Hip hop music Essays & Research Papers

Best Hip hop music Essays

  • HIP HOP MUSIC - 318 Words
    “I love hip hop music.” Hip hop to me is a mixture of both R&B and rap music. There are times when I maybe in the mood to listen to rap or r&b but I’m always in the mood to listen to Hip hop. My worst days can become my best days when I’m jamming to hip hop music. There’s just something about that particular style of music that makes me and keeps me happy no matter what is going on. It also supplies me with energy and motivation. Hip hop music makes my daily life easier and is in fact my...
    318 Words | 1 Page
  • Effects of Hip Hop Music
    TOPIC: Effects of hip hop music on Daystar university students THESIS: Hip hop music has a negative effect on Daystar University students THESIS STATEMENT: Although a source of revenue, form of political and social awareness and a form of breaking down cultural barriers, hip hop Music has negative effects on Daystar University students such as, it affects their language, men’s world view towards women, and the student’s world view towards luxury, money and drugs / drug abuse and it also...
    2,485 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Effects of Hip Hop Music
    The Effects of Hip Hop Music on Today's Youth If a person was born anywhere between the 1980's to the 1990's, he or she is considered a part of the "Hip Hop Generation". Music is a gift that has been given to us, but the question is, "where is hip hop music going?" Hip-hop is now one of the biggest and fastest growing businesses in the world. It's creativity in sound, and its lyrics have impressed and empowered many of today's youth. But is hip-hop music taking today's youths where they need...
    659 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music - 2217 Words
     Introduction Hip hop has been around since the early 70s. Some may say it was originated in New York and others may disagree (History of Hip Hop style, 2012). However, we can all come to one conclusion that hip hop is influential. Hip hop's largest fan base is the teenager population. It has changed over time from Run-DMC to now Lil Wayne and Drake. Hip hop will always be hip hop but it has changed overtime. It is...
    2,217 Words | 7 Pages
  • All Hip hop music Essays

  • Exemplification: Hip Hop Music
    Leon White November 27, 2011 Period 5th Exemplification Essay Hip hop music is the most “put down” music on earth. In my opinion hip hop is also the most influential music in the world. I know what you’re thinking, this is very arguable, but indeed it is true. It’s been around over 40 years now. It’s had its up and its downs. Every one of different colors and genders listen and also participate in hip hop you music. One reason I think hip hop is the most prominent music genre in the...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music - 1355 Words
    There are some forms of music that seem to transcend the sands of time. For example, the classical music pieces of Johann Sebastian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are still relevant in various areas of education and enjoyment today, from everyday piano lessons to speculation of creating smarter babies. Hip Hop is another form of music that seems as if it is starting to transcend the sands of time, but in a slightly different way. Since the emergence of Hip Hop at the early end of the 20th...
    1,355 Words | 4 Pages
  • hip hop music - 1420 Words
    By Ronald Roach As a cultural movement, hip-hop manages to get billed as both a positive and negative influence on young people, especially on Black and Latino youth. On one hand, there are African American activists, artists and entrepreneurs, such as Russell Simmons, who seek to build a progressive political movement among young hip-hop fans and who have had modest success with voter registration efforts. On the other hand, there’s no shortage of critics who denounce the negative portrayals...
    1,420 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music - 1925 Words
    In the following essay I will be applying Arjun Appadurai’s theory of global cultural flows and social imagination to the two African hip hop case studies written by Kunzler and Badsha. I will be analysing the case studies with regard to Appadurai and his theories. Appadurai’s theory was to look at the effects of globalisation on culture and how it has affected the society. He makes five very important points towards global cultural flows. He thought of it as different streams that flow into...
    1,925 Words | 5 Pages
  • Negative Affects of Hip-Hop Music
    Hip-hop music has been an integral part of the American culture since the 1970s. Hip-hop music, which encompasses rapping, disc jockeying, break dancing, and graffiti writing, has become so popular that American culture has adopted the music in mainstream fashion and modern language. The conflict on whether hip-hop music is “art or poison” has been continuous. Some Americans support hip-hop as an essential art form, while others dispute that hip-hop has harmful effects on the American culture....
    939 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1613 Words
    Alex Williams October 29, 2012 Professor Marini Research Paper; 12pm Hip Hop Phenomenon Barack Obama once stated, “The thing about hip-hop today is it's smart, it's insightful. The way they can communicate a complex message in a very short space is remarkable (Morgan 927).” Hip Hop has evolved through the years by the people who participate in it. The message in the lyrics that hip hop artist speak are usually directed to the youth community. Hip Hop is spread throughout the world. Hip...
    1,613 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 984 Words
    Jonathon Bidelspach AFA 2000 Unit IV Paper Hip-hop music is known as one of the most popularizing and popular genres in our modern society. Most of hip-hop music is considered vulgar, offensive, and meaningless, which can be easily displayed by hip-hop artists such as Soulja Boy and Lil’ Wayne. However, who gets lost in translation is the artist who conveys true meaning in their lyrics and sticks with the original roots of the music. For hip-hop’s short life, there has been dramatic change...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1008 Words
    Inside Out Hip-hop WORKSHEET A Jo For many people hip-hop is synonymous with rap music, but I’d say it refers to a whole subculture that emerged with rap in the United States – especially New York – in the late 1970s and has since become truly international. Rapping (or ‘MCing’) and DJing are the two main components of hip-hop music. Maybe you could describe rap as a form of expression that is somewhere between speech, poetry and song. Other parts of hip-hop culture are specific styles of...
    1,008 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 8059 Words
    Hip Hop Hip hop is a broad conglomerate of artistic forms that originated as a specific street subculture within South Bronx communities during the 1970s in New York City. It is characterized by four distinct elements, all of which represent the different manifestations of the culture: rap music (aural), turntablism or "DJing" (aural), breaking (physical) and graffiti art (visual). Despite their contrasting methods of execution, they find unity in their common association to the poverty and...
    8,059 Words | 21 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1093 Words
    “Hip-hop reflects the truth, and the problem is that hip-hop exposes a lot of the negative truth that society tries to conceal. It's a platform where we could offer information, but it's also an escape.”- Busta Rhymes (Hip Hop Quotes) Hip hop does contain a largely negative influence into the American society by black men getting into violence, assaulting black women physically and concerning about their education, their employment and their incarceration. The hip hop music influence young...
    1,093 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2665 Words
    Hip Hop: From ‘the street’ to ‘Wall Street’ Hip-hop music is known for being an outlet for African Americans to express themselves, whether it be political criticism, social criticism, injustice, youth rebellion, oppression or some other social concept. The music has changed form over time, from spirituals sang by slaves to powerful raps about society to meaningless degradation sang by ‘thugs’ and ‘gangsters’. Today, hip-hop music exists in many forms, some of which hold true to the...
    2,665 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 3407 Words
    HIP HOP'S AFFECT ON CULTURE Hip hop has permeated popular culture in an unprecedented fashion. Because of its crossover appeal, it is a great unifier of diverse populations. Although created by black youth on the streets, hip hop's influence has become well received by a number of different races in this country. A large number of the rap and hip hop audience is non-black. It has gone from the fringes, to the suburbs, and into the corporate boardrooms. Because it has become the fastest...
    3,407 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hip hop - 407 Words
    Hip Hop is a category of “music” that has come a long way since it was first fashioned. Born in The Bronx, New York is has defined and interpreted countless of times. The text book definition is “a style of popular music of US black and Hispanic origin, featuring rap with an electronic backing. Originally produce to tell stories of men and women of the time it has since grown and develop a whole new meaning which is not set in stone. Today, hip-hop, can be located worldwide due largely to media...
    407 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop - 470 Words
     Back then, when I hear “Hip Hop”, I associated it with egoistic rappers and gang violence. It was my least favorite music genre because rap artists only rap about their shopping list and other meaningless topics. It came to the point where I asked, “What is Hip Hop?” I was so curious that I decided to use it as an English research topic. From that point on, my opinion on Hip Hop changed completely due to the fact that there’s more to it. As I researched on what Hip Hop is, I found out that...
    470 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 958 Words
    Hip-hop over the past three decades has greatly developed and spread throughout many countries of the world. It is widely listened to today, especially by the youth. Its unique musical style has captivated people of all ages and more importantly, races. Hip-hop is a style all its own, original in its music, clothing, and language. Regardless of culture, background, and native countries, hip-hop has made a name for itself among all people. Perhaps one of the biggest ideas concerning the hip-hop...
    958 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2091 Words
    Music has been around since the beginning of civilization. Music was used to tell myths, religious stories, and warrior tales. Since the beginning of civilization music has greatly progressed. Music still tells a story, we know just have many genres to satisfy the cultural and social tastes of our modern society. Hip Hop is a genre of music that has significantly grown the last couple of decades. It's increased popularity has brought it to the forefront of globalization. Technological advances...
    2,091 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip hop - 1873 Words
    Hip hop music, also called hip-hop,[1][2] rap music,[2][3][4] or hip-hop music,[2][5] is a music genre consisting of a stylized rhythmic music that commonly accompanies rapping, a rhythmic and rhyming speech that is chanted.[2] It developed as part of hip hop culture, a subculture defined by four key stylistic elements: MCing/rapping, DJing/scratching, break dancing, and graffiti writing.[6][7][8] Other elements include sampling (or synthesis), and beatboxing. While often used to refer to...
    1,873 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2342 Words
    Langston Hughes uses a variety of different themes in A Montage of a Dream Deferred, such as overcoming the struggles of Harlem, unstable relationships, inequality, and African Americans trying to pursue their dreams. Hughes explores these themes throughout each of his poems as he portrays the struggles African Americans went through to accomplish their goals while fighting racism and poverty. Hughes’ use of form in his poetry is also equivalent to forms seen in hip-hop music with the use of...
    2,342 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 3879 Words
    Hip hop was first used by Africa Bambatta (Godfather of Hip-Hop culture, Father of the Electro Funk sound, founder of the Universal Zulu Nation, visionary, historian, and the Master of Records) back in the early 80’s to describe the culture which incorporates: Break dancing, Djing (cuttin' and scratching) , Emceeing (rapping), and Graffing. Before that the word hip hop referred to a phrase that MC’s said on the mic. Hip hop is a lifestyle with its own language, dress, music and way of thinking...
    3,879 Words | 9 Pages
  • hip hop - 277 Words
    Pg.1 Hip Hop and R&B Draft Monique Gee 4/13/2014 Com/155 Daniella Bianchi-Laubsch Pg.2 Since the beginning of time music has been a major inspiration to most people. Music helps us to come through some of the toughest times in our lives as well as celebrating the highlights of our lives. There is not just one music genre that moves or inspires us most people are ecletic in a music sense. Although, different music genres evolve from others...
    277 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop - 963 Words
    “Hip-Hop, The Renaissance” By Christopher Bowman Christopher Bowman “Hip-Hop, The Renaissance” They say "they never really miss you til you dead or you gone" So on that note I’m leaving after the song. A wise MC by the name of Shawn Corey Carter told me this as his Black Album gave me identical eclectic vibes I felt listening to the likes of Digable Planets, Big L, Big Daddy Kane, Big Pun, Common, Mos Def and others artists born of “The Renaissance”. I have come to inform you...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2167 Words
    Hip Hop: The Movement and the Social Challenge Hip hop is a musical culture that has undergone rapid development and transformation since its origins during the 1970s in New York City. (I would consider rewording first sentence. The last part of the sentence should maybe be shortened and put at the beginning) What started off first as a relatively underground culture, has rapidly led to a major entertainment industry that has become largely commercialized within mainstream popular culture. (A...
    2,167 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1034 Words
    Hip Hop In the 1990’s hip hop culture went through major changes. Hip hop which originally started in the South Bronx as a street born cultural movement transformed into much more. There are four types also known as the pillars of hip hop, DJ-ing,MC-ing, ( also know as rapping ), break dancing, and graffiti. All of that pretty much faded away with the 90’s and rap was left to take control. Rap in the 1980’s was thought to be a force, until MC hammer,Tupac, and Biggie Smalls took over the...
    1,034 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip-Hop Music and Its Adverse Affect on Women
    Hip-Hop Music and Its Negative Impact on African American Women Irma Royster Sociology 370-01 Professor Woods 4 March, 2011 ABSTRACT In the world of hip-hop music, the message for young women is that in order to be considered beautiful, you have to take your clothes off or allow yourself to be demeaned and degraded by the rappers/hip-hop artist in the entertainment field. People outside the African American community see these portrayals...
    1,653 Words | 6 Pages
  • Rock and Hip Hop the most Loved Forms of Music
    Rock verses Hip Hop Rock and Hip Hop are two of the most loved forms of music today. Unfortunately many lovers of Rock despise Hip Hop and vise versa. Personally, I love both and believe that both genres are great in thier own ways. I am going to compare and contrast Rock music and Hip Hop music in the categories of lyrics, beats, and sound. First I will discuss lyrics; lyrics are the words in the song. Artists in both genres use lyrics that many people find offensive. This is more...
    581 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music Mirrors All Urban Society
    Hip Hop Music Mirrors All Urban Society From 1950 to the late 1980’s, social conflicts all over the world encouraged the success of Hip Hop due its ability to mirror the negative and positive aspects of society, and in doing this, the concept of Hip Hop’s real lyrics were very easily translated and adopted overseas. To understand Hip Hop’s ability to migrate around the world, it must be understood what Hip Hop was created out of. First, American Urban society, from the Civil Rights Era until...
    3,453 Words | 8 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music and African American Community
    What Effect Does the Music Censorship Has on today’s Society? This Topic Interest Me A lot Because A lot Of Society Problems Comes from the Censorship in Todays Music. I Have Many Questions about the Censorship in Today’s Music, Is Half of the Violence That Is Going on in the African American Community’s From the Censorship in Today’s Music? Is The Music Censorship Influences The Lives Of Many People? Is The Censorship In Todays Music Is The Cause Of Violence All Together? Do Many People Try To...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music and Jay-z Shawn Carter
    Shawn Carter aka Jay-Z Shawn Carter, also know as Jay-Z, is an American rapper, record producer, and entrepreneur. He was born on December 4th, 1969 in Brooklyn, New York. Their mother raised him and his 3 siblings. He Attended Eli Whitney High School and Trenton High School, but did not graduate. He started rapping in the early ‘90’s. He didn’t have a major record deal, so he sold CD’s out of his cars. In 1995, He started his own record label called Roc-A-Fella records. Jay-Z has dropped...
    260 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop vs. House
    Compare and Contrast The Sounds of Life House and Hip Hop, are two very similar genres of music. However, no matter how similar these two types of music sound, they are still very different. Hip Hop and House music are two very popular kinds of music today. Some Hip Hop artists that you might be familiar with are MosDef, The Roots, De La Soul, Jurassic 5. Some House music artists are Mark Farina, Chemical Brothers, Inland Knights, JT Donaldson and Deadmau5. All of these artists and groups...
    922 Words | 3 Pages
  • Misogyny: Hip Hop Artists
    Pardon the pun, but when it comes to degrading and sexist representations of women in music, does hip hop deserve its bad rap? Almost exclusively blamed for the negative images of women in music videos, hip hop is often perceived as unforgivingly misogynistic. In hip hop and rap, many of the lyrics and images portray women of all ethnicities as sexual objects and depict the exploitation of and violence against women. The image of dozens of semi-naked women dancing provocatively around one...
    1,111 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cultural Impact of Hip Hop
    The Cultural Impact of Hip Hop Music The Main Impact of Hip-hop music is on the Kids of today. The music, slang and clothing are a couple of examples of heavy influences. Why can't they be more like ... actually kids today are pretty much the same are their parents and grandparents were when it comes to creating their own culture. Only now, instead of flappers, hippies or punks, we've got a generation of youths influenced by hip-hop culture. It's hard to argue that the current domination...
    1,095 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Nationalism - 938 Words
    Jason Chanthorn Christopher y West African American History from 1865 Journal Article- The State of Rap: Time and Place Hip hop is a form of art that has been popular for the past twenty years. Although people in recent years often mistake rap music as vulgar and ill-mannered, the hip hop community continues to provide a great way to channel emotion and soul into their music. In his article, “The State of Rap: Time and Place” Jeffrey Louis Decker illustrates the black nationalism within...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • Roots of Hip Hop - 968 Words
     “The Roots and Stylistic Foundations of the Rap Music and Tradition” Hip-Hop as well as many other artistic cultural forms we practice today can be related back to African culture and various traditions. Author of The Roots and Stylistic Foundations of the Rap Music and Tradition, Cheryl Keyes, discuss’ the spirit, style, tradition, emotions, culture and the delivery of music. Keyes says that many of these practices can be traced back to the West Afrikan Bardic Tradition in particular....
    968 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Compare and Contrast
    Originating in the 1970's among the African American and Latino communities, Hip-hop was born in South Bronx, New York City. Hip hop is a music genre that has a consistent backing beat, while the beat is playing the lyricist rhythmically speaks over the beat, which has become known as rapping. Throughout the 80s and 90s hip-hop gained popularity with major artists such as 2pac, Biggie Smalls, Dr Dre, and The Sugar Hill Gang. In the early days of hip hop, rappers primarily speak of their...
    379 Words | 1 Page
  • Gangs and Hip-Hop - 1257 Words
    In an atmosphere dominated by gang activity, it is evident that the most popular way of seeking freedom from this harsh environment of drugs and violence is self-expression through the popular culture of hip-hop. Whether it is dance, music, or even the fashion aspect of hip-hop, it seems to be the most common escape from such rough surroundings. It is also very apparent that many of these escapees actually make a living out of indulging themselves in the hospitable culture of hip-hop. In fact,...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • Women's Image in Hip Hop
    Women, namely African American, have played a crucial role in Hip Hop culture: from the beginning with Cindy Campbell the sister of Kool Herc — who demonstrated her entrepreneurship of promoting his block parties; the idea of entrepreneurship is still deeply seeded in Hip Hop today—to Debra Lee, the president and CEO of BET. However, accounts of hip hop often downplay, or completely leave out, the contributions of women to hip hop as artist, entrepreneurs, producers, writers, etc. Women have...
    3,372 Words | 8 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Behavior - 1253 Words
    Ja’len Pompey 09/16/14 English 100-02 Prof. Jackson It’s Not the Music, It’s Probably Just You Many people assume that the reason why young, African-American teens behave a certain way is because of the music they listen to these days. The music that these urban kids are listening to is primarily Hip Hop which is if you don’t know is a genre of music that is characterized by a performer speaking rhythmically, or rapping, over a backing track that often but not always consists of...
    1,253 Words | 4 Pages
  • Beef in Hip-Hop - 340 Words
    Beef in Hip-Hop The hip-hop world is a constant struggle, and at times seems like war. Vicious rhymes are being thrown back and forth daily from rappers trying to prove their street credibility. 50 Cent and Ja Rule, both products of the mean streets of southeast Queens came head to head in early 2000. The violence between the two have helped to sell records. But when is the price too high? Violence, both verbal and actual, has been escalating to a level not seen in a while in these...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop and the Crack Epidemic
    It was during the mid-1980s that the emergence of a new smokable form of cocaine, called crack, had been introduced to the United States. Crack, was highly-addictive and swept through impoverished areas of cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Oakland, and Miami. In the end it caused devastating effects for black and Latino Americans. As crack cocaine was becoming a grim and rising epidemic, hip hop was evolving alongside it. It was in the 1980s that crack cocaine and hip hop became the two...
    1,688 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Research - 291 Words
    Hip-Hop 2/19/2013 Research Proposal My topic is how the Trinity has come to shape or define how we, the public define hip-hop. The Trinity is the idea of how hip-hop has become ill or sick due to the fact that it has evolved from the old traditional days into the new pimp, “ho“, and “gangsta” type of hip-hop. In my paper I will diagnose what the you would consider the original thoughts were of hip-hop and how they have been altered. The thought back then for what we know now wasn’t...
    291 Words | 1 Page
  • In Defense of Hip hop - 946 Words
    “In Defense of Hip-Hop” The article “In Defense of Hip-Hop” was an article written by Cathleen Rountree. Rountree claims hip-hop is unfairly made the scape goat of violent words and acts by Congress and other “bastions of self-righteousness” (para.1). Rountree uses comparison by comparing the way some individual claim “Hip Hop made me do it” to a popular phrase by Flip Wilson, “The Devil made me do it!” Rountree also utilizes her personal experiences by stating the documenting “Tupac...
    946 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip-Hop: A New Generation
    Hip-Hop: A New Generation Hip-hop was born out of the Bronx during the 1970s. Artists such as Grandmaster Flash, DJ Kool Herc and Afrika Bambaata mixed funk, soul and Jamaican "toasting" (chanting over music) to create a type of hip-hop. Since its early formation, hip-hop has become one of the world’s biggest-selling musical genres. Its influence on Western society is far reaching and hip-hop is often referred to as a "culture". Hip-Hop has had a notable influence on fashion, language, art...
    681 Words | 2 Pages
  • Politics and Hip-Hop - 802 Words
    Music is an art form and source of power. Many forms of music reflect culture and society, as well as, containing political content and social message. Music as social change has been highlighted throughout the 20th century. In the 1960s the United States saw political and socially oriented folk music discussing the Vietnam War and other social issues. In Jamaica during the 1970s and 1980s reggae developed out of the Ghetto’s of Trench town and expressed the social unrest of the poor and the...
    802 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Influences - 818 Words
    Hip hop is a musical genre which developed alongside hip hop culture, defined by key stylistic elements such as rapping, DJing, sampling, scratching and beatboxing. Hip hop began in the Bronx of New York City in the 1970s, primarily among African Americans, Jamaican Americans, and, to an extent, Latino Americans. The term rap is often used synonymously with hip hop, but hip hop denotes the practices of an entire subculture. Rapping, also referred to as MCing or emceeing, is a vocal style in...
    818 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop vs. Rock
    “Music is the Key to Creativity. Music fuels the mind and thus fuels our creativity. A Creative mind has the ability to make discoveries and create innovations.”(http://www.pianoacrossamerica.com) Music has been around for thousands of years. Today there are many different music genres. Rock and hip hop are two of the most popular music genres. These two music genres are both alike, but also have differences. Rock and hip hop have many similarities. One of the main similarities is the types...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Dance - 576 Words
    What’s your favorite dance style? For me, I love to dance! It is my favorite thing to do. Hip-Hop dance is the most I like. If you can do the moves in hip hop, you will be more flexible for those other kind of dance such as ballet. It is a lot of fun, and you can look “bad” and scare people away by dancing. There are various other popular dance styles used with hip-hop dance, which include breaking, popping and locking. Breaking is a kind of street dance. It is also dances by people who are...
    576 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tattoos and Hip-Hop (Sociology)
    Hip-hop music and tattoos are important to many teenagers of society today because these are forms of self expression. Although, these forms of expression, along with any form of expression, convey positive and negative message because as people, we have positive and negative emotions. Why are these forms of expression so popular in teens? And why is it mostly teens?We should pay close attention to the negative effects of these cultural trends because it shapes the the people of today, the...
    845 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Planet - 2875 Words
    For as long as mankind has walked on this earth, music has been an important part of our culture and lifestyles. Each walk of life beats to a different drum. Different cultures use music for many aspects of their lives; for religious purposes, for celebrations, for comfort, for sorrow, for relaxation, for sports, for dances, for energy, for learning, for sleeping, and for sexual experiences. Everyone uses music for something. Music connects with people and reaches them in ways that words...
    2,875 Words | 7 Pages
  • Hip Hop Never Stops
    Music is a language understood all over through its rhythm and the feeling it can give a person. It defines personality and demonstrates emotions better than any other means of expression. Hip-Hop gives adolescents a way to escape from problems and troubles of their lives and articulate their emotions through dance, rapping, beat boxing, DJing and graffiti. Hip-Hop is more than just a genre that most people don’t understand. It is a civil movement of the public conveying who they are and what is...
    1,369 Words | 3 Pages
  • essay on hip hop - 1511 Words
    English 101 September 11, 2013 For the love of Music Everyone expresses themselves in a variety of ways getting lost in their own world only to be understood by them, this lost realm in which people enter is very vague, there isn’t much to it but the feelings and emotions brought upon by the music. Certain songs or artists/bands seem to strike very emotional ties with many people and that includes me, but idea of what music is undefined. Music doesn’t take shape or size but it...
    1,511 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rap and Hip Hop Culture
    Thomas Runyan Comparison Paragraph Dr. Andrews Mar 22, 2011 Hip Hop and its Rap Culture counterpart comparison It was 1977, and the Summer of Sam was in full swing in New York. But in the neighborhoods and housing projects of the “boogie down” Bronx New York, a new art form was developing called Hip Hop. This new art form would change America and transcend a generation forever with its influences on fashion, music, and lifestyle. Hip Hop is an urban lifestyle that consists of different...
    360 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop morals - 875 Words
    Hip-Hop Artists: Role Models in the Music Industry Introduction: -Ice Breaker: Name and what is your favorite music artist? (preferably hip hop artist) -When you hear the term hip hop, what comes to mind? What is hip-hop? A culture and form of ground breaking music and self expression with elements that consisted of the elements of graffiti art, DJing, MCing, and breaking. It began in the 1970s as an underground movement in the South Bronx area of New York City. Hip hop is used as...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Is Hip Hop Dead???
    Exploratory Paper Mrs. Dickens RHT 160-052 15 February 2008 Is Hip Hop Dead??? I can still recall the first hip hop album I listened to. It was Reasonable Doubt by Jay Z. I remember how I instantly fell in love with the lyrics. I hadn’t heard anything like it before, primarily because I only listened to R&B and some watered down rap music. The lyrics were hard hitting. They meant something. I could his hunger through the speakers as he rapped his song entitled “Can I Live” which said “Well...
    1,491 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip-Hop and Hyper-Commercialism
    Hip-Hop and Hyper-commercialism Simple beat, simple rhyme scheme, strong message. "Vans don't cost G's, real niggaz wear these – Vans," says a member of The Pack in the music video aptly titled "Vans." You may be asking yourself, "So, what's the big deal?" The big, highly lucrative deal is the marriage between big name corporations and their partnership with hip-hop. It's nothing new: Run-DMC had "My adiddas", LL Cool J wore Kangol hats, and even Jay-Z incorporated drinking Cristal into his...
    2,039 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hop Goes Global
    Hip-Hop Goes Global It has been a quarter of a century since hip-hop first made its mark on the American music scene. Hip-hop has become a popular trend that is echoing around the world. By definition, hip-hop refers to a culture that embraces a particular music, language, attitude, and dress fashioned after disadvantaged urban youth. Born out of the ghettos of the South Bronx, New York, and created by black and Latino youth in the late 1970's and early 1980's, this music genre closely...
    929 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Degrade Women
    Some believe that the Hip Hop industry manipulates the young minds of our new generation against women, do you? Back when Hip-Hop began, it was originally meant to send a message of unity. Doug E Fresh quoted "Hip-Hop is supposed to uplift and create, to educate people on a larger level and to make a change." Old-School Hip-Hop was about storytelling and poetry as well, where you're from and telling your story in a good manner. Unfortunately Hip-Hop will never be the same as it was in the...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • Understanding Hip Hop Therapy
    The article "Hip Hop Therapy" by Edgar H. Tyson explains the results of a study in which researchers explore a form of therapy for troubled teens that uses rap music's lyrics. Although in the past these experiments including rap music and troubled youth have focused on the negative effects, this study utilizes a combination of previously effective therapeutic theories to affect them positively. It makes sense that these researchers are trying and tap into this rarely used genre, since it is such...
    301 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop as a Cultural Movement
    Anson Wong WRI 1200 Prof. Patrice Wilson May 14, 2010 Hip-hop as a Cultural Movement What first comes to mind nowadays when you hear the word ‘hip-hop’? Most people think of a gangster embellished in large diamonds, sporting baggy clothes, huge cars, all with a general disregard for the welfare of humanity. It wasn’t always like this: hip-hop was originally born as a recreational activity, used as an outlet to cope with poverty. The notion of hip-hop has clearly changed in a big way...
    2,620 Words | 7 Pages
  • Belonging to Hip-Hop - 657 Words
    Belonging to Hip-Hop Hip-Hop today has become more than a simple pleasure, and has become a business that ranges from socks to accessories. In Jason Tanz’s, “Selling Down: The Marketing of the Hip-Hop Nation,” readers see why corporations turn to hip-hop as a marketing platform. Tanz explains, “We can change ourselves through listening, make ourselves better and more comfortable and more accepting and accepted than we are,” saying that people usually want things to satisfy themselves and...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • The commodity of Hip Hop - 1278 Words
    Hip-Hop as a Commodity As Alexis de Tocqueville stated in a description about Americans, “the recollection of the shortness of life is a constant spur to him. Besides the good things that he possesses, he every instantly fancies a thousand others that death will prevent him from trying if he does not try them soon.” In a country that promoted commodification and mass production, American society thrived on its quest for new and exciting things. Nearly two centuries after his report, what...
    1,278 Words | 4 Pages
  • Narrative Essay on Hip-Hop
    Hip-Hop Comparison Quinton Frizell ENGL112 March 13, 2011 Nelly Aguilar Growing up in the 1980’s and the 90’s I became a huge fan of Hip-Hop music. My friends and I used to sit around for hours listening to our favorite rappers on the radio and watching the videos on television. We would argue for hours about who was a better lyricist and why. Now as I have grown older and the music I have grown to love and still listen to has changed, I find myself asking a very good question. What...
    757 Words | 2 Pages
  • Religion, Diversity, and Hip-Hop
    The impact of religion is sometimes apparent in many different forms of art. One type of artistic expression that religion is sometimes expressed in is music. Whether it is specifically Christian-based music or secular, musicians of all genres may eventually write a song or sing about their religious beliefs at some point. There is a very broad spectrum of diversity in music. People from all around the world with different backgrounds, race, religion, and style can express themselves in this...
    914 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop in History - 3436 Words
    Introduction: Hip Hop in History: Past, Present, and Future Author(s): Derrick P. Alridge and James B. Stewart Source: The Journal of African American History, Vol. 90, No. 3, The History of Hip Hop (Summer, 2005), pp. 190-195 Published by: Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20063997 Accessed: 27/10/2009 14:22 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available...
    3,436 Words | 53 Pages
  • Masculinity in Rap and Hip Hop
    Tasia Walker Masculinity in Rap and Hip Hop Today in Hip Hop every rapper has to portray themselves as being hard, having a lot of girls in their circle and having money. Since the beginning of the American society being considered a real man was to be able to protect their families. When television came around western films portrayed men as either strong or weak and defined their masculinity as being the stronger man because of their guns. For...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop in Society - 3523 Words
    Introduction Music has an immense impact on todays society, and now that hip hop is one of the most listened to genres, hip hop artist including rappers have a venue where they can vent and show the emotions that they are feeling. According to Tia C.M. Tyree in the article Lovin Momma & Hatin' on Baby Mama; Rap is an avenue used by some Black men to express a variety of emotions, feelings and ideas; hope, frustration, anger, love and misogyny. What is being focused on is the misogynistic...
    3,523 Words | 9 Pages
  • The history of Hip-Hop - 619 Words
    The history of hip-hop originated in the late 60th of the 20th century and continues to grow in the present day. Hip hop music first emerged with disc jockeys creating rhythmic beats by looping breaks on two turntables. This was later known as rap, a rhythmic style of chanting or poetry presented in 16 bar measures or time frames. Hip hop is a form of musical expression and artistic subculture that originated in African American and Hispanic American communities during the 1970s in New York...
    619 Words | 2 Pages
  • Communication and Culture - Hip Hop
    Use your knowledge of selected theoretical perspectives and key concepts to evaluate the views about hip hop expressed here. (40 marks) Hip hop marks a significant change in society. It represents the expression of disenfranchised young people originally from the Bronx. However what argument A tries to express is that hip hop is slowly loosing its value and significance looking from a Marxist point of view. Hip hop had many values associated with its subculture, values were based on there life...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Black Women
    Reflection II Today's society is heavily impacted by the music world. Music has a way with influencing its listeners, and many may argue that for some music types, this is a bad thing, especially for black women. Even with many new genres arising from the contemporary music scene , hip-hop has maintained it's leading popularity. In Jennifer McLune's “Hip-Hop's Betrayal of Black Women”, Hip-Hop is portrayed as a negative contender in the advocacy of female activism. Through the argument in...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop: A Misconception
    Hip Hop: A Misconception The year is 1973. The location is 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, South Bronx, New York City, New York. Clive Campbell, also known as DJ Kool Herc, is using two turntables and various R&B and funk records to mix percussion beats and create breaks, while others are dancing and speaking rhythmically to the beat. This is the birth of the hip hop. The art that is hip hop would quickly become a worldwide anomaly, and rather than fade away as swiftly as it grew like many...
    3,707 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hip Hop Influence - 434 Words
    Why you should listen to Hip-Hop music There are many different genres of music available to listen to. Hip-Hop music has gotten a bad rap from the beginning, no pun intended. Good music should evoke some type of emotion from the listener. In hip-hop the artist attempts to paint a picture for the listener by telling a story through spoken word over a beat. Sure some of the lyrics may be raunchy and even destructive, however just like a motion picture director that tells a story through a...
    434 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Is Dead
    Hip Hop Is Dead “Hip Hop is dead” this was a very bold statement that a world famous rapper from Queens by the name of Nas said when he released his 2006 album “Hip Hop Is Dead”. This album Nas released on December 19th turned a lot of heads and created a huge amount of controversy. Nas is a part of southern hip-hop, which has been blamed for the downfall of hip-hop. Yet many of the fellow southern rappers from the south have made statements that go against this album. Artists such as...
    761 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Childrenswear - 1263 Words
    TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 2 The Beginning of Hip Hop 3 Hip Hop Influence on Fashion 5 Moodboard 8 Color Story 9 Collection Look 1 10 Look 2 11 Look 3 12 Look 4 13 Look 5 14 Target Market 15 Conclusion 16 Bibliography 17 INTRODUCTION In the 1970s, black people in United States, who are African American was living in limited environment. They can’t get the same facilities like the white people. This suppressed...
    1,263 Words | 7 Pages
  • Hip Hop Pioneers - 372 Words
    Hip-Hop Pioneers The pioneers of hip-hop started to surface around the mid 70's. The different components to Hip-Hop were Dance, DJ‘s, and MC's. Some say it originated in the Bronx, NY, with DJ's like GrandMaster Flash who invented different techniques on the mix board. He later joined up with a group of rappers call Furious Five and created hits like "The Roof is on Fire." Another Influential Hip-Hop Artist includes Joseph Simmons and Darryl McDaniels, also known as Run and D.M.C. The...
    372 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop History and Reflections
    Rap is something you do, Hip hop is something you live… A historical reflection of Hip Hop Name: Jake Parker Student number: 100072668 Date: Friday, March 30, 2007 Professor: Mark Adam Let's bring it back with that Ol' New York rap. Hip hop is amazing, straight up. It's not just the music, it's everything involved with the four elements of hip hop; the emceeing (rapping), the DJing, the graffiti, and the break dancing. When I was younger I used to search for "hip-hop" and "rap"...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • From Jazz to Hip Hop
    From Jazz to Hip Hop New genres of music often start off with an underground following. As the music evolves it eventually loses its subversive feel. It is no longer revolutionary nor a creative art form, thus it becomes a product of popular culture found amongst the demographics of MTV. One popular style of music that grew by countering American culture is jazz. Today jazz is often compared to hip-hop; both art forms have grown from an underground following to counter American culture....
    1,960 Words | 5 Pages
  • the decline of hip hop - 1150 Words
     The decline of hip-hop Name: Georjette Jeanlouis Class: English CP Date: 6/6/2014 There are many definitions of this term called hip-hop; mainly hip-hop is not just a genre of music… or just a word. Hip-Hop is a lifestyle some people live by that is consisting of four elements-- such as break dancing, graffiti art, disc jockey, and master of comedy-- coining together to form this term called “Hip- Hop”. Hip-hop has taken America by the storm with their new fashion trends, latest...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip-Hop Essay - 949 Words
    Shelby Clemmons Ms. Lancaster English 1301: 5:45pm-7:05pm February 15, 2012 The Positives and Negatives of Hip-Hop In Geoffrey Bennett’s essay titled, “Hip-Hop: A Roadblock or Pathway to Black Empowerment,” he speaks about the positive and negative effects that hip-hop has on the Black Community. Bennett goes all the way to the beginning of hip-hop, which he says took place in the early 1980s with rappers such as Run DMC, Public Enemy, Sugar Hill Gang and many others. The author...
    949 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop vs America
    Hip-Hop vs. America By: Phairron Price Angel Jenkins There is a huge controversy going on right now between the Hip-Hop Culture and America. When we say America we really we The U.S. Even though hip-hop is worldwide. Hip Hop means the whole culture of the movement. When you talk about rap. Rap is of the hip-hop culture. The emceeing. The d-jaying is part of the hip-hop culture. The dressing the languages are all part of the hip-hop culture. The break-dancing, the b-boys, and...
    1,140 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rationalization of Hip Hop - 3405 Words
     Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: Contemporary Hip-Hop Sameness In contemporary popular culture, hip-hop music is as ubiquitous as Taylor Swift, the new teen pop sweetheart, or arguably more popular than the once-prevailing American genre, rock and roll music. However, although one can argue that a wide breadth of hip-hop pervades the airways, it would be very difficult to contend that a wide depth of the genre is played. In fact, the vast majority of mainstream hip-hop music focuses on money and...
    3,405 Words | 10 Pages
  • Hip Hop in Society - 1458 Words
    HIP-HOP: STARTED FROM THE BOTTOM AND NOW WE ARE HERE Rasheeda Brown AP English 12 In order for one to understand the genre Hip-hop, one must know the origination, the changes over the years, and the impact hip-hop has on today’s society. Hip-hop has been around for more than a few decades and it has been considered to be one of the most controversial subjects for quite some time. Some people say hip hop encourages hate and violence, others say it encourages self believe and tackle social...
    1,458 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Fashion - 662 Words
    Jordan Royse According to KRS One, Hip Hop fashion is one of the nine "extended" elements of hip-hop culture. Hip-hop fashion refers to a particular style of dress that originated with African-American and Latino people in New York City. Hip hop fashion has changed drastically over the years. During the 1980s, major hip-hop stars of like Run-DMC and LL Cool J wore things like large glasses, kangol hats, multi-finger rings, and sneakers. Artists such as Kurtis Blow and Big Daddy...
    662 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Effects - 2092 Words
    Hip-Hop’s Media Effects ------------------------------------------------- Term Paper Javier Sanchez Hip-Hop’s Media Effects ------------------------------------------------- Term Paper Javier Sanchez Music. What do you think of when you think of music? Do you think of your favorite singer/ band, or maybe your favorite song at the time; but how often do you think about how that one song, or artist(s) have affected your life, your outlook on politics, society, way of living or way of...
    2,092 Words | 6 Pages
  • Hip Hop Annoted Bibliography
    Annotated Bibliography Research Question: What are the history/cultural importance of Hip Hop? Source #1: Hill, Collins Patricia. From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism. Philadelphia: Temple Up, 2006. Print. Patricia Hill’s l idea of writing this book was to gather different essays for each chapter that were written by African Americans that talks about how they dealt without having the right to stand up for themselves. The importance of this book is to talk about...
    742 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop: Dead or Alive
    Michael Hinden English 101 Honors Hip-Hop: Dead or Alive Since the invention of the internet and P2P (peer 2 peer) downloading all genres of music have become victims of free music downloads and suffered in record sales. However, why has hip-hop music seemingly taken an extra hit? According to Billboard Magazine, “since 2000, rap sales dropped 44%,and declined to 10% of all music sales, which, while still a commanding figure when compared to other genres, is a significant drop from the 13%...
    1,049 Words | 3 Pages
  • Quitting Hip Hop - 495 Words
    Quitting Hip-Hop Quitting Hip-Hop is about a woman named Michaela Angela Davis who can no longer reconcile her love of a great rap beat with the derogatory images of women pervasive in much of today’s music and videos. This article address’ the intended audience of parents and teens, it will inform the negative influence hip hop music videos has on society, and how she gets through the struggles of how she was a part of that influence. I believe the audience intended to read this...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Culture - 406 Words
    Hip Hop and Teenagers 1. What is your name? 2. What does hip hop mean to you? 3. What are the affects of hip hop in your life? 4. What are the affects of hip hop on the people around you? 5. Do you think hip hop has a good or bad influence on teenagers? 6. What are the negatives effects of hip hop on you 7. What are the positives effects of hip hop on you? 8. Do you recommend people to listen to hip hop? Why? What is hip hop to teenagers?...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Evolution of Hip-Hop - 1191 Words
    Malik Shannon Eng 22 Maddox March 9, 2013 The Evolution of Hip-Hop The world of music alone is always evolving, however we've come to a conclusion that the message the artist convey in hip-hop music in this generation are not helping out or paving the way for the next generation. The focus is to inform the readers that "smoke weed everyday" or "finding Molly" getting women is not what the hip-hop scene is all about. Hip-hop artists tell stories, or teach listeners about...
    1,191 Words | 7 Pages
  • Glocalisation of Hip-Hop - 1855 Words
    Critics of the global media giants claim that global media is increasingly homogenised. Others, in contrast, argue that global media is thoroughly hybridised. Discuss the evidence for each of these positions with reference to hip-hop. I: Introduction Increasingly over the past twenty years, hip-hop has transformed from “marginalised to mainstream” (Motley & Henderson, 2008, p.243) as more and more of the world’s youth follow the genre. With these growing numbers all over the world there...
    1,855 Words | 5 Pages
  • Women in Hip Hop - 1556 Words
    “Woman in Hip-Hop” Although hip-hop generally contains male emcees, there has been a plethora of female emcees in the earlier hip-hop days that have made a positive impact on the hip-hop community and the culture itself. Hip-Hop started in 1970 by DJ Kool Herc, but it wasn’t until 1979 that the first female emcee emerged. Her name was Wendy Clark A.K.A “Lady B”. She began spinning hip-hop records on WHAT 1340 AM in Philadelphia. She expanded hip-hop outside of New York to Philadelphia....
    1,556 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Nation Language
    The Language of Hip Hop Term paper for the PS "The English Language in America" SS 2006 handed in by Sebastian Ludyga Magdeburg, 25.09.2006 Table of contents 1. Introduction to hip hop 1 2. Hip Hop Nation Language 2 2.1 Features of the HHNL 3 2.2 The relationship of HHNL and AAL 5 3. Practical application 6 4. Conclusion...
    2,867 Words | 8 Pages
  • Hip Hop America - 538 Words
    Hip Hop America Nelson George's Hip Hop America discusses the nature of hip hop along with the relationship between African Americans and America. Many take the idea of hip hop to be just African Americans and rap music. George continually focuses on hip hop's many contradictions. He addresses how hip hop represents race, ethnicity, class, gender, and generation. George covers much familiar ground: how B-beats became hip hop; how technology changed popular music, which helped to create new...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Stars - 654 Words
     Research Essay #1 draft Many Hip Hop Star Influence Teens Have you ever wanted to be like a hip hop star? Many teenagers choose hip hop star as their role model because that’s all they see and like the way they dress and act. Hip Hop stars influence teenagers in this century by the things they sing or rap in songs, how they dress, and what they do. Hip Hop singers and rappers influence teenagers in their music of today. Ever since the rise of rap and hip-hip music, teen have been...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Culture - 2240 Words
    Assignment for Media with Cultural Studies Level Two Youth Cultures, Subcultures and Industry Hip-Hop Culture This essay aims to examine the importance of the Hip-Hop culture in 21st century society. It will begin with consideration of the history of Hip-Hop, discussing its stylistic adaptations, cultural preferences and concerns, referring to the studies of black culture by Ellis Cashmore and Mark Neal. Within this I will explore the ethnicity and authenticity of the culture, with...
    2,240 Words | 7 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Black Women
    Hip-hop is the latest expressive manifestation of the past and current experience as well as the collective consciousness of African-American and Latino-American youth. But more than any music of the past, it also expresses mainstream American ideas that have now been internalized and embedded into the psyches of American people of color over time. A part of the learned mainstream American culture is sexism and misogyny. Hip-hop culture is frequently condemned for its misogynistic...
    1,729 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Hip-Hop Defense - 795 Words
    The Hip Hop Defense Everyone has an opinion about the influence of hip--hop music on our nations youth. Many people, such as politicians and the ultra conservative, feel the influence is destructive and incites violent behavior. Some people, for instance the media, believe hip- hop glamorizes inappropriate behaviors and actions while promoting the demoralization of women in general, but more specifically black women. Few people are willing to speak out and defend hip-hop music as...
    795 Words | 3 Pages
  • Religion and Hip Hop analysis
    Davon Brown 11/25/13 Hip Hop is a cultural art form whose elements like MCing, breakdancing, graffiti, and DJing are utilized by participating members to illustrate their life experiences and the world around them. Hip Hop artists and most songs display religious aspects like communicating to a supernatural, grappling with existential questions, and the articulation of subjectivity. One song that illustrate different religious aspects is Lord Knows by Ace Hood. Ace Hood is viewed as an...
    822 Words | 2 Pages


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