John Hughes Essays & Research Papers

Best John Hughes Essays

  • John Hughes: Reaching New Levels of Achievement in Hollywood
    John Hughes: Reaching New Levels of Achievement in Hollywood David Bordwell (2006) firmly believes that when faced with the challenge of creating, people ask themselves how they can raise the premises to new levels of achievement, or revive a disreputable genre. He argues that people challenge themselves with the question ‘How can I make casual connections more felicitous, twists more unexpected, character psychology more involving, excitement more intense, motifs more tightly woven? How can I...
    1,856 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Representation of Youth Tribes and Subcultures in the Cinema of John Hughes
     The Representation of Youth Tribes and Subcultures in the Cinema of John Hughes. In this research essay I expect to find that the use of youth tribes and subcultures can clearly be identified in mid-80s comedy-dramas; particularly in those written, produced and directed by John Hughes. The primary texts I will be analysing are The Breakfast Club, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off and Weird Science. I have selected these texts as they are few of many that represent young people in an...
    2,202 Words | 7 Pages
  • Analysing the Opening of 'the Breakfast Club'
    The Breakfast Club The "Breakfast Club" is a teen-comedy, released in 1985 and was directed and produced by John Hughes - who was best known for scripting or directing the most successful films of the 1980's and 1990s, for example: Ferris Bueller's Day Off, Sixteen Candles, the three Home Alone installments and 101 Dalmatians. This film also stars five of the most well-known actors and actresses of this time, who had starred in similar productions throughout the 1980's. "The Breakfast...
    1,639 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Decade of Realizations: American Youth During the 80s
    Of all the 1980's films, that can be described as "Eighties Teen Movies" (Thorburn, 1998) or "High School Movies" (Messner, 1998), those written and (with the exception of "Pretty In Pink" (1986) and "Some Kind of Wonderful"(1987)) directed by John Hughes were often seen to define the genre, even leading to the tag "John Hughes rites de passage movies" as a genre definition used in 1990s popular culture (such as in "Wayne's World 2" (1994 dir. Stephen Surjik)). This term refers to the half dozen...
    3,156 Words | 8 Pages
  • All John Hughes Essays

  • Coming of age essay - 1191 Words
    “Coming of age is a process, not an event” Coming of age is a procedure of growth and maturity seen within individuals; not an event that is celebrated. Several composers have the ability to express the notion of Coming of Age through creative writing literature and films. This is evident within the two texts; Raw written by Scott Monk and The Breakfast Club directed by John Hughes. Both texts articulate ideas about decisions during Coming of Age define who you are, a group of people can help...
    1,191 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Breakfast Club - 939 Words
    “Even though the John Hughes film The Breakfast Club was made in 1985 it still has relevance for modern for modern Australian audiences” To what extent do you agree? ...and these children that you spit on as they try to change their worlds are immune to your consultations. They’re quite aware of what they’re going through... – David Bowie David Bowie’s words above introduce the John Hughes movie The Breakfast Club; they suggest the central themes explored about teenage...
    939 Words | 3 Pages
  • Breakfast Club Analysis - 699 Words
    BREAKFAST CLUB IS STILL CULTURALLY SIGNIFICANT Ask anyone who was a teenager during the 80s who John Hughes is, they’ll start reciting every movie he has been involved in. He has dabbled in writing, directing and even producing. He will forever be remembered as an icon of the 80s. John Hughes was a writer for National Lampoon magazine in 1979. He was inspired by the success of “National Lampoon’s Animal House”, written by an associate of National Lampoon Magazine Harold Ramis, Mr....
    699 Words | 2 Pages
  • Breakfast Club Essay - 1403 Words
    Tom Bergamo AP Psychology Mrs. Theis 9 February 2015 Breakfast Club Essay 1. The character Allison Reynolds in the film The Breakfast Club exhibits Piaget’s formal operational thinking. The formal operational begins at the age of 12 and continues into adulthood, this stage also involves abstract thinking and moral reasoning. Teenagers are able to understand concepts and ideas on a more thought provoking level, with an emotional connection. Allison exhibits abstract thinking as an...
    1,403 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Breakfast Club - 863 Words
    Stereotype/prejudice pg. 309 -Brian fundamental attribution error - Bender agression- displacement- pg. 360 - Andrew The Breakfast Club- Social Psychology The Breakfast Club is a dramatic film by John Hughes from 1985. The story takes place in the library at Shermer high school in Illinois. The movie records, five students from very different cliques as they spend an all day Saturday detention with one another under the supervision of a very forbidding principal. This movie is unique because...
    863 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Analysis of The Sin Bin or Lucy’s Heart by Lucy Cross
    “The Sin Bin or Lucy’s Heart” by Lucy Cross I am about to analyze Lucy Cross’s story “The Sin Bin or Lucy’s Heart”. First, I would like to start the show with a Character Sketch of Lucy Cook and her friend Bethan, followed by a look at the title of the text. Then I would like to share my thoughts on different symbols I think is very important. In the end, I would like to tell you my opinion about the theme and message of this text and compare it to “The Breakfast Club” and “The Body”....
    1,268 Words | 3 Pages
  • Catcher in the Rye Essay - 683 Words
    The Catcher in the Rye As a child you think of the world as a perfect place where no one can hurt you, but eventually you find out that the world is not as perfect as you think and your life begins to change. Violence, injustice, unfairness and death can change a view of the world. Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger is a great example for why the world is not perfect. He is a depressed kid who goes through a lot and figures out that the he can’t protect the innocent...
    683 Words | 2 Pages
  • Movie Analysis of “the Breakfast Club”
    Social Trends Assignment Movie Analysis of “The Breakfast Club” The features of Generation-Xers were efficiently showed in this movie. For most Generation-Xers they were lack of sense of safety and social identity, they were dissatisfied with the government because a lack of trust in leadership, which caused their misleading personality trait. When they watch The Breakfast Club they have to have the same sense of this movie. In the United States only a small part of people had taken...
    535 Words | 2 Pages
  • Breakfast Club - 1616 Words
    I have seen the breakfast club three times before taking this class and then saw it for a fourth time during class and I must say that it is defiantly one of my favourite movies. Before this class, I loved it because it was a fun movie depicting teenage school life in its simplest form and it was more or less something I could relate to. I noticed only the funny quotes; close calls and random scenes that made me say “Ha! It’s funny because it’s true.” Such as the scene where all the characters...
    1,616 Words | 4 Pages
  • Breakfast Club - 979 Words
    This is one of my all time favorite movies, I bet I have seen it at least 50 times since I was teenager. It still reflects today, 25yrs later, the same feelings and issues teenagers feel. Time, styles, eras, your parents don’t change that. The Breakfast Club, a 1980 John Hughes teenage movie classic that shows us the feelings associated with growing up. This film could be mistaken for just another teen film, but I don’t think that is what the writer was going for. These students from different...
    979 Words | 3 Pages
  • Breakfast Club - 774 Words
    For my movie analysis assignment, I chose to watch the movie The Breakfast Club. The breakfast club, written by John Hughes in 1985, is an American teen drama film full of stereotypical gender roles. The characters in this film have all violated a rule at Shermer High School, located in Shermer, Illinois. The five students in the film all violated a rule at Shermer High resulting in a Saturday morning detention. The five students having to report for the Saturday morning detention do not share...
    774 Words | 2 Pages
  • Movie Analysis: The Breakfast Club
    Neima Prabhakar English 8 CP Period 2 5/19/05 A Misleading Exterior In the film, The Breakfast Club (1985), John Bender, the slovenly rebel at Shermer High School in Chicago, is serving a Saturday detention with four very different students. Right from the beginning, Bender exhibits the qualities of a destructive and thoughtless criminal, i.e., he taunts everyone else in order to hide his personal inadequacies. Whenever Bender is questioned by his peers about a personal issue, or...
    916 Words | 3 Pages
  • Character Comparison of the Breakfast Club
    In all of our lives there are goals we have, values we possess, and strengths and weaknesses that make us who we are. All of us, no matter if we are a jock, or a brain, someone who succeeds in education, or someone who wants so badly to get out, face barriers in our lives. Some of us come from broken families, some us of come from abusive situations, but all of us have a unique and individual story. At the heart of this story are the struggles we have experienced, the people we have associated...
    818 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging Skrzynecki/the Breakfast Club
    Changing circumstances can precipitate a change in our intimate relationships. The 1980 John Hughes film The Breakfast Club may seem like just another angst filled high school movie, which in some parts it may be, but in fact, this film is unique because of its exploration of certain ideas of belonging. For example, the idea that people, no matter how different their personalities are, will bond together when they are isolated and a mutual enemy is presented to them. The Skrzynecki poem Migrant...
    935 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cultural Analysis - 943 Words
    Comparing Perks of Being a Wallflower and Breakfast Club. In this essay, I will be comparing John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club published in 1985 with Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower of 1999. The Breakfast club aims to highlight what went on in high schools as well as the larger society at the time, by using five unique stereotypes. In the movie, there was the jock: trying to live up to his dad’s and friends’ expectations; the brain, expected to be super-smart; the princess, who...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • Grease v. The Breakfast Club: Finding Yourself
     “Grease” v. “The Breakfast Club”: Finding Yourself The films “Grease” and “The Breakfast Club” feature the same strong theme: finding your identity. This theme is universal through many books, movies and even real life. The fact that these two films were filmed so far apart, “Grease” being filmed in 1959 and directed by Randal Kleiser and “The Breakfast Club” in 1985 directed by John Hughes, shows that this is a strong theme that sticks throughout the industry. These films have many...
    1,073 Words | 3 Pages
  • Breakfast cClub analysis - 574 Words
    The Breakfast Club Analysis The movie The Breakfast Club is about a group of high school students who are forced to attend detention on a Saturday morning. All five of them have different backgrounds and from the outside, seem to have nothing in common with each other. Because they are forced to sit with each other for most of the day in the school library, they end up talking and getting to know each other pretty well. In The Breakfast Club, director John Hughes brings these five...
    574 Words | 2 Pages
  • Breakfast Club - 709 Words
    "Jock", "prep", "gangster", "loser", "geek", "criminal", " popular", are just a few labels of teenagers that are used everyday by outsiders who judge them without looking skin deep. In the matter of stereotyping, some may perceive it as being the base of an identity in the view of society. Eric Berne, an author and psychologist, wrote an article, "Can People Be Judged by Their Appearance?", where stereotyping is categorized and used as a positive view. As opposed to the film The Breakfast Club,...
    709 Words | 2 Pages
  • Comparative Essay Catcher and Breakfast Club
    The Catcher in the Rye and The Breakfast Club Various pieces of literature and entertainment exhibit similar characteristics in their writing style, themes, and portrayals. These features are in each piece to enhance the reading and viewing. The novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, and the movie The Breakfast Club directed by John Hughes, are two works that are similar in some significant aspects. Both compositions overflow with the theme of teenage rebellion, use rich vernacular,...
    1,660 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jackp - 2563 Words
    The Breakfast Club Film Data Characters/Actors Communication Courses Communication Concepts Synopsis Discussion Questions Pedagogical Perspective Film Data Year: 1985 Director: John Hughes Length: 92 minutes Rating: R Characters/Actors Andrew Clark: Emilio Estevez Richard Vernon: Paul Gleason Brian Johnson: Anthony Michael Hall Carl: John Kapelos John Bender: Judd Nelson Claire Standish: Molly Ringwald Allison Reynolds: Ally Sheedy Communication Courses...
    2,563 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Breakfast Club - 1893 Words
    Introduction Attention getting material Imagine yourself in close proximity with 4 strangers nothing like you. That’s what the characters’ in The Breakfast Club were faced with. Tie to audience For this specific setting a group of 5 eclectic students are forced into serving 9 hours of Saturday detention for whatever they had done wrong. In attendance is a “princess” (Claire Standish), an “athlete” (Andrew Clark), a “brain” (Brian Johnson), a “criminal” (John Bender) and a “basket case”...
    1,893 Words | 5 Pages
  • Review of the movie the breakfast club. Talks about main message and filmography. Contains specific examples
    The Breakfast Club Film Review The Breakfast Club is a movie made in the 80's about 5 very different teenagers who are forced to spend the day in detention. At first, they appear to be judgmental of the others but by the end they learn to respect one another because they aren't so different after all. This movie is still very applicable and popular. The movie is so well received because of the characters, the message and cinematography. The film is an exaggeration of real life. In real life,...
    895 Words | 3 Pages
  • Social Penetration - 1449 Words
    Why do some relationships progress quickly more than others? In order to understand this, relationship must be defined. According to Merriam-Webster's Dictionary, "A relationship is a type of connection existing between people that have a relation or dealing with each other." It is through the process of communication, which is the process where human beings transmit ideas, information, and attitudes to one another, that our relationships are forged. Without communication there would be no...
    1,449 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Breakfast Club and Contact Hypothesis
    Brittany Katz Individual Paper #2 Media and Theory Application Don’t You, Forget About Contact Hypothesis, Don’t Don’t Don’t Don’t What does a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess, and a criminal all have in common? Much more than just a required Saturday detention. The Breakfast Club gives viewers a first hand look at Gordon Allport’s Contact Hypothesis and it’s effect on high school students. The Contact Hypothesis is one of the best ways to improve conflict among inter and outer...
    1,524 Words | 4 Pages
  • the breakfast club claire - 263 Words
    Claire Standish is one of the teenagers spending her weekend in detention in the movie, The Breakfast Club. Claire represents the “popular” clique. Claire is known as a princess; she is spoiled and gets what she wants. Even though Claire has money, friends, and gets what she wants, she is still unhappy. Claire feels like she is misunderstood. Claire comes off as being conceded, but says that she hates being that way. Towards the end of the film, as the group open up to one another Claire...
    263 Words | 1 Page
  • The Breakfast Club Film Journal
    Yanni Thomas 4 December 2013 Professor Stanley COMM 1375-60 Mis-en-scene and Cinematography in The Breakfast Club This film written and directed by John Hughes follows five students at Shermer High School in Shermer, Illinois as they report for Saturday detention in 1984. While not complete strangers, the five are all from different cliques, there’s John Bender "The Criminal," Claire "The Princess," Brian "The Brain," Andy "The Athlete," and Allison "The Basket Case." The school's...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Breakfast Club Reaction Paper
    Escobañez, Kristine Diane P. September 19, 2013 2013 – 02321 ENG101 – CHEM From Past to Modern-Day Dilemmas A Reaction on John Hughes’ The Breakfast Club March 24, 1984. Saturday. Shermer High School, Shermer, Illinois. Forced to spend a Saturday detention in the library, five high school students with nothing in common, and each a member of different social group, met. At first they hated each other, but after telling their own stories and emotions, they became good...
    700 Words | 2 Pages