Massachusetts Bay Colony Essays & Research Papers

Best Massachusetts Bay Colony Essays

  • The Virginia and Massachusetts Bay Colonies
    Even though the Virginia and Massachusetts Bay colonies were the some of the oldest and most heavily populated of the English colonies, their differences in their economies, politics, religions and society set them apart. Some of the differences include the southern Virginia colony having a representative assembly, while Massachusetts Bay colony had a democratic assembly, and the main crop of Virginia being tobacco, while the Massachusetts economy revolved around lumbar, fishing and trade....
    437 Words | 2 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony - 424 Words
    The Massachusetts Bay Colony was an English settlement on the east coast of North America (Massachusetts Bay) in the 17th century, in New England, situated around the present-day cities of Salem and Boston. The territory administered by the colony included much of present-day central New England, including portions of the U.S. states of Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Connecticut. Territory claimed but never administered by the colonial government extended as far west as...
    424 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plymouth Colony and Massachusetts Bay Colony
    Jamestown Colony vs. Massachusetts Bay Colony Many colonies were made for very different reason but in some ways they have similar thing in common such as why they came and what they came for. The two colony Jamestown and Massachusetts colonies have similarities but also have difference in between them. First, the similarities between the two would be that first settle in the area they had a rough time settling in the place. Colonists at Jamestown weren't used to the hard labor they had to...
    431 Words | 2 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony - 260 Words
    The Massachusetts Bay Colony government was able to be, at least partially, simultaneously theocratic, democratic, oligarchic, and authoritarian. It was able to be partly theocratic because of the doctrine of the covenant, which stated that the whole purpose of government was to enforce God’s laws. God’s laws applied to everyone, even nonbelievers. Everyone also had to pay taxes for the government-supported church. This meant that religious leaders held enormous power in the Massachusetts Bay...
    260 Words | 1 Page
  • All Massachusetts Bay Colony Essays

  • Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies
    Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies The Reformation was the driving force behind English Catholic dissenters, many of which would eventually form the base of groups heading for new lands to find religious freedom. These people would come to be called Puritans and their goal was to purify the Church of England. They wanted to do away with the “offensive” features such as Church hierarchy and traditional rituals of Catholic worship in order to promote a relationship between the individual...
    1,242 Words | 4 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony - 697 Words
    The government of the Massachusetts Bay Colony was simultaneously theocratic, democratic, oligarchic, and authoritarian in different ways. The Puritans founded the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1628 and wanted a well-established government, but they ended up mixing all of these together. This colony was important because it was one of the first provincial and true governments to be introduced into the colonies. It also provided an example to other colonies to base their governments on. The...
    697 Words | 2 Pages
  • Puritans: Massachusetts Bay Colony and New England Colonies
    From 1630 to about 1643 Puritans were coming to America for mainly religious reasons. This movement was called the Great Puritan Migration. The Puritans did like the way the Anglican Church was being ran, so they many of them came to America and set up the Massachusetts Bay colony. The leader of this Colony was John Winthrop. The Puritans believed through religion and hard work they could build a perfect commuity. The Puritans influenced the political, economic, and social development of the...
    847 Words | 2 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony vs Virginia colony
    3. Compare and contrast how the differences in geography, demographics and economic structures helped to shape the growth of Massachusetts Bay Colony versus the Virginia Colony. In 16th and 17th century, England had particular group sent to the eastern coast of North America to two regions: Chesapeake and the New England. These two regions later became as one nation, but they it was not from the beginning they had equal thoughts. Because they were so different from the beginning, they had a...
    404 Words | 2 Pages
  • Massachusetts Bay Colony vs. Virginia Colony
    The Virginia Colony vs. The Massachusetts Bay Colony The Virginia Colony and the Massachusetts Bay Colony were both similar and different on three main topics: religion, economics, and demographics. Religious views and importance differentiated greatly between the two colonies. New Englanders, the area in which the Massachusetts Bay Colony settled, came to America to exercise religious beliefs that were not allowed before the English Civil War and after the Restoration. They were made up...
    458 Words | 2 Pages
  • Comparing Massachusetts bay and Virginia colonies
    At the start of the 17th century King James 1 became king and he began to look toward the new world as a place were England could make a profitable settlement , as New Spain was for the Spaniards. This was the start of colonization in the new world for England. Following this, many colonies began to develop, and of these colonies, Massachusetts and Virginia were the most well-known. The early settlements of the Massachusetts and Virginia were both established by similar groups of people at the...
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jamestown vs Massachusetts Bay
    Jamestown was the first permanent English settlement. Its founding expedition was launched by the Virginia Company of London, purely for profit. The 144 men who set sail for America in 1607 were entrepreneurs, meaning that their main reasons for settling in Virginia were for economic gain. The expedition was chartered by James I of England, making the future site of Jamestown a royal colony, and therefore supported by England. The men who traveled to Virginia were not known for their work ethic;...
    689 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Puritans of Massachusetts Bay - 576 Words
    The Massachusetts Bay Colony was an English settlement in North America in the early 1600’s. It was formed by Puritan settlers fleeing religious persecution in England. The lands which became the Massachusetts Bay Colony had previously been inhabited by Native Indians. The Company of Massachusetts Bay received a charter to start a settlement in the New World in 1629. The charter granted the company the right to establish a settlement. The passengers of the “Arbella” who left England in 1630 with...
    576 Words | 2 Pages
  • Virginia and Massachusetts Colonies - 590 Words
    This essay demonstrates and explains the differences between Virginia and Massachusetts in the terms of society and economy. Both colonies developed their own characteristics based upon the factors of: the economic motivation of the settlers, the political and religious motivation of the settlers, and the natural resources and climate of the region. Although located in different parts of the Americas they shared similarities and differences. In 1607, James I granted a charter for the...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • Massachusetts and Virginia Colonies - 624 Words
    Massachusetts and Virginia Colonies Massachusetts and Virginia were two of the early colonies in the new world. Although these two colonies originated from the same place they are very different. Virginia needed slaves for labor while the citizens of Massachusetts worked in production and had less slaves or indentured servants. Virginia traded cash crops such as tobacco and the colonists in Massachusetts build ships and traded fur among other things. While Massachusetts and Virginia were...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Massachusetts Bay School Law
    The Massachusetts Bay School Law Upon arriving in America, the Puritans have a charter granted by the king which gives them some measure of self-government. The "Massachusetts Bay School Law" established in 1642 expressed the Puritans ideas on education, religion, and the study of a "particular" calling. Every Puritan was expected to abide by the law and to report offenders, who were consequently reprimanded or punished accordingly. The master of the family was obliged, according to the...
    412 Words | 2 Pages
  • Development Of The Virginia And Massachusetts Colonies
    Wealth is powerful when it is obtained by someone, but even more powerful when it is not. When people are striving for riches they tend to put that need above everything else. People will go through all sorts of difficulties and obstacles to make it in life. Striving for wealth and power is something that brings both positive and negative results. During the colonial period the development of the Virginia and Massachusetts colonies was greatly influenced by the effects of the search for riches...
    2,407 Words | 6 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast the Development and Establishment of the colonies of Virginia and Massachusetts Bay
    Like Virginia, Massachusetts Bay was settled by Europeans. Both settlements struggled to survive at first. They both also encountered natives living there before they arrived. In Virginia there were the Algonquians and in Massachusetts Bay there was a large number of Puritans. Although there were many differences between the two colonies it comes as to no surprise that they are very much so related in their hardships. Such as in Virginia there was disease, famine and continuing attacks of the...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jamestown Colony vs. Chesapeake Bay Colony.
    In the early seventeenth century two separate groups founded two very different colonies. The first to be colonized was the settlement of Jamestown, located on the Chesapeake Bay which is in present day Virginia. Just over a decade later the colony of Plymouth was founded on what is now known as Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Though both the Massachusetts Bay colony and the Jamestown colony were established in a similar historical timeframe, they developed distinctly different social views regarding...
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast the Colonization of Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay
    HIST 1301: U.S. History to 1865 Fall 2012 Essay Assignment #1 Question: Compare and contrast the colonization of Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay. Be sure to discuss the settlers involved, the purpose of the colonies, the success or failure of the colony, important developments associated with colonization, and the role of religion in the colony. HIST-1301-009 - U.S. HISTORY TO 1865 Essay Assignment #1 Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay are all belong to English...
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare and contrast the English colonies of the Chesapeake with their counterparts at Massachusetts Bay. What were their similarities and differences?
    European explorers first landed on the shores of what would later become North America more than 500 years ago. English settlers ventured out to establish their claims over lands in the New World. Two principal areas they established were the English colonies of the Chesapeake and their counterparts at Massachusetts Bay. The English colonies and the Massachusetts Bay settlements were different economically and socially but similar religiously. The Chesapeake colonies were founded on a basis of...
    560 Words | 2 Pages
  • Differences between the Chesapeake Bay and New England Colonies
    Differences between the Chesapeake Bay and New England ColoniesThere are many key differences that distinguish the inhabitants of the New England colonies from those of the Chesapeake Bay colonies. These dissimilarities include but are not limited to the differences between the social structure, family life, forms of government, religion, and the lives of indentured servants and children in the two colonies. The social structure and family life of the two colonies varied greatly. The...
    1,867 Words | 5 Pages
  • Massachusetts vs Virginia: A Tale of Two Colonies
    Emily G September 6, 2013 The Chesapeake and New England: A Tale of Two Colonies England was late to the colonizing game, lagging behind both France and Spain. But when England did set foot in the New World it left its mark. The early English colonization of what is now America can be broken down into two main settlements, the Chesapeake colony and the New England colony. The Chesapeake colony, which originated as the Jamestown colony in Virginia, was settled in 1607. The Chesapeake colony...
    1,716 Words | 5 Pages
  • Similarities and Differences Between the Virginia Company and the Massachusetts Bay Company
    There are similarities and differences between the Virginia Company and the Massachusetts Bay Company. Both settlements began with a journey to the New World from England. Both settlements were funded by investors. However, one of the biggest differences is the reasoning behind the colonies starting. The Virginia Company began solely for economical profit and was a Royal Colony (supported by the Queen). The Virginia Company was the first settlement in 1607. The Massachusetts Bay Colony was...
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Thirteen Colonies - 642 Words
    The English settlement in America occurring around the early 1600’s was the result of the Age of Exploration in addition, the freedom from religious oppression. For the Separatists later known as the Pilgrims, America was a place for dreams and new beginnings given that they were persecuted for their religious beliefs in England. Some fled to the Netherlands finding religious freedom and no work. The Pilgrims however, settled in America. Moreover, the Puritans came to America to practice their...
    642 Words | 2 Pages
  • 13 Colonies - 995 Words
    New Colonies in New England ¶1 New England started as one large colony settled by two different religious groups. In 1620, the Pilgrims came from England on the Mayflower and started a colony in Plymouth Bay. The Puritans arrived in 1629 and started the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ¶2 The Pilgrims had a charter promising them land in Virginia, but on the trip across, their ship blew off course. Unfortunately, they were unprepared for life in the North. They arrived just before winter. There was...
    995 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anne Hutchinson Versus Massachusetts
    Taylor Bishop History 1301 Hickle February 3, 2012 Anne Hutchinson Versus Massachusetts In the 17th century, religion was remarkably different than it is today. Anne Hutchinson was condemned from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for holding religious “meetings” in her home and sharing her thoughts about the Protestant preachers in the colony. Knowing these actions were forbidden in that centuries society, she continued. Her followers, who also knew she was going against the church as well as...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • Anne Hutchinson Versus Massachusetts
    The First Willing Victim “Mrs. Hutchinson, you are called here as one of those that have troubled the peace of the commonwealth and the churches here. You are known to be a woman that hath had a great share in the promoting and divulging of those opinions that are causes of this trouble…” These are some stone hard words that John Winthrop spoke to/about Anne Hutchinson on her first trial day. While, he was speaking these harsh words that day it is said that Anne stood listening to the charges...
    1,037 Words | 3 Pages
  • Virgina Vs. Massachusetts - 481 Words
    Both Virginia and Massachusetts Bay developed their own characteristics based upon the factors of: the economic, political and religious motivation of the settlers, and the natural resources and climate of the region. Even though English settlers colonized both Massachusetts Bay and Virginia, the unique economic and social systems that evolved in each colony took on regional differences. The kinds of settlers who arrived in Virginia were significantly different in religion from those who...
    481 Words | 2 Pages
  • Colonial Massachusetts and Colonial Virginia
    Throughout 1607 to 1750 colonies in Massachusetts and Virginia were being settled and growing. These two states grew up very different from each other in aspects such as their economic development and it's affect on their politics. In 1607, Jamestown in Virginia was the first permanent English settlement. It was in the Chesapeake Bay area. The people abroad the ships had ideas in their heads of digging and mining to find ways of obtaining gold, silver, and copper. It was their incentive...
    825 Words | 3 Pages
  • Massachusetts and New England - 1099 Words
    DBQ #1 - In what ways did ideas and values held by Puritans influence the political, economic, and social development of the New England colonies from 1630 through the 1660s? During the 1600s, waves of Puritan immigrants arrived in the region of New England, settling the area and establishing population centers in areas like Massachusetts Bay, where the part of Boston was established. In contrast to the Chesapeake region’s inhabitants, the Puritan settlers did not come primarily for economic...
    1,099 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chesapeake Colonies Vs. New England Colonies
    Quinn Anderson Mr. Salmon APUSH 1st Period Chesapeake Colonies vs New England Colonies In 1607, the first permanent English colony was established in North America. This settlement was known as Jamestown, and it paved the way for future English colonies. Originally, the first settlements were established for monetary reasons, future colonies, namely the New England colonies, were established as religious havens for various groups. These first few settlements, Virginia and Maryland, also known...
    805 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chesapeake vs. Mass Bay
    Brianna Boyle Chesapeake vs. Massachusetts Bay Colony Massachusetts Bay (New England) and Chesapeake colonies were both the foundation for the economic and social influences in America. However, their differences are far more numerous then the commonalities. Where the Massachusetts Bay Colony was formed primarily for religious purposes, the Chesapeake Colony was formed for profit. This one difference had an extensive effect when related to the life of each colony in the new world. The...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast Jamestown and Massachusetts
    Both settlers of Jamestown and Massachusetts colonized those different areas to establish a colony in the New World and look for resources to in return to England’s investments. However, Jamestown and Massachusetts both had more early problems than successes in their colonies. One major problem was both colonies faced harsh weather conditions. Along with limited natural resources. Also, they had problems with people coming from England to try to take control of the colonies. One major example...
    643 Words | 2 Pages
  • Settling the Northern Colonies - 1102 Words
    Chapter 3 Settling the Northern Colonies 1619-1700 The Protestant Reformation Produces Puritanism Martin Luther . He declared that the Bible alone was the source of God's words. He started the "Protestant Reformation." John Calvin He spelled out his doctrine in 1536 called Institutes of the Christian Religion. He formed Calvinism. King Henry VIII formed the Protestant Church. There were a few people who wanted to see the process of taking Catholicism out of England occur more...
    1,102 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Establishment of the English colonies in America
    The English colonies in America were established for a variety of reasons including economic and religious factors. Other reasons for colonization include the desire to expand the British Empire, establishing order, protecting colonies and to rehabilitate debtors. Religious factors that contributed to the establishment of the English colonies occurred in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Maryland. In England, due to Henry VIII 's action upon breaking his ties with the...
    1,162 Words | 4 Pages
  • 13 Colonies - Essay - 539 Words
    The environment and atmosphere of the first colonies to settle in the new world was widely dissimilar, and some found success while others suffered harsh conditions. Virginia as labeled by Captain John Smith would fall into the last category. The colony of Jamestown came to the New World seeking land, assets and commerce, and settled in a coastal area, which did not provide the freshest water and proved to be abundant with disease. Jamestown was the first English settlement in America (1607). It...
    539 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Colony I Would Live In
    During the late 1200's early 1600's Europeans first started bring settlers over to America. In1585, Sir Walter Raleigh decided to settle in America. An attempt which failed. As settlers kept coming over, there became thirteen colonies. These colonies were divided into sections. New England which was: Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire, and Connecticut. The Middle Colonies which were: Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York, New Jersey, and Delaware. Last but not least, Southern Colonies...
    478 Words | 2 Pages
  • The New England Colonies - 2155 Words
    The New England Colonies of British America included the colonies of Massachusetts Bay Colony, Connecticut Colony, Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations and Province of New Hampshire. They were part of the Thirteen Colonies including the Middle Colonies and the Southern Colonies. These were early colonies of what would later be the states in New England.[1] Captain John Smith, of Pocahontas fame, was the author of "The Description of New England” published in 1616. The book was the...
    2,155 Words | 7 Pages
  • Thirteen Colonies and New England
    CHAPTER 3 Settling the Northern Colonies, 1619–1700 Focus Questions 1. What religious turmoil in the Old World resulted in the little colony of Plymouth in the New World? 2. Why was the initial and subsequent colonization of the Massachusetts Bay Colony more successful than Plymouth? 3. How did the colony of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colony contribute to the origins of American independence and government? What were the contributions to American independence and government...
    944 Words | 3 Pages
  • Development of American Colonies - 771 Words
    The development of the American colonies had six different factors contributing to it. They were the Enlightenment, European population explosion, Glorious Revolution, Great Awakening, mercantilism, and Religious tolerance. The Enlightenment was a cultural movement that challenged the authority of the church in science and philosophy while elevating the power of human reason. One of the most influential Enlightenment writers was John Locke. He argued with the church that people were not...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • Religious Freedom in American Colonies
    The extent of religious freedom in the British American colonies was at a moderate amount. Although colonies such as Virginia and Massachusetts had little to no religious freedom, there were colonies such as Pennsylvania and Rhode Island that had a certain degree of tolerance for other religions. With Virginia being Anglican with its laws, Massachusetts having puritans and separatists, Rhode Island having Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, and Pennsylvania having William Penn along with...
    608 Words | 2 Pages
  • English Colonies North and South
     During the sixteenth-century in the English Colonies, in this time there was a process where the people that owned some of these colonies were going through a time where immigrants were migrating to the new world. Forty-five thousand Puritans left England between 1620 and 1640 and created religious societies in another part of the world also known as the New World. The English people wanted their colonist to learn more about God and his most holy and wise providence, the people wanted to...
    832 Words | 3 Pages
  • Religious Freedom in the Colonies - 970 Words
    Religious Freedom in the American Colonies Prior to the 1700s The first amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees citizens their right to practice any religion they wish without persecution today, but many years ago when this country was made up of only 13 colonies on the east coast, that was often times not the case. It’s surprising how many were not tolerant of religions different from their own because the main reason why people fled to America was to escape religious...
    970 Words | 3 Pages
  • Puritanism in New England Colonies Dbq
    England in the 1620s was filled with tension between the Puritans and King James I and his son Charles I. Their primary goal for their country was to revive Roman Catholicism and rid of any religions that would not conform; so, they mainly targeted Puritans. This intolerance motivated the Puritans to pursue their economic interests (which later turned into religious interests) and establish a place for themselves in the New England colonies in 1630. What they originally intended was to create a...
    1,131 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chesapeake and New England Colonies Comparison
    Chesapeake and New England colonies Comparison During the early 16th century and into the early 17th century, European colonies rapidly colonized the newly found Americas. England in particular sent large groups to the east coast of North America to two separate regions, which would later become known as the Chesapeake and New England areas. The Chesapeake region included Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, and the New Jerseys. The New England region of the colonies included Rhode Island,...
    713 Words | 2 Pages
  • Puritans: Puritan and New England Colonies
    The New England colonies were developed between the 1630s and the 1660s because of the influential ways of the Puritans. The Puritans grew discontent with the Church of England and wanted to “purify” the church. Because of this, they decided to create their own religion where they could have freedom. Their values during the 1630s and 1660s influenced the development of the colonies in three ways: politically, economically, and socially. One major idea which the Puritans possessed was the...
    833 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Pennsylvania Is the Best Colony During the Colonial Period
    Dear Ronald, Greetings from Quaker Pennsylvania! Truly the best place to settle in these changing and unfamiliar times. Life seems more practical here. A community founded on egalitarian beliefs that grants all with the same respect and political status. All are granted the right to participate within the government. This includes voting and presenting new laws/changes to the colony. As well, women have equal rights to men and we don’t believe in enslaving others. This demonstrates our...
    412 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Role Played by Religion in Shaping the Early Colonies
    PBS: God In America, The Story of a New Adom and Eve Religion played an important role in early colonial America, It shaped who we are as a society and country today. Religion was in everyday colonial life, it was in government, social encounters, and even schools. The European settlers came over to the new world bringing with them there belief of christianity, they were known as the puritans. They established towns such as the Massachusetts bay colony which became an important...
    819 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chesapeake and New England Colonies, and Their Relationship with Natives
    It all depends on the region you look at. New England Colonies: Mass Bay viewed the indians as inferior and believed that because of this they were obligated to take the land. Several indian tribes over the 17th century attacked mass bay with the most infamous being King Phillips war (look it up in textbook index if you need more detail). In the Plymouth colony the pilgrims and the natives started off great (first thanksgiving remember?) an english speaking native named squanto was a big reason...
    367 Words | 1 Page
  • Comparative Settlement of New England and Chesapeake Colonies
    Reflective Essay (9/14/2014) Compare the early development of New England with the Chesapeake as depicted in Massachusetts and Virginia colonies. How do the governing structures differ and what do they tell us about the early challenges the two colonies faced? In 1606, King James I re-initiated England's efforts to establish a viable colony in the New World. The 1606 Charter was granted to the Virginia Company for the establishment of a colony in the Chesapeake region of North America. On...
    1,241 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chesapeake vs. New England Colony Development
    The English colonists who settled in New England and Chesapeake areas created societies with very different characteristics. Despite most of the colonists coming from the same mother country, the settlers traveled to America for separate reasons and thus maintained different lifestyles, which shaped the nature of each society. Since the English emigrants who colonized New England region came with their families and were motivated by religious observance and settlers of the Chesapeake came for...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Foundation of Spanish, English, French & Dutch Colonies in North America
    Unit 1: The Foundation of the Spanish, French, Dutch and English Colonies in North America * Initial Contact (Spanish) * The French and Dutch Colonies * The English Colonies Part I: Initial Contact (Spanish) #1: Who were the earliest inhabitants of the Americas? * About 14,000 years ago (12,000 BCE), people started to migrate across BERINGIA to Americas * By 8,000 BCE, they reached to Tierra del Fuego * 3 waves came from Asia, 1 from...
    2,410 Words | 12 Pages
  • What Was the Puritans Effect on the Political, Economic, and Social Development of the Colonies?
    DBQ Essay In the 1600’s, the New England colony devolved very rapidly. The political, economic, and social development of the colonies was highly influenced by the Puritans, who helped find most of the colonies in the region after emigrating there from England. The Puritans strict values and ideas helped shape the colonies greatly in several ways. They believed in a representative government which later on became an essential part of the United States’ government. Economically, the idea of...
    300 Words | 1 Page
  • The Development of American Colonies: Why did the colonies in New England and the Chesapeake develop different societies if they were both settled by people of English origin?
    Since the discovery of the New World by European powers, the newly established European settlements on American soil varied from region to region. Two such regions were The Chesapeake and The New England regions. Although both were settled vastly by the English people the societies they formed were different. These differences were due to a few factors. The factors include motivation for migration, geography, social, political and economical structures of the settlements. These factors are what...
    2,171 Words | 7 Pages
  • Compare and contrast the political, economic, religious, social, intellectual and artistic elements of colonial Virginia and Massachusetts
    While Virginia and Massachusetts had some similarities like using crops as a money source, they mostly had differences. In this essay, I will compare and contrast the differences in government, religion, economies and the purpose of each of the two colonies. Government. Virginia had a Royal government, which was a monarchy. Its owner was England. They had huge land holding and in 1619, Virginia had the House of Burgesses. It was the first representative self-government. In Massachusetts, the...
    285 Words | 1 Page
  • Were the English Colonists of the 17th Century Motivated More by the Pursuit of Wealth or Faith in Their Struggle to Create a New Society in the American Colonies?
    Question: Were the English colonists of the 17th century motivated more by the pursuit of wealth or faith in their struggle to create a new society in the American colonies? The English colonists of the 17th century came to the American colonies for many different reasons. The one that motivated them the most was their pursuit of wealth because, despite the early colonists saying that it was their mission as children of God to go to the new world and spread Christianity to more people,...
    599 Words | 2 Pages
  • What Efforts Were Made to Strengthen English Control over the Colonies in the Seventeenth Century, and Why Did They Generally Fail?
    The English crown tried to reassert their authority on the colonies after restoring power to the throne after the civil wars. After Charles II was restored to the British throne, he hoped to control his colonies more firmly, but was shocked to find how much his orders were ignored by Massachusetts. He gave royal charters to Connecticut and Rohde island and implemented the Dominion of New England. They generally failed because the English crown had left the colonies in isolation for many years,...
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • In What Ways Did Ideas and Values Held by Puritans Influence the Political, Economic, and Social Development of the New England Colonies from 1630 Through the 1660s?
    As we learn trough out history, many puritans and Calvinists flee England due to the monarch’s Catholic belief. Many of these migrants, called Puritans would move to New England, the North Eastern area of the United States in present day. The reason why Puritans would flee to America was simple: After the English government became a Catholic country, many puritans did not want to the Mayflower Compact. However, in 1630, John Winthrop along with hundreds of puritans would establish a government...
    275 Words | 1 Page
  • “in What Ways Did the Ideas and Values Held by the Puritans Influence the Political, Economic, and Social Development of the New England Colonies from 1630 Through the 1660’s?”
    In the 1630's and the 1640's, the Puritans traveled to the colonies to detach from their opinion of a convoluted Church of England. They set up towns and started new lives that were all based on their idea of a pure religion. The Puritan's definition of a pure religion did not include many of the ideas of the Church of England. They built the colonies and made a system based upon the idea that God was the most important aspect of life. Puritan ideas and values influenced the political, economic,...
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • 2010 AP US DBQ In what ways did ideas and values held by Puritans influence the political, economic, and social development of the New England colonies from 1630 through the 1660s?
     The ideas held by the puritans affected the development of the New England colony in many ways. The New England colony was mainly based on the religious beliefs of the Puritans. Puritans were developed from Protestantism and they wished to purify the Church of England and completely separate from Catholicism. Education and Religion was important to the Puritans. The ideas and values held by the Puritans influenced the social, political, and economic development of the New England...
    517 Words | 2 Pages
  • Puritan Dbq - 827 Words
    During the 1630s to 1660s, Puritans to a vast extent powered the ideas and values on the New England colonies through the political, economical and social development with their belief in religion. Politcally, the did not divide the difference between the government and church. Economically, obtained a work ethic that allowed them to grow, and socially they expanded the knowledge of their religion and education. The Puritans had migrated to New England because they were unsatisfied with the...
    827 Words | 2 Pages
  • During the 1600s - 1306 Words
    During the 1600s, as waves of Puritan immigrants arrived in the region of New England, settling the area and establishing population centers in areas like Massachusetts Bay, where the part of Boston was established. In contrast to the Chesapeake region’s inhabitants, the Puritan settlers did not come primarily for economic interests and for monetary gains, but actually out of a desire to create a more pure, moral society based on their street code of moral living and emphasis on the family and...
    1,306 Words | 4 Pages
  • Analysis of John Winthrop's Sermon
    This essay is a sermon delivered by John Winthrop to the Puritans aboard the ship Arbella as it sailed to America in 1630. Winthrop was an early Puritan leader and the first Governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Winthrop writes that God has purposely made some people to be rich and others poor in order to manifest his work in the areas of mercy, love, gentleness, temperance, faith, patience and obedience. He also speaks of the ‘moral gospel' that requires man to help one another in every...
    364 Words | 1 Page
  • The National Experience: a History of the United States Outline
    Maemae Moloney The National Experience: A History of the United States Outline Chapter 1: Making Use of a New World • The first American came from the Bearing Strait 20-40 thousand years ago and was followed by many to disperse into the various parts • The tribes of the Americas were very diverse • Those in South America were more advanced due to advancements in agriculture (corn), architecture, astronomy and established governments and economies • North American...
    2,785 Words | 13 Pages
  • A City Upon a Hill by John Winthrop
    In John Winthrop’s essay “City Upon a Hill”, Winthrop expresses his distinct views on the aims of the Puritans coming to New England. During the early 17th century in Europe, some groups separated from the Church of England. These groups were known as the Pilgrims, who founded Plymouth Colony in 1620. This religion had a direct impact on religious ideas and culture in America. John Winthrop acquired a royal charter from King Charles I and created the Massachusetts Bay Colony. “City Upon a Hill”...
    682 Words | 2 Pages
  • APUSH DBQ sample - 411 Words
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  • DBQ APUSH TOPIC 1
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    Although they lived on the same continent, John Winthrop and Benjamin Franklin lived in very different worlds. These men are similar in some respects, but overwhelmingly they are different. For example, John Winthrop and Benjamin Franklin can be considered leaders in their time frame. Winthrop led the Puritans; Franklin led his country to war. Both men also possessed many of the same virtues such as patience and work ethic. Despite these similarities, John Winthrop and Benjamin Franklin had...
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     “Belief in religious freedom was central to the development of some colonies, while in other colonies such freedom was denied.” Many Europeans moved to the New World, one of the few reasons why some people moved to the New World was because of religious freedom. Someone once said, “Belief in religious freedom was central to the development of some colonies, while in other colonies such freedom was denied.” I do believe that one of the main reasons why people came to the New World was...
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