Hominidae Essays & Research Papers

Best Hominidae Essays

  • sociology - 1034 Words
    1,Jane Goodall 1. Jane Goodall is a noted humanitarian, environmentalist, and has spent many years observing the behaviour of Chimpanzees in their native habitat. Born: April 3, 1934 (age 79), London, United Kingdom Children: Hugo Eric Louis van Lawick Awards: Hubbard Medal, Nierenberg Prize, Community of Christ International Peace Award, Benjamin Franklin Medal, Edinburgh Medal, William Procter Prize for Scientific AchievementMore Education: University of Cambridge (1962–1964),...
    1,034 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ishmael Essay - 932 Words
    Hyun Park 1/31/14 Fairfax HS per 6 Ms. Antoine Ishmael Analysis The novel Ishmael written by Daniel Quinn is not like any other novels in the library. The story begins when a nameless narrator reads a newspaper ad that tells about a teacher seeking a pupil to save the...
    932 Words | 3 Pages
  • Anth106 Lit Review - 1309 Words
    Literature Review Main Article: 'The Advantage of Standing Up to fight and the Evolution of Habitual Bipedalism in Hominins' Citation: Carrier, D.R. 2011, 'The Advantage of Standing Up to fight and the Evolution of Habitual Bipedalism in Hominins', PloS ONE, vol. 6, no. 5, May, viewed 5 September 2012, Web of Science Database. The aim of this study was to determine whether assuming a bipedal stance, will provide an advantage for striking with forelimbs. Results were determined through...
    1,309 Words | 4 Pages
  • Do Animals Use Some Properties of Human Language
    Are there special properties of human language or can they be found in the communication systems of other creatures? Philip Tweedle This essay will discuss whether six of Hockett’s design features, which are properties of language, are exclusively human or can they be found in other creatures communications. For each of the features, the communication of wild apes, trained apes and humans will be compared. This will not be based solely on vocal communication, but explore the...
    1,223 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Hominidae Essays

  • The Foot of Homo Floresiensis and How It Relates to Evolution
    During the Pleistocene epoch, or 1.8 million years to 10,000 years ago, Homo floresiensis occupied the Liang Bua, a cave on Flores in eastern Indonesia. They were relatively small people, identical to modern-day dwarfs. But after researching recovered fossils of their bodies scientists realize there are distinct differences; one of these differences happens to be the foot of h. floresiensis. The size of the foot is unusually long compared to their tibia and femur. These proportions have...
    483 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reaction Paper - 562 Words
    If this were true, then perhaps big-headed people wouldn't be so pea-brained. This question is mired in many unknowns. For one, scientists still debate over the definition of intelligence. For any IQ definition, how do you measure it? Further, do differences in IQ show up in daily life? And finally, does more brain tissue or a heftier brain equate with higher IQ? One thing scientists do agree on: A big brain alone doesn’t equate with smarts. If it did, elephants and sperm whales would win...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Human Evolution - 3763 Words
    Human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans. While it began with the last common ancestor of all life, the topic usually covers only the evolutionary history of primates, in particular the genus Homo, and the emergence of Homo sapiens as a distinct species of hominids (or "great apes"). The study of human evolution involves many scientific disciplines, including physical anthropology, primatology, archaeology, linguistics, evolutionary psychology,...
    3,763 Words | 10 Pages
  • Did Humans Evolve from Apes?
    Congratulations: You are an ape. A "great ape," technically. Alongside us in this brainy family of animals are four other living species: chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos (formerly called "pygmy chimpanzees"). The biological gap between us and our great ape cousins is small. At last count, only 1.23 percent of our genes differ from those of chimpanzees. But mentally, the gap between us and them is a Grand Canyon. On an average day in the life of the human species, we file...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chimpanzee Versus Humans: Similarities & Differences
    Chimpanzee versus Humans: Similarities & Differences Since the first days of human thought into their beginnings, chimpanzees have played a vital role in showing who we were. The chimpanzee, one of the great apes, makes it home in the forests of Central and West Africa. Their long arms and legs adapt them for living in such regions as lowland jungles and mountainous regions. Humans are classified in the order Primates, and family Hominade. Within this family, human beings, our nearest...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Document 1 - 267 Words
    Jonadel Usita English 12 Period 5 October 10, 2014 Dear Editor, Ed Yong informs us according to the right and dignity of animals . He questioned his readers if great apes are deserving to have their own rights as a person and if so, might as well give other animals too. Animals shouldn't be mistreated or used as experimentations, but at the same time they should not have human rights. All animals deserve our respect, not human rights. No one can deny that the social behavior, abilities, and...
    267 Words | 1 Page
  • Evolution Of Man - 395 Words
    Human evolution is the evolutionary process leading up to the appearance of modern humans. The topic usually covers the evolutionary history of primates, in particular the genus Homo, and the emergence of Homo sapiens as a distinct species of hominids (or "great apes") rather than studying the evolutionary history that led to primates. The study of human evolution involves many scientific disciplines, including physical anthropology, primatology, archaeology, paleontology, ethology,...
    395 Words | 2 Pages
  • The evolution of human intelligence - 1005 Words
    Evolution of human intelligence The evolution of human intelligence refers to a set of theories that attempt to explain how human intelligence has evolved. These theories are closely tied to the evolution of the human brain and to the emergence of human language. The timeline of human evolution spans approximately 7 million years,[citation needed] from the separation of the Pan genus until the emergence of behavioral modernity by 50,000 years ago. The first 3 million years of this...
    1,005 Words | 3 Pages
  • Zoo Observations - 1729 Words
    Dillon, Jason Professor Sime ANTH 102 15 APR 2015 San Diego Zoo Observations It is impossible to go back to the past to observe exactly how different species have evolved and changed over the centuries. This is why it is important for us to observe and study these species now, in order to better understand the past and find the similarities, differences, and how each of these animals have adapted in their environments over time. To better understand ourselves, we must first understand the...
    1,729 Words | 5 Pages
  • I Love Lucy to I Love Ardi
    Jon Willetts 5/12/10 Dr. Curl From I Love Lucy to I love Ardi Ever since Darwin’s discovery at the Galapagos Islands, for hundreds of years scientists have been stuck with the theory of evolution being a species being able to evolve within that species. Darwin said himself that there is no evidence of an intermediary species, just evidence of the evolution of a species within that species. The biggest question this leaves open is when does that species turn into another one? A prime example...
    2,144 Words | 6 Pages
  • What Makes Us Human
    What makes us human? Are humans really biologically and socially different from the rest of the created world? Is there any special characteristic that separates us from other species or any other forms of life, or humans are just an improvement on the body and shape of other animals, the processes of millions of years? There were many attempts to answer these questions. As scientists studied the human body and skeleton, it helped them to recognize the remain between humans and apes, for...
    670 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ardipithecus Kadabba - 1210 Words
    During an excavation in the middle Awash Region of Ethiopia, Haille- Sellaise unearthed six hominid teeth. These were at first thought to be the fossilized teeth of Ardipithecus Ramidus. The teeth have now been determined to be from the late Miocene, and those of Ardipithecus Kadabba. These are the oldest hominid remains found, to date. Upon earlier digs in this region between 1997 and 2000, Haille- Sellasie discovered an earlier tooth and fragments of an arm bone. These remains were...
    1,210 Words | 4 Pages
  • Animal Bill of Rights - 448 Words
    Henry Rose Mrs. Pagani Period III ERWC 21 October 2013 “Body Paragraphs” PARA 1: I believe animals do not need a Bill of Rights because they already have plethora of laws that protect all of their basic needs. For example, Germany has already passed laws to protect the basic rights of Ape’s. In the article “primates” they said, “The Green Party in Germany is preparing two bills supporting the Great Ape Project”(Yong). Another way that animals already have their rights protected is, Dogs...
    448 Words | 2 Pages
  • Who Was the Last Person to Know Everything About Everything There Was to Know at the Time?
    Who was the last person to know everything about everything there was to know at the time? Hunger for knowledge is something that has been inherent for humankind since the beginning. Humans have a need to grasp as much knowledge as possible, because being aware and knowing about things helps us to live an easier and a better life. A human’s hunger for knowledge can never be fulfilled and it is impossible to know everything there is to know, so the idea of being an all knowing person is not a...
    500 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain How Lucy Could Be Viewed as “the Missing Link”
    Explain how Lucy could be viewed as “the missing link” Australopithecus Afarensis, commonly known as Lucy, can be seen by many scientific and historic facts as ‘the missing link’. Anthropologists show that Lucy is a transitional fossil which helps prove the way hominids changed throughout the ages. Bipedalism is the biggest and most important evidence that Lucy has shown to tell one how she lived in the chain of evolution. The morphology of Lucy’s skeleton has so many different...
    1,357 Words | 4 Pages
  • Discovering Ardi - 1122 Words
    Discovering Ardi Introduction The film viewed recently viewed in class titled “Discovering Ardi” and produced by Discovery Communications shows the breakthrough finding a full skeleton of a new hominid buried deep beneath the group in Ethiopia that links chimpanzees and apes to the modern day homo sapiens. The amazing discovery was lead by Tim White and his team in Ethiopia looking at ashes from millions of years ago in vast lakes, and scorching hot deserts in Hadar, Ethiopia when a...
    1,122 Words | 4 Pages
  • Do Non-Human Primates Have Culture?
    Do Non-Human Primates Have Culture? September 26, 2011 Andrew Baron Do non-human primates have culture? Let’s first start off by asking ourselves; what distinguishes us from other primates? It used to be said that what distinguished us from other anthropoids was our use of tools. With new discoveries in the world of anthropology, we found that other apes such as chimpanzees use tools effectively in order to sustain their everyday life. This definition then became nullified, and a search for a...
    549 Words | 2 Pages
  • Western Lowland Gorillas - 587 Words
    Western Lowland Gorillas October 23, 2009 Introduction: When I was around 14, I saw one of the best movies. The movie was Gorillas in The Mist, starting Sigourney Weaver as Dian Fossey. It was one of the most impressive movies of my life. My step-mother at the time notice how must I liked the movie and game me her very well torn copy of Gorillas in the Mist to read. I still have that book and since the first time I read it, I have been fascinated with these great apes. This is way I...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Global Warming's Affect on Wildlife
    Deforestation is indeed the primary threat to the orangutan, a species of great ape known for its keen intelligence and the fact that it’s the largest animal to live primarily in trees. A 2007 assessment by the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) predicts that orangutans will be virtually eliminated in the wild within two decades if current deforestation trends continue. The great reddish-brown apes are native to the tropical rainforests of Indonesia and Malaysia, which are being cut down...
    697 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Culture of Great Apes - 522 Words
     The Culture of Great Apes Bonobo’s and chimpanzee’s are very intelligent species. From using tools and herbal medicines to caring for and raising their young, there are more than a few things that set them apart from other species in the animal kingdom. Culture is a society’s shared and socially transmitted ideas, values, and perceptions, which are used to make sense of experience and generate behavior and are reflected in that behavior . Using this definition it seems that...
    522 Words | 2 Pages
  • Great Apes - 321 Words
    Great Apes as Food This article talks about the love for great apes meat in Central Africa. Although some religions forbidden ape meat as food but others like to consume the meat and they actually prefer it from the other meats. There are many reasons why central Africans like Consuming great apes as food other than the taste. In Some parts of central Africa people believe that eating Apes as food would bring strength and power that these great apes possess. Medicine plays a role in...
    321 Words | 1 Page
  • equal rights for great apes
    Rights for Great Apes I support scientists researching on and experimenting with great apes. Since scientists don’t want to jeopardize the lives of humans, they test on apes. If they were not testing apes, then they would be testing other animals which other people would also fight against. Scientists perform tests on these apes for one very important reason, “98.4 percent of the DNA in chimpanzees (and 97.7 percent of the DNA in gorillas) is identical to the DNA of human beings.” This...
    1,211 Words | 3 Pages
  • Early Hominids and Tools - 1416 Words
    Early Hominids and Tools Jacky Thompson ANT 101 March 20, 2013 Even though humans seem to be the most advanced creatures walking this earth, we certainly had ancestors before us. We share similar genetic information of other animals. They are what we consider early hominids. Early hominids date as far back as 6 to 8 million years ago. Just like humans, they had to have some type of culture in order to survive and make a living. Culture is defined as a dynamic adaptive process of...
    1,416 Words | 4 Pages
  • Viri Essay Chimps And Humans
    The purpose of this essay is to show the similarity and differences between humans and Chimpanzees. They are our closest living relatives, when we didn’t even know about them until Charles Darwin wrote about and popularized Chimpanzees in 1859. Chimpanzees’ discoveries have been studied recently. Chimpanzees are often miscalled monkeys. Those who are considered in the great ape family are the following: humans, chimpanzees, orangutans, and gorillas. Homo sapiens are the only species of human...
    1,219 Words | 4 Pages
  • Humans And Chimpanzees Are Similar
     Humans and Chimpanzees are similar. With the10 comparisons between chimps and humans. These are the ten comparisons number of species, DNA, brain size, sociability, language and facial expressions, diet, sex, walking upright, eye and the tools used. Humans and both chimpanzee species evolved from a common ancestor, possibly sahelanthropus tchadensis, between five and seven million years ago. Only...
    793 Words | 3 Pages
  • Values Education - 259 Words
    Class Agenda July 12, 2013 * Updates & Review (5 mins) * Quiz (15 mins) * Lecture (20 mins) * Discussion (20 mins) Objectives At the end of the session, the students must be able to: 1. Differentiate a human being from other living (i.e., plants and animals) and nonliving creatures (i.e., machines) 2. Identify the material and spiritual nature of a human being 3. Relate the importance of knowing one’s self with the study of Values Education, and even more so with respect to understanding...
    259 Words | 2 Pages
  • Planet of Life - 388 Words
    THE EVOLUTION OF HUMANS PLANET OF LIFE SERIES: APES TO MAN (film summary to be filled in class) Humans: Superfamily Hominoidea Family Hylobatidae Family Hominidae Family Pongidae Gibbons Humans Chimpanzees...
    388 Words | 3 Pages
  • ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE - 532 Words
    ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE MUHAMMAD DZUL HUSSAINI BIN HANAFI KB1309FD4722 CHIMPANZEE INTRO Chimpanzees, sometimes colloquially Chimps, are two extant hominid species of apes in the genus Pan. The Congo River divides the native habitats of the two species. Chimpanzees are members of the family Hominidae, along with gorillas, humans, and orangutans. Chimpanzees split from the human branch of the family about four to six million years ago. Chimpanzees are the closest living relatives to humans, being...
    532 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychology 100 - 993 Words
    PSYC100 Oct 28, 2013 Jiyoon Lee After Watching “The Project Nim” I decided to watch and write about “The Project Nim”. Because, I have heard about the movie several times so it was kind of familiar to me. “The Project Nim” is a documentary movie based on a real story of experiment and observation about a little chimpanzee named Nim Chimpski. This experiment headed by behavioral psychologist Herbert Terrace and the purpose of the experiment was to deny Noam Chomsky’s theory that using...
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bonobos vs Pan Paniscus
    Pan Paniscus vs. Gorilla Beringei Bonobos, sometimes called pygmy chimpanzees, survive and endure in fission-fusion social groups where a behomitic amount of individuals apportion into smaller groups of size and composition. They are classified as those involved in patrilineal groups. Bonobos are in Central Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. There are an estimated number of thirty thousand bonobos in existence. Bonobos abide in the swampy rainforests of the southern...
    1,167 Words | 4 Pages
  • First Steps Film Assignment
    ANTH M01 Online Name: Messinger Film Assignment, “Nova Becoming Human Episode 1: First Steps” The following assignment is based on the film “Becoming Human Episode 1: First Steps.” You may access the film in the following ways: 1. It is available for free on the PBS website at the following address: http://video.pbs.org/video/1312522241/ 2. It is available instantly through Netflix (where you may temporarily set up a free account for a few weeks if you are not a member)....
    978 Words | 4 Pages
  • Primate Observation - 2701 Words
    Rome S. Professor Kindoski Anthro 001 May 18th, 2014 Primate Observation Primates are some of the most interesting animals to watch and learn about whether it be in person at a zoo or seeing a film or documentary on wild ones in a natural environment. Part of this reason is due to the incredible amount of similarities found in between primates and humans. After observing two different primate species at a local zoo, I found out that by observing their behavior, we gain a small insight into...
    2,701 Words | 7 Pages
  • Genius - 862 Words
    EAR West Side HS Science Credit Recovery Ape Genius Name ____________________________________ FG ________________________ Credit Recovery Course ________________________________________________ Teacher ________________________________ Year/Cycle _______________ Part 1: Background 
One of the ongoing discussions in behavioral research is about whether the non-human great apes (chimps, bonobos, orangutans, and gorillas) are as intelligent as human beings. Intelligence refers to the...
    862 Words | 6 Pages
  • Rainforest & Zoo Research Paper
    Rainforest & Zoo Research Paper 1. Adaptation. The Australian Rainbow Lorikeet is found in the areas of northern, eastern, and southeastern Australia. The Lorikeet is only about 10 to 12 inches in its overall length and weighs only about 2.5 to 5.5 ounces. It is magnificently colored and each is colored exactly the same. The Lorikeet's habitat consists of lowland wooded countries, which include the rainforest, mangroves, and the Riparian Woodland, as well as freshwater swamp forest...
    1,137 Words | 3 Pages
  • Leakey's Angels - 1248 Words
    Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born on April 3rd, 1934, in London England. She completed secondary school when she was 18 and began working. She worked as a secretary, an assistant editor in a film studio, and as a waitress to save enough money travel to Africa. When she arrived in Africa she was 23. Then in 1957 she sailed to Mombasa, where she met the famous anthropologist and paleontologist Louis Leakey; who became her mentor. In Africa Leakey and his wife, Mary Leakey had discovered what...
    1,248 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Apes - 1782 Words
    For other uses, see Ape (disambiguation). For an explanation of very similar terms, see Hominidae. Hominoids or Apes Temporal range: Late Oligocene–Holocene PreЄЄOSDCPTJKPgN Orang Utan, Semenggok Forest Reserve, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia.JPG Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Scientific classification e Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Primates Suborder: Haplorrhini Infraorder: Simiiformes Parvorder: Catarrhini Superfamily: Hominoidea Gray, 1825 Type...
    1,782 Words | 7 Pages
  • REFLECTION AND REACTION PAPER OF HUMAN EVOLUTION
    I. INTRODUCTION Planet Of Life: Apes to Man narrated by Stacy Steach, tells us about the origin Of Human Evolution. According to the documentary film, 100, 000, 000 years Ago, the world was first inhabited by the dinosaurs. But, because of the asteroid 6 miles wide That struck the earth; it brought the end of the reign of the Dinosaurs. After being strucked by The Asteroid, the earth became life less. But, insects and plants and some small Mammals would Survive and...
    268 Words | 2 Pages
  • Aquatic Ape Theory - 1941 Words
    The Aquatic Ape Theory Society hears the word “mermaid” and thinks about a mythical creature that sings and lives in the sea. The Aquatic Ape Theory takes the view of mermaids and tells one the real facts about ancient mermaids that humans are said to evolve from. One may wonder how mermaids have gone almost undetected for so many years. That is in fact because they live in parts of the oceans that humans have never explored. Scientists have recently discovered two new breeds of whales, the...
    1,941 Words | 6 Pages
  • Human Evolution - 611 Words
    This article is about the divergence of Homo sapiens from other species. For a complete timeline of human evolution, see Timeline of human evolution. For other uses, see Human evolution (disambiguation). "Evolution of Man" redirects here. For the album by Example, see The Evolution of Man. Part of a series on Evolutionary biology Diagrammatic representation of the divergence of modern taxonomic groups from their common ancestor. Key topics[show] Processes and outcomes[show] Natural...
    611 Words | 3 Pages
  • De Sica's Film Say About Our Dependence on Other Human Beings
    In the movie of Bicycle Thieves, it said that our dependence on other human beings are useless and not solve anything because human are only care on their own matter without thinking other human’s problem. They are egoist. In my opinion, it depends because human can depends upon other human being when the one who is being relied is willing to help without any hesitation. For example, the father and his family was depend to each other because they live in poverty and need each other. However,...
    551 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essays on Scenario of World If Maths Is Removed Wiki
    AMUR LEOPARD The Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a very rare leopard subspecies that lives only in the remote and snowy northern forests of eastern Russian’s Primorye region. Its former range included Korea and northern China, but the Amur leopard is now extinct in those countries. A 2007 census counted only 14-20 adult Amur leopards and 5-6 cubs. Threats facing the species include habitat loss due to logging, road building and encroaching civilization, poaching (illegal...
    491 Words | 2 Pages
  • HUMAN NATURE ESSAY - 693 Words
     Short Essay Isn’t being a dog, part of being human? What if that’s the best part, the dog part? What if you’re really just a two legged dog? While I am agree with Nicholas Cage’s character’s point of view that being an animal, being a creature struggling for survival and occasionally giving freedom to its instincts is the part of being a human, I also think that the other part of being human is unique and is not possessed by...
    693 Words | 4 Pages
  • Technology and Human effects of relationships
    Technology effects of Human Relationships They say “All good things must come to an end”. Well if this is correct, and Technology had stopped existing how would the world respond? I predict that this world would go into a “great depression”. Not necessarily because of beneficial and honorable things like the abilities to further your education, watching the news, or cooking a simple meal for the family but because of the inability to use technology as a relationship based source. Based on the...
    575 Words | 2 Pages
  • fdksjhfnejsdf - 268 Words
    ibsdfklma;kfbcmnvx,ztry was mesmerized by the story of Sandra Herold, a 70-year-old widow in Stamford, Conn., whose 14-year-old, 200-pound chimpanzee, Travis, horribly mauled a close friend of the owner, tearing off her face. Ms. Herold, whose daughter had died in a car accident, had developed a relationship with him that went far beyond the ordinary owner-pet dynamic. She referred to Travis as her son, spoke of sleeping and bathing with him when he was small, and, in an interview with Jeff...
    268 Words | 1 Page
  • Planet of Life - 1951 Words
    A Film Review on Planet of Life Apes to Man Roshan Dominguito Dalapu BSA 2-5D NASC 1013 Professor Adrian Guinto Polytechnic University of the Philippines Planet of Life: Apes to Man is narrated by Stacy Keach, presented y the Discovery Channel. A must see documentary regarding the Theory of Evolution. This series, Planet of Life, presents the history of evolution on this planet. Originally produced for the Discovery Channel, each episode covers a separate chapter in the biography...
    1,951 Words | 7 Pages
  • Planet of the Apes - 1830 Words
    Pierre Boulle was born on February 20, 1912 in Avignon, France. His father, Eugene Boulle, was a brilliant lawyer who taught him his sense of humor and open- mindedness and his mother, Therese Seguin, was born in a family of printers. Pierre’s parents raised him to be Catholic although later in his life he became agnostic. He studied science at the Sorbonne and then entered the Ecole Supérieure d'Electricité de Paris. Pierre Boulle graduated college with a degree in engineering in 1932 and...
    1,830 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cultures of Chimpanzees - 569 Words
    The Cultures of Chimpanzees In the article “The Culture of Chimpanzees” by Andrew Whiten and Christophe Boesch, they reflect on their thoughts of the culture of chimpanzees and how they resemble mankind in its earliest stages. they also states how people have no idea how much we have learned about chimpanzees in the last 2 decades, which might come to an end with all the destruction of forests we commit. Which are true statements in today’s world, I used to think that the only thing interesting...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Rights - 793 Words
    Stephanie Jimenez Mr. Nedelkow ERWC 19 September 2014 Do Animals Need A Bill of Rights? Animals on a daily basis all over the world are being mistreated and abused by many people that do not care for them. There are very few people attempting to protect these animals, whether they are domestic animals, farm animals, or wildlife animals. More attention should be drawn to the treatment of animals because even if we do have laws for animals and for their well being, many people still...
    793 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Primates Posses Culture?
    Writing Assignment One--Do primates posses culture? I think that if culture is defined as learned behavior, than it is reasonable to say that primates posses a form of culture. Primates have been observed making tools to aid in collecting food and developing communication system, both of which are learned behaviors. It is common in monkeys, apes and humans that behavior and social organization aren't necessarily programmed into the genes. There have been several cases where an entire troop...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Human Evolution - 2769 Words
    Human Evolution Human Evolution, the biological and cultural development of the species Homo sapiens, or human beings. A large number of fossil bones and teeth have been found at various places throughout Africa, Europe, and Asia. Tools of stone, bone, and wood, as well as fire hearths, campsites, and burials, also have been discovered and excavated. As a result of these discoveries, a picture of human evolution during the past 4 to 5 million years has emerged. Human Physical Traits Humans are...
    2,769 Words | 8 Pages
  • how smart are sheep?
    Summary: “How Smart Are Sheep?” How Smart Are Sheep by Barbara Drake is about the intelligence of sheep and the studies that have been conducted to prove that sheep can feel different emotions and recognize dogs and humans as their enemies. Evolution has re-wired the sheep brain to know to hate and stay away from humans and dogs. Brain activity research in sheep has shown that sheep see dogs and humans as more alike than comparing the human and the dog to themselves. Drake explains that “Of...
    683 Words | 2 Pages
  • History - 478 Words
    Arturo Perez 11/05/2013 Anthropology Craig Stanford wrote an article titled “Got Culture” and the issues addressed in this article are that our closest relatives who are the Chimpanzees share a culture just as us humans do. But many people in the world do not believe in such theories they believe that culture is specific to humans only and that there is no way that a Chimp can hold such “symbolic relationships” as us humans do everyday (Stanford, 2002.) Throughout the article Stanford...
    478 Words | 2 Pages
  • ABOREssay - 464 Words
    Justo Hernandez Mr. Unger English 4P 14 October 2014 Yes to an Animal Bill of Rights Did you know that more than 50% of the fur in the United States comes from China, where there are no penalties for abusing animals, which are raised in unbearably cramped and run-down cages on fur farms? Animals should have a Bill of Rights because they have emotions, feel pain, and are being forced into painful experiments. Animals should be able to play with each other because they have emotions. In Jeremy...
    464 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay - 513 Words
    The Cooperation Instinct This article explains how even though in todays world, everybody is trying to make it the top, everybody is still helping each other as an instinct that is common among other species as well. We as well as some animals are considered “eusocial” species which are those that live in highly connected structures inhabited by many generations at once. Since we are eusocial, our species tend to look after each other in various situations. Bill Hamilton mathematically...
    513 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Physical Attributes of Chimpanzees - 386 Words
    The male common chimp is up to 1.7 metres (5.6 ft) high when standing, and weighs as much as 70 kilograms (150 lb); the female is somewhat smaller. The common chimp’s long arms, when extended, have a span one and a half times as long as the body’s height and a chimpanzee's arms are longer than its legs.[7] The bonobo is a little shorter and thinner than the common chimpanzee but has longer limbs. Both species use their long, powerful arms for climbing in trees. On the ground, chimpanzees usually...
    386 Words | 1 Page
  • Homo Floresiensis - 552 Words
    Discuss what you believe Homo floresiensis to be – a “one off” freak version of Homo erectus, a separate and very unique species, or something else . . . Homo floresiensis was a hominoid discovered in a cave called Liang Bua on an Indonesia island. She was examined to be from 17,000 years ago and nicknamed “the Hobbit” because she was only around a meter tall even though she was an adult. What was more amazing about this hominoid was the small cranial capacity of 417 cc, much smaller than a...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animals: Intelligence Quotient and Similar Brain Structure
     A Change Of Heart About Animals Essay In “A Change of Heart About Animals”, Jeremy Rifkin mentioned that animals are very similar to us. He said that animals feel pain, suffer, feel stress, affection, excitement, and even love (2). However, I don’t agree with Rifkin. I think animals are not more like us than we think they do. Rifkin’s point isn’t well supported. Most of h is examples aren’t backed up by well thought evidence. Rifkin used...
    433 Words | 1 Page
  • Apes and Language - 1987 Words
    Apes and Language: A Chicago Style Sample Paper Karen Shaw English 214 Professor Bell March 22, 2001 Shaw 2 Apes and Language: A Literature Review Over the past thirty years, researchers have demonstrated that the great apes (chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans) resemble humans in language abilities more than had been thought possible. Just how far that resemblance extends, however, has been a matter of some controversy. Researchers agree that the apes have acquired fairly large...
    1,987 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Panda's Thumb - 558 Words
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  • Shared Trait Between Humans and Chimpanzees
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  • Rise of the Planet of Apes and Biotechnology
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  • Analysis of Meditation IV by John Donne
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  • Anthropology - Process of Human Evolution
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  • Anthropologists, Paleontologists, and Archaeologists
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  • The Naked Ape Book Review
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  • Poetry Analysis - 1312 Words
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  • Anthropology 68 Day 13
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  • Are Apes Capable of Using the Language?
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  • Bonobo Taxonomy - 567 Words
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  • Anthropology - 997 Words
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  • Planet of the Apes Satire - 752 Words
    The setting of the movie compared to the setting in the book makes Planet of the Apes one of the greatest satires. In the movie, the setting takes place on earth in the future where apes deny and are afraid of the past, whereas the setting in the book is on a different planet where apes are civilized and technologically advanced, and the humans were primitive creatures. The orangutans in the movie prevent what happened to the humans from happening to the apes. Orangutans, such as Zaius went to...
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  • Reaction Paper to Planet of Life: Apes to Man
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  • Evolution of Human - 3136 Words
    Human evolution is the biological and cultural development of humans. A human is any member of the species Homo sapiens, meaning "wise man." Since at least the Upper Paleolithic era, some 40,000 years ago, every human society has devised a creation myth to explain how humans came to be. Creation myths are based on cultural beliefs that have been adopted as a legitimate explanation by a society as to where we came from. The science of paleoanthropology, which also tries to create a narrative...
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