Jamaica Kincaid Essays & Research Papers

Best Jamaica Kincaid Essays

  • Jamaica Kincaid - 357 Words
    In Jamaica Kincaid's book A Small Place, she uses strong conviction and passion for the island which she grew up on. Although, the reader may view this strong affection very offensive, Kinkaid generalizes tourists and how they abuse the use of Antiguan workers in hotels and tourism while on vacations, seems like she is trying to leave the reader understanding and empathetic. "Since you are a tourist, a North American or European - to be frank, white - and not an Antiguan black returning to...
    357 Words | 1 Page
  • Girl By Jamaica Kincaid - 331 Words
    The short story “Girl,” by Jamaica Kincaid seems to be a list of instructions given from a Mother to her daughter. These instructions are relevant to topics such as household chores, manners, cooking, social conduct, and relationships. Although they seem demanding to the reader, these instructions are a parents attempt to help a girl to grow up properly, out of care for the daughter. Throughout the story, the mother repeatedly accuses the daughter of being determined to become a “slut.” This...
    331 Words | 1 Page
  • "Girl" Jamaica Kincaid Response
    A Mother’s Words A mother’s words are the ones that ring loudest in a child’s ear, are passed down from generation to generation, and the one’s that hold a special place in a child’s memory and heart forever. Expectations and guidelines are set at a young age. Morals and values are learned throughout the years, and life lessons are taught through the wisdom passed down from a mother to a daughter. Every mother has a wish for their daughter to be the best they can be. But at what point does...
    1,306 Words | 3 Pages
  • girl by jamaica kincaid - 523 Words
    Mikayla Cooper Mr.Brand 10th Honors B block 8/12/13 “Girl” In the short story “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid the author gives a perspective of the relationship between a strict mother and her young daughter. Jamaica Kincaid wrote series of sentences that sets the tone of the story to be uptight, oppressive, and informative. The author described her daughter into becoming a ‘slut’ which tells the readers that the mother is worried and is disapproving of her daughters actions. Others might think that...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Jamaica Kincaid Essays

  • Jamaica Kincaid: Girl - 738 Words
    Reflections on Jamaica Kincaid’s Short Story, Girl Seeing a child who is ostracized for being a slut is a mother’s worst nightmare. The short story Girl, is a perfect example; insofar as, it deals with the experience of being a young female in a poor country, and a mother’s concern for her daughter’s respect. Girl mainly consists of single lined sentences of advice that the mother gives to her daughter in order to prevent her from losing respect for becoming a slut. However, in doing so...
    738 Words | 2 Pages
  • Annie John - Jamaica Kincaids
    Annie’s Search for Her True-Self Jamaica Kincaid’s, Annie John, tells the story of a young girl named Annie. In this novel, Kinkaid provides her readers with an in-depth look at a teenager girl in search of her identity. Annie grows up admiring her mother and living in an almost idyllic environment. One day, Annie’s so fascinated by the funeral of a girl she knew that she forgets to buy fish for dinner. As a result, her mother punishes her by threatens not to kiss her goodnight. Annie’s...
    972 Words | 3 Pages
  • That Girl Jamaica Kincaid
    “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid “Girl” is one long enduring sentence that is characterized as a poem by Jamaica Kincaid that brings to light the tensions between mother and daughter at a young vital age. Throughout the poem we see a list of loaded commands and a detailed blueprint from mother to daughter on the topics of household chores, how to cook, proper table and social etiquette, and relationships with men from mother to daughter, but the poem mainly depicts the dynamic of a their relationship....
    1,386 Words | 4 Pages
  • Analysis of Girl by Jamaica Kincaid
    “On Sundays try to walk like a lady and not like the slut you are so bent on becoming.” This particular line from Jamaica Kincaid’s story Girl quickly drew my attention. Most of what I had read otherwise sounded very much like what a tough mom would dictate to a young daughter. However, all of the slut references has me a little confused. I believe that most conversations between mothers and daughters is probably a little less abrasive and the content is more modern. However, the basic...
    313 Words | 1 Page
  • A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid
    The beginning of A Small Place by Jamaica Kincaid opens in second-person and talks about the tourism in a post-independent Antigua, in the British West Indies. Written in the 1980's the book is a natives view on how Antigua operates today, and how it differs from the past. The opening section keenly addresses the reader as "you" and describes how beautiful Antigua used to be. She addresses topics in the first section such as the natives of the island, and how much you will never actually...
    746 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cultural Rhythm of Jamaica Kincaid
    The Cultural Rhythm of Jamaica Kincaid Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” is about a traditional mother who is trying to teach her young daughter the traditional way of growing up to be a woman. Simmons, Diane discuses: “The story begins with the mother’s voice giving such simple, benevolent, and appropriately maternal advice” (1); And “In “Girl” the mother’s chant of information and advice enfolds and ensnares the daughter, rendering the girl nearly helpless before the mother’s transforming will” (2)....
    1,282 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jamaica Kincaid- Girl - 1090 Words
    Jamaica Kincaid- Girl The poem "Girl" by author Jamaica Kincaid shows love and family togetherness by creating microcosmic images of the way mothers raise their children in order to survive. Upon closer examination, the reader sees that the text is a string of images in Westerner Caribbean family practices. Jamaica Kincaid has taken common advice that daughters are constantly hearing from their mothers and tied them into a series of commands that a mother uses to prevent her daughter from...
    1,090 Words | 3 Pages
  • Kincaid - 951 Words
    Kincaid’s aspect of England Kincaid’s summary of England causes a conflict that is apparent through her story, however it is evident that human flaw is well capable and individuals have false generalizations. Kincaid is her own individual and with this she has a tendency of hold her own opinions. Although it may be human flaw, she uses very clever and descriptive ways to convey her hatred for England. She then uses every aspect of English culture, and displays it in her own negative way....
    951 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Short Story Analysis: "Girl" by Jamaica Kincaid
    Jamaica Kincaid, born Elaine Potter Richardson, is originally from St. John's, Antigua (Britannica). She was born in 1949 and three years later she had learned to read by attending local schools which provided a british style education (Britannica). Her father was a cabinet maker and her mother was a political activist (Britannica). By the age of sixteen, she left her home in St. John's to come to America and be an au pair in Manhattan (Garner). She however felt that being an au pair was...
    1,403 Words | 4 Pages
  • Kincaid essay - 782 Words
    Kincaid’s Viewpoint of England In Jamaica Kincaid’s essay “On Seeing England for the First Time”, Kincaid expresses her viewpoint on England’s authority over her homeland, the Caribbean island of Antigua. Kincaid has strong resentment towards England. She sees England as a dictator in her life. Through the use of emotional arguments and social appeal the author, Kincaid, gets the feeling across that she was a victim of England. At an early age she started to realize that the English had taken...
    782 Words | 0 Page
  • Kincaid Essay - 1209 Words
    Question: What is the tourism business really promoting? Kristi Leslie Professor Barry English 112 3 October 2013 Kincaid Essay “A tourist is an ugly human being”(115) Kincaid announces to her readers as she pours her anger out.. “A Small Place” by Jamaica Kincaid slams the tourism in her native country, Antigua . Through her fiery tone and strong evidence, Kincaid provides a substantial argument regarding the negative effects of tourism. Due to a tourists’ ignorance, the lacking development...
    1,209 Words | 1 Page
  • Girl- Jamiaca Kincaid - 846 Words
    Girl by Jamaica Kincaid starts off with a traditional adult female figure telling a young girl commands on how the girl should conduct responsibilities. Oftentimes, phrases are repeated by the female figure. The female figure asked the girl “is it true that you sing benna in Sunday school?” then continues to tell the girl how to act. The girl interrupts the female figure to answer the question. However, the girl’s statement is ignored and the female figure continues talking by telling the girl...
    846 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jamaica Kincaid's Lucy - 1762 Words
    Jamaica Kincaid’s Lucy Coming of age is a popular topic for many fiction novels. Jamaica Kincaid is an author that excels at her craft. She envelops you in the plot, making you feel as if you yourself are a part of the tale. Lucy portrays the life of a young woman beginning her quest for freedom. Kincaid usually focuses on the West Indian culture and Lucy is no different. As Lucy finds her way in new surroundings, she meets friends and copes with personal issues in her life. Her...
    1,762 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" - 1113 Words
    Analysis Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" is a remarkable piece that gives readers the knowledge of her childhood. In this "Girl" short story, the character gives the daughter a list of instructions on what she must do to become a woman. Kincaid's short story reveals the significance of a woman's role. Kincaid uses special techniques for readers to recognize how difficult a women's job is. The author also gives us clues through the story that she demands for equality. Jamaica techniques also gives...
    1,113 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" in social context
    Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” in Social Context Jamaica Kincaid short story "Girl" was the first fiction work, which she has written. 650 words of prose poem is a mother teaching her daughter how she should behave and to do everything that Antiguan women do. There is no introduction, no action, no character description and no composition seen, only two voices, which at the end appears to be the mother and the daughter. Antigua, was the place, were Kincaid grew up during 50’s and 60’s. When she...
    956 Words | 3 Pages
  • "On seeing england for the first time" by J. Kincaid.
    Jamaica Kincaid grew up on the dependent island of Antigua. As a result of this, she had a very biased outlook on what England meant. She wrote about how some thought highly of the country, but she had other ideas regarding England. In the opening of the passage, Kincaid uses plenty of imagery to illustrate how England was first shown to her. It was displayed in such a way that it was made out to be more beautiful than it really was. Due to the fact that Antigua was a British colony, Kincaid...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • Provoking the Inevitable Change: an Analysis on Jamaica Kincaid’s Girl
    Girl, a narrative written by Jamaica Kincaid, is a short story written in a dialogue style and stream of consciousness narration. The speaker is an authoritative female figure who teaches a girl about traditional living and the obligations of a girl to society. The narrative is basically one large sentence. Its ideas are separated by semicolons instead of the usual periods. Jamaica Kincaid’s short biography found in www.english.emory.edu by Vanessa Pupello: “Jamaica Kincaid was born in 1949 as...
    901 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reaction to Jamaica Kincaid's A Tourist is an Ugly Human Being
    According to Jamaica Kincaid a tourist is an ugly human being in a few ways. One way in which a tourist is an ugly human being is in the way in which a tourist perceives the place in which he is in. A tourist is an ugly human being due to his/her differences and also indifference to the situation going on at the place where he/she chooses to travel. Ugly in the way that they take no pity, or choose not to realize that their momentary fantasy world is an ugly truth for the natives of that...
    381 Words | 1 Page
  • Commodification of Caribbean Culture in Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place
    K. L. Johnson II 25 September 2014 Commodification of Caribbean Culture in Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place “If you go to Antigua as a tourist, this is what you will see. If you come by aeroplane, you will land at the V. C. Bird International Airport. Vere Cornwall (V.C.) Bird is the Prime Minister of Antigua. You may be the sort of tourist who would wonder why a Prime Minister would want an airport named after him – why not a school, why not a hospital, why not some great public monument?”...
    3,653 Words | 9 Pages
  • Jamaica Kincaid’s Main Female Protagonists, Their Personalities and Relationships in Novels Lucy and Annie John
    Jamaica Kincaid’s Main Female Protagonists, Their Personalities and Relationships in Novels Lucy and Annie John Every person’s character is created and formed in background the person grows up in, and is influenced by everything that surrounds him or her, like friends, teachers, television and other media, and of course, family. And if our person is a female, the strongest influence always comes from her mother and their relationship, and this is clearly visible in Jamaica Kincaid’s novels,...
    2,296 Words | 6 Pages
  • A small place - 1065 Words
    Danielle Bryant Mark Neumann Communications 101 4 November 2001 “In a small place people cultivate small events,” states author Jamaica Kincaid in her novel A Small Place. The book illustrates a landscape in which she lives thus detailing who she is as explained by Jose Ortega y Gasset. Born and raised in the twelve-mile long, nine-mile wide country of Antigua Kincaid has struggled with her small place her entire life as she narrates the paradise that many visit and the prison in which...
    1,065 Words | 3 Pages
  • je pense doc je suis
    Jamaica Kincaid's Lucy chronicles the life of the protagonist, Lucy, over her first year in America as an au pair. The author herself came to America as an au pair. Kincaid originally published the novel as installments in the New Yorker; the novel is arranged into five episodic chapters. Lucy narrates her story by interspersing flashbacks, dreams, and internal dialogue. The product is a nonlinear narrative that flows smoothly between past and present because of the strength of Lucy's voice and...
    691 Words | 2 Pages
  • Place Small - 518 Words
    In Jamaica Kincaid’s “A Small Place”, she expresses her life in a world that is made to be an escape for pleasure for tourists who visit Antigua. In this memoir, the author illustrates a conflicted sense of life and identity on the island of Antigua. To tourists, it is a place of paradise, a sense of unreality, like the island is a stage that is set theatrically. It is a symbolically charged environment that creates a fictional world. It seems too good to be true. Consequently, Kincaid’s...
    518 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mother and Daughter Relationship in "Lucy"
    Mother-Daughter Relationships in “Lucy” Relationships are a prominent and frequent theme throughout many of Jamaica Kincaid's novels. One example of this can be seen in “Annie John,” which deals with relationships the protagonist has throughout her childhood, particularly, the relationship between mother and daughter. This paper however will explore the mother-daughter relationship that can be found in “Lucy” and how it affects the protagonist’s relationships with the people around her....
    1,886 Words | 6 Pages
  • Tourism in Kincaid's Antigua - 717 Words
    Tourism in Kincaid’s Antigua Born an Antiguan, Jamaica Kincaid writes of her native country in A Small Place, and that of the nation’s foreign influences. In particular, she is highly critical of the purpose of tourists and of the effects tourism has had on the country, condemning both. Kincaid appears to write to highlight her concerns in a bid to struggle against the consequences of tourism, and by association colonialism. However, it appears that ultimately, Kincaid is resigned to the fact...
    717 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rhetorical Analysis Jane Welty
    The Oppression of Antigua Jamaica Kincaid grew up in a world where everything she owned wasn’t hers. While she may have physically owned it, mentally she did not. As her world of Antigua was being eaten alive by England, Kincaids family loved every bit of it. In the essay, On Seeing England for the First Time, Jamaica Kincaid uses several literary elements to explore her negative feelings towards England and England’s influence in Antigua. Three of the main elements used in the essay are...
    640 Words | 2 Pages
  • Selections from Annie John
    Selections from Annie John Jamaica Kincaid The passage entitled “Selections from Annie John” was written by Jamaica Kincaid. In this extract it tells of the life of a young girl and her relationship with her mother. It begins with her stating clearly how being with her mother was an important part of her life. This was followed by narrating the things they did together. She would help her admirable mother to cook and clean. She then goes into detail of what and how things were done in...
    812 Words | 2 Pages
  • Annie John: Relationship between Mother and Daughter
    Annie John Annie John is an autobiography written by Jamaica Kincaid. In the Autobiography, Jamaica Kincaid plays Annie John, and her mother's name is also Annie John. The Background of this novel is about the activity in the society of children on a small island named Antigua. Annie John is separated continuously from her mother throughout the story, due to her increasing rebellion, resulting in Annie moving to England to be free, just as the African Americans were emancipated from...
    945 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Response to " Annie John" - 1110 Words
    Adolescent Psychology Response Paper to Annie John Response Paper for Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid Annie John was, in my opinion, as poignant and universal a book dealing with adolescence as I have ever come across. The fact that it was the story of an adolescent girl, and that it took place in Antigua, in a vastly different racial, social, and economic climate than in which I personally grew up in, did nothing to lessen my ability to relate to the universal themes of...
    1,110 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tourism and Colonization in Antigua - 2313 Words
    Tourism and Colonization in Antigua Visiting someplace new is an exciting and stimulating event. There are new places to see, people to meet, things to eat, and memories to be made. However, the typical tourist rarely takes into consideration the type of people that inhabit their selected destination from day to day. These people are often poor and never will have the opportunity to visit far-away places like the tourists who have come to experience their home have. The visitor seldom...
    2,313 Words | 6 Pages
  • Annie John - 994 Words
    In Bernard Rodgers’ criticism of Jamaica Kincaid’s novel, Annie John, he points out the relationship Annie had with her mother growing up. He mentions how in the beginning, Annie loved being with her mother and doing things with her like taking baths, shopping, cooking, and just following her around and observing the things she did all day (Rodgers). Also, Rodgers reveals the change that took place in the relationship between Annie and her mother when she became an adolescent, around the...
    994 Words | 3 Pages
  • Dave Eggers Short Story
    Dave Eggers short story, “Accident,” describes the scene of an accident between the narrator and a car full of three teenagers. Eggers chose to tell his story in the second person persepection so the reader can fully understand the emotions. The narrator seems lonely to purposely hit the teenager’s car. The narrator states, “You pulled in to an intersection, obstructing them, and their car hit yours. They have every right to be upset, or livid, or even violence-contemplating.” I like this short...
    496 Words | 2 Pages
  • On Seeing England for the First Time
    This material may be prOb0~ !x copyright law. (Title 17, US Code) JAMAICA KINCAID JAMAICA KINCAID 365 On Seeing England for the First Time of the most sinister sides of imperialism is the way it pfomotes the ruling nation S culture and rejects the colony ‘s. The effect of this on an impressionable young person is vividly a2xribed in Jamaica Kincaid’s sensitive and angry autobiographical essay about growing up in Antigua with the dark shadow of England continually looming over her...
    5,453 Words | 14 Pages
  • Lima Essay on Lucy - 882 Words
    Outline, Summary, and Discussion Questions for Maria Helena Lima’s “Imaginary Homelands in Jamaica Kincaid’s Narratives of Development” Outline: Section 1: Writing to rescue her life—It seems as though writer Jamaica Kincaid has written a number of novels in an effort to understand her past and her growth and development throughout it. Almost all of the novels Kincaid has written seem to be interconnected in that they all shed light on certain struggles of her past...
    882 Words | 3 Pages
  • Girl and Woman - 9501 Words
    Document Type: Critical essay, Interview Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2001 Gale Group, COPYRIGHT 2007 Gale, Cengage Learning Full Text: [(interview date 1 January 1996) In the following interview, Kreilkamp provides an overview of Kincaid's life and literary career upon the publication of The Autobiography of My Mother, and Kincaid comments on her relationship with the New Yorker, publishing, and gardening.] A teenage girl in the mid-1960s abandons her home on Antigua, a tiny...
    9,501 Words | 29 Pages
  • Anne John - 2874 Words
    Annie John by Jamaica Kincaid, 1985, Penguin Books Type of work · Novel Genre · bildungsroman, Caribbean novel Language · English Time and place written · New York City, 1982–1983 Narrator · Annie John Point of View · First person Tone · It varies according to the age of Annie John. As a child, the language and imagery is very rich. As she ages, the tone grows more serious while also having more comic touches. Tense · Past tense Setting (time) · Sometime in the 1950s...
    2,874 Words | 9 Pages
  • Colonialsm and the Darjeeling Limited - 1215 Words
    When traveling to a country different from his own, an individual may be intrigued and astounded by the sights, smells and the people he discovers. This all plays a part in the experience the tourist comes out for and pays for. The individual plans and books this visit to enjoy his stay at the exotic land. By doing so, the individual can take a break from the life he left back in his hometown and use this opportunity to escape its harsh realities. However, what they don't realize is that they...
    1,215 Words | 3 Pages
  • Girl by Jamacia Kinkaid - 394 Words
    This short Girl written by Jamaica Kincaid can be considered a dialogue. Through class discussions we are aware that Jamaica was born in Antigua, singing Benna is an example of that.Most of her stories were written based on the relationship with her mother. This short essay focuses on the theme and style of writing in this short story. We are introduced directly to where a mother is giving necessary but basic instructions to a girl, presumably her daughter on how to act. The style the author...
    394 Words | 1 Page
  • Annie John - 1421 Words
    Dreams play a major role in deciphering subconscious psychological issues, such as fears, desires, and anxieties in Annie John. Dreams "have been interpreted as expressions of infantile desires or considered elaborations of the problems of waking hours". In Jamaica Kincaid’s Annie John, Annie’s dreams become a significant element in the way she views herself and the world around her. Annie comments about her dreams: "I had been taught by my mother to take my dreams seriously. My dreams were not...
    1,421 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Coming of Age - 1249 Words
    The Coming of Age Childhood is a time where children learn about the world around themselves. They see and experience many factors that influence their everyday lives, which help them grow stronger when they become adults. In “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid and “The Lesson” by Toni Cade Bambara the characters within the stories learn valuable lesson with help them grow to become better individuals. In “The Lesson” the character of Sugar undergoes a...
    1,249 Words | 3 Pages
  • Annie John. A Journey of Self-Realization
    ENGL 103, Section Q Paul Garcia Instructor: John Labella pagarci2@illinois.edu A Journey of Self-Realization Somewhere in the Caribbean, the narrator tells a story which describes her psychological changeover and talks about relationships of mother-daughter, racism, and education. ‘Annie John’ is an emotive...
    886 Words | 3 Pages
  • On Seeing England For The First Time
    1999 ENGLISH LANGUAGE Question 2 (Suggested time—40 minutes. This question counts one-third of the total essay section score.) The passage below (on this page and on the following page) is from the opening of an essay, "On Seeing England for the First Time," by Jamaica Kincaid. Kincaid grew up on the Caribbean island of Antigua before it became independent from England in 1981. Read the entire passage carefully. Then write an essay analyzing the rhetorical strategies Kincaid employs to...
    1,279 Words | 3 Pages
  • Annie John - 1 - 565 Words
    Many novelist of the time have wrote their books based on the story of their life, where they lived and the effects it caused. Within the novel, Annie John, author, Jamaica Kincaid's use of the character of Annie John to reflect a young girl's development in the Caribbean society in the late 1950's. Kincaid's self reliance provides a basic foundation for the character of Annie John portrayed as Kincaid and her struggle to find individuality in a male privileged century. Annie seeks capability to...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Huge Unsolved Problem - 718 Words
    A SMALL PLACE: A HUGE UNSOLVED PROBLEM In A Small Place, Jamaica Kincaid brings us into the realm of Antigua- a small country in the British West Indies, having its hard time dealing with reality after being ruled by European for a very long time. From a native's perspective, Kincaid shows us the hatred Antiguans feel for white people since the colonization is based on racism and envy for their life conditions. The huge difference between natives and tourists is the main reason why...
    718 Words | 2 Pages
  • On Seeing England for the First Time
    Jensen 1 Kincaid's "On Seeing England for the First Time" In this essay titled, On Seeing England for the First Time Jamaica Kincaid subtly argues that England's vain dominating presence, produced from the common admiration for England, played a negative role in her life. Kincaid develops this claim of England by battling the reality of England versus her childhood idea of England. Since this is the beginning of her work not only is the purpose to entice the reader but to also inform...
    544 Words | 4 Pages
  • No Pain No Gain
    No Pain, No Gain Families everywhere deal with great challenges. With each obstacle they face generally the outcome will make each individual a little bit stronger. With these experiences our perspective in life changes and we become more knowledgeable. “Girl” and “Tiger Mending” are two stories that I believe reflect this in two very different ways. Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” is a story about reflection. It is about a girl reflecting back upon the past. Maybe she just lost her mother or...
    1,276 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Small Place Essay Response
    sMorgan Serughetti Ms. Briggs Foundations 1 4-20-15 A Small Place Essay Response In the book A Small Place Jamaica Kincaid uses powerful diction and specific imagery to empower the identities and culture of the native people living on Antigua. Due to the British colonists and tourists visiting their island she uses her sarcastic voice to convey that she and her fellow Antiguans are angry and have been oppressed, because the British are eliminating the native culture. With the great diction...
    634 Words | 2 Pages
  • Being a Women - 911 Words
    Women nowadays are not worried about society, women tend to behave more liberal and find happiness in self dependency. Women do not care how the world will criticized her daughter because both men and women sees each other equal. However, A while back, being a women was the toughest job.Women were just typical housewives who had to take care of her family and sometimes they had to self-sacrifice because she worries how the society will view her. In “The Girl,” the writer Jamaica Kincaid shows...
    911 Words | 2 Pages
  • Girl - 305 Words
    In the story Girl by Jamaica Kincaid the mother does most of the talking who gives her daughter a long list of instructions and warnings. The daughter responds twice but they happen to go unnoticed by the mother. There is no introduction of the characters, no action, and no description of setting. The mother's voice simply begins speaking, "Wash the white clothes on Monday," and continues through to the end. The mother dispenses much practical and helpful advice that will help her daughter...
    305 Words | 1 Page
  • My Brother - 2401 Words
     Exoticism, Extirpation, Ambivalence, and Identity: Flora in Kincaid’s “My Brother” Jamaica Kincaid’s “My Brother” is a mini-epic about disjointed family, loss of identity and absolution, all of which are represented quite distinctly in the story through setting—more specifically, by the plant life in the story. Symbolism, I feel, should not be part of a universal lexicon; artistically superior symbols are only tied to specific works (while less talented authors use symbols from the...
    2,401 Words | 7 Pages
  • Lucy: Mother-Daughter Relationship
    The mother-daughter relationship is a common topic throughout many of Jamaica Kincaid's novels. It is particularly prominent in Annie John, Lucy, and Autobiography of my Mother. This essay however will explore the mother-daughter relationship in Lucy. Lucy tells the story of a young woman who escapes a West Indian island to North America to work as an au pair for Mariah and Lewis, a young couple, and their four girls. As in her other books—especially Annie John—Kincaid uses the mother-daughter...
    1,470 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Lady with the Pet Dog
    The Lady with the Pet Dog The same story two different points of view “The Lady with the Pet Dog” initially written by Anton Chekhov (1860-1904) and later on written by Joyce Carol Oats (B. 1938). The story of two lovers, seen by a man with a Romanticism style, and 100 years later written by a woman in the post modern time. This pieces show is how different can be a story when is told in a different gender on a different time frame. The first difference in this story is about the authors....
    629 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Small Place Essay - 413 Words
    In this passage, Jamaica Kincaid articulates upon how foreign power vastly altered the lives of Antiguans, by affirming that they have been ripped away from their families and homeland. Kincaid uses word choice which exhibits her frustration toward the Antiguans, who cheers at “some frumpy, wrinkled-up person passing by in a carriage waving at the crowd.” Kincaid juxtaposes Antiguans to orphans to further relate her feelings about the people of Antigua. To create a harsh tone consisting tragedy...
    413 Words | 2 Pages
  • Lucy - 833 Words
    The Life of a Promiscuous Girl The level of promiscuity described throughout the Jamaica Kincaid’s novel, Lucy, defines Lucy’s experience as an immigrant living in the United States. Full of anger and resentment towards her mother and various other people at home, Lucy uses her sexuality to explore outlets in which to express herself. Upon her arrival to the United States, Lucy befriends a woman named, Peggy, who is not of the best reputation in her host family eyes. From there, Peggy...
    833 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mother Daughter Relationships - 1109 Words
    MOTHER-DAUGHTER RELATIONSHIPS In my opinion a woman is never complete until the birth of her first child. The moment she holds her baby for the first time, she thinks of all the things she’ll teach the baby. Many mothers dream of having a baby girl, to share the secrets of “woman-hood”. A mother-daughter relationship is a special bond between mother and daughter; their bonding can start at a very early age. As children we idolized our mothers and that’s the way it’s always been,...
    1,109 Words | 3 Pages
  • “Hills like White Elephants” and “Girl” Themes and Symbolism
    “Hills like White Elephants” and “Girl” Themes and Symbolism The themes and symbolism for the stories “Hills like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway and “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid work with the structure of said stories to create an understanding of a girl’s sexuality and how others attempt controlling it by providing symbols that uncover the truth that lies behind the words. In, “Hills like White Elephants”, the American man consistently and angrily persuades his girlfriend to have the...
    1,068 Words | 3 Pages
  • Th Real Meaning of Girl
    Professor Cynthia Villegas English 1022 3 July 2013 Understanding the real ‘Girl’ Do stories need characters? Characters are essential in stories. They can be either a protagonist or antagonist. Characters are fictional and created from the author’s imagination, yet the characters may be influenced from real life experiences of the author himself/herself or other people. In her book “Girl”, Jamaica Kincaid made this fact abundantly clear. Jamaica Kincaid’s biography shows that the...
    440 Words | 2 Pages
  • Annie John - 1110 Words
    Annie John: A Bildungsroman? Jamaica Kincaid’s story Annie John is often thought of as a “postcolonial coming-of-age novel.” To understand this, it must first be known what both terms, postcolonial and coming-of-age novel, mean. Postcolonial refers to the period of time after the establishment of independence in a colony. European countries, including England, France, Spain, Portugal, and the Netherlands, colonized other nations in order to benefit from things like resources or geographical...
    1,110 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Mother's Advice - 702 Words
    Girl by Jamaica Kincaid: A Mother’s Advice Girl, a short story by Jamaica Kincaid based on her thoughts from a woman’s words to her as she remembers. Words that in her younger years she just listens and hears but as she grew older , came out to be wise words from a mother that has experienced life. These wise words gave her a realization that her mother is giving her advices in the hope of her becoming a responsible and decent woman that everybody sees and gives her warnings so she could be...
    702 Words | 2 Pages
  • Docs - 473 Words
    Expansion of ideas - No Pains, No Gains No Pains, No Gains We cannot achieve real success in any field without great efffors and plenty of sacrifice. No pain, no gains is very true in case of education. Those who aspire to reach the top of the academic ladder must work very hard. Scholars are not born scholars but made with hard work and perseverance. What a student needs the most is concentration and perseverance. We must always imbibe into us the three D's - Devotion, Dedication and...
    473 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Compare Kincaid's "Girl" and Olsen's "I Stand Here Ironing"
    Why compare Tillie Olsen’s “I Stand Here Ironing” and Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” Daughter and mother relationship is an endless topic for many writers. They meant to share the bond of love and care for each other. Nevertheless, in the real world their relationship is not as successful as it ought to be. The stories “Girl” and “I Stand Here Ironing” are examples of this conflict. The author of the short story “Girl” Jamaica Kincaid was born and raised up to the age of seventeen in Antigua, a former...
    1,347 Words | 4 Pages
  • “W I Have Been Doing Lately” Essay
    The short story “What I Have Been Doing Lately” by Jamaica Kincaid, is told from within the dream of a young girl. She encounters many conflicts throughout her dream stemming from personal problems. The story is written in a circular structure that continues without resolution since her troubles are never resolved. The story makes use of small, choppy sentences which help the reader follow the quick, fast-paced actions happening during the dream. The non-traditional circular structure helps show...
    695 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Mother's Purpose - 1138 Words
    A Mother’s Purpose In Jamaica Kincaid’s story “Girl” we are given a dialogue of a mother and her daughter. The dialogue consists of the mother giving her daughter instructions on how she is to behave and carry herself. She wants her daughter to become a lady, not a slut, and learn to be a good housewife for her future husband. The mother instructs her daughter on how she is to walk, talk, and sing at church on Sundays the proper way. She does this in order to prevent her daughter from being...
    1,138 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ms Galluzzo s Essay
    Darrien Carvajal Ms. Galluzzo Period 6 October 10, 2014 In order to achieve success in life, a good education lays a strong foundation. Getting a good education is not, however, easy for everyone. In the two works Marita’s Bargain by Malcolm Gladwell and A Walk to the Jetty by Jamaica Kincaid, two girls make a huge personal sacrifice for an education to ensure their chances of success. Marita had to make many sacrifices to attend her new school and she’s expected to go a great length with...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reread "Girl" - 900 Words
    Girl, written by Jamaica Kincaid, is a short story about the relationship between a mother and daughter. Actually, it reflects the true living background in Kincaid’s time by listing a series of imperative sentences, which show how the mother had a certain life style on how she wanted her daughter to live up. In this story, the setting and tone and characters interlace and work together to create an intense description of the daily conversation between the mother and daughter, and...
    900 Words | 3 Pages
  • Girl - 1262 Words
    Patsy Vernon Prof. Graves Eng. 102 A-19 21 January 2013 RR 54 Jamaica Kincaid’s short story “Girl” is of a complicated relationship with her mother that comes out in the mother-daughter dynamic in the story. The mother, obviously a dominant figure in the young girl’s upbringing, informs the young girl of various duties associated with being a young, dignified lady. Her mother gives the daughter advice to make her the "proper" woman she should in fact be, and this advice gets more and more...
    1,262 Words | 3 Pages
  • Boys: American Novelists and Motherly Speaker Figure
    And today in the wide world of Literature, well maybe just short stories, we will be going over Rick Moody's "Boys" and Jamaica Kincaid's "Girl" and discerning the way in which Moody chose to make his story very quick paced to the reader and in a way difficult to read, but with a purpose. Also how that affects the way the reader may read, perceive, or understand the story in a different way. And comparing how the similar writing style of Kincaid compares to Moody's use. In "Boys" we are...
    318 Words | 1 Page
  • Negotiating Hall's Caribbean Identity in Kincaid's Annie John
    Negotiating Hall's Caribbean Identity in Kincaid's Annie John In his article "Negotiating Caribbean Identities," Stuart Hall attempts to relay to the reader the complications associated with assigning a single cultural identity to the Caribbean people. Even though the article is intended by the author to represent the Caribbean people as a splicing of a number of different cultures, the processes Hall highlights are noticeable on an individual scale in the main character of Jamaica...
    3,208 Words | 8 Pages
  • Jaimaica Kincaid's "Girl" - 692 Words
    Jamaica Kincaid’s “Girl” The short story “Girl” is about a mother who shows her deep concern, compassion, sympathy, disdain, and fear for her daughter’s future and utilizes her own personal life experiences to help prepare and advise her daughter of what inevitable challenges in life are to be expected. The obvious translation of Jamaica Kincaid’s story “Girl” is that a mother is offering her knowledge and practical advice to her daughter on how to present herself in the Antiguan culture...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Leg of Mutton - 492 Words
    A Leg of Mutton Antigua became independent from England in 1981, but before that, every aspect of Jamaica Kincaid’s life was affected by England. The way she ate, what she studied, what she wore, how her family acted all were influenced by the historical incident during this time period… she absolutely hated it. To display her negative feelings of defeat and betrayal she used rhetorical strategy in her essay, such as intense figurative language, sarcastic syntax, and development of...
    492 Words | 2 Pages
  • Girl - 556 Words
    Many females can relate to “Girl” by Jamaica Kincaid, not only through childhood experiences but also through society’s view on women today. The mother may seem strict and overbearing but has reason to do so due to her fear of her daughter becoming a slut. With the theme as fear of the community’s judgment, her mother not only gives her advice on how to be a proper woman, but also ways to maintain a proper household and how to behave around other people. With experience of being a mother,...
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • A small place - 961 Words
    Critical Book Review on “A Small Place” A Small Place is written by a woman named Jamaica Kincaid. She’s considered by some as being the most important Westen Indian woman writer. In this book, Jamaica gives the reader a tourism journey into her native Antigua, to argue that the reason her people so heavily rely on western culture and economics influence in their everyday life is because of the colonial past Antigua has faced. The first key theme I see in A Small Place is, Thief. Jamaica...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Smallplace - 706 Words
    Rough Draft Attending the University of Georgia is a dream for many students. After several months, the city of Athens, Georgia becomes a new home for thousands of new incoming freshman. For me, I take great honor in saying that I live in the Classic City. Recently, there has been an increase in the number of “campus tour” busses and tour groups around campus, looking and observing the area and its inhabitants. I remember just last year when I took campus tours to help guide my decision of...
    706 Words | 2 Pages
  • Domination of Women - 1378 Words
    Our history takes us back to when women where taken advantage of and had no mind of their own. These manipulative actions have been taken on by the domination of the women by their spouses, their family, as well the way they where raised as young girls as in the story “Girl” these are just some of the sources of domination. A young girl is being manipulated as she is raised to be what her mother tells her to be. Her mother continuously over talks the girl as if she has no mind of her own. Don't...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • Short Story "Girl" - 985 Words
    If you look back 200 years, women enjoyed few of the legal, social, or political rights that are now taken for granted. They could not vote, could not sue or be sued, could not testify in court, had extremely limited control over personal property after marriage, were rarely granted legal custody of their children in cases of divorce, and were not allowed to go to institutions of higher education. Women were expected to remain subservient to their fathers and husbands. Their occupational...
    985 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rhetoric and England - 635 Words
    England, lying gently on a map, seemed like a jewel to Jamaica Kincaid. By using rhetorical strategies and figurative language throughout her essay, she explains why and how she is overcome by England's greatness. With Kincaid's choice of details, figurative language, and creation of tone, she conveys an attitude of awe toward England. Kincaid uses repetition in many instances throughout her essay. In particular, lines 38-73 demonstrate a perfect example of the rhetorical strategy. She...
    635 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Small Place Response - 1140 Words
    Ciarra Leocadio ENGL 102W 1/14/15 Response Paper The Queen is Dead Jamaica Kincaid’s critical novel, A Small Place, highlights the adverse effects of imperialism on her birthplace Antigua. Antigua became a sovereign state in 1981. However according to Kincaid, its yield to its colonizer, England, has yet to cease. Kincaid provides clear evidence of the natives’ high regard for everything that is English through national celebrations of the Queen’s birthday and royal visits, the education...
    1,140 Words | 4 Pages
  • Highlighting the Issue of Neo-Colonialism through Media and Literature
    The Effects of Neo-Colonialism as presented in Motorcycle Diaries and A Small Place Neo-Colonialism is a very powerful and controversial issue in the world today. Countries such as the United States, Great Brittan and France still greatly profit over the countries they left as independent years ago. This paradox is created by the mother country exerting economic and political influence on the former colonies; allowing them to still profit from these third world countries without actually...
    1,421 Words | 4 Pages
  • Characterization Through Deviation of Plot: the Evolution of the Main Characters in "Girl" and "Lust"
    Plot is an element of fiction that if narrated well, can shape a character and intrigue a reader. Susan Minot and Jamaica Kincaid demonstrate in their respective short stories, "Lust" and "Girl" that this component is not necessarily required in order to create a character. Moreover, in these two cases the creation of the main character is stronger through the abstinence of this feature. Through explication of the text, we can see how the overpowering strength of the characters makes up for...
    774 Words | 3 Pages