Infection Essays & Research Papers

Best Infection Essays

  • Infection - 2687 Words
    INFECTION An infection is the colonization of a hostorganism by parasitespecies. Infecting parasites seek to use the host's resources to reproduce, often resulting in disease. Colloquially, infections are usually considered to be caused by microscopic organisms or microparasites like viruses, prions, bacteria, and viroids, though larger organisms like macroparasites and fungi can also infect. Hosts normally fight infections themselves via their immune system. Mammalian hosts react to...
    2,687 Words | 9 Pages
  • Preventing Infection - 2535 Words
    Preventing Infection INFECTION The invasion or colonization of the body by pathogenic microorganisms The presence of a particular type of microorganism in a part of a body where it is not normally found and may lead to a disease Microorganism A small (micro) living plant or animal that cannot be seen without the aid of a microscope A microbe Contributions TYPES of Microorganism Bacteria Fungi Protozoa Algae Viruses Multicellular Animal Parasites BACTERIA Very small, simple,...
    2,535 Words | 11 Pages
  • infection control - 633 Words
    Infection Prevention and Control Kathleen E. Haertel, Analysis of Nursing Research / Nur 518 April1, 2012 Mrs. Susan Steele- Moses Abstract Florence Nightingale was the first person to initiate the concept of infection prevention and control in Healthcare. Although she had no understanding about the science of asepsis, the research she did on the sanitary problems of the hospitals made her an unyielding advocate of pure water, pure air, cleanliness, efficient system of...
    633 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nosocomial Infections - 343 Words
    Nosocomial Infections (NI) can arise from an inanimate object or substance, other patients, medical personnel, visitors, air, water, even the health care process itself. Also, the use of reusable equipment/supplies, invasive devices or techniques (catheters, valves, etc.). Patients in a hospital setting are also exposed to more drug resistant strains of microbes; as in this setting the microbes are selected at a higher rate than outside the hospital due to antibiotic usage in the hospital. NI...
    343 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Infection Essays

  • Infection Control - 578 Words
    Infection Control Policy and Procedures Policy: Always wash your hands: * After using the toilet * After changing a diaper — wash the diaper-wearer's hands, too * After touching animals or animal waste * Before and after preparing food, especially before and immediately after handling raw meat, poultry or fish * Before eating * After blowing your nose * After coughing or sneezing into your hands * Before and after treating wounds or cuts *...
    578 Words | 3 Pages
  • Infection Control - 1774 Words
    Causes and Spread of infection Q 1.1 - Identify the differences between: bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. * Bacteria are unicellular, prokaryotic microorganism found almost in all kinds of habits. Some bacteria are beneficial like those involved in nitrogen fixation and some pathogenic, which cause diseases. * Viruses are unicellular, tiny organisms which is mostly composed of DNA (DeoxyriboNucleic Acid) and protein. Its...
    1,774 Words | 9 Pages
  • Infection Control - 2955 Words
    Infection Control What causes people to get sick? How is disease spread from one person to another person? What can be done to stop the spread of infection and disease? As a health care worker, it is important to know the answers to these questions. When you understand what causes infection, you can learn how to prevent it. Infection control is a set of practices and procedures that will help to prevent the transmission of disease within a health care facility. Infectious and Communicable...
    2,955 Words | 10 Pages
  • Infection Control - 336 Words
    1. Define the following words Antiseptics- is a substance, which inhibits the growth and development of microorganisms Asepsis- is the absence of infectious agents that may produce disease Autoclave- An appliance used to sterilize medical instruments or other objects with steam under pressure. Bacteria- are tiny, one-celled forms of life that cause many diseases and infections. Bactericidal- An agent that destroys bacteria Bacteriostatic- Preventing bacteria from growing and multiplying...
    336 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chains of Infections - 2102 Words
    Lesson 1: Introduction to Epidemiology Section 10: Chain of Infection As described above, the traditional epidemiologic triad model holds that infectious diseases result from the interaction of agent, host, and environment. More specifically, transmission occurs when the agent leaves its reservoir or host through a portal of exit, is conveyed by some mode of transmission, and enters through an appropriate portal of entry to infect a susceptible host. This sequence is sometimes called the...
    2,102 Words | 7 Pages
  • Infection Model - 768 Words
    Modeling the Spread of an Epidemic | By developing a computer model of the spread of an infectious disease, the student develops an understanding of the role of the infection rate and the removal rate on the spread of the disease. The Threshold Theorem of Epidemiology claims that the extent of spread of an epidemic can be predicted if three values are known: initial number of susceptible people (S(0)), the infection rate (K), and the removal rate (by quarantine or cure) (Q). The extent of...
    768 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ear Infections - 557 Words
    Ear Infections Have you ever had a painful infection in your ear that is stops you dead in your tracks? I am going to inform you about ear infections. An ear infection is an infection of the middle ear. Healthcare providers call this otitis media. You may wonder why I choose to inform you about this today but I am a victim of several serious ear infections, which I will later inform you about. Ear infections are inflammation of the middle ear. This inflammation often begins when infections...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chain of Infection - 802 Words
    December 10, 2010 Microbiology Chain of Infection Link 1: The Organism (10 pts) Scientific name: Infectious mononucleosis Common name of disease: mono; also, the kissing disease Characteristics: [bacteria/virus/parasite, toxins, anaerobe/aerobe, etc] Mononucleosis is a lymphatic system disease, usually caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) (first cultured by Michael Epstein and Yvonne Barr). A similar condition is often caused by...
    802 Words | 4 Pages
  • Infection and Children - 328 Words
    CORE MARKETING STRATEGY The main focus of UNICEF in Pakistan is on the following issues of children. They focus on the rights of every child globally which include; I. Child survival and development II. Basic education and gender inequality III. HIV/AIDS and Children IV. Child Protection V. Policy advocacy and Partnerships VI. Gives children the best start in life VII. Helps children survive and thrive VIII. Gets kids into school IX. Creates a...
    328 Words | 1 Page
  • infection control - 434 Words
    UNIT 22 INFECTION CONTROL OUTCOME 1 UNDERSTAND THE CAUSES OF INFECTION 1.1 Bacteria are one celled micro-organisms that get their nutrients fro their environment to live eg: The human body. Bacteria causes infections and can reproduce either inside or outside the body. Viruses are pieces of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein. Viruses need to be inside living cells to grow and reproduce. They do not survive long unless they are inside a living thing eg:...
    434 Words | 2 Pages
  • Understand causes of infection and its transmission
    Infection Control Understand causes of infection and its transmission The cause of infection is by germs that surround us. These are bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. These infectious germs are spread from person to person by transmission. There are three types of transmission; droplet, airbourne and contact. Droplet transmission is when an infectious individual coughs or sneezes spreading their germs into the air that can land on surfaces or people...
    977 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sexually Transmitted Infections - 1973 Words
     Sexually Transmitted Infections Unit 9 Assignment 1 A&PII ITT Tech - Breckinridge School of Nursing Ashley Wigglesworth Genital herpes is a viral infection that causes lesions or sores in the genital area and is spread through sexual intercourse or by touching a sore and then touching another part of your body; it is a highly contagious virus. Often it does not present with symptoms, or produces very mild symptoms such that the infected individual is unaware they have it. When symptoms are...
    1,973 Words | 6 Pages
  • Causes and Spread of Infection Cu254
    Causes and Spread of Infection 1.1/1.2 | Features | Illnesses Caused | Bacteria | Can be helpful, can be an aid in digestion, able to break down sewage, can be used in food (yoghurt), affects odour, taste and texture. Needs nutrients, pH, time, temperature, +/- Oxygen and water activity to grow. | Lyme disease, Tuberculosis | Viruses | Exist only to replicate, need a host, infect all types of cells, found in soil, water and air. | Hepatitis A, Norovirus, Measles, Mumps | Parasites |...
    1,029 Words | 4 Pages
  • Prevention and Control of Infection - 1046 Words
    Section Two: Task 2 Understanding Systems and Procedures 3.1 Describe procedures and systems relevant to the prevention and control of infection Standard Operation Procedures (S.O.Ps) At unit E, BMI, Standard Operation Procedures (S.O.P’s) can be found in each room, it covers the health and safety policy along with other legislations and regulatory body standards in accordance to the prevention and control of infection. These policies include instructions of how to carry out ‘safe’ manual...
    1,046 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dengue Virus Infection - 331 Words
    Dengue Virus Infection I. What is the name of the disease? What is the name of the pathogen that causes this disease? A. Dengue fever 1. Four related viruses 2. DENV 1, DENV 2, DENV 3 or DENV 4 B. Dengue Virus Infection II. What are some characteristics of the pathogen? How is the pathogen grown in the lab? A. Single stranded RNA virus 1.Positive strand virus of the family Flaviviridae 2. Virus enveloped with a lipid membrane. B. Replication grown in...
    331 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ic02 Causes and Spread of Infection
    IC02 Causes and spread of infection The difference between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are: Viruses are coated genetic material that invade cells and use the cell's apparatus for reproduction. Bacteria are single celled organisms. Some classify them as a separate (fourth) kingdom on the tree of life. Fungi are multi-celled organisms that form a third Kingdom of life, along with the plant kingdom and the animal kingdom. Parasites are plants or animals that derive benefit...
    882 Words | 3 Pages
  • causes and spread of infection - 1329 Words
    ICO2 Causes and spread of infection 1.1 Identify the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites Viruses - With the exception of newly discovered prions, viruses are the smallest agents of infectious disease. Most viruses are exceedingly small (about 20 - 200 nanometers in diameter) and essentially round in shape. They consist of little more than a small piece of genetic material surrounded by a thin protein coating. Some viruses are also surrounded by a thin, fatty envelope....
    1,329 Words | 4 Pages
  • Impetigo: Infection and New Ointment
    Impetigo Being a member of a sports team, it is common that you hear about skin conditions like Impetigo. The bacterial infectious disease is very common in contact sports such as football and wrestling. Because I have seen cases of Impetigo and know many people that have had it, I wanted to learn more about the different aspects of the disease. One of the people that I knew that had it was my cousin Chris, who I got to interview and gain some more insight from. Impetigo is a highly...
    1,811 Words | 6 Pages
  • Infection Control and Environmental Safety
    Leaflet on Infection Control & Environmental Safety Infection Control Here are a list of routes by which infections can enter the body: Mouth Ears Nose Breakages on the skin Eyes If you were to go to your work place with symptoms of a virus then it's quite likely that you've got an infection. By even approaching other individuals within your workplace you are putting them at risk of infection. You are passing the infection on. However if you haven't got any...
    575 Words | 2 Pages
  • Infection Control in the Workplace - 1732 Words
    Infection Control in the Workplace Every health care worker plays a vital part in helping to minimise the risk of cross infection – for example, by making certain that hands are properly washed, the clinical environment is as clean as possible, ensuring knowledge and skills are continually updated and by educating patients and visitors. Standard precautions (formerly known as universal precautions) underpin routine safe practice, protecting both staff and our residents from infection. By...
    1,732 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Principles of infection and prevention and control
    The Principles of infection and prevention and control Employee’s rights and responsibilities in the relation to the prevention and control of infection are to follow company policies and procedures; keep themselves safe and others, report any hazards which could lead to infection, attend relevant courses, use the PPE provided, keeping the work environment clean and tidy and to maintain good personal hygiene Employers responsibilities in the relation to the prevention and control of...
    3,291 Words | 12 Pages
  • Causes and Spread of Infection - 1172 Words
    Unit 4222 - 265 Causes and spread of infection Outcome 1 - Understand the causes of infection 1 - Identify the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites Bacteria - Bacteria are organisms made up of just 1 cell. They are capable of multiplying by themselves, as they have the power to divide. Bacteria exist everywhere, inside and on our bodies. Most of them are completely harmless and some of them are very useful. But some bacteria can cause diseases, either because...
    1,172 Words | 5 Pages
  • causes and spread of infection - 406 Words
     Causes and spread of infection. 1. Understand the causes of infection. 1.1 You need to understand the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites; this also covers cell structure and growth pathogens. 1.2 Common illnesses and infections include bacteria for example tuberculosis, MRSA, tetanus, gangrene, Legionnaires ‘disease, salmonella and conjunctivitis. Viruses like winter vomiting disease, measles, mumps, chickenpox, HIV, Hepatitis B,...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Principles of Infection Prevention and Control
    The principles of infection prevention and control Understand roles and responsibilities in the prevention and control of infections Outcome 1 1. The employees’ roles and responsibilities in relation to the prevention and control of infection differ between roles of whether you’re a health support worker, social worker and social care assistants, you all have roles and responsibilities you need to follow. You all need to be aware of and report change in the health conditions of the...
    3,139 Words | 12 Pages
  • Infection control- hand washing
    Write an account: Based on safe infection control techniques using ADPIE (Assessment, Diagnosis, Planning, Implementation, Evaluation) These will be written up to demonstrate the links between practice and the supporting theory. Direct observation (2): Infection control. Assessment Hand washing is extremely important in clinical areas, as it reduces the risk of infections. Infections are caused by organisms which invade the host's defence mechanisms. Effective hand washing can reduce the...
    698 Words | 3 Pages
  • cause and spread of infection control
     Unit ICO2 Causes and spread of infection Assessment Criteria Outcome 1 Understand the causes of infection The learner can: 1. Identify the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites? Bacteria : Bacteria are one cell structures that multiply rapidly and can become a colony of 2 million within 2 hours. Viruses : Visible can only be seen with an electron microscope they can float in the air, sit on a door handle or remain non-living. They become active when they are...
    727 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Are Infections Spread
    How Are Infections Spread? Alicia Todd University of Mobile How Are Infections Spread? According to Lynch, Elmore and Morgan (2012), millions of people die each year from infectious diseases such as influenza, malaria, tuberculosis, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (p. 245). Everything we eat, breathe, or touch throughout the day puts us at risk for developing an infection. Knowing how infections are spread will decrease these risks and is crucial for overall health. No matter how hard...
    353 Words | 2 Pages
  • Infection and Protective Personal Equipment
    Along with learning in class about infection control, we were able to watch a movie that would help us better understand. In the movie Outbreak infection control is used to show positive and negative outcomes. Standard precautions are used to provide someone with precautions and awareness to prevent the spread of diseases and infections. For example washing your hands when needed. Examples are being soiled and a after coughing and sneezing. The process of washing your hangs is known to be...
    413 Words | 1 Page
  • The Causes and Spread of Infections - 1362 Words
    UNIT 4222-265 The causes and spread of infection Outcome 1: understand the causes of infection Bacteria are a very small, self-sufficient, one-celled organism that thrives in a variety of environments. However, many bacteria thrive in the mild 98.6 health body environment, some of these environmentally content bacteria in your body are actually good for you; its only 1% that isn’t. Some examples of the sicknesses that bacteria cause are; * Impetigo * Meningitis *...
    1,362 Words | 5 Pages
  • Causes and Spread of Infection - 3876 Words
    ESSEX HEALTH PROTECTION UNIT Part of the INFECTION CONTROL GUIDELINES CARE HOMES Issued January 2004 Revised April 2006 and December 2007 2 ESSEX HEALTH PROTECTION UNIT INFECTION CONTROL GUIDELINES FOR CARE HOMES SECTION B – INFECTION, ITS CAUSES AND SPREAD 1. The Causes of Infection An understanding of commonly encountered mi cro-organisms is essential for good infection control practice. Micro-organism s that cause disease are referred to as pathogenic organisms....
    3,876 Words | 25 Pages
  • Causes and Spread of Infection - 259 Words
    Cases And Spread of Infections 1.1 Identify the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. The difference between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites are: Viruses are coated genetic material that invade cells and use the cell's apparatus for reproduction. 1.2 Identify common illness and infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. Bacteria Food poisoning, Bubonic plague, Bacterial meningitis, Cholera, Diphtheria, Rheumatic fever, Scarlet...
    259 Words | 2 Pages
  • Causes And Spread Of Infection Unit 265
    Unit 265 – Causes and Spread of Infection 1. Identify the differences between bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Bacteria is something that we need some of, it needs a warmth, moisture, time and food in order to multiply, which in the right conditions they multiply quickly. Viruses need a living host in order to survive, they don’t respond to antibiotics and new strains of virus are developing all the time. Fungi are moulds and yeasts, they need a warm and damp environment to survive,...
    648 Words | 4 Pages
  • How Does Infection Enter the Body?
    How does infection enter the body? Infection control is about controlling the spread of communicable diseases between people. Some of the individuals we support will be particularly vulnerable to infection and this means you need to be extra vigilant! In order to spread infection, there needs to be a source, a host, a means of transmission and a point of entry. The source could be a person or the surroundings; the host is the person at risk. Transmission could be through contact with another...
    421 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ways to Prevent Infection after Surgery
    Usually when a person has a problem with any part of his body, the first line of treatment is always conservative in nature. This generally includes the use of antibiotics and, in some cases, resorting to certain exercises or a change in diet. In some cases however, these measures do not work, and hence the only option left happens to be a surgery. While surgery as a treatment option is relatively beneficial, the chances of infection after surgery, i.e., post-surgical infection, cannot be...
    842 Words | 2 Pages
  • Infection: Infectious Disease and Health Protection Agency
     SECTION ONE INTRODUCTION AND NOTIFICATION 1. INTRODUCTION AND NOTIFICATION 1.0 INTRODUCTION The guidance is divided into sections as follows: Section 1 Introduces infection control and explains notification; Section 2 deals with general infection control procedures; Section 3 gives guidance on the management of outbreaks; Section 4 describes specific infectious diseases; Section 5 contact numbers and sources of...
    1,875 Words | 11 Pages
  • Infection Control Nvq 3 Unit 0.20
    1.1 and 1.2 Bacteria - are micro-organisms that consist of only one cell. Bacteria multiply by splitting themselves in two, which is called a binary fission. Because of this they can increase in number rapidly. The majority are harmless, but some can be pathogenic which results in bacterial infection occuring. Bacterial infections can be treated by using antibiotics. Bacteria can evolve a resistance to antibiotic e.g. MRSA. Some diseases caused by bacteria include tuberculosis, pneumonia,...
    1,465 Words | 5 Pages
  • Outline Procedures for Infection Control in Own Work Setting
    Outline procedures for infection control in your own work setting At Gap Club to reduce the risk of infections we: 1. Provide protective clothing and equipment for staff in accordance with company procedures. 2. Have daily, weekly and monthly routine sterilising processes in place. 3. Outside contract cleaners clean premises daily. 4. If an outbreak does occur then a deep clean is completed in the appropriate area/s by Gap staff and contract cleaners. It is a fact that children will...
    413 Words | 2 Pages
  • Unit 20 Causes and Spread of Infection Hsc3045 Health and Social Care Level 3 Diploma
    Unit 20 Causes and Spread of Infection 1.1 See worksheet. 1.2 Identify common illnesses and infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. Bacteria - sore throat, tuberculosis, bubonic plague, whooping cough, anthrax.Viruses – flu, AIDS, HIV, hepatitis b, common cold, Fungi – thrush, ringworm, anthrax, madurella mycetoma, athlete's foot. Parasites – worms, malaria, sleeping sickness, river blindness, elephantiasis, katamaya fever, body / head lice, amoebiasis. 1.3...
    438 Words | 2 Pages
  • Citrus Diseases - 298 Words
    Citrus Diseases Citrus Canker Citrus canker is a highly contagious bacterial infection of citrus trees causing yellow halo-like lesions or scabs on the fruit, leaves and twigs of citrus trees. Severe infections can cause leaf loss, blemished fruit, fruit drop and die back. The canker bacterium spreads easily and quickly on air currents, insects, birds and on humans by means of clothing and infected implements. There are a variety of sprays designed to protect against infection including...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • Measles Virus - 701 Words
    Measles Virus In the 1800's the measles was a very dangerous disease, and when people who come in contact with it will die, if they have never been exposed to the virus before. The measles is transmitted through the air. The way that the virus is transmitted is that infected droplets are released by coughing, sneezing, and by talking. When the infected droplets that contain the measles are in the air, they are taken into the body through the mouth, nose and eyes of the potential person...
    701 Words | 2 Pages
  • Food Borne Illness - 406 Words
    Food Borne Illnesses Allan Gonzalez Sci 163 July 16, 2013 Gwendolyn Moore Food Borne Illnesses Food poisoning or food borne illnesses are cause by bad food hygiene. Bacteria, parasites, pathogens, and viruses are all developed in food that is not cared for, properly handled before being cooked, and stored properly when not cooked can lead to infections and illness. Bacteria are the most common cause for a food borne illness, which take about 12-72 hours for the bacteria to multiply and...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • Viral Diseases - 295 Words
    What causes viral diseases? Viral infections occur when a virus enters the body and invades the inside of the body’s cells in order to reproduce. If the body’s immune system is unable to fight off the virus, it multiplies and spreads to other cells, repeating the process and leading to a widespread infection. Signs & Symptoms of rabies One of the most distinctive signs of a rabies infection is a tingling or twitching sensation around the area of the animal bite. In people, symptoms of rabies...
    295 Words | 2 Pages
  • Diseases was a big killer in World War 2
    Diseases was a big killer in World War 1 because of the little medicine and medical knowledge. The Anzacs would have experienced many diseases such as influenza, typhoid, trench foot and trench fever. Trench foot is a disease which makes your foot turn blue or red and makes your foot very numb. It often involves blisters and open sores which allows fungal infections to enter. If the foot is untreated it can result into gangrene. Trench foot is caused by exposure to damp and wet conditions. In...
    396 Words | 2 Pages
  • Everything on Bursitis - 612 Words
    Bursitis Bursitis is a disorder that causes pain in the body's joints. It most commonly affects the shoulder and hip joints. It is caused by an inflammation of the bursa, small fluid-filled bags that act as lubricating surfaces for muscles to move over bones. This inflammation usually results from overactivity of an arm or leg. What is bursitis? Bursitis is inflammation of a bursa. A bursa (the plural form is bursae) is a tiny fluid-filled sac that functions as a gliding surface to reduce...
    612 Words | 3 Pages
  • Diseases of WWI - 869 Words
    All though many wars are known for deaths due to harsh fighting, World War I was known for many reasons for soldier’s deaths. It was very hard for soldier’s to get the type of medical care and technology that we have today, and difficult to be cured. In this case, during World War I diseases were very common and were spread thoroughly. Fighting in the WWI meant being high at risk of death. Soldiers were constantly doing life threatening duties. Deaths numbers were so intense that “after a...
    869 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1920s medicine - 306 Words
     The 1920s had many discoveries and innovations when it comes to medicine and science. Many of the things that we now take for granted were just getting their start during the 20s. Throughout the 1920s, new innovations in the medical and science field led to the discovery of vitamins and knowing more than ever before about the human body. New vital drugs and vaccines were created in this era that are hard to imagine not having today. The invention/discovery of the first anti-bacterial drugs...
    306 Words | 1 Page
  • What Is Ebola - 490 Words
    What is Ebola? 1. Simply, the Ebola virus is an aggressive pathogen that causes a highly lethal fever syndrome in humans and nonhuman primates. Ebola was discovered in 1976, originally. Five Ebola species have been identified as time has progressed. Ebola was named for a small river near Maridi, Sudan. Since the emergence of filo viruses in 1967, there have been over 1000 cases of Ebola or Marburg, with more than 50% of the patients dying within days on the onset of acute symptoms. It is...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Common Ailments/Defects of School Children
    COMMON AILMENTS/DEFECTS OF SCHOOL CHILDREN DENTAL CARIES * Dental caries is an infectious, communicable disease, which causes destruction of teeth by acid-forming bacteria found in dental plaque. * Early childhood caries (ECC) is a “virulent” form of dental caries that can destroy the teeth of preschool children and toddlers. Early childhood caries can also be defined as the occurrence of any sign of dental caries on any tooth surface during the first 3 years of a child’s life....
    4,643 Words | 15 Pages
  • Acacia Confusa as an Alternative Antibacterial Agent Against Staphylococcus Species Using in Vitro Method.
    CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION One of the most common infections that we can easily get was skin infections caused by bacteria, specifically Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. These two Staphylococcus species can found worldwide, they are a small component of soil microbial flora. We have different treatments for skin infections, but in those treatments only few people can afford it. Because most of them are expensive for ordinary people who are...
    634 Words | 3 Pages
  • Infectious Bronchitis (Chickens) - 902 Words
    The Infectious Bronchitis Virus, commonly known as IB, is an extremely contagious virus which is transmitted through aerosols, contaminated feed and water and contact with animals or material (Spc, Inc) IB infects chickens through the respiratory tract, kidney, gut and reproductive system (Encyclopedia of Life, 2013). Infectious Bronchitis can only infect chickens and is largely responsible for significant financial loss within the poultry industry (Encyclopedia of Life, 2013). By examining this...
    902 Words | 3 Pages
  • Parvovirus and Its Treatment - 394 Words
    Parvovirus Parvovirus is a viral disease that is most common in canines. The strains will infect dogs, wolves, and foxes, but only some will infect cats. Although strains of parvovirus are not transferrable to humans, other strains have been reported in humans. Fifth disease is a mild rash illness that occurs most commonly in children. The ill child typically has a "slapped-cheek" rash on the face and a lacy red rash on the body and limbs. Occasionally, the rash may itch. An ill child may...
    394 Words | 2 Pages
  • Penicillin: A Wonder Drug
    Wonder Drug Most people know that Penicillin is an extremely important drug, but few know just how important and influential it really is. Think about what life would be like today without it. What would be of contemporary medicine today? Would society as a whole succumb to these relentless infinitesimal organisms? What would have been of one’s ancestors if they too like so many before and after incurred a serious infection? This essay shall explore these questions and many like it. It will...
    1,064 Words | 4 Pages
  • nvq level 2 - 337 Words
    IC02 Question 3 Infection is caused by bad bacteria which does not belong there Colonisation is when it inhabits a specific body part but no signs and symptons of infection they only cause infection if they move from one part of the body to another or person to person. Question 4 A localised infections is an infections that is limited to a specific body part or region. A systemic infection is the opposit. That's when the patogen is distributed throughtout the whole body....
    337 Words | 2 Pages
  • Investigating an Outbreak of Meningitis - 360 Words
    1. Describe an additional laboratory test that could be used to confirm the diagnosis of one of the patients who is not infected with meningitis. Blood and urine tests can determine certain diseases within the patients who are not affected with meningitis. Your kidneys will excrete bacteria if present in the body and your blood will show the presence of the disease. 2. Anthony still insists that he needs an antibiotic to treat his viral infection. Explain to him why an antibiotic will not...
    360 Words | 2 Pages
  • szt 1 task 3
     SZT 1 - Task 3 Name here WGU SZT 1 January 19, 2014 SZT 1 - Task 3 Rubeola Rubeola, or measles, is a communicable disease that is highly contagious and easily spread from person to person through close physical contact or direct contact with infected bodily secretions. “Measles is caused by a virus in the paramyxovirus family” ("Measles," 2013). Paramyxoviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses that infect respiratory cells. If an infected individual coughs or...
    1,164 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ebola Virus Disease - 520 Words
    Ebola virus disease (EVD; also Ebola hemorrhagic fever, or EHF), or simply Ebola, is a disease of humans and other primates caused by ebolaviruses. Signs and symptoms typically start between two days and three weeks after contracting the virus as a fever, sore throat, muscle pain, and headaches. Then, vomiting, diarrhea and rash usually follow, along with decreased function of the liver and kidneys. At this time some people begin to bleed both internally and externally.[1] The disease has a...
    520 Words | 2 Pages
  • Prevent the Spread of Disease by Washing Your Hands
    Topic: Prevent the spread of disease by washing your hands Purpose: To persuade my audience that proper hygiene and hand washing can reduce the risk of contracting infectious diseases. Introduction Hand washing is a simple habit, something most people do without thinking. Yet hand washing, when done properly, is one of the best ways to avoid getting sick. The purpose of my speech is to show how hand washing is an easy way to prevent infection. I will begin with the dangers of not...
    279 Words | 1 Page
  • Literature review Fish Disease
    Literature review An in-depth view into fish disease Kimberley 12/1/2010   Contents 1 Introduction 3 1.1 What is Fish Disease 3 2 Viral diseases present 3 2.1 Freshwater species only 3 2.1.1 Herpesvirus salmonis 3 2.1.2 Channel catfish virus 4 2.1.3 Epithelioma papillosum 4 2.1.4 Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis 5 2.1.5 Koi Herpes virus 5 2.1.6 Spring Viraemia of Carp and Swim Bladder Infection Virus 6 2.2 Both Freshwater and Marine species 6 2.2.1 Viral...
    2,748 Words | 8 Pages
  • Imci-Chn Notes - 1217 Words
    Community-Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (CIMCI) For WHOM? Community Children: ❑ One week to 2 months ❑ Age 2 months to 5 years Main Concerns: • Cough or Difficult Breathing (ARI) • Diarrhea • Malaria • Measles • Ear Infections • Malnutrition • Breastfeeding • Preventive Activities: Vaccinations & Vitamin A Algorithm: Check for Danger Signs Assess Main Symptoms Assess Immunization, Nutrition and feeding...
    1,217 Words | 11 Pages
  • Negligence Case - 373 Words
    NEGLIGENCE CASE Kathy Pagan vs. Dr. Rouchdi Rifai On June 4, 2009, 40 year old Kathy Pagan underwent an abdominoplasty and liposuction of the abdominal flap, at Dr. Rouchdi Rifai’s office in Jackson, MI. She experiences problems from the surgery right from the start. She had “dark-colored drainage, clots, and painful burning sensations and continued to report issues, according to her complaint, first filed in 2011.” She went to Dr. Rifai office where he cleaned the wound area without...
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • Chicken Pox - 406 Words
    Everybody knows what the chicken pox are, they are when you get bumps all over your body. The cause of the chicken pox is the virus varicella. Males and females are both able to get the virus, but children ages five to six are the most likely to be infected.Like I said chicken pox is caused by the virus varicella. Chicken pox is very contagious and unless you got it at birth one attack carries lifelong immunity. The chain infection is only present if a group of people come in...
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  • Tularemia - 368 Words
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  • Rheumatic Fever: Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment
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  • Cypw Level 2 - 675 Words
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  • Hand, Foot & Mouth Disease
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  • Research Into the Effects of Stress on the Immune System
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  • Ebola Assignment - 426 Words
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  • kkkkkkkkkkkkkkk - 299 Words
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  • Epidemiology COH 13 public health
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  • Prevention Is Better Than Cure
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  • Certified nursing assistant - 1784 Words
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  • This is a paper all about ringworms. It's very informative and it's just a basic paper.
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  • Stevens Johnson Syndrome - 1272 Words
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  • Yaws - 533 Words
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  • Elephantitis - 629 Words
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  • willowbrooke experiments - 1125 Words
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  • Herpes Zoster Ncp - 372 Words
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  • Pediatric Nursing Study Guide -- Covering Communicable Diseases/ Blood Disorders/Childhood Cancers/Integumentary
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  • Safeguarding Children and Young People
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  • Essay on Antibiotic Use in America
    Antibiotics use is as popular as ever with American people today. Every day over 190 million doses of antibiotics are administered in hospitals and more than 133 million antibiotic prescriptions are written out to non-hospitalized patients every year (4). These staggering numbers have made many skeptics question the effectiveness of these antibiotics and the frequency in which doctors prescribe them. Antibiotics are not a one stop cure for all illnesses. In fact, antibiotics are only...
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  • Mononucleosis - 1702 Words
    Infectious Mononucleosis and Community Health Nursing Infectious mononucleosis (IM), or "mono," is a communicable disease that is most commonly caused by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). EBV is one of the most common human viruses found all over the world, and most people will become infected with it at some point in their lives (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2014a). However, not all people infected with EBV will develop IM. By understanding the epidemiologic triangle of IM...
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  • Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia F
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  • Rheumatoid Arthritis - 437 Words
    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that sauses chronic inflammation of the joints. Rhematiod arthritis can also cause inflammation of the tissue around the joints, as well as other organs in the body. Autoimmune diseases are illnesses which occur when the body tissues are mjistakenly attacked by its own immune system. The immune system is a complex organization of cells and antibodies designed normally to "seek and destroy" invaders of the body, particularly infections. Patients...
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  • AP Euro DBQ essay
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  • Antibiotics Debate - 398 Words
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  • Sample Forensic Speech Outline
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  • Case Study - 1459 Words
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    1,459 Words | 5 Pages
  • Strep Throat - 923 Words
    Strep Throat Strep Throat Catherine Dickinson-Maney Strep Throat This paper will discuss the communicable disease, strep throat and the efforts to control it. It will identify the environmental factors related to the disease and explain lifestyle influences, socioeconomic status, and the management of the disease. Any gaps in available resources for strep throat and how to meet the needs of the gaps with recommendations on expanding community programs will also be...
    923 Words | 3 Pages
  • What Is Vibrio Vulnificus?
    CDC What is Vibrio vulnificus? Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium in the same family as those that cause cholera. It normally lives in warm seawater and is part of a group of vibrios that are called "halophilic" because they require salt. Top of Page What type of illness does V. vulnificus cause? V. vulnificus can cause disease in those who eat contaminated seafood or have an open wound that is exposed to seawater. Among healthy people, ingestion of V. vulnificus can cause vomiting,...
    2,404 Words | 8 Pages
  • Contagion - 2282 Words
    Contagion A. STORYLINE Soon after her return from a business trip to Hong Kong, Beth Emhoff dies from what is a flu or some other type of infection. Her young son dies later the same day. Her husband Mitch however seems immune. Thus begins the spread of a deadly infection. For doctors and administrators at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, several days pass before anyone realizes the extent or gravity of this new infection. They must first identify the type of virus in question...
    2,282 Words | 8 Pages
  • Catalase Lab - 363 Words
    Cintya G. Alarcon Donna Biology 121 section WDF Lab Report # 1 1.On the graph paper in Figure 3, plot a graph of your experimental results. Choose an appropriate number scale for the Y-axis and label it Number of Infections. Choose an appropriate number scale for the X-axis label it Number of Exchanges. 2. In a few sentences, summarize the results of the experiment. In your summary, include data from your summary chart and graph. Statements of results should include only facts—no...
    363 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hantavirus - 374 Words
    Disease is common throughout the world and can spread at a fast rate. It is spread very often by animals other than humans and is often spread through person to person or animal to person contact. The small deer mouse can infect a human with a disease named the Hantavirus from the family Bunyaviridae. Hantavirus is a deadly disease that has shocking causes, dangerous effects and also has preventions and treatments. The causes of Hantavirus are shocking. Hantavirus starts when a contaminated...
    374 Words | 1 Page
  • Pros and Cons of Tattoos - 610 Words
    Pros and cons of tattoos There are a lot of different opinions when it comes to the subject of tattoos, but with the way times have changed there is a lot more people getting them for many different reasons. I feel that if you have your own reasons and thoughts into what you really want to get imprinted on your skin then there is nothing wrong with that. I think it is actually very meaningful. Pro: Self-Expression Marking and altering the body is the ultimate form of self-expression...
    610 Words | 2 Pages
  • 4223-007 - 344 Words
    4:3 Describe the process of carrying out a risk assessment The important issues are whether a known or potential risk is likely to occur, if it will be significant should it occur, and whether the organization is adequately prepared to handle it so that the negative effects are eliminated or minimized. When we have any new admission on the ward, the first thing we find out from the staff handing over to us is if the patients are infectious. So I’ll say the processes of carrying out a risk...
    344 Words | 1 Page
  • penicillin - 295 Words
    1) Penicillin has saved about 200 million lives, meaning that if penicillin wasn’t around, some of you may not be alive. penicillin was discovered by accident by a man called Alexander fleming in 1928, it is therefore known as the wonder drug or the miracle drug. If penicillin wasn’t around, we would be dying of simple things such as colds, flu etc. penicillin also helps build the immune system. 2) Penicillin being the first... started the antibiotic revolution. It was also able to save 95% of...
    295 Words | 1 Page
  • Respiratory Syncytial Virus (Rsv)
    I. Cause: * RSV is caused by a virus. It can be spread through droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes or by contact with the nasal or oral secretions of an infected person, either directly (i.e., kissing) or indirectly (i.e., touching a doorknob). II. Signs/Symptoms: * Runny nose * Decreased appetite and activity level * Coughing * Sneezing * Fever * Wheezing/Difficulty breathing * Irritability III. Incidence: *...
    355 Words | 2 Pages


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