of mental retardation is relatively high in developed countries and this can lead to various problems in terms of care and treatment. It can have far-reaching consequences for the healthcare...
    3,463 Words | 10 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 764 Words
    Mental Retardation (MR) Haythem Abdelli, L1 G2B Subject: Mentally retarded Person A mentally retarded person has a bad and an abnormal behavior and also insufficiency in his intellectual and psychism. Mental disability (traditionally called mental retardation) is a generalized disorder seen before adulthood, characterized by a deficit and cognitive dysfunction in two or more adaptive functioning. It is historically defined as having a score of 70 in...
    764 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 6182 Words
    CASE OF THE CHILD WITH MENTAL RETARDATION * INTRODUCTION: Mental retardation (MR) is a generalized disorder appearing before adulthood, characterized by significantly impaired cognitive functioning and deficits in two or more adaptive behaviours. It has historically been defined as an Intelligent quotient score under 70.Once focused almost entirely on cognition the definition now includes both a component relating to mental functioning and one relating to individuals' functional skills in...
    6,182 Words | 21 Pages
  • Mental Retardation - 265 Words
    Intellectual disability (ID), once called mental retardation, is characterized by below-average intelligence or mental ability and a lack of skills necessary for day-to-day living. People with intellectual disabilities can and do learn new skills, but they learn them more slowly. There are varying degrees of intellectual disability, from mild to profound. What is intellectual disability? Someone with intellectual disability has limitations in two areas. These areas are: Intellectual...
    265 Words | 1 Page
  • Mental Retardation in American Society
    Research Paper: Mental Retardation in American Society Mental retardation is a very serious illness, and most of the American population is ignorant regarding the subject. Approximately 3 percent of people in the U.S. are considered mentally retarded. With a percentage like this, the ignorance on the subject is bizarre. The nation has adopted slang terms such as "retard", to insult others. Using this term is a way to call someone stupid. But there is a lot that people do not understand...
    1,111 Words | 4 Pages
  • Autism and Mental Retardation - 741 Words
     Autism and Mental Retardation Barry Piccini PSY 270 May 7, 2015 Cathy Matresse University of Phoenix Material Appendix F Autism and Mental Retardation 1. List the primary features of autism. Autism is a developmental disorder that influences a person’s ability to communicate and socialize with others. The main symptoms of autism include a person’s social skills, language, behavioral signs and medical signs. Another feature of autism is repetitive behavior, where things are done over...
    741 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mental Retardation and Child Development
    There are general stages children pass through as they develop and certain time frames during which these transitions occur. There is not a specific time that is considered normal for any individual child to attain a goal, as cultural and environmental factors are also important to development, but researchers have formed general, broad ranges of time in which skills such as walking and talking are displayed. Children with disabilities or delays may follow different paths of development....
    2,619 Words | 8 Pages
  • Autism and Mental Retardation - Essay
    Appendix F – PSY/270 CheckPoint: Autism and Mental Retardation Respond to the following: 1. List the primary features of autism. Children with autism are unresponsive to others, uncommunicative, repetitive, and rigid their symptoms usually appear before the age of three. An autistic individual will have difficulty sustaining employment, accomplishing household responsibilities, and leading independent lives. Furthermore, they express having problems displaying closeness and empathy...
    1,405 Words | 5 Pages
  • Evaluating Mental Retardation - 1343 Words
    Evaluating Mental Retardation The history of mental retardation originated during the era of therapeutic papyri of Thebes, Egypt (Biasini, Bray, Grupe, & Huffman). Although the concept was unclear, because of complications in translation, these documents evidently refer to psychological and biological disabilities due to damages of the brain (Biasini). Those assumed to posses these developmental disabilities were habitually victims of infanticide and homicide. The se outcasts were often sold...
    1,343 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mental Retardation and American Teenager
    Down Syndrome My favorite television series is “The Secret Life of an American Teenager.” The character Tom has Down syndrome. Tom struggles with communicating with girls, coping with the death of his biological parents, and meeting people that accepts his disability. He later finds friends with the same disability and the girl of his dreams. Trisomy 21, known as Down syndrome is a condition in which extra chromosomes cause delays in the way a child develops mentally and physically....
    550 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reading and Students with Mental Retardation
    Reading and Students with Mental Retardation Reading proficiency is considered a top priority in education, and a skill with myriad implications for learning and achievement in other areas. Yet in the past, literacy rarely has been emphasized for students with mental retardation. With interventions that recognize the importance of literacy for all students, students with mental retardation can build reading skills that can lead to new interests, increased competencies, and greater...
    2,965 Words | 11 Pages
  • Mild Mental Retardation - 1945 Words
    Mild Mental Retardation Speech and Language Disorders Introduction: Mild mental retardation is a lifelong disability that limits both the intellectual function and the adaptive behavior during the period of development. It first appears in children under the age of 18 and occurs in 2.5-3% of the population. There are a number of factors that cause mental retardation and most of the causes are chromosomal, metabolic and environmental. Symptoms appear once the child is born and later in...
    1,945 Words | 6 Pages
  • Profound Mental Retardation - 1138 Words
    Profound Mental Retardation Mental Retardation – is a developmental disability that first appears in children under the age of 18. It is defined as an intellectual functioning level (as measured by standard tests for intelligence quotient) that is well below average and significant limitations in daily living skills (adaptive functioning). Description Mental retardation occurs in 2.5-3% of the general population. About 6-7.5 million mentally retarded individuals live in the United States...
    1,138 Words | 4 Pages
  • Autism and Mental Retardation - 485 Words
    Autism and Mental Retardation Appendix F CheckPoint: Autism and Mental Retardation This is to be uploaded in the assignments section (along with your Certificate of Originality) by Friday, Day 5. Respond to the following: 1. List the primary features of autism. The primary feature of autism are lack of responsiveness, language problems, communication problems, limited imaginative play, rigid behavior, unusual motor movements, overstimulation, as well as under stimulation. 2....
    485 Words | 2 Pages
  • Understanding Mental Retardation - 1362 Words
    MENTAL RETARDATION Mental Retardation is a major health, social and economic problem to the entire nation. Unfortunately, it has been cloaked in an aura of myth and stigma that reflect a lack of knowledge and understanding. The primary purpose of this study was to contact an empirical survey identifying the current status of public knowledge about mental retardation. Concomitant objectives were (a) to elicit what attitudes the public has toward mental retardation, and (b) to identify and relate...
    1,362 Words | 7 Pages
  • research paper on mental retardation
    MENTAL RETARDATION Chapter 1 Historical Overview Introduction Pre-Independence–Changing Life Styles in India I dentification of persons with mental retardation and affording them care and management for their disabilities is not a new concept in India. The concept had been translated into practice over several centuries as a community participative culture. Changes in attitudes towards persons with disabilities also came to about with city life. The administrative...
    37,603 Words | 289 Pages
  • Child with Mental Retardation
    PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction Mental retardation is a condition characterized by limitations in performance that result from significant impairments in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior, expressed as abnormal conceptual, social, and adaptive skills that occurs before age 18. Mental retardation can occur in any family and cuts across all racial, educational, social and economic backgrounds. The degree of impairment can be divided into mild (IQ 50- 70), moderate (IQ...
    2,532 Words | 7 Pages
  • Causes of Mental Retardation in CHildren
    Causes of Mental Retardation in Children Nowadays, although many women prefer to focus on their jobs rather than give birth to children, but some young mother agree that it is a life-changing experience. Giving birth to a child is the most significant event in the life of almost any woman. It is undeniable that a good looking and healthy child is the most valued living being for every mother. However, unfortunately, some children are born with different deviations, both physically and...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mental Retardation and Vivid Memory Replay
    Nell 1) The loss of Nell's twin sister had a dramatic effect on her. Nell and May were raised in a secluded environment with no outside contact. As a result, May and Nell became very close emotionally and were an integral part in each others lives. When May died, Nell lost part of her life as well which resulted in vivid memory replay. A good example of this is when Nell was turning around in circles by herself but, in her mind, she was turning around in circles with her missing...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • Autism and Mental Retardation Appendix F
    University of Phoenix Material Appendix F Autism and Mental Retardation Respond to the following: 1. List the primary features of autism. Extremely unresponsive, uncommunicative, repetitive, rigid, changing events that the child is use to doing on a daily basis can result in an outburst where he or she becomes angry and very confused, loud noises can cause an outburst as well for some 2. Which explanation for autism is no longer considered valid and lacks research support? The...
    535 Words | 2 Pages
  • What Causes Mental Retardation In Children?
    What Causes Mental Retardation In Children? Giving birth to a child is, perhaps, the most significant event in the life of almost any woman. Though today women often prefer to follow a career rather than give birth to children, the majority of young mothers state that it is a life-changing experience. Without a doubt, a beautiful healthy child is the most valued and loved living being for every mother. But, unfortunately, a certain percentage of children are born with different deviations,...
    440 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Psychological View of Benjy's Mental Retardation
    A Psychological View of Benjy's Mental Retardation Benjamin Compson, a character from The Sound and the Fury, is the youngest child of Jason and Caroline Compson who has round the clock supervision. His keepers say, "he been three years old thirty years" (Faulkner 17). Mental retardation is a condition that is associated with a person who develops slowly. "The label mentally retarded is applied when someone is significantly below average in general intellectual functioning (IQ less than...
    1,801 Words | 5 Pages
  • Brownies: Mental Retardation and Term Caucasian Chihuahuas
    5. The use of the word Caucasian in the story “Brownies” is first used when the Brownie Troop first saw the Caucasians in Brownie Troop 909. Having these African-American girls see other white folk was extremely rare, therefore filling them up with rage and envy. One of the girls, Arnetta, pointed out that the girls from Troop 909 smelled of “wet Chihuahuas” and later coined the term “Caucasian Chihuahuas” (357, Meyer). That line it itself made the Brownie Troop go wild and later use it for any...
    667 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mental Illness - 2538 Words
    Unfortunately there are people who are born less fortunate than other's. Some are slower than others, and there are some who pick up. Sadly some are made fun of because of the condition. This is when mental retardation comes into place. In my report I will be talking about mental retardation and the different kids of mental illnesses. Mental retardation is often thought of a disease ( Mental retardation 1 ). Disease would be the wrong term. Mental retardation is a...
    2,538 Words | 15 Pages
  • Ethical Dilemmas at Willowbrook Mental Institution
    Willowbrook State School was an institution for children with mental retardation located in the Willowbrook neighborhood of Staten Island in New York City from the 1930s until 1987. Originally this school was designated to house 4,000 mentally retarded; however by 1965 it had a population of a little over 6,000. This large number of occupants named this the largest state-run institution for the mentally handicapped in the United States. (Bursztyn, 2006) After Kennedy took a tour of the...
    870 Words | 2 Pages
  • Radio-Movie Review of Mental Disabled Individual
    Movie Review 11-1-2012 “Radio” The movie I picked to review was one I had not seen before, “Radio” starring Cuba Gooding Jr and Ed Harris. It is based on a true story of James Robert “Radio” Kennedy and tells the story of how a man who is mentally retarded becomes friends with the high school football coach. The coach befriends Radio after some of his players have bullied and hurt him. The movie opens with Radio pushing his cart through the street and shows a woman moving her child away...
    607 Words | 2 Pages
  • Evidence Based Practice in Mental Health Nursing
    One of the most common and disabling psychological disorders encountered within mental health and general medical settings is that of an anxiety disorder (Dattilio & Kendall 2000). Research has indicated that people with learning disabilities are more prevalent to psychological disorders than the general population (Hassiotis et al 2000) consequently it could be hypothesised that prevalence rates of anxiety disorders are similar if not greater within the learning disabled population....
    3,333 Words | 12 Pages
  • History of Testing Mental Age and IQ Levels
    History of Mental Testing – Answer A British scientist, Sir Frances Galton was amongst the first to investigate individual differences in intelligence. He compared them based on awards and achievements. His research convinced him that intelligence was inherited. This further encouraged him to compare the reaction time and range and specificity of the senses, which have since been shown to correlate with academic success. French scientist, Alfred Binet developed a test to accurately predict...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • I Am Sam Reaction Paper
    I AM SAM According to the summary by Rotten Tomatoes, a film review aggregator, Sam Dawson is a developmentally disabled adult who has been working at a coffee shop and raising his daughter Lucy for seven years. Sam receives help in his parenting duties from a circle of trusted confidantes, including his ADD-afflicted best friend Ifty, the paranoid Robert, an agoraphobic neighbor, and his other disabled pals, Brad and Joe. Although he provides a structured and loving environment for Lucy...
    837 Words | 3 Pages
  • 509 Paper - 3137 Words
    Multiculturalism: Educating Society Reduces Racism John Doe Jstep University HSER 509: Multicultural Issues in Human Services Abstract Multiculturalism in education is an essential element in shaping America’s increasingly diverse society by reducing racism. This research takes a look at the relationship between multiculturalism and how educating the youth would cure racism. Multiculturalism is the view that cultural differences should be respected or even encouraged. The concept...
    3,137 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hall Vs. Florida case summary
    The 8th Amendment to our Constitution prohibits the federal government from imposing cruel and unusual punishment. This amendment reigns over the states as well. According to the decision made in the Atkins vs. Virginia case it is cruel and unusual punishment to place someone with an IQ score of 70 or lower on death row. Many also deem it cruel and unusual to place anyone diagnosed as mentally disabled on death row. Similar cases to the Hall v. Florida case include Atkins v. Virginia, Penry v....
    371 Words | 1 Page
  • History of Intellectual Disabilities - 1242 Words
    History of Intellectual Disabilities St. Francis University Abstract The following paper will be a reflection on the history of intellectual disabilities. It will reflect on the progression of events and analyze them. The analysis will be on the implications of intellectual disabilities in social, economic, and political conditions. Reflection will also take place on how and why the attitudes or treatments of students with intellectual disabilities has differed throughout...
    1,242 Words | 4 Pages
  • Understanding Persons with Intellectual Disabilities
    Running head: UNDERSTANDING PERSONS WITH INTELLECTUAL Understanding Persons with Intellectual Disabilities Abstract Intellectual disability, autism, severe disabilities, and deaf and blindness, all these are different disabilities that fall under the umbrella of Special Education. As a special educator it is very critical for one to learn about all the different disabilities, to know about the causes and the characteristics. Students with disabilities are evaluated by their school...
    1,219 Words | 4 Pages
  • Fragile X Syndrome - 804 Words
    Paul Keel CDV 106 Cassandra Johnson December 2, 2013 Script for Fragile X Presentation Slide 1. FRAGILE X SYNDROME Slide 2. Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder and the leading cause of inherited mental retardation. Children with this syndrome often have significant delays in learning, autistic-like behavior, hyperactivity, and a distinctive physical appearance Slide 3. The term “fragile X” comes from the finding that the X chromosomes of affected individuals have a...
    804 Words | 5 Pages
  • Life & Work of Dr. Maria Montessori.
    Birth & Family: Montessori was born in Ancona, Italy. Her father, Alessandro Montessori, 33 years old at the time, was an official of the Ministry of Finance. Her mother, Renilde Stoppani, 25 years old, was well educated for the times and was probably related to Italian geologist and paleontologist. While she did not have any particular mentor, she was very close to her mother who readily encouraged her. She also had a loving relationship with her father, although he disagreed with her choice...
    1,264 Words | 4 Pages
  • Intellectual Disability - 4000 Words
    NATURE OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY Intellectual Disability (ID) is also known as “Mental Retardation” (MR). The term MR was replaced to the term ID by the doctors, professionals and health care practitioners because of the undesirable or negative connotation in our society. In 2010, President Obama signed the S. 2781 (111th): Rosa’s Law, A bill to change references in Federal law to mental retardation to references to an intellectual disability, and to change references to a mentally...
    4,000 Words | 13 Pages
  • Intellectual Disability - 371 Words
    Intellectual disability Intellectual disability, also known as mental retardation, is a term used when there are limits to a person’s ability to learn at an expected level and function in daily life. Levels of intellectual disability vary greatly in children – from a very slight problem to a very severe problem. Children with intellectual disability might have a hard time letting others know their wants and needs, and taking care of themselves. Intellectual disability could cause a child to...
    371 Words | 2 Pages
  • Biology disorder paper - 699 Words
    Jazmeen Floyd IB Biology March 9, y The genetic disorder I choose was Smith-Magenis syndrome which is a developmental disorder that affects many parts of the body. This disorder occurs when the chromosome 17 gets deleted which contains the retinoic acid-induced 1 (RAI1) gene or due to mutation of RAI1 .It happens spontaneously at conception, which means it is almost never inherited. Some of the major symptoms that are brought forward with this disorder Distinct facial features brachycephaly...
    699 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alienation - 490 Words
    Alienation Alienation. To alienate a person is to separate him; to make him feel alone. For as long as humans have existed there has always been one form of alienation or another. All it takes is one miniscule difference, and an individual can immediately become targeted and harassed; for years people with mental disabilities have dealt with this. Name-calling is a very prominent form of alienation by making a person’s differences his or her identifier. During the 80’s and 90’s the word...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Intellectual Disability - 1565 Words
    For many years, society has used the word “retard” as slang, to refer to an individual’s level of intelligence. Although we joke around and use this term frequently, there is a population of the community that lives with an Intellectual Disability every day. The early word used to acknowledge Intellectual Disability was Mental Retardation. The term Mental Retardation was changed on October 5, 2010, when President Obama signed the Rosa Law which omitted Mental Retardation and...
    1,565 Words | 5 Pages
  • Theoretical Background and Conceptual Framework
    Theoretical Background and Conceptual Framework Article 14, Section 2 of the 1987 Constitution of the Philippines states that I is the study of the state to provide adult citizens, disabled, out-of-school youth with training in civics, vocational efficiency and other skills. With this provision, the Philippine government is expected to take responsibility for these growing numbers of individuals known as the mentally subnormal. This provision of the law, too which the Department of Education...
    409 Words | 2 Pages
  • Flowers for Algernon Essay - 971 Words
    Flowers For Algernon: Quarter Four Book Review: Flowers for Algernon, is a science fiction novel written by Daniel Keys. Taking place in the mid 1960s, the story revolves around Charlie Gordon, a mentally retarded young man from New York, whose life is completely altered when he becomes the test subject for an intelligence science experiment. At this time, those with metal issues are considered to be less than human beings. Flowers For Algernon, is composed of progress reports written by...
    971 Words | 3 Pages
  • Crime and Punishment: Essay Questions
    PHI 3260 — CRIME AND PUNISHMENT TOPICS FOR ESSAY TWO. Choose any ONE (and only ONE) of these topics upon which to write your essay, and please read the instructions on page 3 very carefully before you begin. 1. Consider this situation: Alf and Bob rented a motel room. The room was rented under Alf’s name, and Alf paid for the first day’s rent; the second day’s rent was paid by Bob, and the third day’s rent was not paid. The motel manager, finding the appearance of his guests...
    1,277 Words | 5 Pages
  • Using the Word Retard Loosely
    Retard I find it interesting that saying somebody has cancer would not be taken as a joke and yet using another disease such as mental retardation as an insult is common among society and many do not realize how offensive it is. The term mental retardation acquired pejorative and shameful connotations over the last few decades due to the use of “retard” as an insult. A “retard” will usually suffer ridicule from society because people fear what they do not understand. Those who...
    1,446 Words | 8 Pages
  • Effects of Privation - 643 Words
    Privation is when a child never forms attachment. A study of privation includes the case study of Genie and Czech twins. Genie was a young girl who was kept in isolation due to her father’s belief that she was mentally retarded, however as she was discovered at age 13, it was too late to test this. Because Genie never formed attachment, her level of speech was very low and even now, has not recovered as upon discovery she was kept in the care of many different psychologists and then was restored...
    643 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis: Flower for Algernon - 1577 Words
    I. Setting and Atmosphere The Flower for Algernon took place in New York, City 1960s. It tone is vary with Charlie’s mental insight. It’s all about mentally disabled person wants to become intelligent and who was abandon by his mother and bullied by other people. II. Plot and Structure Beginning- Charlie is so innocent, don’t know how read and write. He is working at Donner’s Bakery. He wants to become intelligent. He is the subject for Prof. Nemur and Dr. Strauss’s experiment. Rising...
    1,577 Words | 5 Pages
  • Educating Special Needs Students
    Educating Special Needs Students 1 Angela Anthony Grand Canyon University: SPE-226 December 1, 2013 Educating Special Needs Students 2 Educating special needs students can be challenging for all individuals involved. Students who may have intellectual disabilities, autism, and severe or multiple disabilities can have many bumps along the road of education. The impact of having a disability as a student can affect not only the student and the...
    1,265 Words | 4 Pages
  • psy/270 appendix f
    University of Phoenix Material Appendix F Autism and Mental Retardation Respond to the following: 1. List the primary features of autism. The primary features are emotional and social reciprocity. This includes characteristics such as seeming indifferent to physical care and loving emotional interests which others provide to an autistic individual, verbal and other communication and language impairments and inability to use and to speak. Additional characteristics in autism include a...
    694 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Impairments - 1134 Words
    Cognitive Impairments Hannah Forkel EDUC 206 Professor Davidson Cognitive impairment occurs when problems with thought processes occur. It can include loss of higher reasoning, forgetfulness, learning disabilities, concentration difficulties, decreased intelligence, and other reductions in mental functions. Cognitive impairment may be present at birth or can occur at any point in a person’s lifespan. An intellectual disability is a term used when a person has certain limitations in mental...
    1,134 Words | 3 Pages
  • Spread the Word to End the Word
    Spread the Word to End the Word There are about 200 million people around the world that has “intellectual disabilities”? That’s three percent of the world’s population! The word ” retardate” once was used to describe a person with a mental disability. Today, however, it is used in the pejorative form ”retard” or “retarded.” Often unwittingly, the word is used to describe behavior that is “hapless,” “clumsy” and even “hopeless.” It is Important to bring awareness to our society; everyone...
    752 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Outline
    My specific purpose is to inform my audience about the effects of alcohol on the fetus, the many effects and harms associated with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and treatment for fetal alcohol syndrome. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome l. how consuming alcohol affects a fetus A. Definition of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome 1. Use Medical encyclopedia example 2. When you drink, the baby drinks too, not well for developing organs and brain cells. B. There are no safe levels of alcohol...
    290 Words | 2 Pages
  • A liiterary analysis of Flowers for Algernon
    "Flowers for Algernon" is a book about a human experiment, which turns a mentally retarded individual, Charlie, in a genius in a short amount of time. Algernon is a mouse, which they have tested the experiment on first. As the book begins, a major conflict of man vs. society appears. Basically its between Charlie, representing the mentally retarded vs. society. Charlie does not realize this when his intelligence is limited but as he grows brighter he notices the people he used to call friends,...
    920 Words | 3 Pages
  • flowers for algernon - 588 Words
     Jia Liang Zeng 11/11/13 Mrs. Guadagno Period 2 In the story “Flowers for Algernon” written by Daniel Keyes, the main character, Charlie Gordon, and he has a decision to make. Should Charlie make the decision by getting the operation to triple his IQ of 68? Charlie made the wrong decision by getting the operation because it brought pain; he was able to see the true side of his friends, and he was able to see the sad realities of life which he was oblivious to before the operation. He was...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • Intellectual Disability - 4223 Words
     Challenges Encountered by People with Intellectual Disabilities Your Name School’s Name Author Note Your Name, Department of XXXXXX, School’s name This paper was submitted in partial fulfillment of Class name XXX. Correspondence concerning this research paper should be addressed to Your Name, Department of XXXXXX, School's Name, City, State, Zip Code, Email: XXXXXXXXX Challenges Encountered by People with Intellectual Disabilities Intellectual disabilities can result from many...
    4,223 Words | 11 Pages
  • gifted - 572 Words
    Characteristics of Gifted Children Very Observant Extremely Curious Intense interests Excellent memory Long attention span Excellent reasoning skills This above average giftedness can be generic or acquired. Mildly gifted (IQ 115-129) Moderately gifted (IQ 130-144) Highly gifted (IQ 145-159) Exceptionally gifted (IQ 160-174) Profoundly gifted (IQ 175+) MENTAL RETARDATION Genetic conditions Problems during pregnancy. Problems at birth. TYPES syndromic intellectual...
    572 Words | 5 Pages
  • Importance of Information and Communication Technology
    ASHA KIRAN CHARITABLE SOCIETY Asha kiran centre for the Mentally handicapped Dipupara P.O.Jharsuguda DT, Orissa. 768201 Regd. No. 854-9-2001-2002 To Date 24-3-2010 M/s Tata Projects Ltd Jharsuguda Kind Attn_Mr. SK.Chaudhuri,RCM Dear Sir Sub: Letter of Appreciation On...
    1,287 Words | 5 Pages
  • Intellectual Disabilities paper - 991 Words
    Running head: INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES 1 Introduction to Intellectual Disabilities Essay Theofanis Karavangelas Grand Canyon University SPE 351 October 11, 2014 INTRODUCTION TO INTELLECTUAL...
    991 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psy 270 Wk7 - 532 Words
    University of Phoenix Material Appendix F Autism and Mental Retardation Respond to the following: 1. List the primary features of autism. The primary features of autism are uncommunicative, extremely unresponsive, rigid, repetitive and cannot handle changes. 2. Which explanation for autism is no longer considered valid and lacks research support? The sociocultural view is no longer valid as an explanation. It explains that the caretaker is to blame for the...
    532 Words | 3 Pages
  • Flowers for Algernon Book Report
    Flowers for Algernon is a novel written by Daniel Keyes and first published in 1966. It was originally a short story and, in the year 2000, was adapted into a film of the same name. There are no direct references to the time period in which the story takes place, but it’s safe to assume that the events take place around the time the novel was written; the mid-1960s. In this novel, there are two primary settings, the main character’s room, where he writes in his journal, and the...
    2,208 Words | 6 Pages
  • Capella - 1732 Words
    Examination of how crisis in the home affect children and adolescents with disabilities Asia Spann Capella University Abstract After doing so research and coming up with a research question, I found three articles to be very interesting. These three articles looked at how children and adolescents with disabilities are affected by crisis in the home. These articles looked at how grandparent’s involvement with the children or adolescent either helped or hindered the impact on the child or...
    1,732 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas Essay
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