Literary criticism Essays & Research Papers

Best Literary criticism Essays

  • Literary Criticism - 5276 Words
    Psychoanalytical Approach in Literary Criticism (Written report) PSYCHOANALYTICAL APPROACH IN LITERATURE Psychoanalytic literary criticism refers to literary criticism or literary theory which, in method, concept, or form, is influenced by the tradition of psychoanalysis begun by Sigmund Freud. Psychoanalytic reading has been practiced since the early development of psychoanalysis itself, and has developed into a heterogeneous interpretive tradition. As Patricia Waugh writes,...
    5,276 Words | 14 Pages
  • Literary Criticism - 766 Words
    Literary Criticism What comes to your mind when you hear the word “criticism”? Nowadays, most people look at criticism as something negative and personally, it has a negative connotation to me. Multimedia (for example, television, radio, etc.) has often depicted criticism as an antagonist. On reality TV shows, say, a singing competition, there is usually a panel of judges who criticize the contestants' performances particularly focusing on its fine points and flaws (more on the latter) and the...
    766 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary Criticism - 537 Words
    BIOGRAPHICAL CRITICISM Biographical criticism begins with the simple but central insight that literature is written by actual people and that understanding an author’s life can help readers more thoroughly comprehend the work. Anyone who reads the biography of a writer quickly sees how much an author’s experience shapes—both directly and indirectly—what he or she creates. Reading that biography will also change (and usually deepen) our response to the work. Sometimes even knowing a single...
    537 Words | 2 Pages
  • Literary Criticism - 995 Words
    Literary Criticism Critics throughout the years agree that F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby is one of his most renowned accomplishments in his entire career. Although there are a few who believe this novel was like one of his previous ones. It portrays not only his understanding of the Jazz Age of being happy and having money but also the loss of traditional. Some critics found his novel entertaining, “a real attention grabber”, while others found it a bit negligible. In 1942 Alfred...
    995 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Literary criticism Essays

  • Literary Criticisms - 1134 Words
    Tolentino, Fenina Gabrielle M. 11074523 January 8, 2013 Assignment #1 1. What are the different types of Literary Criticisms? * New Criticism / Formalism - This type of criticism concerns itself with the parts of a text and how the parts fit together to make a whole. Because of this, it does not bring in any information outside of the text: biography of the author, historical or literary allusions, mythological patterns, or the psychoanalytical traits of the characters (except those...
    1,134 Words | 4 Pages
  • Literary Criticism - 6000 Words
    DEFINITION OF POSTCOLONIAL CRITICISM A type of cultural criticism, postcolonial criticism usually involves the analysis of literary texts produced in countries and cultures that have come under the control of European colonial powers at some point in their history. Alternatively, it can refer to the analysis of texts written about colonized places by writers hailing from the colonizing culture. In Orientalism (1978), Edward Said, a pioneer of postcolonial criticism and studies, focused on the...
    6,000 Words | 16 Pages
  • Literary Criticism - 5621 Words
    Seth Adriel R. Baldovino November 3, 2014 L10 LS 304 English Assignment Criticism is the practice of judging the merits and faults of something (or somebody) in an intelligible (or articulate) way. • The judger is called "the critic". • To engage in criticism is "to criticise"/"criticize".[1] • One specific item of criticism is called "a criticism" or a "critique". Criticism as an evaluative or corrective exercise can occur in any area of human life. To criticize does not...
    5,621 Words | 19 Pages
  • Literary Criticism Juno - 1021 Words
    Literary Criticism Steven Garita Out of class essay #2 Scrutinizing the cultural studies approach in regards to the film Juno Juno is a movie that can be analyzed from several perspectives in regards to the study of hegemonic discourses that are within the text. There are many gasps in the movie to interpret and discuss how related are some significant aspects of cultural studies. The text is a social production in the movie; the circumstances around the plot are political engaged...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • Feminism and Literary Criticism - 1378 Words
    Зборник радова ВТШСС Урошевац 172 UDK: 821.111.09:305-055.2"17/18" FEMINIST LITERARY CRITICISM IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (How does it apply to ‘Pride and Prejudice’-by Jane Austen?) Sanja Dalton1 Abstract: The aim of this paper is to express Feminist Literary Criticism in English Literature, as critical analysis of literary works based on feminist perspective, as well as to uncover the latent dynamics in a novel relevant to women’s interior role in society. Feminist Literary...
    1,378 Words | 6 Pages
  • Structuralism And Literary Criticism - 604 Words
    ‘Structuralism and Literary Criticism’ - Gerard Genette Structuralism is a way to examines a literary text to arrive at their meaning, rather than the actual meanings of the text themselves. It is a study of structure wherever they occur. In the essay Genette analyses content, logics, grammars and semiotics. He is considering structuralism as a method to study literary criticism. In the beginning of the essay Genette is establishing difference between Bricoleur and Engineer, Art critic and...
    604 Words | 3 Pages
  • Narrative “New Literary” Criticism
    Narrative “New Literary” Criticism A good novel is hard to put down. The story in the novel is perfect with a great plot, convincing characters, and a suspenseful build up to the climax. You have been drawn into the story and it is almost like you are there, living along side the characters. You understand their background, their trials, and their joys. The story brings to life something from long ago that may or may not be fictional. It is hard to tell without doing further...
    1,735 Words | 5 Pages
  • What is Literary Criticism?
    This paper is only for testing, just wanna be member.Literary criticism is the study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. Modern literary criticism is often informed by literary theory, which is the philosophical discussion of its methods and goals. Though the two activities are closely related, literary critics are not always, and have not always been, theorists. Whether or not literary criticism should be considered a separate field of inquiry from literary theory, or conversely...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Pragmatic Literary Criticism - 795 Words
    Pragmatic Literary Criticism Pragmatic criticism is concerned, first and foremost, with the ethical impact any literary text has upon an audience. Regardless of art's other merits or failings, the primary responsibility or function of art is social in nature. Assessing, fulfilling, and shaping the needs, wants, and desires of an audience should be the first task of an artist. Art does not exist in isolation; it is a potent tool for individual as well as communal change. Though...
    795 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary Criticism and Study Material
    ENG1501/101/3/2014 Tutorial letter 101/3/2014 Foundations in English Literary Studies ENG1501 Semesters 1 & 2 Department of English Studies IMPORTANT INFORMATION: This tutorial letter contains important information about your module. ENG1501/101 CONTENTS Page 1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................ 3 2 PURPOSE OF AND OUTCOMES FOR THE MODULE...
    5,715 Words | 38 Pages
  • The Contribution of Marxism in Literary Criticism
    THE CONTRIBUTION OF MARXISM TO THE STUDY OF LITERARY CRITICISM It is evident that Marxism has made great contribution in the study and criticism of Literature, there is need to explain a little bit on Marxism before we discuss its contribution. Marxism is a social and political theory based on the works of Karl Marx and his followers, associated with the socialist and communist movements, these works mainly are Manifesto of the Communist Party and the German Ideology. It should be...
    3,191 Words | 10 Pages
  • Nature and Function of Literary Criticism
    The word criticism is derived from the Greek word meaning " judgment". Hence, criticism was known to be the exercise of judgment on works of literature, or it can be said that criticism is the play of mind to observe the merits and defects on the work of literature. A critic , therefore, is a person who expresses judgment on works of literature or poetry or the art of an artist or a painter. The critic is also defined as a person who is possessed of the knowledge necessary to enable him to...
    536 Words | 2 Pages
  • literary criticism approaches - 3103 Words
    10 Literary Criticism approach An Overview of Approaches The Three-fold Purpose of Criticism: To help us solve a problem in the reading. To help us sift between and resolve conflicting readings. To enable us craft interpretative, yet scholarly judgments about literature. 1. Historical / Biographical Approach: Historical / Biographical critics see works as the reflection of an author’s life and times (or of the characters’ life and times). H/B approach deems it necessary to know about...
    3,103 Words | 10 Pages
  • Literary Criticism of Lord of the Flies
    Raef Sengupta 2 English H, 7 Georgantas 4/17/13 Literary Criticism of Lord of the Flies This article was very interesting in that it embraced the idea that perhaps authority figures should not be authority figures, maybe everyone needs to work together. I agree with their conclusion that a balance needs to be formed, this is nearly my view on this matter. First a look needs to be taken at the roles of authority figures and what they really do. Authority figures exist because people need...
    426 Words | 2 Pages
  • A History of Feminist Literary Criticism
    This page intentionally left blank A HISTORY OF FEMINIST LITERARY CRITICISM Feminism has transformed the academic study of literature, fundamentally altering the canon of what is taught and setting new agendas for literary analysis. In this authoritative history of feminist literary criticism, leading scholars chart the development of the practice from the Middle Ages to the present. The first section of the book explores protofeminist thought from the Middle Ages onwards, and analyses...
    149,501 Words | 430 Pages
  • Types of Literary Criticism - 722 Words
    Types of Literary Criticism Since ancient times, readers have debated and critiqued literature from a variety of perspectives. Some have looked at a story or play from a moral stance, considering how values are represented in a text. Another critic might evaluate a poem in terms of its form. Recent critics have looked at literature to see what it might be saying about our lives in society, our political or power relations, gender roles, or sexuality. Below I have summarized some types of...
    722 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary Theory and Criticism: Investigating Literature and Literary Study
    Literary theory, literary criticism Methods of studying literature are defined and described. A section on definitions and distinctions investigates literature and literary study; literary theory and literary criticism. First of all it is necessary for us to know the definition of literary theory, and literary criticism. Nevertheless, the distinctions between literary theory, criticism, and history are the most important Literary theory is the study of the principles of...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Literary Theory and Criticism, and Its Relevance Today
    Literary Theory and Criticism and Its Relevance Today Literary criticism is primarily the evaluation of the importance of a particular work or body of work on such grounds as: the personal and/or cultural importance of the themes and the uses of language of a text; the insights and impact of a text; and the aesthetic creation (or, performance) of the text; mainly as these areas are seen to be reciprocally dependent, supportive or inflective. The word 'criticism' has ordinary-use negative...
    964 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Literary Criticism of D. H. Lawrence
    The Literary Criticism of D. H. Lawrence Author(s): René Wellek Source: The Sewanee Review, Vol. 91, No. 4 (Fall, 1983), pp. 598-613 Published by: The Johns Hopkins University Press Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27544211 . Accessed: 28/12/2010 10:04 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp. JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use provides, in part, that unless you...
    5,919 Words | 42 Pages
  • Literature and Criticism Psychoanalytic Criticism
    Philippine literature is the literature associated with the Philippines and includes the legends of prehistory, and the colonial legacy of the Philippines. LIT 3 _ LITERARY CRITICISMliterary criticism, the reasoned consideration of literary works and issues. It applies, as a term, to any argumentation about literature, whether or not specific works are analyzed. Plato’s cautions against the risky consequences of poetic inspiration in general in his Republic are thus often taken as the earliest...
    4,957 Words | 17 Pages
  • New Criticism - 5580 Words
    New Criticism [pic]New Criticism is a name applied to a varied and extremely energetic effort among Anglo-American writers to focus critical attention on literature itself. Like Russian Formalism, following Boris Eikhenbaum and Victor Shklovskii, the New Critics developed speculative positions and techniques of reading that provide a vital complement to the literary and artistic emergence of modernism. Like many other movements in modern criticism, New Criticism was in part a reaction against...
    5,580 Words | 15 Pages
  • New Criticism - 1344 Words
    English 441 New Criticism Explained Beginning in the 1920's and coalescing in the 1940's, an interpretative approach emerged that did not define literature as essentially the self-expressive product of the artist nor as an evaluative reflection or illumination of cultural history. These "New Critics" opposed the traditional critical practice of using historical or biographical data to interpret literature. Rather, they focused on the literary work as an autotelic (self-contained) object. The...
    1,344 Words | 7 Pages
  • New Criticism - 1519 Words
    Stephanie Ihekwoaba English 3341—Fall 2013 Monday, October 21, 2013 New Criticism Analysis of The Crate (Francis Ponge) VS. A Dog After Love (Yehuda Amichai) As defined by the editors of the Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, mentioned in a handout given by Professor Tomás Q. Morin, New Critics have the ability to “treat a work of literature as if it were a self-contained, self-referential object,” rather than intently evaluating a poem on the basis of the reader’s...
    1,519 Words | 4 Pages
  • Criticisms Explained - 1529 Words
    Literary Analysis Questions A. Historical 1. Is this method of composition indicative of the period? 2. Is the subject matter representative of events occurring at this time? 3. Is the philosophical outlook indicative of the historical period? 4. How does the work relate to works in the same time period? To other periods? To works from other countries at this time? 5. What culture existed for this writer? 6. Is the work part of a historical trend (novel, Christian literature, allegory,...
    1,529 Words | 5 Pages
  • Function of Criticism - 1484 Words
    Richard L. W. Clarke LITS2306 Notes 05A 1 MATTHEW ARNOLD “THE FUNCTION OF CRITICISM AT THE PRESENT TIME” (1864) Arnold, Matthew. “The Function of Criticism at the Present Time.” Critical Theory Since Plato. Ed. Hazard Adams. New York: Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich, 1971. 592-603. Pragmatic theorists from Plato onwards have emphasised the impact which literature has on the reader. Here, Arnold, arguably England’s most important cultural critic in the second half of the nineteenth century and...
    1,484 Words | 4 Pages
  • Biographical Criticism - 738 Words
    Biographical Criticism The novel Invisible man can be interpreted through many other literary criticisms but in order to achieve a more concrete interpretation of the novel, biographical criticism should be used. Biographical Criticism is the best choice for this novel because Ellisons experiences of his life, beliefs, and the time period in which he was raised, have direct influence on his writing of Invisible man. After reading Invisible Man and doing research on Ralph Ellison’s...
    738 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Purpose of Criticism - 4165 Words
    The Purpose of Criticism: Literary criticism has at least three primary purposes. (1) To help us resolve a difficulty in the reading. The historical approach, for instance, might be helpful in addressing a problem in Thomas Otway's play Venice Preserv'd. Why are the conspirators, despite the horrible, bloody details of their obviously brutish plan, portrayed in a sympathetic light? If we look at the author and his time, we see that he was a Tory whose play was performed in the wake of the...
    4,165 Words | 12 Pages
  • Criticism Philosophy - 2728 Words
    • CRITICISM PHILOSOPHY o SECTION A: INTRODUCTION Not too many people can listen none defensively, or none antagonistically, to criticism. And very few of those who listen admit it when they see that they are wrong. The thing is, we think that admission of guilt, or of being wrong, or that we have made a mistake, is a sign of weakness. Yet true failure is repeatedly refusing to see your faults. Learning to listen to criticism is a life skill that we'd all do well to master. It is about...
    2,728 Words | 9 Pages
  • Sociological Criticism - 614 Words
    Sociological criticism examines literature in the political, economic and cultural context in which it can be either written or received. It looks at the sociological status of the author to evaluate how the profession of the writer in a milieu affected what was written. It analyzes the social content of literary works culturally, economically and politically. Sociological criticism also examines the role the audience has in shaping literature. A view of Shakespeare might look at the economic...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychoanalytic Criticism - 1306 Words
    1. (c.) Psychoanalytic Criticism Psychoanalytic Criticism was first mooted by the Austrian neurologist Sigmund Freud. It deals with the mind of the author at the time of writing hence the “psycho” aspect of it. The text is seen as a dream and the readers unravel the mysteries of the dram as they read and endeavor to gain understanding of the text. In this theory, the author’s mind, the impact of the text on the reader and the third character are of paramount importance. This theory came from...
    1,306 Words | 4 Pages
  • Practical Criticism - 1201 Words
    ‘Words in poetry invite us, not to "think about" and judge but to "feel into" or "become" – to realize a complex experience that is given in the words' - F.R. Leavis PRACTICAL CRITICISM: AN INSIGHT The heart is a bloom Shoots up through the stony ground There's no room No space to rent in this town You're out of luck And the reason that you had to care The traffic is stuck And you're not moving anywhere If the first two verses of Beautiful Day by U2 (lyrics by Bono)...
    1,201 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Traditional Criticism - 1062 Words
    A Research about The Traditional and The New Criticism What is Literary Criticism? Literary criticism or literary analysis can be defined as, “An informed analysis and evaluation of a piece of literature”. Or A written study, evaluation and interpretation of a work of literature”. * The study, evaluation, and interpretation of literature * A theory founded upon the term “critique” (an analysis of written or oral discourse) * Literary Criticism is usually in the form of a...
    1,062 Words | 3 Pages
  • Feminist Criticism - 12329 Words
    ter Elaine Showalter “Feminist criticism in the wilderness Pluralism and the feminist critique” Women have no wilderness in them, They are provident instead Content in the tight hot cell of their hearts To eat dusty bread. Louise Bogan, "'Women'" In a splendidly witty dialogue of 1975, Carolyn Heilbrun and Catharine Stimpson identified two poles of feminist literary criticism. The first of these modes, righteous, angry, and admonitory, they compared...
    12,329 Words | 39 Pages
  • New Criticism - 843 Words
    NEW CRITICISM Introduction New Criticism The name New criticism came into popular use to describe this approach to understanding literature with the 1941 publication of John Crow Ransom’s The New Criticism. This contains Ransom’s personal analysis of several of his contemporaries among theories and critics. Here he calls for an ontological critic (one who will recognize that poem is a concrete entity) like Leonardo Da Vinci’s “”Mona Lisa”. In New Criticism, a poem can be analyzed to...
    843 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychoanalytic Criticism - 325 Words
    Psychoanalytic Criticism Psychoanalytic criticism adopts the methods of "reading" employed by Freud and later theorists to interpret texts. It argues that literary texts, like dreams, express the secret unconscious desires and anxieties of the author, that a literary work is a manifestation of the author's own neuroses. One may psychoanalyze a particular character within a literary work, but it is usually assumed that all such characters are projections of the author's psyche. One...
    325 Words | 2 Pages
  • literary teory - 6975 Words
    LITERARY THEORY Misconceptions about theory: 1. Theory is difficult What is difficult however is the language because most of the theorists are French 2. theory is meaningless, pretentious jargon 3. that we are intellectually incapable of coping with it(i.e we are at fault) 4. We take everything as gospel truth; We should question What is literary theory? Theory is a coherent set of conceptual hypothetical and pragmatic principles forming the general frame of reference for a...
    6,975 Words | 20 Pages
  • Literary Approaches - 616 Words
    Literature • Choose six of the following approaches and find one article for each approach. • Writing:  One page per article  2 pgs summary Critical approaches important in the study of literature: MORAL/INTELLECTUAL • Concerned with content and values • Used not only to discover meaning, but also to determine whether works of literature are both true and significant. • To study lit from this perspective is to determine whether a work conveys a lesson or a message...
    616 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary Periods - 1150 Words
    [pic] | In grouping texts according to "type," the concept of genre is applied to all literary works, past, present, or | |future. Thus seeing a single work in its generic context becomes inseparable from seeing it as part of literary history. | |The concept of literary period also implies a grouping through time. But a work, rather than being "placed" within the | |entire sweep of literary history, is "placed" within a much more restricted time frame. The period concept provides...
    1,150 Words | 4 Pages
  • Literary theories - 941 Words
    Solidad Reyes’ view on Literary History, Literary Theory and Literary Criticism In an attempt to solve different problems and issues in Literary Studies such as the effects of major trends to modern Philippine Literature, role of the audience and critics in studying text, three areas of literary study was explained, literary history, literary theory and literary criticism and their integration to Philippine Literature. Each area was explained based on their individual roles or impacts in the...
    941 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literary Criticsm - 7115 Words
    LITERARY CRITICISM LITERATURE • What is literature? Literate/ literacy - able to read/write Origin- from Latin “litteratura” (letter) • literature with the small ‘l’ Literature - piece of writing/printed information on a particular subject • literature with the big ‘L’ Literature - pieces of writing that are valued as works of art eg. Novels, plays, poems (contrast to technical books/ scientific/ academic writings) • Literary - connected with...
    7,115 Words | 25 Pages
  • Literary Theory - 5709 Words
    Source (Full article not excepted here): Brizee, Allen, and J. Case Tomkins. “Literary Theory and Schools of Criticism.” OWL at Purdue. The Writing Lab and OWL at Purdue and Purdue U, 1995-2012. Web. 20 Oct 2012. Literary Theory and Schools of Criticism Introduction A very basic way of thinking about literary theory is that these ideas act as different lenses critics use to view and talk about art, literature, and even culture. These...
    5,709 Words | 18 Pages
  • Literary Perspectives - 1379 Words
    English september 8, 2009 Literary Perspectives The following information was excerpted from The Bedford Introduction to Literature, 8th edition, 2079–2098 Formalist critics are primarily concerned with the language, structure, and tone of a work, otherwise known, as it’s “formal elements”. Formalists gravitate towards “intrinsic” matters in a piece of literature, in simpler terms, diction, irony, paradox, metaphor, and symbol. In a similar fashion, they emphasize larger...
    1,379 Words | 4 Pages
  • Literary Theory - 4902 Words
    Literary Theory: An Introduction’ by Terry Eagleton It took me forever to read this, but mainly because I was taking fairly detailed notes; it’s not too tricky a read really. I took notes because I knew I’d forget so much of it straight away, but I’d like some of it to stick, or at least be ready to hand for when I forget. It was a good grounding for someone like me whose English Literature study stopped at sixteen. Introduction: What is Literature 2-5 The Formalists, Russia, 1910s. “Lit...
    4,902 Words | 13 Pages
  • New Criticism VS Reader-Response Criticism
    New Criticism VS Reader-Response Criticism What is more accurate, new criticism or reader response criticism? The answer is neither, seeing as both styles of critic views and analyzes the topic at hand and gives feedback. Though both styles offer feedback, they are different forms of feedback entirely. New criticism involves focusing on the material at hand, and not what it was meant to be perceived as, to judge the topic by every measurable feature possible. Reader response criticism is...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Literature Is Criticism of Life
    Jeremy Jeon Mrs. Rowe English 1H 17 August 2013 The literature is a criticism of life. Arnold is correct in says that literature is a criticism of life because personally I think that it is simply a portrayal of life’s situations. Also I think that Literature is often a mirror for what is going on in society and a vehicle to change that which we don’t like. Many books today use their pages to put forth social commentary. They reflect the issues of the time, including...
    546 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reader-Oriented Criticism - 520 Words
    Reader-Oriented Criticism This essay will summarize what Reader-Oriented Criticism actually is and how it plays a role with in Friday Night Lights. First of all, Reader-Oriented Criticism is the interaction of what the text was written to mean and how the viewer reads it, also known as text-reader relationships. “As such, reader-oriented criticism is largely concerned with “potential” as opposed to “actualized” meanings of the text to an audience” (Vande 331). The text throughs out cues on how...
    520 Words | 2 Pages
  • The New Criticism and Formalist Analysis
    The New Criticism and Formalist Analysis 09/12/2012 Methodology #1 The New Criticism and Formalist Analysis In the new criticism and formalist analysis the author is portraying a point as to which in todays day and age no matter what we read whether is may be a poem, short story, novel, etc. we as humans are already making valued and momentous distinctions. The author also presents that us as critics today have self-awareness in the use of language and a clear comprehension of the...
    358 Words | 1 Page
  • New criticism essay - 850 Words
    Grace Lear Ms. Joan Richmond English 2261 17 Feb. 2013 New Criticism: A Focused Summary New criticism is a type of literary theory that focuses on the close reading of literature and how the literature functions as the object it’s meant to be. No external influences are to be taken into consideration, strictly the writing itself. This movement emphasizes the text in literature and explains the writers meaning to the reader. The author’s intention, excluding historical and cultural context...
    850 Words | 3 Pages
  • Criticism of Lust by Susan Minot
    Jennifer Vescio Dr. Helena Liddle ENGL3062 27 March 2015 Analysis Paper 2: Old Spice Commercial There are seven major schools of literary criticism: gender, social/historical, biographical, psychological, mythological, new criticism, and reader based criticism ("Schools of Literary Criticism." A-41 - A-49). Each school allows for us to “read” the “text” (Old Spice Commercial) through diverse theoretical “lenses”. The question is how can these diverse “lenses” allow for us to focus in on...
    1,250 Words | 4 Pages
  • Structuralistic Criticism and Gerard Genette
    Gerard Genette writes at the outset in his essay ‘Structuralism and Literary Criticism’ that methods developed for the study of one discipline could be satisfactorily applied to the study of other discipline as well. This is what he calls “intellectual bricolage ’, borrowing a term from Claude Levi-Strauss. This is precisely so, so far as structuralism is concerned. Structuralism is the name given to Saussure’s approach to language as a system of relationship. But it is applied also to the study...
    1,053 Words | 3 Pages
  • New Historicism and Cultural Criticism
    New Historicism Most of us raised to think about history in the traditional way would read an account of a Revolutionary War battle written by an American historian in 1944. The questions asked by traditional historians and by new historicists are quite different, and that’s because these two approaches to history are based on very different views of what history is and how we can know it. For most traditional historians, history is a series of events that have a linear, causal relationship:...
    3,498 Words | 10 Pages
  • Formalism and New Criticism - 1240 Words
    Formalism and New Criticism “Formalism” is, as the name implies, an interpretive approach that emphasizes literary form and the study of literary devices within the text. The work of the Formalists had a general impact on later developments in “Structuralism” and other theories of narrative. “Formalism,” like “Structuralism,” sought to place the study of literature on a scientific basis through objective analysis of the motifs, devices, techniques, and other “functions” that comprise the...
    1,240 Words | 4 Pages
  • Approaches of New Criticism - 1406 Words
    New criticism approaches - FOUZIA LAKHMOR - G3 - S4 - ON : 530 New Criticism A literary movement that started in the late 1920s and 1930s and originated in reaction to traditional criticism that new critics saw as largely concerned with matters extraneous to the text, e.g.,...
    1,406 Words | 4 Pages
  • Characteristics of New Criticism - 1040 Words
    New Criticism was used between 1940s – 1960s in reading and interpreting literary text. It is used ‘close-reading’ method, which concentrates only in text itself without include another literary aspect outside the text. This method is only temporary used because there’re many critics about it. For New Critics the most important and the only one that should be concerned is only the text itself. In interpreting literary works, we don’t need to know about author’s life, biography, whether...
    1,040 Words | 3 Pages
  • Literature: A Criticism of Life
    Literature: A Criticism of Life Literature does not simply add to reality, but describes it. Matthew Arnold’s statement about literature being a “criticism of life” is right because literature teaches it talks about problems that the world faces daily, good moral lessons through criticism, and it shows the author commentary on things. Literature is used to express people’s feelings and thoughts. In some literature, it can be used to show what authors critique in this world, being either good...
    522 Words | 2 Pages
  • Guide to Conducting Literary Research
    Guide to Conducting Literary Research Because the Literature Resource Center (LRC) offers a wealth of information that includes criticism, biographies, bibliographies, work overviews and explications, Web sites, periodical articles, compare and contrast pages, full-text author's works, and reading lists, it is an invaluable electronic library for you, the student of literature. This guide is designed to support you as you use the LRC as well as other electronic and print resources to:...
    8,456 Words | 24 Pages
  • Freud Literary Culture - 109095 Words
    ure This page intentionally left blank FREUD’S LITERARY CULTURE This original study investigates the role played by literature in Sigmund Freud’s creation and development of psychoanalysis. Graham Frankland analyses the whole range of Freud’s own texts from a literary-critical perspective, providing a fresh and comprehensive reappraisal of his life’s work. Freud was steeped in classical European literature but seems initially to have repressed all literary influences on his scientific work....
    109,095 Words | 318 Pages
  • Literary History and the Concept of Literature
    Literary history and the concept of literature I From the 1970s onwards, much has been said about the writing of history and literary history that has cast doubt on its intellectual credibility. For example, Hayden White’s Metahistory (1973) included an influential analysis of the metaphorical foundations of 19th century history writing. In 1979, Jean-François Lyotard criticized grand narratives in La Condition postmoderne (The Postmodern Condition), and in 1992 David Perkins presented a...
    3,857 Words | 11 Pages
  • Feminism: Contemporary Literary Theory
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