Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Essays & Research Papers

Best Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Essays

  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (Idea)
    The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act is also known as the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. The IDEA legislation "needed to assure that students with disabilities receive free appropriate public education (FAPE) and the related services and support the need to achieve" (Jeffords 1). IDEA was created to make sure that disabled children are receiving fair and equal education and support. This act has several parts to it which include providing grants, funds early...
    355 Words | 1 Page
  • Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 2004
    IDEA 2004 IDEA 2004 (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act) was created so that any student with any type of physical or mental disabilities would receive an equal opportunity for a better education. I feel that IDEA 2004 has satisfied its purpose. Idea 2004 has implemented special education teachers to teach the students with disabilities. Since the first time that the act was created, it has been modified several times. Each time implementing special elements that aid mentally...
    264 Words | 1 Page
  • Mainstreaming: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Child
    My topic for my research paper will be on mainstreaming or it is also called inclusion. I will be discussing what mainstreaming is and briefly telling you about the history of mainstreaming. I will also be talking about the advantages and disadvantages of mainstreaming for children with disabilities and non disabled children. Mainstreaming or inclusion in general is the practice of educating children with disabilities in a regular classroom alongside non disabled students. Making them part...
    1,305 Words | 4 Pages
  • Advocacy: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and Advocate
    Advocacy and Learning Disabilities The need for Human Services professionals to assist parents in advocating for their children to receive appropriate services and to assist in the process has become a necessary task. This paper will discuss the role of the advocate in assisting parents through the difficult process of an IEP and to ensure that the child receives the services and resources needed at the school. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is a law...
    829 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Essays

  • The Impact of Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (Idea) 2004, on the Education of Children with Disabilities
    The Impact of Section 504 of the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 2004, on the Education of Children with Disabilities Abstract Education is regarded as a fundamental right in the United States. Up until the 1970’s, however, children with disabilities were being denied this right. Congress passed landmark legislation to redress this injustice, beginning with the Vocational Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and culminating with...
    2,629 Words | 8 Pages
  • Teaching Individuals with Disability
    CHAPTER ONE INTRODUCTION Background to the Study There is growing concern about increasing number of youth and children with special needs in our communities in Ghana today, who like any other children, must have the opportunity to go to school. The term special needs or children with special needs refers to individual learners whose needs arise from physical, emotional, sensory, behavioural and intellectual conditions that have a long-term adverse effect on their ability to access...
    2,161 Words | 6 Pages
  • Discrimination Against Specialized Individuals with Disabilities
    Many students with disabilities in the United States are receiving a sub-standard education because states are not complying with federal rules on special education as a result of discriminatory practices (BBC News Online). In many cases, children with disabilities are being taught in separate classroom, when they should not be segregated. In addition, schools are not always following regulations meant to protect students with disabilities from discrimination. Historically ethnic and...
    2,836 Words | 8 Pages
  • Special Education and the No Child Left Behind Act
    Special Education And The No Child Left Behind Act Introduction On January 8, 2002 President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act. The purpose of the act is to insure all children have a fair and equal opportunity to obtain a high-quality education. In regard to special education students, the plan is to narrow the gap that currently exists in many schools between the advantaged and disadvantaged students. However, NCLB may be butting heads with another federal act,...
    1,441 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Learning Disability - 1714 Words
    A Learning Disability (LD) “is a disorder in one or more of basic psychological process involved in understanding or using the language which may manifest in an imperfect ability to think, speak, listen, read , write , spell or conduct mathematical calculations” . (Zastrow, & Kirst-Ashman, 2007) It involves difficulty in processing information and/ or using this information to communicate. Children with LD currently make up to 6 present of the school- aged population in the United States...
    1,714 Words | 5 Pages
  • Learning Disability - 376 Words
    Read Chapter 9: Physical and Cognitive Development in Middle and Late Childhood Ryan entered first grade with boundless hope and a keen desire to read. Unfortunately, an undiagnosed vision problem interfered with his reading, and fine motor deficits made writing difficult. In most ways, Ryan was at least equal to his peers: physically active, imaginative, and highly intelligent. Socially, however, Ryan was hampered by spending time in the special education classroom. Because he had been...
    376 Words | 2 Pages
  • Students with Disabilities - 1089 Words
     Students with Disabilities MAE506 – Law and Ethics in Education Dr. Anna Lint December 23, 2013 The students were entitled to receive all the benefits of a normal student however the teacher played a big part in this role. With the numbers of students regular education teachers have and the demands made upon them, which they are not able to adapt their presentation of subject matter nor able to devote the time needed to a particular student or group of...
    1,089 Words | 4 Pages
  • Special Education - 686 Words
    Coming into Introduction to Exceptional Children, I was not sure what to expect. The thought of becoming a special education teacher was always on my mind, but it was rather overwhelming. I was afraid that I wasn’t “cut out” for the job and I knew that it would be hard work. As the class progressed through the weeks, I started to have different thoughts about the special education profession. I began to notice that, despite what I thought earlier, this was something that I wanted to do with...
    686 Words | 2 Pages
  • Special Education - 2865 Words
    The education system in our country was put in place in order to do service to our children. Despite this, in many cases, children that have disabilities are neglected by their schools. As a society, we all want to make sure that these children are being taken care of. However, there is a large spectrum of students with disabilities, and more needs to be done in order to meet every individual’s needs. In some cases, they do not receive enough attention, and others receive so much that it...
    2,865 Words | 8 Pages
  • Reflection on Learning Disabilities - 723 Words
    Learning Disabilities I believe that of the millions of young children who are diagnosed with a learning disability, only a few receive the full scope of assistance that they need in order to grow and succeed. Despite the advances our society has made when it comes to special education and offering resources to special needs children, I still believe that society is falling short of operating at its greatest potential to aid those with learning disabilities. I also feel that our culture...
    723 Words | 2 Pages
  • Misconceptions About Learners with Disabilities
    Misconceptions about Learners with Learning Disabilities There are many misconceptions associated with learners who have a learning disability. One common myth is that we know very little about the causes of learning disabilities. This is very untrue. Even though we don't know all of the causes of learning disabilities, we know a great deal as to why they happen. In our book it discusses how they may be caused by genetic factors, teratogenic factors, such as alcohol during pregnancy, and...
    464 Words | 2 Pages
  • Special Education - 2229 Words
    Special education has come a long way since the concept came about in the 1700s. In that era people with disabilities were considered to be hopeless, an embarrassment to their families and were therefore hidden or abandoned. Today, in America, those who have special needs are increasingly gaining acceptance in society and their rights as individuals are being acknowledged, particularly in education. With the passing of important laws such as the Rehabilitation Act, Americans with Disabilities...
    2,229 Words | 6 Pages
  • Special Education - 1157 Words
    From the first day a child is born, parents are there to nurture their child, to support them as they grow and develop. There is a lot to learn about raising a child under normal circumstances, but when a child has special needs parents must learn this whole new language of medical and special education terms (Overton, 2005). Parents enter this new world where navigating for the best interest of their child is riddled with challenges and obstacles that they need to somehow overcome. This is...
    1,157 Words | 3 Pages
  • Special Education - 2631 Words
    Running Head: SPECIAL EDUCATION Special Education as My Chosen Career EDU 623 Introductions to Teaching and Learning Ashford University Deborah Naughton April 14, 2013 Introduction “Education is important for all children, but even more so for children with disabilities, whose social and economic opportunities may be limited (Aron & Loprest, 2012.) Depending on the quality of education doors will open and the quality of life will all be determined by one’s...
    2,631 Words | 8 Pages
  • Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities
    Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities 1 Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities Legal Rights of Students with Disabilities 2 Task 1 Part A: Summarize the six key components of the original 1975 IDEA In 1975, President Gerald Ford signed into law Public Law 94-142, Education for Handicap Act. This federal law was created to assure that all children with disabilities have free and appropriate education available to them. The six key components of the original 1975 Education...
    2,084 Words | 7 Pages
  • What Is a True Learning Disability
    Identifying a True Learning Disability – Over Identification Lucella Glazier Western Governors University, Salt Lake City, Utah October 3, 2012 Table of Contents Abstract 3 Introduction 3 Purpose/Goal Statement 3 Questions for Research Plan 4 Importance of the Study/Hypothesis 5 Researcher Role/Bias 5 Literature Review Discussion 5 Research Design/Method 8 Participants 8 Instruments 8 Procedure 8 Data Analysis 8 Possible Constraints 9 Summary 9 References 10 Appendices 10...
    2,863 Words | 8 Pages
  • Programs That Serve Learners with Disabilities
    Programs that Serve Learners with Disabilities Michelle Blakley Education Psychology 225, Section 40 Professor Wall December 2, 2012 One of every dozen U.S. children and teenagers -- 5.2 million -- has a physical or mental disability, according to new figures from the 2000 Census that reflect sharp growth in the nation's young handicapped population over the past decade (Cohn, 2002). Everyone, at any time, is at risk to acquire a disability, whether through an illness, an injury, or...
    2,665 Words | 8 Pages
  • Intro to Intellecutal Disability - 1110 Words
    Introduction to Intellectual Disability (ID) Introduction to Intellectual Disability (ID) Kimberly Fox Grand Canyon University: SPE-351 May 23, 2013 Introduction to Intellectual Disability (ID) When learning about Intellectual Disability (ID) it is important to explore the subject with people that work with students of ID. The (SPED) special education team placed together for a student in order to determine the students individual education plan (IEP). This SPED team consist of:...
    1,110 Words | 4 Pages
  • Helping Children with Learning Disabilities
    Children with learning disabilities are smart or smarter than their peers, but may have difficulty with things like reading, writing, reasoning, and organizing information by themselves. A learning disability is a lifelong issue that cannot be cured or fixed with a snap of the fingers. Children who have the right support and intervention can succeed in school. Then later they will be able to go and be successful later in life. Children with learning disabilities need the support of parents,...
    1,559 Words | 4 Pages
  • learning disabilities final draft
     Specific Learning Disabilities Yvette Ramirez-Cabrera Concordia University-Portland Specific Learning Disabilities How Many Are Affected by a Learning Disability? Specific learning disabilities are affecting 10 percent of the population in classrooms today. About 2 or 3 pupils in every classroom have dyslexia, dyscalculia, or autism. Some of these children have more than one disability. Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder also suffer from dyslexia and...
    2,502 Words | 8 Pages
  • History of Intellectual Disabilities - 1242 Words
    History of Intellectual Disabilities St. Francis University Abstract The following paper will be a reflection on the history of intellectual disabilities. It will reflect on the progression of events and analyze them. The analysis will be on the implications of intellectual disabilities in social, economic, and political conditions. Reflection will also take place on how and why the attitudes or treatments of students with intellectual disabilities has differed throughout...
    1,242 Words | 4 Pages
  • Learning Disability Definitions - 3484 Words
    Learning Disability Definitions Carolyn Stacey Introduction This article addresses the components of The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (2004) and The National Joint Committee on Learning Disabilities (1981) definitions of Learning Disabilities. Their similarities and differences in terms of their impact on identification and program development for students , the Canadian definition perspective as well as the inclusion of studying tips for special needs students is...
    3,484 Words | 12 Pages
  • History of Special Education Law
     History of Special Education Law Michelle L. Johnson Grand Canyon University: SPE- 355 June 15, 2014 History of Special Education Law From the beginning of time until the end of time, there will always be students who require special education services. Throughout the 20th century, there have been many laws written to try and protect and help students with disabilities. Two in particular are the Education for All Handicapped Children Act of 1975, and the Individuals with...
    1,225 Words | 4 Pages
  • History of Special Education - 1586 Words
    Running head: History of Special Education History of Special Education Marie Cudia Grand Canyon University: SPE526: Educating Learners with Diverse Needs April 2, 2012 History of Special Education The history of Special Education just as any history; is a long battle that has been fought by many who cared in order to bring us to where we are today. Its Journey has and will be never ending; since society is forever evolving. We will be fighting for equal rights in...
    1,586 Words | 5 Pages
  • Equal Opportunity in Education - 1156 Words
    EP EDU-215 June 10th, 2012 Laura Greenstein Equal Opportunity in Education Equal opportunity education has come a long way since the founding of our country. Formal education in early America was reserved primarily for the males of elite, upper-class families. While great strides have been made in promoting educational equality for all Americans regardless of gender, race, religion, disability, or socioeconomic status; equity continues to be a work in progress for our country....
    1,156 Words | 3 Pages
  • Movers and Shakers in Education - 950 Words
    Running head: AMERICAN EDUCATION Trailblazers in American Education Nicole Hickman-Calix Grand Canyon University: EDU 576 July 4, 2012 Trailblazers in American Education There have been several individuals throughout America’s history who have helped develop, shape, advance, balance, and reform education to what it is today. America’s educational system has a rich background from its roots of one room school houses to our current system of education which offers an array...
    950 Words | 4 Pages
  • Inclusion: Education the Exceptional Child
     Inclusion: Educating the Exceptional Child History of Education Shanona Merrell February 19, 2010 The inclusion classroom is a classroom that has a mixture of students with and without disabilities. I selected this topic because I was an inclusion teacher at the local head start. I am writing about this because while I was a teacher I learned that the students learn how to help one another and the non disabled students learn a lot about the disabled students. They learn how to...
    854 Words | 3 Pages
  • Introduction to Special Education - 645 Words
    Chapter 2 : Introduction to Special Education Chapter Overview * What Is Special Education? * The Modern History Of Special Education * Prevalence Of Students With Exceptionalities * Inclusionary Practices * The Categorical Model What Is Special Education? * students with exceptionalities exhibit differences in learning and behaviour that significantly affect their educational potential - they have exceptional needs that cannot be met by typical approaches to schooling...
    645 Words | 3 Pages
  • History of Special Education - 1011 Words
    Special education has changed in many different ways throughout the last century. The views of they way students with differences should be taught and treated have changed as people have become more open minded. The education laws have also seen a turn about. One major area of education was in a desperate need of changed opinions and beliefs. Education for children with learning problems has emerged from no education to special funding and programs especially for those individuals...
    1,011 Words | 4 Pages
  • Special Education Law - 296 Words
    Instructor Mundle, Brown vs. Wade was an historical movement in laying the foundation with regards to the changes that would soon come in special education. Special education in the United States has come a long way. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act also know as ESEA which came about in 1965 is the primary vehicle for federal help within the public schools today. Originally this act did cover all children with disabilities however in the second year congress passed that the...
    296 Words | 1 Page
  • Action Research in Physical Education
    Action Research of Inclusive Physical Education for Raising the Regular and Special Education Students Participate in Teaching Activities EDGAR JOEY M. PERALTA Pidigan Central School, Pidigan, Abra Abstract The purpose of this study was to put into practice an inclusive physical education by adjusting a variety of teaching methods, so self-contained special education students and regular students can also join the general physical education. With the adjustment of teaching,...
    6,534 Words | 19 Pages
  • The Referral Process for Special Education
     The Referral Process for Special Education Laura J. Cornelius Grand Canyon University SPE 529N March 15, 2014 The goal of a public school is to equally educate students in a least restrictive environment (LRE). When a student starts to display behavioral or academic problems, schools are obligated to find solutions to help. With the reauthorization of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 2004), Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS), and Response...
    1,237 Words | 4 Pages
  • Special Education: Mainstreaming Students
    Kim Dieter December 5, 2012 Foundations of Education Mainstreaming Learning Disabled Students In an ideal world all children would be born without disabilities. This idea is not possible though and sometimes children are born with special needs. The child could have only one disability or several. A disability can be mild and treated with medication or the disability can be severe and the child will need constant supervision. Once the child becomes of age to attend school, the issue of...
    796 Words | 3 Pages
  • Special Education Inclusion - 1040 Words
    Special Education Inclusion addresses the controversy of inclusion in education. It argues that inclusions controversy stems from its relation to educational and social values in addition to individual worth. Stout states the important questions that should always be asked when discussing inclusion. She gives us some arguments from advocates on both sides of the issue and everyone in between. She recognizes that inclusion has no simple answers. She merely intends to overview the concepts of...
    1,040 Words | 4 Pages
  • Investigating Special Education - 1134 Words
    Candace Campbell May 2, 2013 SPE-330 Special Education Foundations and Framework Instructor: Mary Urich Investigating Special Education Internet Resources Table of Content * Disabled Students Program * National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD) * OSERS-Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services * Team (START) * The National Education Association (NEA) * Special Needs Center * Special Education Association * National Center for...
    1,134 Words | 5 Pages
  • Special Education Law Analysis
    Special Education Law Analysis Special Education Law Analysis Education in the United States has had a reputation of un-uniformity and mistreatment of certain groups especially students with disabilities. However, the recent past has yielded some advancement. Federal legislation has put into place three major laws that have lead to better treatment and higher quality education of students, especially those with disabilities. These laws are the Individuals with Disabilities Education...
    2,183 Words | 7 Pages
  • History of Special Education - 620 Words
    Special education only began when parent-organized groups started advocating for disabled children’s rights. Prior to this, disabled children were considered crippled, dump, mentally defective or feeble-minded, (J. E. Wallace Wallin, 1924). They were therefore excluded from education in public institutions. By 1975, more than half of disabled children were denied an opportunity to education. (William N. Myhill, 2004) However, during the 1950s and 1960s several parent-organized groups of...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Laws Special Education - 497 Words
    Prior to 1969, there was no special education or related services offered to learning-disabled children. By providing funds, the Public Law of 1969 known as the Children with Specific Learning Disabilities Act has recognized children with "learning disabilities" (Berger, 2008, p. 302) and enabled them to receive special education and other services such as physical therapy, speech, transportation, etc. In addition, by enforcing mandated education for all children, the Public Law has protected...
    497 Words | 2 Pages
  • History of Special Education - 1367 Words
    Abstract This paper will discuss the history of special education including a timeline of the significant events that happens in the history of special education. It would further discuss the laws associated with Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Furthermore, this paper will address the current and future challenges the laws have on special education. All children are created differently with different talents and abilities. Some are tall, others are short. Some are big,...
    1,367 Words | 5 Pages
  • Special Education: a Look at the History
    Special Education: A Look at the History Tracy Len Baier November 23, 2011 Abstract The purpose of this paper is to address the historical landmarks and legislation that have formed and created our current special education system. We will take a journey from the start of public education and its exclusion of special needs students to the current push for inclusion of all students learning within a general education classroom. The author will also share some of the pros and cons of...
    1,291 Words | 4 Pages
  • Assessment in Special Education - 3694 Words
    Research Paper: Assessment in Special Education Abstract Sometimes the general education program alone is not able to meet the needs of a child with disabilities, and he/she may be able to receive special education services. The evaluation process can be a very difficult task when trying to identify if the child qualifies for special education, schools often have a pre-referral intervention process. The most prominent approached used today is the “response-to-Intervention” or RTI....
    3,694 Words | 11 Pages
  • Movers and Shakers in Education - 1030 Words
    EDU 210 November 4,2013 Movers and Shakers in Education While navigating through the virtual timeline, I found so many interest ting articles to write about, I have chosen the following four events that had an impact on education that affected my life while I was in school and also have helped shape the educational systems during my children’s education in America today. The four articles that I found are: Engle vs. Vitale: 1962; I.D. E. A.: 1990; No Child Left Behind: 2002; and...
    1,030 Words | 3 Pages
  • References for Assessment in Special Education
    De La Salle University Manila College of Education Educational and Leadership Management Department List of Readings as partial fulfilment for the requirements in SPE561M: Assessment and Evaluation of Children with Special Needs Presented by GOTIZA, Adai Liyah M. MA Ed Special Education 11194820 Presented to Dr. W. Sison 19 January 2013 List of Readings [1] Bendak, L. (2011). The role of individual educational plans in helping cycle one students with dyslexia to become...
    2,735 Words | 6 Pages
  • History of Special Education - 1516 Words
    Running head: History of Special Education History of Special Education Julie G. Delk Grand Canyon University: SPE 526 May 4, 2011 Abstract The realm of Special Education has many components and features. It has a well rounded historical background and the laws governing special education are equally as important to discuss. A key point to discuss is the Individuals with Disabilities Act-its laws and principles that are associated with Special Education. Challenges found within...
    1,516 Words | 5 Pages
  • Special Education Components - 847 Words
    Special Education Law Review Audra Haines Ashford University Survey of the Exceptional Child 631 Stacy Roberts April 09, 2013 Special Education Law Review The reauthorized Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was signed into law on Dec. 3, 2004, by President George W. Bush. ("IDEA," 2004) This particular piece of legislation has gone the distance to protect student education through the development of six principals. The following principals are “zero-rejection,...
    847 Words | 3 Pages
  • Special Education Key Terms
    Special Education Key Terms and Definitions 0. Disability an inability to do something; a diminished capacity to perform in a specific way. 0. Handicap a disadvantage imposed on an individual . 0. Prevalence the percentage of a population or number of individuals who have a particular exceptionality. 0. Special Education specially designed instruction that meets the unusual needs of an exceptional student. 0. Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) a legal term referring to the fact that...
    3,512 Words | 10 Pages
  • Life After High School for Students with Disabilities
    Life After High School This article discusses the options (and lack thereof) for students with disabilities after graduating from high school. I am glad to have found this article because it really opened up my eyes to the difficulties that these students face when entering into this transition period. Federal special education law requires that students with disabilities have a transition plan in place. School officials will work with the parents and/or students on developing this plan, but...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Learning Disabilities and Their Effects on the American Educational Process
    Running Head: EDUCATIONAL STUDIES: LEARNING DISABILITIES Educational Studies: Research on Learning Disabilities and the Effects they have on the American Educational Process Gideon Scott South Carolina State University Dr. Littlejohn, Spring 2013 April 20, 2013 Abstract In this research paper viewers will be introduced to learning disabilities is are and what they are not . Understanding learning disorders are important because the public frequently confuse them with...
    1,901 Words | 6 Pages
  • Early Childhood Special Education Roots
    Early childhood special education that is practiced today has a varied and sometimes hard won history. Its roots are entangled in cultural, economic, and idealistic influences; each facet tinged by the colored lens of the times and adding a little glint to modern day practices. The conglomeration of historical theories and practices, political actions and enacted laws has paved the way to modern early childhood special education practices and programming. Just like a child learns and builds...
    1,497 Words | 4 Pages
  • Literature Review of Aims Testing for Students with Disabilities
    Overview- With the passing of the No Child Left Behind Act in 2001, teachers became increasingly more accountable for improving the achievement of all students, including those with disabilities. NCLB put more emphasis on standardized testing, which congruently put more stress on teachers because their contracts were threatened if student achievement dropped. In the state of Arizona, Arizona’s Instrument to Measure Standards, or AIMS, is a norm-referenced/standardized test administered to...
    2,308 Words | 8 Pages
  • Attitude, Legislation and Litigation towards Students with Disabilities
     Attitude, Legislation and Litigation towards Students with Disabilities Grand Canyon University: SPE-226 September 15, 2013 Attitude, Legislation and Litigation towards Students with Disabilities Understanding of children and adults with learning disabilities has come full circle but has a long way to do to fully reach every individual. In the 4th century the great philosopher Aristotle wrote,” As to the exposure and rearing of children, let there be a law that no...
    1,093 Words | 4 Pages
  • Promoting Lifelong Physical Activity in Children with Disabilities
    Two strategies can be used to promote lifelong physical activity of children with disabilities: an individual transition plan (ITP) and ongoing assessment (Kim, So-Yeun (2008). Most children with disabilities have an individualized education program (IEP), which measures the child’s educational goals and objectives, levels of performance, and provides authorities and parents with the child’s progress report. Children that have an IEP should also have an ITP by the age of 16 to be in accordance...
    326 Words | 1 Page
  • Ese Final (Exceptional Student Education)
    Meeting the Need of Every Student XXXXX XXXXXXXX ESE 315 Professor XXXXXX Current trends in education show that there are movements towards embracing inclusion of students with differences into general education classrooms, rather than placement into special classrooms. In order to meet the legal requirements of IDEA pertaining to the education of children with disabilities, and, more importantly, being prepared and...
    2,657 Words | 10 Pages
  • Discipline in High School and Elementary Education
     Discipline in High School and Elementary Education Grand Canyon University: SPE-350 January 10, 2014 When it comes to special education, discipline is a major concern in this area because many students are incessantly being expelled for their behavior issues that are caused by their disabilities. With the previous law students were excluded from school and received long suspension time because of their behavioral problems but when the new law was passed in 2004 students...
    1,201 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pros and Cons of No Child Left Behind Act.
    On January 8, 2002, President Bush signed into law the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). This law represents his education reform plan and contains changes to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) since it was enacted in 1965. It is asking America's schools to describe their success in terms of what each student accomplishes. The act contains the President's four basic education reform principles: stronger accountability for results, especially in reading, increased...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • Summary of Special Education Laws and Court Cases
    Case Year Effect Brown vs. Board of Education 1954 Inclusion 14th amendment PARC vs. Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 1972 FAPE, no cost, no deny mental retard. Stuart vs. Nappi 1978 Student stay in school despite bad behavior Armstrong vs. Kline 1979 Extended school year services Hendrick Hudson School vs. Rowley contested IDEA and lost. Board of Education v. Rowley 1982 Individual plan & supportive services. A program of a special child is compared to the program of a none...
    1,256 Words | 4 Pages
  • Curriculum Access for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: the Promise of Universal Design for Learning
    NCAC Curriculum Access for Students with Low-Incidence Disabilities: The Promise of Universal Design for Learning This report was written with support from the National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum (NCAC), a cooperative agreement between CAST and the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP), Cooperative Agreement No. H324H990004. The opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the policy or position of the U.S. Department of...
    53,253 Words | 177 Pages
  • Disproportionality Researching the Overrepresentation of Minority Students in Special Education
    Introduction This paper focuses on the overrepresentation or over-identification of minority students found in special education in our schools. I chose to research this topic because being an immigrant myself, I can relate to the education experience of a student who is new to the American school system. Debates on the overrepresentation of minority students, particularly African- Americans and Hispanics are not new in special education and have characterized research in this field for...
    3,089 Words | 10 Pages
  • Disproportionate Representation of African American Students in Special Education
    Running head: DISPROPORTIONATE REPRESENTATION Disproportionate Representation of African American Students in Special Education Shystudent March 1, 2011 Abstract In 2011 there is still disproportionate representation of African American Students in special education classes. This can be defined as conflict in the education environment because, government legislation mandates that No child be left behind, yet...
    2,572 Words | 8 Pages
  • Over Representation of African Americans in Special Education
    Running head: OVERREPRESENTAION OF BLACKS IN SPECIAL ED. Matt Wainright Troy State University 02/27/2009 Dr. Thompson Introduction The overidentification and overrepresentation of minority students in special educational classes has been a cause for concern (Bernahu, 2008). This literature review will discuss the prevalence of overidentification of African-American students in special...
    3,451 Words | 12 Pages
  • Deal v. Hamilton County Dept. of Education
     Due Process and Parental Rights: Deal v. Hamilton County Board of Education Grand Canyon University: SPE 350 28 October 2012 Due Process and Parental Rights: Deal v. Hamilton County Board of Education In 2004 the case of Deal v. Hamilton County Board of Education was coming to a close after reaching the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit in Ohio. Within this essay, detailed examination of this case, along with issues that developed the case, disagreement...
    1,677 Words | 5 Pages
  • Education for Learners with Special Needs: Introduction to Organization and Planning
    Education for Learners with Special Needs: Organization and Planning Introduction In 1990, statistics showed that there were well over 43 million Americans with one or more physical or mental disabilities (Dixon, Kruse, & van Horn, 2003). Historically, society has isolated and segregated these individuals. After the passage of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and despite numerous laws and civil rights acts, discrimination against individuals with disabilities continues to be a serious social...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Examining Expectations of General Education Teachers’ of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder & Its Relationship to Academic Instruction
    Examining Expectations of General Education Teachers’ of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder & its Relationship to Academic Instruction Tonya Trepinski Baylor University Introduction As a teacher in the public school system for ten years, this researcher has had the privilege of working with students with special needs, in particular, with students on the autism spectrum. While in the classroom, she has observed a disturbing trend...
    2,635 Words | 8 Pages
  • Identifying Problems and Issues in Developing and Implementing 504 Plans and I.E.P. Plans in South Carolina Schools to Ensure Appropriate Education for Exceptional Children.
    Identifying problems and issues in developing and implementing 504 Plans and I.E.P. Plans in South Carolina schools to ensure appropriate education for exceptional children. December 11, 2005 Abstract Special needs students were identified by Parent/Student Advocates serving Horry, Georgetown and Anderson Counties in South Carolina with the written consent of the parents and students. When appropriate, the files containing 504s and I.E.P.s (Individualized Education Plans), psychological...
    4,068 Words | 13 Pages
  • Is the use of Seclusion rooms and restraint appropriate for children on IEP’s in public education schools when used appropriately and within the laws set forth to govern them?
     Is the use of Seclusion rooms and restraint appropriate for children on IEP’s in public education schools when used appropriately and within the laws set forth to govern them? Seclusion and restraint has been a controversial topic in special education for a long time. Recently there has been more talk over the use of seclusion rooms and restraint on violent children in the public education setting. Many advocates feel that the use of such practices is unjust and unethical, that it...
    3,129 Words | 9 Pages
  • Schools and Society - 1532 Words
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