Mao Zedong Essays & Research Papers

Best Mao Zedong Essays

  • Mao Zedong - 2132 Words
    Mao Zedong or Mao Tse-tung Pronounced As: mou dzu-doong , 1893-1976, founder of the People's Republic of China. One of the most prominent Communist theoreticians, Mao's ideas on revolutionary struggle and guerrilla warfare were extremely influential, especially among Third World revolutionaries. Of Hunanese peasant stock, Mao was trained in Chinese classics and later received a modern education. As a young man he observed oppressive social conditions, becoming one of the original members of...
    2,132 Words | 6 Pages
  • Mao Zedong - 1858 Words
    Mao Zedong is one of the most controversial leaders of the twentieth century. He has been known both as a savior and a tyrant to the Chinese people. From his tactical success of the Long March to his embarrassing failure of the Great Leap Forward, Mao has greatly influenced the result of what China is today. Most of Mao's major successes have been in the CCP's rise to power, while Mao's failures have come at a time when the CCP was in power.

    Mao Zedong was born on December 26, 1893 is...
    1,858 Words | 5 Pages
  • mao zedong - 596 Words
    Simply a Strategy To make the story short, the article discussed how Mao Zedong seemed to have bias over the peasants. In his strategy to overthrow the government, Mao Zedong supposedly relied on the peasant class more so than he did the proletariat thus contradicting his beliefs as a Marxist. There are many ways to view his favor of the peasants over the working class. For one, the peasants might have taken up most of the population in China similar to how those on the poverty line and...
    596 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong - 948 Words
    Mao Zedong Communism, a revolutionary socialist movement to create a classless, moneyless, and stateless social order structured upon common ownership of the means of production, as well as a social, political and economic ideology that aims at the establishment of this social order. Many countries frown upon communist ruled societies; with barely any freedom distributed among classes and discipline given when speaking out against the government, one whom is a supporter of...
    948 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Mao Zedong Essays

  • Mao Zedong - 385 Words
    Mao's English exactly to what extent? Mao Zedong readily admits: "Yes, I invented an English glossary - paper tiger." Mao Zedong started learning English a lot of people think of Mao Zedong in his later years to learn English as early as the age of 17, however, Mao Zedong exposure to English is actually very early. American witter Trier wrote the "Biography of Mao Zedong" that left Shaoshan, hometown of Mao Zedong in 1910, into the Xiangxiang county New Schools - Dongshan small school reading,...
    385 Words | 1 Page
  • Mao Zedong - 569 Words
    Mao Zedong Mao Zedong was born in Chaochan in Hunan province in 1893. He is considered to be the father of Communist China and along side Sun Yat sen and Chiang Kai Shek played a fundamental part in China's recent history. He came from a peasant family. His education was hard and he experienced no luxuries same with all the peasants that living in 19th century China. He first became a Marxist while he worked as a library assistant at Peking University. In June 1921, he co-founded the...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong - 781 Words
    communists, who by now numbered in the tens of thousands across China. Ignoring the orders of the Wuhan-based KMT government, he marched on Shanghai, a city controlled by communist militias. Although the communists welcomed Chiang's arrival, he turned on them, massacring 5000 with the aid of the Green Gang. [79][82] Chiang's army then marched on Wuhan, but was prevented from taking the city by communist General Ye Ting and his troops. [83] Chiang's allies also attacked communists; in Peking, 19...
    781 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mao Zedong - 232 Words
    Mao Zedong Mao Zedong was the Leader of the Communist Party of China from 1893-1976. He was a key figure in the cold war, which resulted in millions of deaths for the Chinese Republic. This ruthless dictator did whatever he could to keep his power. He did many horrendous things one major problem was his stance on the Cultural Revolution. This power struggle could have gone to ways: no violence or violence. Zedong chose to strongly support the force of violence.. He alone can be to blame for of...
    232 Words | 1 Page
  • Mao Zedong Essay - 1907 Words
    Global history Pd 7. Mao Zedong Hero or Villain?! Through out all of history we have seen so many heroes and villains all over the world. But one place in particular was in China, with a leader who goes by the name of Mao Zedong. Mao Zedong was a well-known communist leader in china who actually lead the Chinese Communist Party. He is one of the most important people/historical figures in history. At first he was helping China at the beginning of his ruling, nut then his actions...
    1,907 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mao Zedong Summary of Life
    Mao Zedong's ideas varied between flexible pragmatism and utopian visions, exemplified in the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. As Professor Nutter says, Mao established a regime that was based upon his own personality. Ruthless and ambitious, Mao turned China into a world military power and created a cult of personality, forcing the distribution of his image and his "Little Red Book" (a collection of political maxims) upon the Chinese people. As far as the world was concerned...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong: Man, Not God
    “Mao Zedong: Man, not God” by Quan Yanchi was first published in 1992, book is translated to English from Chinese by Wang Wenjiong and edited by Gale Hadfield. The book is based on the recollections of Li Yinqiao, Mao's bodyguard for many years. Highlighting the book are photographs of Mao with his relatives and Li, published for the first time. This book can help anyone who is new to China or know just a little about this country to get more familiar with who Mao for Chinese is. They love...
    752 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution
    Mao Zedong cultural revolution era In 1966, China’s Communist leader Mao Zedong launched what became known as the Cultural Revolution in order to reassert his authority over the Chinese government. Believing that current Communist leaders were taking the party, and China itself, in the wrong direction, Mao called on the nation’s youth to purge the “impure” elements of Chinese society and revive the revolutionary spirit that had led to victory in the civil war 20 decades earlier and the...
    1,387 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping
    Three Red Banners - Mao Zedong - General Line for Socialist Construction - Great Leap Forward - People's Communes 1. General Line for Socialist Construction Mao said "Go all out, aim high and achieve greater, faster, better and more economical results in building socialism". By urging the Communist Party and the people from China work on Great Leap Forward in order to boost the economic development. It clearly shown to the whole China what the government aim at and giving...
    979 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and Jawaharlal Neru
    Although Mao Zedong and Jawaharlal Nehru were both fighting for equality for the majority of the citizens in their countries, and justice for those citizens they both had different idealogical beliefs and goals as far as politics is concerned. Not only were their beliefs different but many aspects of their lives were different which lead their political and social views to vary. Zedong was a peasant in China growing up, he lived with his family and his father worked hard...
    715 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Life of Mao Zedong - 1410 Words
    Alyssa Franco 11/28/12 Mao Zedong is considered to be one of the most controversial political leaders of the twentieth century. He has been known both as a savior and a tyrant to the Chinese people. From his strategic success of the Long March, to his humiliating failure of the Great Leap Forward, to the Cultural Revolution that shocked the country and took countless lives, Mao has significantly influenced the result of what China is today. From humble origins, Mao Zedong rose to absolute...
    1,410 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mao Zedong Life Outline
    2009 Mao Zedong, Chinese solider • Early Life o Born 26 December 1893 o In Hunan, Qing Dynasty • Mao enlisted as a soldier in a local regiment and fought on the side of the revolutionaries o Once the Qing Dynasty had been effectively toppled, Mao left the army and returned to school o Graduated from the First Provincial Normal School of Hunan in 1918 • In 1923 was elected as one of the five commissars of the National Congress of the Communist Party of China in Shanghai • In 1927,...
    323 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and Cultural Revolution
    Zedong initiated a series of revolutions to change the way China ran, the final being the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution starting in 1966 and ending in 1976 (1). The goal of this investigation is to determine Mao Zedong’s motives as a leader to initiate such a movement that ended up with the loss of culture, struggle between social classes, force of government, and the loss of human life (2). This investigation will describe Mao as a person, China as a country, the Cultural Revolution...
    1,484 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and the Chinese Revolution
    In 1949 a powerful communist leader by the name of Mao Zedong came to power based on his idea for a, “Great Leap Forward.” This idea was meant to bring China’s economy into the twentieth century. He had assembled a revolutionary government using traditional Chinese ideals of filial piety, harmony, and order. Mao's cult of personality, party purges, and political policies reflect Mao's esteem of these traditional Chinese ideals and history. However, the product of this revolution created a...
    1,570 Words | 5 Pages
  • Leasership of Mao Zedong - 3287 Words
    Leadership of Mao Zedong RXE Chen Qianqian 3011521 November 4, 2010 Content Abstract …………………………………………3 Introduction………………………………………4 Biography Family ……………………………………5 Education – Self-study……………………5 Revolutionary road Into the party’s central power………6 Conquest Kuomintang………………7 Rebuild China………………………8...
    3,287 Words | 10 Pages
  • Marxism and Mao Zedong - 5616 Words
    Maoism, also known as Mao Zedong Thought (simplified Chinese: 毛泽东思想; traditional Chinese: 毛澤東思想; pinyin: Máozédōng sīxiǎng), is a political theory derived from the teachings of the Chinese political leader Mao Zedong (1893–1976). Its followers, known as Maoists, consider it as an anti-Revisionist form of Marxism. Developed during the 1950s and 1960s, it was widely applied as the political and military guiding ideology of the Communist Party of China (CPC). It fell into disfavour in China in...
    5,616 Words | 16 Pages
  • Mao Zedong Genocide - 465 Words
    The genocide that took place during Mao Zedong's rule in China is by far one of the worst genocides in history; worst being in terms of lives lost. It is estimated that Mao Zedong more than quadrupled the death toll of that during Hitler's rule in Germany. From 1958-1961, which was known as the Great Leap Forward, the most lives were lost. Many people were tortured, and many others went missing. Mao Zedong's background For years, he formed a group of anarchist, known as the "Revolutionary...
    465 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping
    Assess the critical differences between the developmental strategies of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. To what extent was each successful in contributing to the economic and social development of china? Introduction This paper aims to find out the differences between the developmental strategies of Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping. Mao Zedong and Deng Xiaoping are important characters of China's history. Both great leaders and both tried to bring about reform with China. In addition, through the...
    2,095 Words | 7 Pages
  • china mao zedong - 3296 Words
     The Great Chinese Revolution Stage 2: Socialist Revolution 1949 -1953 Big Ideas of the Triumph of the Chinese Communist Party and its Foreign Relations Idea #1 Events in China were dramatically affected by the Second World War in Asia and the tensions of the early Cold War. Idea #2 The Chinese Civil war was both lost by the GMD and won by the CCP. Idea #3 Mao Zedong viewed his victory in October of 1949 as the completion of the first step in a two-step process to transform...
    3,296 Words | 10 Pages
  • Mao Zedong Paper 1 Ib
    Paper 1: Mao Zedong 1. A) According to source A, Mao Zedong along with the Party Central Committee were able to efficiently construct a socialist system in China, within a very short period of time. Mao and the PCC were able to analyze the economy of China and develop a system called the Great Leap Forward, which would fix the problems that they had discovered. That system quickly transformed China into a self-sufficient country, which were able to function under a socialist system....
    1,009 Words | 3 Pages
  • China During Sun Yat-Sen and Mao Zedong
    Question 1 When classifying revolutionary movements of the 20th century it is often customary to try and label the conflict either Left Wing or Right Wing. However, in the cases of Sun Yat-sen and Mao Zedong, neither Left nor Right Wing seems an appropriate label for what their revolutions contained for China. The difference between democratic and anti-democratic is more fitting for the two Chinese revolutionaries. Both Sun and Mao advocated different methods of development to achieve...
    3,439 Words | 10 Pages
  • Examine the Conditions That Led to the Rise of a Single-Party State Under Mao Zedong.
    Victor Heaulme IB History SL 28/02/12 EXAMINE THE CONDITIONS THAT LED TO THE RISE OF A SINGLE-PARTY STATE UNDER MAO ZEDONG. “In October 1949 Mao Zedong proclaimed the establishment of the People’s Republic of China” (IB Packet, 60). This date marked the official beginning of the CCP’s (Chinese Communist Party) rule under a single party rule. However, one question remains: what exactly were the prominent conditions that led to this rise of the CCP under Mao Zedong? Although one could...
    1,507 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mao Outline - 1691 Words
    Bader Al Majed IB History China and Mao Origins and nature of the authoritarian and single-party states * Conditions that produced authoritarian and single-party states * Mao Zedong came to power and created the People’s Republic of China after decades of civil and international war. * The Communist party assumed power and utilized propaganda strategies to alter people’s opinions and outlooks. * Emergence of leaders: aims, ideology, support * Communist ideology helped...
    1,691 Words | 6 Pages
  • The evil of Mao - 2189 Words
    Mao Zedong, and also commonly called as Chairman Mao. He is born at December 26, 1893, and died in September 9, 1976. He was a Chinese Communist revolutionary and the founder of the People's Republic of China, which he governed as Chairman of the Communist Party of China from its establishment in 1949 until his death. He lived in a wealthy farmer in Shaoshan, Hunan. Mao adopted a Chinese nationalist and anti-imperialist perspective in his early life. On October 1, 1949 Mao proclaimed the...
    2,189 Words | 6 Pages
  • Mao Zendong - 749 Words
    Mao Zedong was born to a peasant family in Hunan, Southern China on December 1893. By the age of six, he already started toiling in the farm. Mao lacked adequate education, but he loved to read and had a strong sense of adventure. At the age of fourteen, Mao’s father set him up with a wife, but he did not want this. He was extremely close with his mother than his father. Later on in 1919, he moved to Beijing and found a job as a librarian; there he learned about the Communist revolution and...
    749 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Biography - 3849 Words
    In the millennia across which China has existed relatively few forms of political and economic systems have dominated the scene. For nearly all but the last fifty-two years, China was ruled by a feudal system under an Emperor, the Son of Heaven. In the late 19th century, the feudal warlords had usurped nearly all of the actual power of the Emperor and had led the country into an age of decadence, economic chaos, and a class system that consistently denied the majority of the population any real...
    3,849 Words | 11 Pages
  • mao zhedong - 579 Words
    Throughout Chinese history, many individuals changed China’s culture, or way of life. These individuals made significant impacts, positive and negative, on the Chinese people. One of these individuals was Mao Zedong, leader of the Communist Party. The beliefs and achievements of Mao Zedong portrayed him as both a hero and a villain. He influenced Chinese society dramatically. When Mao Zedong faced the Nationalists with his new ideas of communism, he was a hero to the peasants during the 1930s....
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • Marxism and Mao - 981 Words
    1. What specific development in Hunan province reinforced Mao’s convictions about the peasantry as a revolutionary force? The peasant movement in Hunan province reinforced Mao’s convictions about the peasantry as a revolutionary force. In china, man and woman are usually subjected to the domination of the three systems of authority: the state systems, the clan system, the supernatural system, and women are dominated by man. Hundreds of millions peasants have been oppressed for thousands years....
    981 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rise of Mao - 1925 Words
    Single Party State – China Rise of Chinese Communist Party (Mao Zedong) Background to Chinese History 1) 1st and 2nd Opium war (1939-42) 2) Internal rebellions e.g. Taiping Rebellion, Boxer Rebellion 3) Weaknesses of governments before 1949 4) Growing peasant poverty 5) The Hundred Days of reform (1898) 6) Sun Yatsen and revolutionary nationalism (3 people’s principles) 7) Reform by imperialist government 8) Revolution of the Double Tenth 1911 setting up of...
    1,925 Words | 7 Pages
  • Explain the Struggle between Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek to Lead a New Chinese State in the 1920s
    Vanna Qing Exam-History Essay#2 March 3rd Monday Ms. Macaulay Explain the struggle between Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek to lead a new Chinese state in the 1920s In the 1920s, Mao Zedong was an organizer of Communist Party, and Chiang Kai-shek was the second leader of the Nationalists. The Nationalist and Communist Parties had struggled for a long time to seize the central power to lead a new China. They tried to work together and formed an alliance to drive the imperialists and...
    917 Words | 3 Pages
  • The “Red Guards” and the “Cult of Mao”
    Mao Zedong and the Red Guards go hand in hand in the history of China. Mao knew that the Red Guards were a useful tool in implementing his teachings. The Red Guards were a group of people who were very devoted to Mao and they wanted to spread his ideas all over China. This paper will cover the Cult of Mao and the role the Red Guards played during this time in China. Mao Zedong started the Cultural Revolution in 1966 in the hoped that it would put an end to “liberal bourgeoisie” and to keep...
    2,817 Words | 7 Pages
  • China & Democracy Post Mao
     China and Democracy Post Mao The Potential Power of China’s New Middle Class By: Ryan Smith Senior Thesis Professor Felker Abstract: This paper examines China during the reform era after Mao. It tries to understand how a country, which has been engaging in economic liberal reforms since 1978, has been able to resist any major political reforms. The answer to this question lies with the newly created middle class in China. The reforms...
    13,175 Words | 38 Pages
  • Mao and the Cultural Revolution - 1642 Words
    China in the Cultural Revolution The historically unprecedented great peoples proletarian cultural revolution was a struggle for supremacy within the Chinese communist party which manifested into a wide scale social and political upheaval which brought china in 1966 to the brink of all out civil war. Although millions of people were murdered and tortured during its bloody course the cultural revolution is a chapter of china’s history rarely talked about, its just bad business to bring it up...
    1,642 Words | 5 Pages
  • MAO TSE TUNG - 1548 Words
    BIOGRAPHY MAO TSE-TUNG Mao Tse-Tung was a principal Chinese Marxist theorist, a soldier and a statesman who commanded China’s communist revolution. He was the leader of the Chinese Communist Party from 1935; he was chairman of the People’s Republic of China from 1949 until his death on 1959. Mao was born in a farming community in Hunan Province, China to a peasant family. As a child, he worked in the fields and attended a local primary school where he studied traditional Confucian classics....
    1,548 Words | 5 Pages
  • Maos Last Dancer - 412 Words
    Maos last dancer Mao’s last dancer is a true story of Li Cunxin. Li came from an extremely poor family in a small village in China. When Li was only a young boy, he was selected to study at the Begjin dance academy to learn to be a dancer. When arrived in Begjin, the children right away started ballet trainin, they were also given education but the main focus was studying to be a ballerina. Li was then chosen to visit America for three months to train with the Houston ballet Academy. Li then...
    412 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Ze Dong - 532 Words
    How successful was Deng Xiaoping in achieving his aims regarding democracy and the Four Modernizations? Deng was partially successful in achieving his aims regarding the Four Modernizations as despite notable annual growth in agricultural and industrial sectors and a boom in the economy, as the Four Modernizations brought social and political problems that pitted the old against the young due to Mao’s Cultural Revolution and economic problems such as inflation that disgruntled the public....
    532 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gandhi and Mao Essay - 1735 Words
    Humanities Exam Essay Structure Amza 10E QUESTION 1 INTRODUCTION Contention Gandhi was mostly effective in achieving independence for India Terms Evaluate – finding how valuable Gandhi was as a leader through his ideas about passive resistance that he introduced to his follower and how he used it to achieve independence Effective Leader – is someone who doesn’t always successful, but able to bring change and new ideas to the society. An effective leader should have support from his...
    1,735 Words | 7 Pages
  • Mao is a Rotten Egg
    I enjoyed reading Chairman Mao is a Rotten Egg because it shows the relationship between parents and children and parents and the government under Mao Tse-tung. The mother in the story was very concerned with what she thought her child said because it had potential to jeopardize her relationship or right standing with the government. If her child, Ching-Ching, was a counterrevolutionary, there was a possibility that he would have been killed or at the least had his statement on record for the...
    261 Words | 1 Page
  • Mao Tse Tung - 915 Words
    Few people in history deserve sole credit for changing the fate of an entire nation. One of them is Mao Tse-tung, the man who rose from the peasantry to become the pre-eminent revolutionary theorist, political leader and statesman of Communist China (CNN, 2001). Mao Tse Tung was born on December 1893 in a village of Shaoshan in Hunan Province (China's south). His family is wealthy peasant farmers. He has one sister and two younger brothers. Mao lives with his mother's family in a neighboring...
    915 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mao Cultural Revolution - 2608 Words
    In my study of history in high school the revolution wasn’t broadly taught in class. We did a small study on the revolution but I never truly got an insight on the matter. In my recent traveling through china I discovered the great impact the revolution actually had on the country. Devastation, violence and great personal loss as well as social upheaval were key words to describe the revolution. All Chinese I spoke to were either direct or indirectly affected by the revolution, and often...
    2,608 Words | 8 Pages
  • Mao Study Guide - 1488 Words
    Mao’s Rise To Power I. Mao first got into radical issues in his home province of Hunan, because there were large spheres of influences there II. In 1920, Mao stumbled upon Professor Chen Tu-hsiu, China’s foremost Marxist. He gave Mao a position selling party literature in a bookshop III. Mao rose in status to provincial party leader soon afterward IV. In 1923, the Nationalist Party sought help and money from another source, so...
    1,488 Words | 5 Pages
  • Mao Cultural Revolution - 326 Words
    The Cultural Revolution was a violent mass movement in the People’s Republic of China that started in 1966 and officially ended with Mao Zedong's death in 1976. It resulted in social, political, and economic upheaval; widespread persecution; and the destruction of antiques, historical sites, and culture. It was launched by Mao Zedong, the chairman of the Communist Party of China, on May 16, 1966. He alleged that liberal bourgeois elements were permeating the party and society at large and...
    326 Words | 1 Page
  • Evaluating Mao and China - 547 Words
    To what extent has nationalism driven Chinese history? Chinese history has been guided to the global economic power player that it has become today, based largely on its nationalism. A strong sense of national pride and subsequent perceived competition with the rest of the world for superiority has given birth to a ‘technological revolution’ in more recent years. One of the fundamental principles inherent of a nationalistic society is the shared sense of “all for one, one for all”, which in...
    547 Words | 2 Pages
  • Maos Domestic Policies - 2519 Words
    Mao’s domestic policies Ib History Notes * HOME Communist China The Early Years 1911
 10 October Double Tenth
 Uprising at Wuchang –ends the Qing Dynasty

1912
 Sun Yat-sen becomes President of the Republic of China
Three Principles of the People 
-Nationalism (rid china of Western invaders) 
-Livelihood and the People’s Welfare, Socialism (government control of capital)
-Representative Government, Democracy (Chinese...
    2,519 Words | 8 Pages
  • Maos Last Dancer - 348 Words
    “What about that one?” These were the words that changed a young peasant boy’s life by the name of Li Cunxin forever. By pure luck he was chosen to study ballet and serve in Chairman Mao’s Revolution, he didn’t know it at the time but he would grow up to become one of the best dancers of all time. His book ‘Mao’s last dancer’ retells his amazing story of survival, courage and the battle one man had to prove for his worth. Li Cunxin's book is an emotional yet inspiring book about an ordinary boys...
    348 Words | 1 Page
  • Maos Last Dancer - 819 Words
    The 2003 autobiography "Mao's Last Dancer", by Li Cunxin, is a book that is open to interpretation. Overall, it is an interesting book that presents many different ideas and themes, including traditional Chinese culture and the comparison between East and West ideology. "Mao's Last Dancer" tells the tale of Li Cunxin, a Chinese dancer in the Houston Ballet, and his adventures. The book also includes various members of Li's family, his dance teachers at his ballet academy and the friends he...
    819 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mao Reading Response - 1128 Words
    Mao Zedong Readings Response Paper Being one of the most well-known characters of Chinese modern history, Mao Zedong has been constantly debated in both Western and Eastern worlds. Like all historic figures, Mao Zedong has been seen in different light: sometimes under glorification and reverence, and sometimes as a devil that dragged China into one of its darkest eras. These contradicting opinions can be easily seen in the assigned readings of this course. While Mao Zedong is generally...
    1,128 Words | 3 Pages
  • mao last dancer - 1031 Words
    ‘Non-fiction texts only deal with facts.’ Discuss the validity of this statement. In your essay response, you should discuss how composers of non-fiction texts present their point of view with specific reference to your non-fiction text. Autobiographies, as a narrative non-fiction text, generally rely on the conventions of factual historical evidence while presenting a personal point of view. Non-fiction texts therefore, rely on objective detail and a subjective perspective....
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mao Zedong's Hundred Flower Movememt
    In the 1950’s Mao Zedong’s ‘Hundred Flower Movement’ came far from achieving its goal of improving Chinese Society, by having intellectuals criticise the government and its policies. In order to prove that the Hundred Flower Movement was unsuccessful, this essay will exhibit why Mao believed it would work, as well as how he carried it out and the resulting affect that spread across China afterwards. The Hundred Flower Movement was a campaign spanning from 1956-1957 in which the Chinese...
    936 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mussolini Versus Mao (Totalitarian Dictators)
    Ty Easley World History Honors Unit VII Paper 12/16/09 Mussolini versus Mao Benito Mussolini and Mao Tse-tung were both influential totalitarian leaders in their own right. Both were revolutionaries, visionary or otherwise, and booth loosely followed a similar pattern of leadership and control, though with some deviations to allow for incongruent circumstances. Mussolini and Mao shared similar source philosophies – both were portrayed as an example of a “phoenix arising from the ashes”....
    461 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mao Tse Tung- the People's Emperor
    Zachary Lee 6/27/2013 Mao Tse-Tung: The People’s Emperor “From Cold War to Global Terror” Mao Tse-Tung: The People’s Emperor Mao Tse-Tung is undeniably one of China’s most prominent historical figures. Born in 1893 into a wealthy family, Mao had a Confucian upbringing, while receiving new, western style schooling in high school. After a brief stint in the revolutionary army from 1911 to 1912, Mao enrolled at Peking University, where he was first introduced to the doctrines of...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • Primary Source- Analysis Essay Mao
    Yashika Dhall Yashika Dhall Long Live the Great Marxist- Leninist Mao Zedong Thought Long Live the Great Marxist- Leninist Mao Zedong Thought History 1111 Professor Ingram February 1, 2013 History 1111 Professor Ingram February 1, 2013 Since the 1970s, Stefan R. Landsberger had collected Chinese propaganda posters and developed his collection into one of the largest private collections in the world. They have become a rich primary source dealing with many important subjects...
    1,312 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chairman Mao: Delivering Effective Leadership
     From my point of view, the most important characteristic of a leader is that she/he should have a strong personal charisma so all other people are willing to follow her/him. The personal charisma may be gained from a lot of aspects. The leader should know the benefits the followers are seeking. And the leader should be able to show strong ability to lead the followers to achieve the goal. Achieving both two ways above will all make the one a good leader to follow because people know leader of...
    841 Words | 2 Pages
  • Was Mao the Cause of the Great Famine
    How accurate is it to say that Mao Zedongs agricultural policies from 1949 were the foremost reason for the famine of 1959-1962? The Chinese famine lasting between 1959 and 1962 was one of the largest in recorded human history; the famine followed Mao’s revolutionary Great Leap Forward in which radical new policies were created and implemented. It is hugely likely that the aforementioned reforms were the main cause of the famine itself and whilst it is arguable that other factors such as...
    960 Words | 3 Pages
  • Crossing Boundaries- Maos Last Dancer
    Crossing boundaries is pushing yourself past the limits. There are many people that cross various boundaries, whether it is a physical boundary, cultural boundary or a mental boundary. This is seen in the prescribed text, the film ‘Mao’s Last Dancer’ directed by Bruce Beresford. In this we see not only the main character Li cross boundaries but also, the minor characters, Ben and Teacher Chang. Crossing boundaries also heard in the Song ‘Love Story’ by Taylor swift. This song relates back to the...
    1,179 Words | 3 Pages
  • Moa Zedong Against Revisionism in the Cultural Revolution
    “Revisionism,” A policy first put forward in the 1890s by Edward Bernstein (1850-1932) advocating the introduction of socialism through evolution rather than revolution, in opposition to the orthodox view of Marxists. People who follow revisionism are often called revisionist and this is what Nikita Khrushchev was referred to as by communist such as Mao Zedong. After the death of Joseph Stalin, Khrushchev took power of the Soviet Union to change the whole economic plan of Russia from the...
    1,061 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Did Mao Rise to Power in China?
    Why did Mao rise to power in China? “Communism is not love. Communism is a hammer which we use to crush the enemy. “Mao Zedong clearly referring to the Kuomintang. After a bitter civil war (1946-1949), which faced the major Chinese parties Kuomintang and CCP, Kuomintang’s defeat, evidenced with Chiang’s and 200.000 people´s fled to Formosa, Mao Zedong (1893-1976), born in Shoshan, Hunan, proclaimed the new People´s Republic of China with himself as both Chairman of the CCP and President of the...
    2,450 Words | 7 Pages
  • Mao S Last Dancer Relation To Kite Runner
    Mao’s Last Dancer 1. Identify your text and author Non-fiction text, autobiography: Mao’s Last Dancer written by Li Cunxin 2. What is this text about? Summarise the story or the premise of the text. The text is about a young, peasant boy called Li Cunxin who lives in a poor village in north-east China. The text is set around the rule of the communist party led by Chairman Mao. One day, Li is visited by Madame Mao’s cultural delegates at his school. They are searching for young children to be...
    735 Words | 2 Pages
  • China Between the Fall of the Kmt and Mao Tse-Tung's Death
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  • Ib History Ia: Why Did Mao Intervene in the Korean War?
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  • Causes and Consequences of Sweat Shop Labor in Post Mao Era
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  • How accurate is it to say that Mao Zedong’s agricultural policies from 1949 were the most important reason for the famine of 1959–62?
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  • How Far Do You Agree That the Hundred Flowers Campaign Was a Trick Designed by Mao to Trap His Opponents?
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    To what extent was the CCP able to develop as a significant political force in the years 1927 to 1945? The Chinese Communist Party (CCP) was a revolutionary movement led by Professors Chen Duxiu and Li Dazhao, who emerged from the May Fourth Movement, challenging the traditional Confucian Chinese ideas and were influenced by the ideas of Karl Marx. When the CCP was first founded, in 1921, it contained only 50 members. However, throughout the years 1927 to 1945 it went through horrific defeats...
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  • Red Scarf Girl - 824 Words
    Red Scarf Girl Red Scarf Girl is a memoir of the Cultural Revolution by Ji-Li Jiang. It is a book in which Ji-Li tells her own very personal narrative of the experiences that happened to her within this unstable period of Chinese culture. Seventh grade students will be glued to the pages of this book as they learn about one girl’s personal journey during a destructive period of Chinese history. Ji-Li is a positive role model for seventh grade students because she is concerned about...
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  • Chin Peng - 601 Words
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  • Love Must Not Be Forgotten
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  • Assess Mao's Rise to Power
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  • Sanlu Group Case Analysis
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  • Great Leap Forward Essay
    “The first years of the People’s Republic of China under the CCP Rule 1949-1962” Question 1: “The changes the CCP initiated in the period 1949 to 1958 were of benefit to the peasants and to China” Between 1949 and 1958, Chairman Mao Zedong implemented large scale changes to China in hopes of rapidly transforming the country from an agrarian economy into a modern communist society. Inevitably, the changes that Mao implemented in this period of time had a significant impact on both China...
    1,075 Words | 4 Pages
  • How Far Do I Agree That the Hundred Flowers Campaign Was a Trick.
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    718 Words | 2 Pages
  • Annotated Bibliography the Chinese Revolution
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  • Cultural Revolution - 881 Words
    The Cultural Revolution was the greatest educational incident chronicled in the last hundred years and it took place from 1966 to 1976. Mao Zedong was the leader of the Cultural Revolution and he wanted to bring about the Cultural Revolution by setting goals to form a more affective bureaucracy. The Cultural Revolution was a time when Red Guards fought against a democratic society and the guards attacked an aspect called the "4 olds." The "4 olds" were old ideas, old culture, old customs, and...
    881 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why did the Chinese Communist Party Win the Civil War in 1949?
    The Chinese Civil War, which lasted from 1927 to 1949, was a civil war in China which the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) overthrew the Guomindang (GMD) . As the CCP had always been inferior to the GMD in many aspects, many were shocked and startled by the Communist's victory; although numerous factors show that the Communist's victory was almost inevitable. This essay will examine the factors that lead to the Communists victory, which includes ideology, economic, political, social, military,...
    1,278 Words | 4 Pages


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