Jane Eyre Essays & Research Papers

Best Jane Eyre Essays

  • Jane Eyre - 1735 Words
    Activity worksheets LEVEL 5 PENGUIN READERS Teacher Support Programme Jane Eyre While reading Chapters 1–5 1 What happened first? Put the sentences in order and number them, 1–10. a c Jane faints and wakes up in her bed. b c John Reed throws a book at Jane. c c Mrs Reed tells Mr Brocklehurst that Jane is a bad child. d c Jane is frightened while in the red room. e c Jane says goodbye to Bessie. f c Jane reads a book full of pictures. g c Jane talks to Mr...
    1,735 Words | 7 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 7334 Words
    Jane Eyre Book Summary Orphaned as an infant, Jane Eyre lives with at Gateshead with her aunt, Sarah Reed, as the novel opens. Jane is ten years old, an outsider in the Reed family. Her female cousins, Georgiana and Eliza, tolerate, but don't love her. Their brother, John, is more blatantly hostile to Jane, reminding her that she is a poor dependent of his mother who shouldn't even be associating with the children of a gentleman. One day he is angered to find Jane reading one of his books, so...
    7,334 Words | 19 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1176 Words
    Psychological Effects of Injustice Everyone at one point or another has experienced some sort of injustice that has occurred within their lives. Injustice is defined in many different terms, but essentially it being treated unfair. One kind of injustice is abuse. In the novel Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, the main character is abused at a young age. Injustices occurred everywhere in the main character, Jane Eyre's life. Jane lived at different places throughout her life which include...
    1,176 Words | 3 Pages
  • jane eyre - 25868 Words
    undefined Jane Eyre Charlotte Brontë Cliff's Notes - Chapter Summaries & Character Analyses • Introduction • Chapter Summaries • Character Analyses • CHARLOTTE BRONTE - HER LIFE AND TIMES At the time, literary society in England was a very small world. For a complete unknown to publish a successful novel was relatively unusual. For three unknowns to manage it in a single year was unheard of. Naturally, everyone was curious about them, though normally the curiosity would have died...
    25,868 Words | 60 Pages
  • All Jane Eyre Essays

  • Jane Eyre - 419 Words
    Jane Eyre Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Brontë, is about a young woman’s life that goes through many hardships. The story takes place in three main places it begins in Gateshead, then Lowood, and ends in Thornfield during the 1840’s. The genre of the book is romance. A young woman who falls in love with the owner of the house but in her eyes it is forbidden to fall in love with him. The characters in this book are Jane Eyre, Edward Rochester, St. John Rivers, Diana Rivers, Mary Rivers,...
    419 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - 548 Words
    In Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Brontë, the main character, Jane Eyre, is a low-class feminist woman that stands up for herself and is not afraid to express her opinion in public. Throughout the novel, she receives two completely different proposals for marriage, one from Mr. Rochester and one from St. John Rivers. Mr. Rochester is a rich and intelligent man who is captures by Jane’s wit. St. John Rivers is a conservative and religious man led by the Church. John finds in Jane an incredible...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1590 Words
    Devina Chintaman Survey of British Literature II Veronica Schanoes December 13, 2012 Hidden Meanings in Jane Eyre Jane Eyre is the story of an underprivileged, orphaned girl's pursue for love. However, the plot of Jane Eyre is very obscured. Suspense plays a great role in the story. In each chapter, Jane discovers an answer to one question only to be perplexed with another mystery or dilemma. Through the use of similes, metaphors, and other literary devices, Charlotte Bronte...
    1,590 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1144 Words
    Foiled Again (Critical Writing: Literary Analysis/Research) In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Bronte’s use of foils to reveal Jane’s true character enriches the reader’s interest when reading the novel. Characters in the novel such as Georgina Reed, Blanche Ingram, Helen Burns, Bertha Mason and Mr. Rochester show a meaningful contrast to Jane’s personality. Georgina Reed and Blanche Ingram act as similar foils to Jane. Georgiana and Blanche have beautiful appearances and are spoiled while...
    1,144 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 912 Words
    Jane Eyre Love, Family, and Independence As an orphan at Gateshead, Jane is oppressed and dependent. For Jane to discover herself, she must break out of these restrictive conditions and find love and independence. Jane must have the freedom to think and feel, and she seeks out other independent-minded people as the loving family she craves. Jane, Helen Burns, and Ms. Temple enjoy a deep mutual respect, and form emotional bonds that anticipate the actual family Jane finds in Mary and Diana...
    912 Words | 3 Pages
  • JANE EYRE - 879 Words
    A. Jane Eyre is described as plain rather than beautiful. Would the plot of the novel still make sense if Jane were beautiful? How would the story be different if Jane were not poor? Why does it matter? In the novel Jane Eyre by Jane Austin, the main character Jane is continually described throughout the book as “plain” and not naturally attractive. However, her kindred and charming personality makes up for her attractiveness and ultimately wins the heart of Rochester. Time and time again...
    879 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 579 Words
    Jane Eyre Essay “The humblest individual exerts some influence, either for good or evil, upon others” said Henry Ward Beecher. Everyone has some type of influence on another, whether it is big or small, good or bad. For example, outside influences, such as other characters, can affect a characters actions and thoughts in either a positive or negative way. In the novel Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Bronte, many characters influenced Jane, but Mr. Rochester and St. John Rivers had the most...
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 17089 Words
    JANE EYRE Chapter -1 The novel opens on a dreary November afternoon at Gates head, the home of the wealthy Reed family. A young girl named Jane Eyre sits in the drawing room reading Berwick’s History of British Birds. Jane’s aunt, Mrs. Reed, has forbidden her niece to play with her cousins Eliza, Georgiana, and the bullying John. John chides Jane for being a lowly orphan who is only permitted to live with the Reeds because of his mother’s charity. John then hurls a book at the young girl,...
    17,089 Words | 42 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 2395 Words
     Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre emerges with a unique voice in the Victorian period for the work posits itself as a sentimental novel; however, it deliberately becomes unable to fulfill the genre, and then, it creates an altogether divergent novel that demonstrates its superiority by adding depth of structure in narration and character portrayal. Joan D. Peters’ essay, Finding a Voice: Towards a Woman’s Discourse of Dialogue in the Narration of Jane Eyre positions Gerard Genette’s theory of...
    2,395 Words | 6 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 565 Words
    Jane Eyre centrals around a quest to be loved. Jane (the main protagonist) searches, not just for love, but also for a sense of belonging. It also is apparent however, that Jane has a longing of being autonomous, something that is hard to retain while one is in a relationship, and it happens on many occasions that she is forced to choose between one or the other. Over the course of the book, Jane must learn how to gain love without sacrificing and harming herself in the process. Jane's fear...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 3711 Words
    REPRESENTATION OF VARIOUS WOMEN IN JANE EYRE AND THE SOCIAL POSITION OF WOMEN IN THE VICTORIAN SOCIETY Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte utilizes the Victorian convention of the orphaned heroine who is forced to find her way in the world. Two popular feminist theorists, Sandrs M. Gilbert and susan Gubar have said in their essay “The Madwoman in the Attic” that there is a trend int the literary history that places women characters into one of the two stereotypes : either the “passive angel” or the...
    3,711 Words | 9 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 2231 Words
    Critical Examination of Jane Eyre as a Bildungsroman Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte boasts a multitude of themes such as gothic, romance, fantasy, social class, religion, morality and the supernatural. However, first and foremost it is a novel of growth and development within a restricted social order. It follows the protagonist, Jane’s ‘coming of age’ story in a chronological order from Gateshead to Lowood to Thornfield and Moor House to Ferndean. At each place Jane begins a new emotional...
    2,231 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 546 Words
    In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, good weather is Bronte's tool to foreshadow positive events or moods and poor weather is the tool to set the tone for negative events or moods. This technique is exercised throughout the entire novel, alerting the readers of any up coming atmosphere. In the novel, Jane's mood was, to a degree, determined by the weather mentioned. For example, after Jane was publicly, falsely accused of being a liar by Mr. Brocklehurst, an upcoming positive event was predicted...
    546 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 332 Words
    Moral reconciliation is described when one loses their moral, but reconciles with it at the end. In the novel, Jane Eyre, the main character Jane never goes through moral reconciliation because her morals were never broken. As he reward, she returns to Rochester and marries him. Through the journey of Jane, she approaches many new places, as well as obstacle. Every event, she is asked the same question--to submit and she gives the same answer--no. For example, in the beginning of the novel...
    332 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - 1426 Words
    Reason vs. Passion in Jane Eyre Reason and passion are two emotions that are shown by most of the characters in Jane Eyre. Some people´s behaviour is governed by rationality and they think carefully about all what they do. The opposite happens with impulsive people who follow their feelings, prevailing passion to reason. Passionate people do not think before performing their actions, because of that they are considered more authentic than people who act guided by reason. However, sometimes...
    1,426 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 312 Words
    Jane Eyre — A Beautiful Soul Jane Eyre, is a poor but aspiring, small in body but huge in soul, obscure but self-respecting girl. After we close the covers of the book, after having a long journey of the spirit, Jane Eyre, a marvelous figure, has left us so much to recall and to think: We remember her goodness: for someone who lost arms and blinded in eyes, for someone who despised her for her ordinariness, and even for someone who had hurt her deeply in the past. We remember her pursuit...
    312 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - 620 Words
    Jane Eyre In what ways is Jane Eyre like or unlike a gothic novel? Gothic novels were around from 1764 until about 1820 the gothic novels were said to have started with the castle of otranto by Horace warpole in 1764. Some features that can define a gothic novel are things such as terror, mystery, the supernatural, doom, death, decay, haunted buildings, ghost's, madness, hereditary problems and so on. Jane Eyre is not a gothic novel but it seems to have elements which are like that of a...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 740 Words
    Everyone goes through life searching and questioning what really matters to them and what their own true beliefs are, it’s just the normal progression of life. In Jane Eyre, Jane is seen as searching, and questioning her own spiritual beliefs from an early age. Jane struggles to find the right balance between ideas of faith and her own principles. Jane meets Mr. Brocklehurst at a very young age and leads Jane to question everything about religion; this moment illustrates Mr. Brocklehurst...
    740 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 552 Words
    Jane Eyre is a gothic novel. A gothic novel contains an atmosphere of gloom, terror, or mystery. Jane Eyre is a gothic novel because it contains elements of gloom and horror. One element of a gothic novel is that the uncanny challenges reality, and causes the character to believe in supernatural beings. The first example of this is when Jane is at Thornfield. Jane has left to mail a letter and is returning to Thornfield when she sees something. She believes it to be a gytrash, which is a...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 890 Words
    Jane Eyre In the novel Jane Eyre written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre is a character whose consistent characteristics are significant in terms of the novel. Characteristics are a feature or quality belonging typically to a person, place, or thing and serving to identify it. Jane Eyre’s character is measured by her looks and beliefs, what she says, and how she contributes to the novel. Jane Eyre’s bland looks, beliefs, and background define who she is. Jane thinks that she is Plain looking...
    890 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 756 Words
    Literature ENG – 1100C 19 September 2014 What was Miss Temple’s influence on Jane? The story of “Jane Eyre” takes place in a period where women were repressed and restricted compared to men. This period was known as the Victorian era. Women had few options for jobs; one of the few respectable jobs to choose from was to become a governess. A governess is a woman who is employed to teach children in a private household. “Jane Eyre” is not only a novel discussing a women’s journey, but is...
    756 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1619 Words
    The novel is an art form. It allows the author to develop their social and moral opinions in a way that no other literary genre allows them to. Within the novel, the author can expand and detail their thoughts, values and beliefs through their characters. In other genres, such as poetry or short stories, authors are not allowed the time or space to develop ideas. Novels also allow the author to comment on or respond to new ideas in society. Charlotte Bronte did this with her novel Jane Eyre...
    1,619 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1075 Words
    * * Food for Thought * * In Jane Eyre, authored by Charlotte Bronte, Jane is the protagonist character who undergoes struggles and successes which are consistently accompanied by hunger and physical fulfillment. Specifically, there are two instances in which Jane is subject to a troublesome predicament and her food deprived state is described. When Jane was sent off to the boarding school in Lowood and when she abruptly leaves her position as a governess to flee from Mr....
    1,075 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 2273 Words
    Jane Eyre | By: Charlotte Bronte | Sophie Nelson November 15, 2011 Period 7 | Sophie Nelson November 14, 2011 Mrs. Vanderplas British Literature Period 7 Book Report Vocabulary: 1. Promontories-(n.) a high point of land or rock projecting into the sea or other water beyond the line of coast; a head land. (Page 1, Location 79) 2. Opprobrium- (n.) the...
    2,273 Words | 6 Pages
  • jane eyre - 732 Words
    Jessica Jones Mateo Engl 3820 Jane Eyre Essay April 23, 2013 Bront’s Family or Fiction: Did Charlotte BrontWrite about her Family in Jane Eyre? In the novel Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bront wrote about wish fulfillment. In the novel, Jane is never satisfied. She always needs more, more respect, more money, more in life. Another theme as Freud would say is that of the “Daydreaming poet.” This is where the adult dreams for more, but he would say that for females it is the longing for sexual...
    732 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 642 Words
    Max Hellerstein Ms.Adamcyzk Jane Eyre Essay Jane Eyre was by far my favorite piece of literature we’ve read in the A.P English course. It was not the typical love story at all, and finally we get to see the not over exaggerated love story come to fruition, but rather actions depict the emotions that flare more than spoken word. The story begins with an interesting, but recognizably typical story. Girl who can’t relate to most people, born in to a super religious lifestyle with the...
    642 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1581 Words
    With detailed analyis of Jane Eyre and a wider referance to Turn of the Screw compare and contrast the presentation of Gothic in both texts. Throughout Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre there is a presentation of a gothic theme. The ‘Red Room’ is Janes room of torture, because Mrs Reed banishes Jane to that room every time she’s done something wrong. The ‘Red Room,’ I feel has a gothic atmosphere because of the way it is portrayed, Bronte uses a lot of red to describe the room, hense the name...
    1,581 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 857 Words
    Female Passions. In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the characters Jane Eyre and Bertha Mason’s feministic passions are expressed in two totally different ways. As the novel progresses Bertha Mason is living life as she always dreamed, rich and wealthy, as for Jane Eyre who was struggling to live by her principles and was paying a price for them. Jane’s female passion is expressed in her idealism, independence, straight forwardness and honesty while Bertha’s passion is...
    857 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 870 Words
    Jane’s Quest for Love and Acceptance Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre, is an autobiography that focuses Jane Eyre’s past and her search in finding love and acceptance. The inception of Jane Eyre’s quest begins with her infancy and continues all throughout her adult life. She is presented with new obstacles as she ages all which test her vigorously. Her successes present themselves during her stays at Gateshead, Lowood, Thornfield, and lastly the Moor House. Jane experiences different...
    870 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 676 Words
    Jane Eyre /ˈɛər/ (originally published as Jane Eyre: An Autobiography) is a novel by English writer Charlotte Brontë. It was published on 16 October 1847 by Smith, Elder & Co. of London, England, under the pen name "Currer Bell." The first American edition was released the following year by Harper & Brothers of New York. Primarily of the bildungsroman genre, Jane Eyre follows the emotions and experiences of its eponymous character, including her growth to adulthood, and her love for Mr....
    676 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1167 Words
    FRQ: Jane Eyre In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, the protagonist Jane Eyre deals with conflicts of feeling belonged and loved in society. Interestingly, this desire comes into conflict with her tremendously unique personality. Throughout the novel several characters assisted Jane through her struggles of gaining acceptance and love, such as: Edward Rochester, St. Johns, Mrs. Reed, and Mr. Brocklehurst. As Jane deals with the hardships of her life, Charlotte Bronte manages to portray...
    1,167 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1750 Words
    It is possible to read and enjoy Wide Sargasso Sea without any knowledge of its relationship to Jane Eyre but an important dimension of the story will be missing. It is certain that Jean Rhys herself expected that her readers had a passing knowledge of Charlotte Brontë’s novel even if they didn’t know it in detail. In an interview in 1979 Jean Rhys said that, on reading Jane Eyre as a child, she resented the way in which Creole women were represented as mad and that this inspired her to present...
    1,750 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1536 Words
    Stephen Fisher Ms.Wolf English 9H 9 May 2013 Jane Eyre: An Unconventional Heroine The story of a woman who comes from the worst circumstances to grow and prosper by breaking the rules set for her is relevant in many different works of literature. Jane, the endearing heroine in Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, breaks through barriers set for women during the Victorian Era. Throughout the novel, Jane shows incredible self-respect and self-esteem, even during the worst of circumstances. After...
    1,536 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 316 Words
    After reading pages 320–353 in Writer’s Choice, complete your proposed research topic, a thesis statement, a rough outline, and a polished working copy of your Works Cited page. Proofread your work, and have someone else edit it for clarity and to eliminate errors. Then, review your composition with the checklist below to determine your strengths and weaknesses, and set a goal to improve as a writer. Research Paper Jane Eyre Topic: the views of love in the novel Thesis statement: must be...
    316 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 652 Words
    Thought Shot 3: P. 184-277 Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte Entrapment-Escape: Jane Eyre’s excursion throughout Charlotte Bronte’s novel encompasses of a sequence of exploits in which Jane is challenged with variations of entrapment followed by escape which serves as an act of overcoming. In the course of the novel, Jane finds herself imprisoned in Victorian England’s strict and complicated social hierarchy, one of Bronte’s most important themes, and her struggle against prejudice prevails...
    652 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 275 Words
    In the book Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte models the male protagonist, Edward Rochester, as a Byronic hero. A Byronic hero is an idealised, but flawed character exemplified in the life and writings of Lord Byron. Edward rochester is portrayed as a Byronic hero bases on appearance, background, and personality. Mr. Rochester can be seen as a Byronic hero from his appearance. Although Mr. Rochester is masculine, he is not handsome. When Jane Eyre first sees Mr. Rochester she thinks, “He had a dark...
    275 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - 1042 Words
    Out of the Shell: Jane Eyre’s Transformation Arguably one of Charlotte Brontë’s most interesting protagonists, Jane Eyre illustrates the paradoxically maternal and child-like role women had in the Victorian era. Despite her ornery and rebellious temperament as a child, Jane proves herself to be desirable to two very different kinds of men. Her unique characteristics appeal to both the virtuous, pious Mr. St. John as well as the hedonistic, wealthy bachelor, Mr. Rochester. Her transition from a...
    1,042 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1270 Words
    In the novel Jane Eyre, charlotte Bronte displays the different stages of maturity an individual goes through from childhood to when they become an adult. Bronte shows this idea of maturity clearly in Jane Eyre character. Jane Eyre is a dynamic character as throughout the novel she changes her decisions and ideas according to the situations she faces. Jane’s action and decision making in the novel demonstrates the growth in her maturity from a rude wilful child to an ambitious young lady and...
    1,270 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane eyre - 2567 Words
    Mersadie Tallman DezureAP Lit 21 October 2014 In the mid-nineteenth century, a woman would have carried the burden of "staying in her place." In other words, she was subject to the generally accepted standards and roles that society had placed upon her, which did not necessarily provide her with liberty, dignity or independence. Yet if Charlotte Bronte's character Jane Eyre had truly existed in that time period, she would have defied most of these cultural standards and proved herself a...
    2,567 Words | 7 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 525 Words
    Describe how the character of a literary work you have read recently has made a lasting impression on you. Of all the many exciting and admirable characters in literary works I have read, the one character that made a lasting impression on me would have to be Jane Eyre in the worldwide famous novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Jane’s admirable qualities in the thought provoking narrative in which she narrates her journey as an angry, rebellious 10 year old orphan and develops into a...
    525 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 963 Words
    Charlotte Bronte’s novel, Jane Eyre, shows an enormous amount of relevance to the Victorian era while establishing the Victorian respect for high standards of decorum and moral conduct. The main character Jane Eyre proves by the results of her moral choices that in Victorian society the idea that women who wanted to gain various rewards would need to obtain the patience to wait for these rewards to come to them to be true. Jane’s firmness to refuse the offer from Mr. Rochester to become his...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1656 Words
    Feminism in Jane Eyre Abstract: Charlotte Brontë’ masterpiece Jane Eyre symbolized a new era in the history of literature. It awakened women’s awareness to be independent. It brought about a completely new concept of marriage and of the value of life to a woman. That is marriage should base on true love, equality and respect rather than social ranks, materials or appearance. Marriage should be the combination of souls as well as bodies. The heroine of the novel Jane Eyre has successfully...
    1,656 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1057 Words
    Since its publication Jane Eyre has incited passionate debate about the values communicated” Discuss why the novel has evoked this response Charlotte Bronte communicates controversial values in Jane Eyre, which demonstrate her beliefs about women’s feelings and emotions as well as their role in society and in relationships. Bronte also shows her perspectives on values of religion and morality. These values have evoked passionate debate and controversy both in the Victorian period of the 19th...
    1,057 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 2793 Words
    3/11/13 Jane Eyre Study Guide : Summary and Analysis of Volume III, Chapters 1-6 | GradeSaver Jane Eyre Summary and Analysis by Charlotte Bronte Summary and Analysis of Volume III, C hapters 1-6 Buy PDF Buy Paperback Volume III, Chapters 1-6 Volume III, Chapter 1 Summary: After the revelation of Mr. Rochester’s previous marriage, Jane returns to her bedroom and wrestles over whether or not she should leave Thornfield. When she leaves her room, Mr. Rochester is waiting for her...
    2,793 Words | 7 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 1083 Words
     1st period November 10, 2013 Jane Eyre Characterization Jane Eyre a Victorian woman that is poor and plain. She is an average traditional governess trying to make the best out of life. While her physical appearance may seem dull and boring deep down inside Mrs. Eyre is an outspoken, confused, insecure woman. Jane was not born this way, but her experiences have caused her general identity. Experiences that make her question her moral integrity, and traditional upbringing to be a pure...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 686 Words
    Character Analysis: Jane Eyre In Charlotte Bronte’s classic, Jane Eyre, the protagonist spends the younger years of her life at Gateshead, the home of her unloving aunt and cousins. As the story progresses, Jane makes her way to Lowood, where she finds people who truly love her. Thornsfield is Jane’s next destination. At Thornsfield, she meets Mr. Rochester, whom she later falls in love with, and complications start to rise when she finds out he is married. Jane Eyre’s character is rational,...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 393 Words
    It is fair to say that the quote “Victorian reviewers were disturbed not so much by the proud Byronic sexual energy of Rochester as by the pride and passion of Jane” is in fact true as displayed by the theme of independence and social prominence in the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. It is undeniable to call Edward Rochester a Byronic hero. A Byronic hero is a character who demonstrates characteristics of a hero, yet is still flawed like a human. In chapter 27 Jane truly demonstrates her...
    393 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - 435 Words
    In “Jane Eyre”, the writer, Charlotte Bronte, wanted to convey, through Jane's desolate childhood, that loneliness is a perceptive battle. A battle which can be faced and overcome if one possesses faith and determination. A battle that continuously reappeared in Jane’s life; when she was at Gateshead, Lowood, and eventually Thornfield. Through Jane’s lonely childhood, Bronte was able to, ultimately, shape the meaning of the awe-inspiring bildungsroman, as a whole. Jane, a lonely ten years...
    435 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 646 Words
    AP English 7th Hour Approach to Jane Eyre Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë is a novel in which an orphan child, Jane, is sent away to Lowood Institute after ten dreadful years living with her adoptive family, the Reeds. Eight years later, Jane applies for a governess job at Thornfield Hall, where she falls in love with the unpleasant Mr. Rochester and discovers the alarming news that he is married, and has stowed his unstable wife in the attic! Upon finding this horrible information at the...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - 766 Words
    Plain Independence In Charlotte Bronte’s, Jane Eyre, Jane refuses to be objectified by men, and defies society’s expectations on gender roles unlike most women from the Victorian Era. Although this trait that Jane maintains through the novel can often generate controversy between her authority figures and peers, she withholds herself from accepting the typical female stereotype. Through all of her spite, Jane remembers the importance of independence for her own self satisfaction.Charlotte...
    766 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre compares to The Eyre Affiar
     Lies and Love The main protagonist from both Jane Eyre and The Eyre Affair both deal with the struggles of achieving honest love with their respective love interest due to the unusual circumstances of the relationships. For Jane, her and Rochester’s relationship is not normal in any sense of the word. For Thursday, the issues she has with Landen are much more realistic, but they sting just the same. Both Jane and Thursday have their fair share of issues with their men, but some of them are...
    1,883 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane-Bertha Link in Jane Eyre
    "Jane Eyre" is one of the most brilliant and popular novel written by Charlotte Bronte and it has successfully dealt with a number of issues that have not assumed the same poignancy in her other works of fiction. The book has handled certain very important issues such as racial discrimination, gender discrimination and others with great adroitness. Being centrally located around a woman most of the issues too, have been dealt with in context to her. To begin with, it is interesting to note...
    2,338 Words | 6 Pages
  • Jane Eyre as Cinderella in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre
    Jane Eyre as Cinderella In charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, there are several paradigms that are used throughout the story; one of the most obvious is the Cinderella template. When looking at Jane Eyre through this template, the ideas of an orphan child, the stepfamily, and the fairy godmother seem to be all the characteristics of Cinderella. Jane Eyre is the orphan child, which symbolizes Cinderella. Jane, like Cinderella lost both her parents and is dependent on others to care...
    516 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: A Fairy Tale?
    Jane Eyre: A Fairy Tale? If there’s one thing that Charlotte Bronte could not be accused of, it is writing a simple romance novel. Jane Eyre is by all accounts a novel of love, but also a novel of personal growth, of pain, of things above human comprehension, and of happiness. Bronte intimately acquaints her readers with Jane Eyre, and gets us to love Jane despite all the obstacles she has to face .In keeping with the heart of the bildungsroman novel, Bronte lets us see not just the good times...
    1,391 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: Feminist Hero
    Jane Eyre: Feminist Hero Submissive, domestic, good-tempered, quiet, agreeable and mild; these are all words that could be used to describe the ideal Victorian woman. Sexism and discrimination put up roadblocks and didn’t allow much room for educational growth for women. Education and job opportunities were limited and left most women with marriage, particularly to a wealthy man, as their best option for security. Jane Eyre broke the mold of the common Victorian woman; she was determined,...
    1,024 Words | 3 Pages
  • Love as a Theme in Jane Eyre
    Love is an important theme in the famous novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte. Jane's love for Rochester is clearly noticeable throughout the novel. But Jane's true love for Rochster becomes appearent in only a few of her actions and emotions. Although it may seem Rochester manipulated her heart's desire, this can be disproven in her actions towards him. Jane followed her heart in the end, by returning to Rochester. Jane's true love for Roshester becomes appearant during her walks with him...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Victorian Mores of Jane Eyre
    Victorian mores are the unspoken rules known and observed by society. In the eighteen-hundreds several mores were very important including justice, Christianity, high standards of honesty and morality, and women’s roles. All good people are part of a family, a Christian family and women are to serve men as they stand unequal to them. Marriage is simply a tool to gain more money and connections, and only people of the same social class are worthy of each other. Whichever social class someone is...
    1,660 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre S Childhood
    Jane Eyre’s childhood Jane Eyre’s childhood is very typical for the Victorian era, when children were to be modest, plain and virtuous. Charlotte Brontë gives Jane a very difficult and severe childhood. Jane finds herself in an unloving family of her aunt Mrs. Reed and her children. She is lacking in love, caress and care and so she becomes a very solitary and suffering child. From the very beginning of the book Jane’s emotions and feelings are reflected in a state of nature. The bad weather...
    471 Words | 2 Pages
  • Book Report of Jane Eyre
    Stella So Jane Eyre General Information Jane Eyre is an autobiography novel written by English novelist and poet Charlotte Bronte. Born on April 21, 1816, Charlotte was the eldest daughter of a Yorkshire clergyman. During Charlotte’s early life, she often published her work under a pseudonym “Currer Bell”, along with her sisters Emily and Anne. In 1847, she wrote Jane Eyre again under her pseudonym and later was revealed her identity of the author of it. On March 31, 1855, Charlotte died...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Essay - 413 Words
    Jane Eyre While reading this book, the reader may pity Jane. Charlotte Bronte creates a consistent thread until the end of the book. Jane struggles with the same problem throughout the work, which is betrayal. She deals with it a place that was supposed to be her home, school and the work place. Jane Eyre is an orphan adopted by her aunt. Jane is treated very cruel by her aunt her three children. Her aunt, Mrs. Reed, never listened to Jane. Her cousins always tormented her because they knew...
    413 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre Nature Analysis
    Throughout the classic novel, Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre progresses from a somewhat immature child to a well-rounded and mature woman. Nature plays a large role in the novel, as it symbolically portrays Jane's "education" and progression as a woman. Nature is first used in the beginning, when Jane is speaking of her loneliness in the Reed household. She toils in the idea that she is separated from the rest of the family, and that she is not allowed to be an equal. No...
    675 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre 8 - 713 Words
    Blanche Ingram: Villain? Blanche Ingram is the most important woman, other than Jane Eyre, in the novel. Arguably, she is the most important antagonist in this book. It is difficult to fathom how an absolutely horrid, conceited, venal, apathetic creature could be so vital to the book; but take her away, the motivation, conflict, and character itself crumbles. Consider this synopsis: Jane Eyre has not yet come to terms with her love with Mr. Rochester. Mr. Rochester is so infatuated...
    713 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Essay - 592 Words
    Throughout the passage, Jane Eyre is facing the internal conflict of proclaiming her love to Mr. Rochester. She is also facing the dilemma of whether or not she should let the one she loves fall for the one who is not the right match for him. From the beginning of the passage, Jane Eyre’s feelings toward Mr. Rochester can easily be recognized. She is falling in love with him and she is trying to tell herself that it is all in her mind. Jane feels the idea of this love is absurd. “I at once...
    592 Words | 2 Pages
  • Repressive Patriarchs of Jane Eyre
    “The men in the novel are all repressive patriarchs. For them, male supremacy must be absolute.” In the light of this comment, discuss Bronte’s presentation of male characters in ‘Jane Eyre’. Throughout the novel of Jane Eyre, there seems to be a common sense of patriarchal dominance, as possessed by the male characters. Bronte shows male supremacy through four key characters that Jane encounters throughout her life. Each character differs hugely, though this sense of a higher and more powerful...
    2,917 Words | 7 Pages
  • Feminism in Jane Eyre - 1408 Words
    Feminism in Jane Eyre Jay Sheldon Feminism has been a prominent and controversial topic in writings for the past two centuries. With novels such as Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, or even William Shakespeare's Macbeth the fascination over this subject by authors is evident. In Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre the main character, Jane Eyre, explores the depth at which women may act in society and finds her own boundaries in Victorian England. As well, along with the notions of feminism...
    1,408 Words | 4 Pages
  • Love in Jane Eyre - 1363 Words
    How are the ideas of love and relationship portrayed in Jane Eyre? Jane Eyre is fundamentally a novel about the conflict between love, and the artificial context of relationship, which introduces impediments and pain to what should be pure and unconstrained. It is the pain of love forbidden by the constraints of societal morality which drives Jane to leave Thornfield Hall, and it is love’s attraction which pulls her back there at the end of the novel, overcoming this barrier. The love...
    1,363 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: A Review
    Liceul Pedagogic “Mircea Scarlat”- Alexandria Profil: Filologie, Engleza-Bilingv Jane Eyre Charlotte Brontë Lucrare pentru obtinerea atestatului de competente lingvistice, Limba Engleza Coordonator: Candidat: Prof. Calota Madalina Zgîrie Adrian-Valentin...
    15,202 Words | 44 Pages
  • Gender Roles in Jane Eyre
    To varying degrees, Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre addresses the expectations of gender roles presently common in Victorian novels during the nineteenth century. Even in modern day society, the view of man tends to be aggressive, dominative, and ambitious, while women are portrayed as emotional, subservient, and sometimes passive. Bronte's depiction of the stereotypical male and female roles are accurate, but she also displays how one's gender can be altered. Jane, the novel's protagonist, is a...
    1,153 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Thematic - 1200 Words
    Jane Eyre Bronte's Jane Eyre is about love: a strong affection for or devotion to a person or persons (Webster 1070). For instance a dog will at first fall in love with you, and then it will hate you and again fall in love and live happily ever after. Love is a process and you must go through all the steps of this process in order to reach your ultimate goal of happiness. Love is something that we all must endure and desire. For some of us this can even be more of a challenge and perfection...
    1,200 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Compare and Contrast
    Engl 111 Professor Williams Essay Three Assignment First Draft due Nov 17th Final Draft due Nov 21st Write a polished four page essay in which you compare and contrast opposing symbols -- how they are used, and what they represent in Jane Eyre. Examples of opposing symbols which one could compare and contrast to their use in the novel are: society and solitude, the character of Jane and the character of Mr. Rochester, the religion of Mr. Brocklehurst and of Helen Burns, the...
    288 Words | 1 Page
  • Jane Eyre - Setting. - 1310 Words
    JANE EYRE In the novel, ‘Jane Eyre’ by Charlotte Bronte, setting is used throughout the novel to illustrate the development in the character. The novel is revolved around five separate locations, ; the Reed family's home at Gateshead, the wretched Lowood School, Rochester's manor, Thornfield, the Rivers family's home at Moor House, and Rochester's rural retreat at Ferndean, these settings all play a very important part in Jane’s life as they all represent the development of Jane’s character...
    1,310 Words | 4 Pages
  • Use of Weather in Jane Eyre
    In the novel Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, good weather is Bronte’s tool to foreshadow positive events or moods and poor weather is her instrument for setting the tone for negative events or moods. This technique is exercised throughout the entire novel, alerting the readers about the upcoming atmosphere. Jane’s mood is determined by the weather mentioned. For example, after Jane was publicly and falsely accused of being a liar by Mr. Brocklehurst, an upcoming positive event was predicted when...
    406 Words | 1 Page
  • Early Feminism in Jane Eyre
    Introduction Charlotte Bronte has long been considered as an outstanding woman literary figure in the Victorian time. Despite of the largely autobiographical content of her novels, Charlotte Bronte breaks the conventional, and ignorant in the nineteenth century. Her novel, Jane Eyre, has been translated into many languages and is always high in reading popularity. The highly acclaimed Jane Eyre best demonstrates the breakthrough: its heroine is a plain woman who possesses the characteristics of...
    5,668 Words | 14 Pages
  • Theme of Jane Eyre - 7835 Words
    Themes in Jane Eyre Passion, Dreams, and the Supernatural in Jane Eyre Introspection, half-belief in the supernatural, conflicting emotions, gushing description appear throughout Jane Eyre. Rochester's mention of prescience — both foreshadowing and premonition — come up again and again throughout the work. "I knew. . . you would do me good in some way . . . I saw it in your eyes when I first beheld you," Rochester tells Jane. Both he and she believe implicitly the things they read in...
    7,835 Words | 20 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Mystery and Suspense
    Discuss how Charlotte Bronte creates mystery and suspense in Jane Eyre. Mystery and suspense play a key part in creating an atmosphere for the reader and foreshadowing coming events. Bronte establishes an air of mystery and suspense throughout the book; from Jane Eyre and Mr Rochester’s first meeting to the reveal of Bertha. She uses many techniques to create this atmosphere, engaging the reader and crafting a very effective plot. Bronte subtly uses aptronyms to generate a mysterious feel for...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Essay - 2441 Words
    The Search of Freedom and Belonging The strength of a woman is not measured by the impact that all her hardships in life have had on her, but the strength of a woman is measured by the extent of her refusal to allow those hardships to dictate her and who she becomes. Charlotte Brontё’s Jane Eyre, follows a woman named Jane Eyre, who goes through hardships throughout her life, and uses those experiences to strengthen her and help her grow in maturity as she ages. She remains true to her morals...
    2,441 Words | 6 Pages
  • Book Card for Jane Eyre
    Book Card Title: Jane Eyre Author: Charlotte Brontë Publication Date: 1847 Plot: Jane Eyre, a young orphan at the time, is living with her uncle’s family, the Reeds at Gateshead Hall. She is neglected by her aunt, Mrs. Reed and her cousins. Soon Mrs. Reed decides to send Jane to Lowood Institution, a school for orphans. Jane is sent with the impression that she is rude and deceitful but a caring administration member named Miss Temple helps Jane clear stained reputation. When...
    1,408 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Practice Essay
    Jane Eyre Practice Essay In Jane Eyre Bronte presents a vivid image of a strong, independent young woman living in Victorian England. Discuss this statement. Throughout the novel, Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, a vivid image of a strong, independent young woman living in Victorian England is strongly portrayed. From a young age, Jane is constantly ridiculed and frowned upon at Gateshead. When at Lowood, she lives in harsh conditions under strict rules. At Thornfield and Marsh End, she...
    800 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: a Gothic Novel
    Jane Eyre, written by Charlotte Brontë, is considered by many to be a "gothic" novel. The use of "supernatural" incidents, architecture, and a desolate setting helped to decide this classification for Jane Eyre.

    Many cases exhibited the use of "supernatural" occurrences. For example, when Jane Eyre was ten years old, she was locked in a room called the "Red Room" for misbehaving. In this room, it was written that her uncle passed away there. Because of being told this, Jane Eyre...
    608 Words | 2 Pages
  • Female Oppression in Jane Eyre
    Throughout Jane Eyre Charlotte Brontë uses the character Jane as a tool to comment on the oppression that women were forced to endure at the time. Jane can be seen as representative of the women who suffered from repression during the Victorian period, a time when patriarchy was commonplace. Brontë herself was affected by the time period, because according to Wolfe, she was deprived “experience and intercourse and travel.” (70) Thus Jane offers a unique perspective as a woman who is both keenly...
    1,588 Words | 4 Pages
  • Essay Jane Eyre - 1714 Words
    Jane Eyre In chapter 12 Bronte uses pathetic fallacy to show how bored she is. An example of this is how she describes the fields around her as having a ‘dim sky-line’. This tells the reader how she is clearly finding life uninteresting and is in search for something which is out of her reach. Bronte uses colours such as grey which are plain and boring, even when she describes the sun she adds the word ‘plain’ which gives us the idea that nothing seems to grab Janes attention and interest....
    1,714 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jane Eyre, Hamlet and Keats
    To convey a sense of argument, imagery and perspective, authors use various types of language, syntax and vocabulary to achieve this. An extract from Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte, a soliloquy from Hamlet, by William Shakespeare and Ode to Autumn, by John Keats all have a number of striking similarities between them, as well as a few differences, which will be analysed to show. Unlike Hamlet and Autumn, the extract from Jane Eyre, doesn't have any particular argument, but the use of language...
    1,664 Words | 5 Pages
  • Orphan in Jane Eyre - 2704 Words
    Charlotte Brontë-Jane Eyre (1847)-Chapter 14 He had been looking two minutes at the fire, and I had been looking the same length of time at him, when, turning suddenly, he caught my gaze fastened on his physiognomy. "You examine me, Miss Eyre," said he: "do you think me handsome?" I should, if I had deliberated, have replied to this question by something conventionally vague and polite; but the answer somehow slipped from my tongue before I was aware—"No, sir." "Ah! By my word! there is...
    2,704 Words | 8 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: Feminism - 1709 Words
    Feminism: Jane Eyre Unveiled Brittney Christensen English 153 Shona Harrison November 15th, 2012 “Feminism: The advocacy of women’s rights on the grounds of political, social and economic equality to men, statuses and classes.” The novel Jane Eyre greatly depicts many forms of feminism throughout, and is an eye opener as to how much time have changed and in a sense stayed the same since the Victorian Era. The thought of being exposed to such standards and conditions at such a young...
    1,709 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Theme Analysis
    Theme Analysis: Jane Eyre The Romantic Era was defined by a newfound freedom in art, music, and life in general. Unlike the Classical Era before it, the era of Shakespeare and The Scarlett Letter, Romanticism gave birth to novels like Wuthering Heights, Dracula, and Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is the quintessential Romantic Novel. It exhibits themes of love, nature, and the ideal Romantic, otherwise known as the Byronic, Hero. Bronte uses these themes to describe...
    648 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Extended Metaphor
    Jane Eyre Caged Bird Setting: Repression ● ● ● Gateshead= She was harassed and treated unjustly by her benefactress and her family. Lowood= In the beginning she felt repressed by rules, and she was accused of something she did not do Thornfield= As, she walks down the corridor, she feels repressed by society’s customs Character Foil: human dignity -Helen Burns= she is spiritual and sees the good in most everything, but is also very passive -Blanche Ingram= a beautiful,vain, high class...
    430 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jane Eyre - Critical Evaluation
    The novel "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Brontë consists of the continuous journey through Jane's life towards her final happiness and freedom. This is effectively supported by five significant ‘physical' journeys she makes, which mirror the four emotional journeys she makes. 10-year-old Jane lives under the custody of her Aunt Reed, who hates her. Jane resents her harsh treatment by her aunt and cousins so much that she has a severe temper outburst, which results in her aunt sending her to...
    1,829 Words | 6 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Journal Entries
    Journal Entries Journal Entry #1 “I was conscious that a moment’s mutiny had already rendered me liable to strange penalties, and, like any other rebel slave, I felt resolved, in my desperation, to go all lengths.” –-- -Chapter 2, page 6 Reaction: Being really young, her sudden decision was a poor choice. Response: She’s still very young, and needs to experience more of life in order to make better decisions. Have logic and not be fooled by only emotions. Explanation:...
    1,313 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre: Imagery - 747 Words
    Jane Eyre: Imagery Jane Eyre tells the story of a woman progressing on the path towards acceptance. Throughout her journey, Jane comes across many obstacles. Male dominance proves to be the biggest obstacle at each stop of Jane's journey: Gateshead Hall, Lowood Institution, Thornfield Manor, Moor House, and Ferndean Manor. Through the progression of the story, Jane slowly learns how to understand and control her repression. I will be analyzing Janes stops at Thornfield Manor and Moor...
    747 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Chapter Summary
     Jane Eyre Summary Chapter 1: Novel begins with first person narration from the main character Jane Eyre who is a child in the scene. The scene is set at Gateshed, the home of the wealthy Reed Family who Jane (being orphaned) lives with. The scene is set on a bleak November afternoon creating an unhappy and depressing atmosphere. The audience feels pathos for Jane Eyre when we discover her aunt has forbidden her from playing with her cousins and is then conspired against and bullied...
    6,081 Words | 16 Pages
  • Jane Eyre and Feminism - 1835 Words
    Charlotte Bronte's novel Jane Eyre embraces many feminist views in opposition to the Victorian feminine ideal. Charlotte Bronte herself was among the first feminist writers of her time, and wrote this book in order to send the message of feminism to a Victorian-Age Society in which women were looked upon as inferior and repressed by the society in which they lived. This novel embodies the ideology of equality between a man and woman in marriage, as well as in society at large. As a feminist...
    1,835 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Response Paper
    Jordan Jones English 201 Professor Morimoto January 28, 2013 A Hero, Rich or Poor Most societies during the mid-nineteenth-century believe wealth and power meant self-righteousness or morality, resulting in lower-class citizens being judged as problematic and unrighteous. This idea promotes some to think that people with money and in a high social class were the most righteous and moral. In her book Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte writes to challenge the representation of heroism as wealth and...
    611 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Analytical Essay
    Jane Eyre Analytical Essay A person’s character is shaped by the people he/she has met along with the places he/she has been. While growing up it is hard to recognize how one’s moral code is shaping and forming. In the gothic novel, Jane Eyre, Charlotte Bronte writes as if she is an older, matured Jane. She reminisces on her past and the people who affected her. Each place that Jane ventures to throughout the novel accompanies people who will largely impact the type of person she...
    925 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fire motif in Jane Eyre
    In most novels a motif represents one thing, in Jane Eyre the motif of fire changes as Jane gets older, more mature and meets new people. In the beginning of the novel fire represents comfort to Jane. This changes to passion as Jane gets older and meets Mr. Rochester, When Jane is young fire represents comfort even in places she does not like or feel comfortable like Gateshead or lowood. During her time at gateshead jane was sent to the red room from time to time as punishment. Jane was very...
    1,306 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Eternal Charm of Jane Eyre
    Lee Zhuo Alice Chuang English 102: Introduction to Literature Nov.8.2012 The Eternal Charm of Jane Eyre An Interpretation of the Formation of Women’s Rebellious Spirit In the middle 19th century, Charlotte Bronte successfully creates a character with a striking personality named Jane Eyre who is born unfortunate but dares to fight fate. There are four life scenes in this novel which show the embryo, emergence, development, and climax of Jane Eyre’s rebellious spirit. In 19the century,...
    2,554 Words | 7 Pages
  • Jane Eyre Tone and Diction
    Jane Eyre The novel Jane Eyre is a story about a stoic woman who fights her entire life through many trials and tribulations until she finds true love and achieves an almost nirvana-like state of being. The manner, in which Charlotte Bronte writes, her tone and diction especially, lends its self to the many purposes of the novel. The diction of Bronte usually had characteristics of gothic culture and showed the usually negative and angry inner thoughts of Jane. The tone of the novel was there...
    968 Words | 3 Pages


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