Great Plains Essays & Research Papers

Best Great Plains Essays

  • Great Plains - 508 Words
    THE GREAT PLAINS The Great Plains Native Americans were indigenous people who live in the center of North America. They covered states from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River and cover some provinces in Canada to Texas. The Great Plains Native Americans were separated into two groups called the Plain Indians and Prairie Indians. The Great Plains Native Americans were rich with culture, wore traditional clothing, and made their own tools. Some of the Great Plains Native...
    508 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Physical Geography of the Great Plains
    University of the Philippines Diliman College of Social Sciences and Philosophy Department of Geography Final Paper in Geography 155 THE GREAT CENTRAL PLAINS Mary Angelie A. Pasion PHYSICAL BACKGROUND OF THE GREAT CENTRAL PLAINS General Information and Physical Background The North American Plains include the area from the Canadian boreal forest in the north to central Texas in the south and from the Rocky Mountain in the west to the Missouri River and the eastern boundaries of...
    3,267 Words | 9 Pages
  • Buffalo The Great Animal Of The Plains.
    Buffalo The Great Animal Of The Plains Buffalos or bison are one of the beasts that used to freely roam the Wild West. They are one of the strongest and most powerful animals in North America. Millions once roamed the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Today they're far fewer and less common. Most buffaloes live in national parks and protected areas. What Do Buffaloes Look Like? Buffaloes are very large animals that sort of resemble a bull. They have a big hump on their back close to their...
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Great Plains Essay - 777 Words
    Have you ever been in a place of green with forests and animals everywhere? Well, where some of the Native Americans lived, there were such things. Native American tribes such as the Crow lived in the Great Plains. The Crow tribe of the Great Plains were nomadic and followed the buffalo migrations which provided their food. This tribe spent a good part of the year living in camps that could easily be dismantled and moved to follow the buffalo migrations. Other tribes of the plains were...
    777 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Great Plains Essays

  • Plain Indians - 437 Words
    When the people were hunting they lived in teepees. The teepee always faced east. The outside of the teepee was decorated with paintings of animals, stars, or other objects. To build the teepee the women took long sticks and stuck them in the ground in the form of a circle. They leaned the poles together at the top. The poles were fastened with hides. The poles were covered with buffalo hides. Two longer poles were attached to the top corners. c. The Indians had little bit of furniture. Their...
    437 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plains Indians - 276 Words
    PLAINS INDIANS The American Indians are among the best known of all Native Americans. These Indians played a significant role in shaping the history of the West. Some of the more noteworthy Plains Indians were Big Foot, Black Kettle, and Crazy Horse. Big Foot Big Foot was also known as Spotted Elk. Born in the Northern Great Plains, he eventually became a Minneconjou Teton Sioux chief. He was part of a tribal delegation that traveled to Washington, D.C., and worked to establish schools...
    276 Words | 1 Page
  • Plains Indians - 1806 Words
    For many tribes of Plains Indians whose bison-hunting culture flourished during the 18th and 19th centuries, the sun dance was the major communal religious ceremony . . . the rite celebrates renewal - the spiritual rebirth of participants and their relatives as well as the regeneration of the living earth with all its components . . . The ritual, involving sacrifice and supplication to insure harmony between all living beings, continues to be practiced by many contemporary native Americans....
    1,806 Words | 4 Pages
  • Development of the Plains - 507 Words
    How did the railroads develop the Great Plains? {16 marks} The railroads developed the Great plains in a lot of ways such as; law + order, work, communication and manifest destiny. Railroads helped develop the Great Plains as they made Law and order possible and enforceable. Before Law and Order the towns and villages were ran by vigilantes and road agents that not only controlled the towns viciously but unfairly as well. Due to railroads being built the Government were able to transport...
    507 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Dust Bowl: How did it Impact the Lives of Agricultural Families of the Great Plains?
     The Dust Bowl: How did it Impact the Lives of Agricultural Families of the Great Plains? December 19th, 2013 Ruth very much enjoyed her mile-long walks home from school in the Great Plains of Oklahoma. It seemed especially beautiful on this sunny afternoon in the fall of 1933. Apart from the peace and quiet of walking alone, she enjoyed the beautiful nature around her. The flatness of the land, which had recently been bountifully planted with green and...
    4,100 Words | 11 Pages
  • Plains Indians - 412 Words
    Plains Indians The American Plains Indians are among the best known of all Native Americans. There Indians played a significant role in shaping the history of the West. Some of the more noteworthy Plains Indians were Big Foot, Black Kettle, Red Cloud, Sitting Bull, and Spotted Tail. Big Foot Big Foot (? 1825-1890) was also known as Spotted Elk. Born in the Great Plains he eventually became a Minneconjou Teton Sioux chief. He was part of a tribal delegation that traveled to Washington, D.C.,...
    412 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Decimation of the Plains Indians - 482 Words
    Maddie Eddy Mrs. Hyde Honors US History/ 6th hour Feb. 27, 2013/ Plains Indians Paper Decimation of the Plains Indians The Plains Indians were affected negatively when Americans came to the west and took the lands from the Indians. Not only did the Americans kill off the buffalo till they were almost extinct, but the Americans also tried to “Americanize” the Native Americans. Indians either died off or were sent to reservations, where the Indians were treated awful by the white police system...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why did the plains Indians lose control of the plains?
     Why did the plains indians loase controll of the plains? Indians lost control of the plains due to white settlers. Although there are many causes which could of contributed to the Indians demise, it is hard to determine the most important. Some of these factors i think significant than others. One reason of why the indians lost controll of the plains was the development of homesteading. Homesteaders would fence of the land which the buffalo used to graze on and...
    735 Words | 2 Pages
  • Food and Environment of the Plains Indians
    The Plains Indians lived in the area from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains and from Canada to Mexico. The most important tribes were the Sioux, Blackfoot, Cheyenne, Crow, Kiowa, and Comanche. The plains area was hotter than 100 degrees in the summer, and could drop to 40 degrees below zero with heavy snows in the winter. The region was so dry that when it rained it often flooded. The Great Plains was made up of grasslands, valleys, streams, and hills. There were very...
    975 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Great American Dessert - 754 Words
    DBQ Essay The mass development of the West beyond the Mississippi did not occur until the 1860s in the middle of the Reconstruction Era. The environment helped shape this development and the lives of those who not only lived there but came to settle there as well. Both political and economical factors also helped for this expansion to occur. The settlement on these Great Plains, which came to be known as the “Great American Dessert” will leave large scars on the land as well on the inhabitants...
    754 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cheif Sharitarish of the Great Pawnees
    Danielle DuBroc Blake Ellis History 1301 09/22/12 Chief Sharitarish on Changes in Indian Life (Pg. 188) Chief Sharitarish, the principle chieftain of the once Great Pawnees who are a tribe that mainly hunted on the Great Plains, decided to pay a visit to the new president of the time, James Monroe. Impressed by the colonist’s ability to create beautiful buildings and large vessels, Chief Sharitarish praises them for their innovations for these creations are far from his own comprehension....
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • Why Were Buffalo so Important to the Plains Indians.
    Why were Buffalo so important to the Plains Indians? Plains Indians became totally dependent on the Buffalo for their existence and it provided them with food, shelter, tools, entertainment and clothing. The Plains Indians became traveling hunters because the Buffalo moved to different places and the Indians followed the vast herds that covered the Plains. Until the arrival of the horse, the Native Americans hunted on foot. As they followed the Buffalo killed as many animals as possible for...
    332 Words | 1 Page
  • Explain the ultimate defeat of the Plains Indians by whites. Select at least three major reasons for the decline of the Plains culture; then tell which you think was the most important and why.
    FRQ: Explain the ultimate defeat of the Plains Indians by whites. Select at least three major reasons for the decline of the Plains culture; then tell which you think was the most important and why. From the time that the Spanish reached the New World in 1492, European powers, and later on American, consistently tried to quash the native people, one way or another. Throughout the 1800s, and especially during the Gilded Age, the federal government’s attempts to confine the Native Americans to...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • ryur - 713 Words
    What Caused the Dust Bowl? The Dust Bowl was much more than an abnormal weather occurrence of wind and rain; It was actually the lack of rain. In ways farmers were hit the hardest because they lost all of their crops and everything on their farms. The Dust Bowl caused a bunch of problems in many different small towns and farms. Some families had to decide whether to move on away from their homes caused by the Dust Bowl or to stay and try to revive everything they had. There was nothing...
    713 Words | 2 Pages
  • Giants in the Earth - 669 Words
    O.E. Rölvaag’s thesis in the novel Giants in the Earthis well hidden throughout the text of the novel, but his purpose is very clear. The purpose of the book is to give the reader a full experience of how life was like for an immigrant to start all over again in an unknown, unexplored habitat. It also furnishes the reader with the knowledge of the hardship and consequences that the alien settlers dealt with on the prairie. The topics that Rölvaag writes about in the novel are...
    669 Words | 2 Pages
  • The worst hard time description
    Bam White :They were moving from the high desert chill of Las Animas, Colorado, to Littlefield, Texas, south of Amarillo, to start anew.. Bam White was a ranch hand, a lover of horses and empty skies. Archaeologists: were just starting to sort through a lost village, a place where natives. The Spanish: They brought horses, which had the same effect on the Plains Indian economy as railroads did on Anglo villages in the Midwest. Comanche: They migrated out of eastern Wyoming, Shoshone...
    536 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan
    The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan Presently, as many people enjoy the beauty of the prairie either in the north or in south, they fail or do not understand that a big proportion of those plains are consequently modern era ecological disaster. It is common to hear people talk about “the Dust Bowl or “the Dirty ‘30s”. This is where Timothy Egan in his non-fiction book The Worst Hard Time basis his book, i.e., on the historical 1930 Dust Bowl. In his book, Egan critically examines the origin...
    1,174 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sinclair Ross's Praire Isolation by Symbolism: "The Lamp at Noon"
    "The Lamp at Noon" is a short story that focuses on the reality of the desiccated, secluded, and expansive prairies. Set on the haunting Canadian prairies, weather emulates the emotions of Ellen, a housewife desperate for freedom of the dustbowl lifestyle. The authority of wind and dust seem to taunt Ellen and her husband, Paul, into desperation. Ross applies symbolism across the pages of "The Lamp at Noon" to inform the reader of the lonely emotions that are wrought by the desolate and barren...
    913 Words | 3 Pages
  • the dust bowl - 1707 Words
    Gabrielle Payne Ms. Molise 10/10/13 Causes of the Dustbowl In the year 1930 America’s economy was in a state of depression. The last thing America needed at this time was a catastrophic event to destroy the economy even more, but that is exactly what they got. The “Dust Bowl” drought is one of the worst climatic events in the history of the United States drought which devastated the United States central states region known as the Great Plains. The Dust Bowl worsened the already...
    1,707 Words | 5 Pages
  • Imatthewistudy's Documents - 607 Words
    How did the Plains Indians solve the problems of living on the Plains? The first three lessons of this unit will lead up to an assessment which will look at your ability to select and combine information from different sources and to structure and organise this information in your work. You will be working in a group and individually to find out about the lives of the Plains Indians. The Great Plains were a hostile environment to live in and as a result the Plains Indians had to solve...
    607 Words | 2 Pages
  • What Caused the Dust Bowl?
    Olisae Udemadu May 16, 2013 Core 2 The early 1900's were a time of turmoil for farmers in the United States, especially in the Great Plains region. After the end of World War I, overproduction by farmers resulted in low prices for crops. When farmers first came to the Midwest, they farmed as much wheat as they could because of the high prices and demand. Of the ninety-seven acres, almost thirty-two million acres were being cultivated. The farmers were careless in their planting of the crop,...
    753 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Dustbowl of America in the 1930's.
    The Dustbowl of America in the 1930’s The Dust Bowl of North America was a disaster in the early 1930's when huge parts of the Midwestern and Western farmlands of America became wastelands. This happened due to a series of dry years, which agreed, with the extension of agriculture in unsuitable lands. Droughts and dust storms caused by poor labor practice troubled farms and ranches of the Great Plains; causing a great migration of its people to other, more fertile, lands. The problem had...
    558 Words | 2 Pages
  • Violence in Old West - 728 Words
    How Violent was the Old West During the time frame of 1860-1890 there was an area in the West known as the Great Plains. Although, before it was designated as the Great Plains it was known as the Great American Desert. The Great Plains was originally home to buffalo and Indians labeled as Plains Indians which can be broken down into several different groups such as, the Lakota Indians, Pawnee Indians, and Cheyenne Indians just to name a few. Soon all that changed when the Idea of money...
    728 Words | 2 Pages
  • CHAPTER 5 Textbook PowerPoint
    The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier The culture of the Plains Indians declines as white settlers transform the Great Plains. Meanwhile, farmers form the Populist movement to address their economic concerns. Next Copyright © by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company The Americans: Reconstruction to the 21st Century Chapter 5 Changes on the Western Frontier SECTION 1 Cultures Clash on the Prairie SECTION 2 Settling on the Great...
    2,109 Words | 19 Pages
  • Dust Bowl Informational Essay
    Celina October 17, 2013 Dust Bowl The Dirty Thirties You cross dusty roads Coughing and plugging your nose The yellow-ish brown haze Is coming your way Nowhere to hide No one to lean beside You’re all alone With your aching bones Beginning in the 1930’s, and causing terror ever since, the Dust Bowl has been one of the worst times in our history. Many farms in the American Great Plains Region were destroyed because of the drought and dust storms. “It was this giant wall coming...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay 1 - 923 Words
    Native Americans, or Indians, or whatever people might choose call people who first came to North America, are pictured with bow and arrow, riding a horse, and hunting buffalos, or with a tomahawk in the hand, and a feather in their head trying to fight and be violent. The truth is people only see one side of the story. In reality Native Americans have a complex and diverse culture, that has evolved as the time has passed. They have gone from hunting mammoths, and collecting wild barriers to...
    923 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Conquest of the Far West - 7182 Words
    Griffin Weiss Mr. Arroyo U.S. History II Advanced Placement 1 September 2013 Chapter 16 Outline: The Conquest of the Far West The Societies of the Far West (434-441) The Western Tribes * Indian tribes were the most important group before the Anglo-American migration in the Far West * Western tribes developed several forms of civilization * More than 300,000 Indians lived along the pacific coast among them were Serrano, Chumash, Pomo, Maidu, Yurok, and Chinook * When the...
    7,182 Words | 22 Pages
  • The Dust Bowl - 452 Words
     The Dust Bowl was the name given to the Great Plains region devastated by drought in 1930s depression-ridden America. The 150,000-square-mile area, encompassing the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles and neighboring sections of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico, has little rainfall, light soil, and high winds, a potentially destructive combination. When drought struck from 1934 to 1937, the soil lacked the stronger root system of grass as an anchor, so the winds easily picked up the loose...
    452 Words | 2 Pages
  • American West Tribes - 1373 Words
    Sioux Indian Tribe The Sioux Indians were one of the largest tribes in the American West, so they were known as a nation. They are also called Lakota or Dakota. The name Sioux means ‘little snakes’. Like a lot of the other tribes, the Sioux were nomadic and lived in places like Wisconsin, North and South Dakota and Minnesota. The Sioux nation had a rich history and was a very powerful tribe. A Frenchman, Jean Duluth, moved into the Sioux territory in the 17th century and took control of most of...
    1,373 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dust Bowl - 526 Words
     Dalhart, Texas June 30, 1935 Dear President Roosevelt, Hello Mr. President, my name is Donald. I am 13 going on 14, I am from the Great Plains and I’ve been a victim of what they call the “Dust Bowl”. I’ve been trapped in my house for 100 hours due to these wild winds. The wind blows so hard sometimes I think my house is going to blow straight off the ground. Once the winds stop me and Paw walked out to see our fields blown over in dust; I can still see the dazed look on my father’s face...
    526 Words | 2 Pages
  • Black Tuesday - 406 Words
    Black Tuesday is the commonly used term for the catastrophic stock market crash of October 29, 1929 on Wall Street. But due to the hard downfall on the economy it was later known as Black Tuesday which was the onset of the great depression. Numerous circumstances caused Black Tuesday such as the following: excessive use of credit, weak farm economy, and overproduction of consumer goods. Automobiles, appliances, and radios were many of the goods that made an up rise in the 1920s. Using the...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • APUSH Gilded Age notes
    Unit 10: The Gilded Age Economic & social changes 1865 – 1920 Part one: The Last Frontier The Final settlement of the Trans-Mississippi West Historiography THE FRONTIER THESIS: Frederick Jackson Turner The Significance of the Frontier in American History – July 12, 1893 1890 Census – no more defined frontier line; had pockets of settlement spread out Turner Thesis: spirit and success of US is directly tied to westward expansion; a turning point in American Identity American...
    4,066 Words | 18 Pages
  • Cheyenne Native American Civiliztion
    Angel N. Ocañas Coach Adame W. History 11 October 2010 The Cheyenne Civilization A land undiscovered to the world, so rich with its natural beauty that many have settled in parts around it. One of which was the Cheyenne Tribe (TSE-TSEHESE-STAESTSE), during the mid 17th century. The Cheyenne were nomadic, roaming about from place to place frequently, or without a certain destination, and they traveled around the Americas. The Cheyenne were said to have started in the Great Plains region....
    977 Words | 3 Pages
  • Wagner Matinee vs the Story of an Hour
    A Comprehensive Analysis of “A Wagner Matinee” and “The Story of an Hour” On the surface, “A Wagner Matinee” and “The Story of an Hour” seem like completely different stories, with a dissimilar plot and unlike settings. “A Wagner Matinee” is a story about the effects and hardships of living on the Great Plains, and the sustaining power of music on the human spirit, while “The Story of an Hour” expresses the constraints of marriage in the 19th century. However, after thoroughly reading both...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gangs Questions for Histor 1212
    assignment gangs qu\estions 1)what are the conditions like in the five points area? poverty, rampant crime, decadence and despair. 2)describe the role of public officials like the firefighter? firefighters took on the role of other officials meaning they did their job and ithers too 3)who are the natives? the irish 4)describe the racism sentiment of many people in new york city. include persecution, discrimination, hatred or fear of the Irish great depression 1)describe...
    490 Words | 3 Pages
  • Heaven Is for Real - 787 Words
    Heaven is for Real “I want them to know that heaven is for real.” -Colton Burpo Have you ever wondered what is beyond this world? Heaven is for Real by Todd Burpo is an incredible story that has a shocking plot, followed by interesting characters and an inspiring theme. A young boy emerges from a life-saving surgery with remarkable stories of his visit to heaven. This book is filled with unbelievable events and great twists that will make you not want to put the book down! Heaven is for...
    787 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dust Bowl - 548 Words
    DBQ: What caused the Dust Bowl? In the 1930’s many people were devastated by vast dust storms. Many people suffered from them in Kansas, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Texas and some people even died. In the fiction book Out of the Dust, an Oklahoma girl named Billie Jo tells her story on how she survives the Dust Bowl with the loss of her mother. Billie Jo also describes the pain she is going through having her beloved piano destroyed by a dust storm. Lots of people think differently on...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Ogallala Aquifer - 760 Words
    The Ogallala aquifer is located in American Midwest it’s the home of America’s most vital water source for American agriculture the largest aquifer in North America. It runs underground through eight states from Dakota to Texas It covers over 174,000 miles across the eight states and it hold over 978 trillion gallons of fresh water. It supplies about 30 percent of America’s irrational water. It has an average of 100 feet of water. An aquifer is a...
    760 Words | 3 Pages
  • Causes of the Dust Bowl - 621 Words
    Imagine being blinded by dirt and disoriented by wind. Imagine having to cover your faces whenever you left the house and having to cover your food whenever you ate. Well, welcome to the Dust Bowl. During the 1880s, farmers fled to the Southern Great Plans after hearing word that it was great for planting wheat. However there was an awful drought in the 1890s, which caused some farmers to leave. Most stayed, though, because those who stayed for three years got 320 acres of land. Farmers were...
    621 Words | 2 Pages
  • American Agriculture DBQ - 754 Words
    1865-1900 was the period when the United States was changing from the Reconstruction period to the new Industrial age. The new change of the United States also changed the American agriculture for the citizens. The American agriculture changed because new technology was advancing, government policy was treating some people unfair, and economic conditions were rough for many. As the United States grows larger in population and larger in land, technology was becoming newer and better as...
    754 Words | 3 Pages
  • Our hearts fell to the ground
    Colin Calloway has done a masterful job of selecting and presenting an array of speeches, letters, documents, and drawings that tell compelling stories about the Plain Indians in the 1800's. His introduction alone has just the right level of information and links basic themes and events to the documents presented in the text. In short, a model of how an introduction should be done. Colin Calloway's intentions were to focus on the humanistic study of the Plain Indians views on how the West was...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • Henretta chapter 16 study guide
    Study Guide CH. 16: CONQUERING A CONTINENT (493-522) KEY TERMS Index cards should be created for the following key terms including time period relevant, definition, and significance in historical time period • Homestead Act • Protective tariff • Trusts • Munn v. Illinois • Gold standard • Bimetallic standard • The Crime of 1873 • Greenbacks • Bland-Allison Act • Matthew Perry • William Seward • Morill Act • Great Plains • Cow country • Long Drive • Cattle towns • Wild...
    436 Words | 3 Pages
  • What Caused the Dust Bowl
    What Caused the Dust Bowl During the 1930’s, giant sand and dust storms hit the western horizon. Many families across the nation were struck with the Depression, however, families living across the Southern great plains were not only struck with Depression, but also by 300 dust storms that ruined all their land. The main reasons for the cause of the Dust Bowl were the geography of the Southern Great Plains, heavy machinery, and extremely dry climate. One of the main causes of the Dust...
    421 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Worst Hard Time - 1884 Words
    One theory in Jared Diamond s Collapse is that soil degradation and erosion leads to insufficient agriculture and a society s demise. In Timothy Egan s The Worst Hard Time, he sets forth in specific and excruciating detail exactly what Diamond outlines in Collapse. Only Egan s book isn t theoretical. It isn t a survey of what s happened in other countries. It s about the Dust Bowl in the 1930s. It s about what happens, right here in the heart of America, when the land is misused, mistreated, and...
    1,884 Words | 5 Pages
  • Native Americans in the United States and Cheyenne
    Region: By the time the Americans met the Cheyenne Indians they were living on the Great Plains of South Dakota, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado and Kansas. The U.S. government forced the Cheyenne’s to move to Oklahoma during the 1800’s which the Cheyenne’s called “The Trail of Tears”. Some Cheyenne Indians escaped to the North into Montana. Today there are two Cheyenne tribes, one in Oklahoma and the other in Montana. Houses: Originally the Cheyenne’s lived in villages of earthen lodges and...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • Expansion In The West From 1840-1890
    When an area is settled for the first time, there are certain things that shape the development of the land and the people who settle it. From the 1840's to the 1890's, the natural environment, among other things, shaped the development of the West beyond the Mississippi River and the lives of those who lived and settled there. Some examples of places that were shaped and/or affected by the natural environment are Texas, the Great Plains, the Rocky Mountains, and the California/West Coast area....
    1,384 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dust Bowl - 530 Words
    Dust Bowl Tragedies Imagine being blinded by dirt and disoriented by wind. Imagine having to cover your faces whenever you left the house and having to cover your food whenever you ate. Well, welcome to the Dust Bowl. During the 1930’s dust storms took over the Great Plains and the borders of Texas and Oklahoma. Many Americans had troublesome days due to the dust storms which were mainly caused by the loss of short grass prairie. With tractors many farmers over plowed their fields and with the...
    530 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dust Bowl - 1684 Words
    As part of a five-state region affected by severe drought and soil erosion, the "Dust Bowl" as it was called was result of several factors. Cyclical drought and farming of marginally productive acreage was exacerbated by a lack of soil conservation methods. Because the disaster lasted throughout the 1930's, the lives of every Plains resident and expectations of farming the region changed forever. The settlement and development of the Southern Plains came relatively late. Not recognizing the...
    1,684 Words | 5 Pages
  • APUSH Outline - 374 Words
     F1 Outline I. The Great Plains A. Background 1. The Great Plains had blazing temps in the daytime and frigid cold at night. The only vegetation that could survive was grass which made the Great Plains a great place for livestock that needed to graze B. Indians of the Great Plains 1. There were about 100,000 native Americans in the great plains i. A portion of them were settled in permanent villages. These people were decimated by European diseases such as smallpox ii. The...
    374 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Buffalo Common Metaphor - 879 Words
    A Buffalo Common Metaphor Over the past few decades the High Plains have consistently been losing its population. So, in 1987 Doctors Frank and Deborah Popper introduced the idea of Buffalo Commons. They described this project as “A combination of literary metaphor, public-policy proposal, futurist prediction and ecological restoration project” (The Buffalo Commons: Its Antecedents). The essential focus of this project was to replace the ever decrease population by returning buffalo back to...
    879 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparing and Contrasting Regions of Texas
    There are many similarities and differences in a state as large as Texas. The state is divided into 4 geographic regions: Mountains & Basins, the Great Plains, the North Central Plains, and the Coastal Plains. Even in these regions there are enough differences for subdivisions. The Great Plains is divided into the Llano Basin, Edwards Plateau, and the High Plains. The North Central Plains is also divided into 3 sub-regions: Grand Prairie, Cross Timbers, and Rolling Plains. The Coastal Plains...
    858 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1850-1900 - 3171 Words
    Chapter 17-The West: Exploiting an Empire Time Period: 1850-1900 1. Beyond the Frontier -line of white settlement at MO timber country by 1840s What’s in the West? What land? -“The Great Plains”/Prairie Plains: rich soil and good rainfall (Wisconsin down to Texas) -High Plains: rough, semiarid (Montana down to NMex.) -Rockies: formidable barrier (Alaska to NMex.) -Western Basin: home to many NA, desert, held in by the Cascades and Sierra Nevada, MOST travelers here (Idaho and Utah)...
    3,171 Words | 12 Pages
  • Buffalo Soldiers - 815 Words
    Buffalo Soldiers The Buffalo Soldiers Museum has been opened approximately for 4 years now. The purpose of the museum is to explain the history and outstanding contributions the buffalo soldiers have made for the United States of America. The Buffalo Soldiers represented the first black professional solders in a peacetime army. The recruits came from several backgrounds including former slaves and veterans from service in the Civil War. These African Americans have served proudly in...
    815 Words | 2 Pages
  • Blackfeet: Native Americans in the United States and Blackfoot Tribe
    The Blackfeet: Native American Mini Research By: Nathanael Cho The Blackfeet or Blackfoot is a Native American tribe that was originally located in Canada, Montana, and Idaho. The majority of the tribe is located in Alberta, Canada, where three of the four Blackfeet bands are established. The Blackfeet can be found in the Great Plains, around many rivers and mountains. Some of these rivers include the Yellowstone River and the Missouri River. Also, just east of the Rocky Mountains, a major...
    520 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wagner Matinee - 875 Words
    Asia Roper English 1020, sec. 01 October 1, 2014 Short story essay During the 1800's there was an increase in immigration to the Great Plains due to an abundance of free land offered by the Homestead Act. Many individuals and families went west to seek their fortune and a home on what was once called the great American desert. Moving westward was a difficult process, and many were forced to leave their old lives behind completely. In "A Wagner Matinee," written by Willa Cather, the...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Scott Russell Sanders Stand on Mobilization
    Scott Russell Sanders, author of Staying Put: Making a Home in a Restless World, believes that inhabiting places permanently benefits our society and community as a whole. In response to Salman Rushdie’s essay about the advantage of migrating, Sanders uses historical reference, and sarcasm to develop his perspective about moving. Firstly, not only does Sanders integrates historical reference into his writing to give the reader background, but also to show examples of times in...
    411 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Did Westward Expansion Transform the Nation?
    Period:3/us history February 26, 2013 How did westward expansion transform the nation? In the early 1800’s, Americans pushed steadily westward, moving even beyond the territory of the United States. They traveled by canoe and flatboat, on horseback, and by wagon train. Some even walked much of the way. American merchant John Jacob Astor created one of the largest fur businesses, the American Fur Company. His company bought skins from western mountain men. These adventurers were...
    2,024 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Homestead Act - 564 Words
    To my understanding, and from what I have read in the book and throughout the course links, I believe that the intent of the Homestead Act was to defeat land monopoly. Many farmers, however, lacked the economic means to move west and manage a farm. . By this, fewer still understood the new type of agriculture, in which technology was used to farm the land that the Great Plains required. Instead, speculators and corporate interests were able to reap in profits, and fraud and corruption, and often...
    564 Words | 2 Pages
  • Separate but Equal Essay - 2043 Words
    Brooke Lucas Professor Ramirez History 147 30 October 2013 Essay Question 1) How was the policy of “separate but equal” established and what exactly did it mean? Provide specific examples of how “separate but equal” was applied in the United States. How it started: Plessy vs. Ferguson case. Plessy: 7/8ths white 1/8th black boarded an all white train car. The conductor asked of his race, so he told him. He sent him to the all colored railcar. Plessy refused and he was immediately arrested....
    2,043 Words | 6 Pages
  • Dust Bowl Essay - 1217 Words
    The Dust Bowl was a treacherous storm, which occurred in the 1930's, that affected the midwestern people, for example the farmers, and which taught us new technologies and methods of farming. As John Steinbeck wrote in his 1939 novel The Grapes of Wrath: "And then the dispossessed were drawn west- from Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico; from Nevada and Arkansas, families, tribes, dusted out. Carloads, caravans, homeless and hungry; twenty thousand and fifty thousand and a hundred thousand and...
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  • How Old World Diseases Destroyed Indian America and Created Colonial America.
    The Invisible Enemy – How Old World diseases destroyed Indian America and created Colonial America. In the years prior to the Pilgrims establishing Plymouth colony in 1620, the area had been ravaged by an epidemic of disease which had wiped out the original Indian inhabitants. The Pilgrims believed that God had sent the disease among the Indians to clear the site for his ‘chosen people’. This is but one example of how the introduction of disease would forever change the existing Indian America...
    1,238 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dust Blow - 2040 Words
    The Dust Bowl was the name given to the Great Plains region devastated by drought in 1930s depression-ridden America. The 150,000-square-mile area, encompassing the Oklahoma and Texas panhandles and neighboring sections of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico, has little rainfall, light soil, and high winds, a potentially destructive combination. When drought struck from 1934 to 1937, the soil lacked the stronger root system of grass as an anchor, so the winds easily picked up the loose topsoil and...
    2,040 Words | 6 Pages
  • Ch 17 the West: Exploiting an Empire
    Chapter 17 The West: Exploiting an Empire After the Civil War, Americans, who believed expansion was their “manifest destiny,” began moving westward across the continent, subduing the Native Americans through various means, creating a North American empire for raw material to fuel factories. Western economies need the Fed Govt BEYOND THE FRONTIER Prior to the Civil War, the march of White settlement paused at the margin of the semiarid Great Plains, a region seared by hot winds and too...
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  • Moving West Letters (Life in the West Journal)
    To those back home, I send greetings, to momma, hoping that she gets better, shake papas hand for me and thank him for supporting my stand against slavery. It has been two years since this Civil War ended and it has been extremely hard to find a job. I traveled north to the factories, but they paid you awfully low wages, and I could not support myself on those wages. I then tried my hand at farming but farming it proved to be hard both physically and economically since buying land is so very...
    595 Words | 2 Pages
  • Two Environmental Factors of the Us
    I think that two of the most important environmental factors that helped to play a part to the development and expansion of the United States were the potato famine in Ireland and the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s. These two major events helped to shape our country into the one we know today and are more closely linked then some people believe. The Irish Potato Famine began in September of 1845 with the first death from starvation being recorded the fall of the following year and lasted another...
    904 Words | 3 Pages
  • Apes: Ogallala Aquifer - 697 Words
    Ogallala Aquifer (10:45 min.) 1. Where does the water for the aquifer come from? underground 2. Why do they call the Ogallala Aquifer water “fossil”? it was develop million years ago, and recharge very slowly 3. How big is the Ogallala Aquifer? 174000sq mile + 4. How many states drain water from the Ogallala Aquifer? 8 mid western states 5. How much of the land is sand dunes? 20 percent of its land 6. What is the depth of the Ogallala Aquifer? few feet to a thousand ft down 7. How...
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  • 21st Century and Late 20th
    05.02 Describe some of the challenges facing the American people during the late 20th and early 21st centuries An example of a challenge facing the American people during the late 20th and early 21st century is public education. The American democracy depends on an educated and well informed citizenry. The less meaningful we make a high school diploma, the less opportunity we make for meaningful access to higher education. Also, the less emphasis we place on the ability of the next generation...
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  • kkkkkkkkk klj - 1537 Words
    New Concerns in the North, 1868-1876 Grantism: Grant’s presidency was filled with bribery, fraud, and corruption—his subordinates, not him personally; he had few political skills His sec/state named FISH! Convinced England to pay America $15.5 mil. for Confederate ships they damaged during the war Previous president annexed Alaska, so Grant tried to annex Dominican Republic and failed. The Liberals’ Revolt: Liberal Republicans (free trade, hard money, supply/demand)—thought...
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  • The Worst Hard Time - 587 Words
    In this work of non-fiction Timothy Egan expresses his wish for sounder government policy to avoid natural disasters. Egan’s The Worst Hard Time is a harrowing tale about farmers who decided to stay on the plains stretching across Texas’ panhandle, Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Colorado during the major drought in the 1930’s. The disaster, known as the Dust Bowl, is largely regarded as a human caused problem. Egan, who is a national correspondent on environmental issues for the New York Times,...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • DBQ What Caused The Dust Bowl
    During the 1930’s a massive dust and sand storm hit the western horizon. Families across the nation were struck with the Depression, however, people living in the Southern Great Plains were not only affected by the Depression, but also by the 300 dust storms that destroyed their land. The three main reasons for the cause of the Dust Bowl were: the geography of the Southern Plains, heavy machinery used to farm, and dry climate. ...
    474 Words | 1 Page
  • study guide - 2043 Words
    Block: B Socials9 Study Guide: Final Exam Multiple choice sections: Chapter six: 1-20 1. Coniferous trees: Coniferous trees have small, waxy and usually narrow leaves (needles or flat scales). 'Coniferous' means that it is a cone-bearing tree. 2. Appalachian region: Some of the landforms found in this region are low mountains, flat uplands, forests, rocky cliffs, and many islands. Climate can be described as cool and wet for most of the year. Variety of vegetation that grows in the...
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  • Lewis and Clark - 877 Words
    Last night, was a terrible night. I couldn’t sleep at all. It was really hot and really buggy. The mosquitos were so terrible, I couldn’t even sleep! Hopefully tonight I can get some sleep. Today we woke up at sunrise and packed everything up and now we’re traveling northwest. I hope we find some new species of animals to send to Thomas Jefferson. It is so fascinating to find new species of animals every day. Yesterday we found the Horned Toad, and Lewis found it to be quite interesting so he...
    877 Words | 2 Pages
  • Changes in Farming Post Civil War
    Changes in Farming: Contributing factors in farming changes post Civil War After the Civil War there were many factors that contributed the changes that occurred in farming in America. Among them was the drive for the South to renew and regain what had been lost due to the war. Leaders saw it as a time to diversify and turn towards industrialization. The Industrial revolution was underway and with it brought many new inventions that would lead to growth in the farming industry. The wide...
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  • Shoshone Eassay - 385 Words
    The Shoshone would dress in these clothes every day to show that they are part of their tribe and to show respect to elders. This is a Shoshone teepee. It is made mostly of sticks and animal hide. They are portable houses made for hunt and war. The Shoshone were one of the many Native American tribes to use these as shelter. This is a group of hunters or fighters. The Shoshone would wear these clothes and ride horses in war or just while hunting, but hunting was a little bit like war...
    385 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ap Dbq List - 5047 Words
    A.P. United States History 2. Name___________________________Date________ ➢ Chapter 26. The Great West and the Agricultural Revolution, 1865-1896. Theme 1: After the Civil War, whites overcame the Plains Indians’ fierce resistance and settled the Great West, bringing to a close the long frontier phase of American history. Theme 2: The farmers who populated the West found themselves the...
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  • Lewis Clark Expedition - 501 Words
    Lewis & Clark Expedition Fedena F. Florestal Clark’s Nutcracker First level ◦ Second level  Third level  Fourth level  Fifth level Facts About Clark’s Nutcracker Nutcrackers are 10-13 inches long and normally are black, white and a gray pattern. There eyes are dark and have a long bill. They love being around tree lines and large mountains. There is a hidden pouch under their tongue that used to carry seeds. ( Carry thousands of seeds annually.) Nutcracker’s live in the west of...
    501 Words | 4 Pages
  • Man vs. the Environment
    The environment can be something as vast as global weather patterns or as simple as the desert regions. With the advent of many technologies, the delicate balance of the environment has been upset (Elliot, 1961, p. 392). Strip mining, slash and burn farming, damming of rivers, and the extinction of many species of plants and animals have all lead to the permanent changing of the environment. Some say the change is for good, and others say for the change is for worse, but what is good about...
    709 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Dust Bowl - 1315 Words
    Krysta Howard Jeffrey Schulze History 1302, Section 001 2 March 2012 The Dust Bowl Donald Worster believed the Dust Bowl was “the inevitable outcome of a culture that deliberately, self-consciously, set itself that task of dominating and exploiting the land for all it was worth”(Worster, 4). He investigated this phenomenon, which took place in the “dirty thirties”, and came to the conclusion that capitalism was to blame. The inhabitants of the Great Plains responded quite differently...
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  • Climate and the Dust Bowl - 1928 Words
    Not only was the “Dust Bowl” one of the most devastating climatic events in American history, we cannot even comfortably call it a natural disaster. Rather, it was us, humanity, who played a major role in bringing this calamity upon on ourselves. Indeed, one does not need to look further than the 20th century to see that human activity may in fact have immediate consequences on climate. In particular, situations can be exacerbated when in unison with the forces of natures. What would otherwise...
    1,928 Words | 5 Pages
  • GKE1 task1 - 1430 Words
    A. According to some archaeologists, the ancient civilization of Mesopotamia had its first settlements dating back since 10,000 BCE. Due to this, it is considered as one of the birthplace of civilizations. Mesopotamia was also known as “the country between two rivers.” (Chilvers, 2007) These two rivers that surrounded this fertile land were the Tigris and the Euphrates. I believe that both rivers were one of the significant environmental factors that contributed to the development of the...
    1,430 Words | 4 Pages
  • Lakota Culture During the 19th Century
    The Lakota Indians had the sad and unfortunate luck of becoming personally acquainted with the westward thrust of American development when the Americans’ attitudes toward Indians had grown cynical and cruel. This interaction caused the Lakota culture to change a great deal during the nineteenth century. Horses and guns brought about a dramatic change in the Lakota’s culture. They “enabled them to seize and defend their rich hunting grounds, to follow the great migrating herds of buffalo that...
    758 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cheyenne Indians - 432 Words
    The Cheyenne Indians- Tribe of Algonkian linguistic stock, whose name means "red talker", or "people of a different speech", lived, and hunted on the hills and prairies alongside the Missouri and Red rivers. In the 1700s, after acquiring horses from the Spanish like the Comanche Indians before them, the once sedentary Cheyenne became expert buffalo hunters. The tribe usually moved their encampments according to the location of the buffalo herd they were following. Like other plains Indians,...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dust Bowl - 1303 Words
    John Mayernik History 124 November 20th 2009 The Dust Bowl The southern plains were one of the greatest places to be in the late 1920’s and early 1930’s. Farmers were producing crops with ease, some were even overproducing. Wheat was one of the main things that were making farmers so successful, everything was just growing right for them at the time. In 1931 though there was a drought for farmers, in which many dust storms hit the Southern plains, causing an indescribable amount of damage...
    1,303 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Turtle - 663 Words
    The Turtle is an allegory written by John Steinbeck. He symbolized every character and objects happening in the story to describe the experience of the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression. So here are the parallels between the Turtle and human struggling during The Great Depression and the Dust Bowl. The Turtle was on a journey. This is like what people living on the Great Plains did. The environment in the Turtle and the Dust bowl was both arduous and painful. The highway was...
    663 Words | 2 Pages
  • Book Review of The Worst Hard Times by Timothy Egan
    The Forgotten Truth of the Dirty-Thirties HIS-190 19 November, 2010 When you consider the disaster of the American Dust Bowl of the Dirty Thirties on the Great Plains, no wonder Stephen Long of 1821 concluded that the American West was “almost wholly unfit for cultivation, and of course uninhabitable by a people depending upon agriculture for their subsistence.”1 It seems that Timothy Egan’s book, The Worst Hard Times, hit the nail right on the head as to the cause of the worst natural...
    2,202 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cattle Ranches - 276 Words
    The Part Played By The Cattle Ranchers In 1892 The Johnson country war started in 1892 in a town called Wyoming. The war was between the Cattle Ranchers and the Homesteaders. The war started when the first farmers on the plains clashed with the cattle barons who had there ranchers on the land . There were a lot of disputers mainly over fencing and waterholes. This lead to a series of clashes know as the range wars. The governor of Wyoming called Barber supported the cattle ranchers. He...
    276 Words | 1 Page
  • American History Notes 9th Grade Chapter 11 Section 2
    Chapter 11.2 Notes 1. The Beginning of Settlement Guiding Question: What encouraged settlers to move west to the Great Plains? * The Great Plains is a vast region of prairie roughly was of the Mississippi River and east of the Rocky Mountains. * Settlers faced many challenges with the weather * In this dry grassland, trees naturally grew only by the rivers and streams. * To get water they often had to drill wells more than 100 feet deep * Eventually this land turned...
    489 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dust bowl - 1174 Words
    Imagine waking up each morning having to sweep up dust that blew into homes at night. Nearly starving from lack of food and water then going broke and living without a home with family's to care for. We'll that was life during the Dust Bowl having to face the Great Depression and loving in the Southern Plains.The Dust Bowl was a very unexpected tragedy that hit America in the 1930 lasting a whole decade. The dust bowl accrued mostly of high climates mixing with the broken down jet stream in...
    1,174 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Migrant Experience - 1140 Words
    The Migrant Experience The largest migration in American history was the Dust Bowl exodus. “Between 1935 and 1939 nearly 300,000 southwesterners migrated to California” (Rice 407). Family farmers, tenant farmers, and sharecroppers, were the people that were displaced during the 1930’s; there were multiple reasons behind the exodus of the people whose families had worked the land for many generations. Severe drought in the Great Plains region, particularly western Oklahoma and the Texas...
    1,140 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comanche Indians - 2779 Words
    COMANCHE INDIANS The Comanches, exceptional horsemen who dominated the Southern Plains, played a prominent role in Texas frontier history throughout much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Anthropological evidence indicates that they were originally a mountain tribe, a branch of the Northern Shoshones, who roamed the Great Basin region of the western United States as crudely equipped hunters and gatherers. Both cultural and linguistic similarities confirm the Comanches' Shoshone...
    2,779 Words | 8 Pages
  • Dream Paper - 711 Words
    Africa is the home of my ancestors, and a place I would love to visit. It’s the motherland to civilization, everyone in one way or another has ties that go back to Africa. Instead of animals locked up in a zoo, Africa is their natural habitat. It’s a beautiful place that would be such an adventure to go and explore. My dream is to go live in Africa, explore for the great wild life, and visit some historical sites that Africa has to offer. I would take this trip in 2 different phases that lasted...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • The American Expansion Into the West
    the expansion of americans into the west was a major step in the 1800's. the united states had a great deal of land that no one had ventured to settle. however, that all changed as the prospect of making it big in the west entered people's minds. although white settlers wanted desperately to settle the west rapidly, they encountered varous problems. the west was land like thye had never seen. the climate could change from one extreme to the other in a matter of hours, it was very dry, there...
    804 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Gilded Age - 1084 Words
    While many Americans living during the “Gilded Age” (1865-1900) considered it a time of prosperity, others were not so fond. Many peoples that weren’t middle and upper class whites were being treated very poorly by both the government and by other members of society. While all Americans found their lives changed by big business and new technologies, others found their way of life completely altered. Particularly Native Americans, industrial workers and African Americans saw their entire way of...
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • Early American History Paper (Lewis & Clark)
    Denise Gilbert History 108 Mr. Marcum October 1, 2012 Lewis and Clark as Pioneer Naturalists The story of Lewis and Clark as Pioneer Naturalists from excerpts of Bernard DeVoto, ed. The Journals of Lewis and Clark (Boston: Houghton, Mifflin Co., 1953), pp. 117-118, 144-146, 263-264, 307-318, 322-323. Is for those who want to learn or understand the expeditions of Lewis and Clark, naturalist or people who want to study life of early American history. The three main ideas the author...
    693 Words | 2 Pages
  • Causes the dust bowl. - 330 Words
    he Dust Bowl, also known as the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms that greatly damaged the ecology and agriculture of the US and Canadian prairies during the 1930s; severe drought and a failure to apply dryland farming methods to prevent wind erosion (the Aeolian processes) caused the phenomenon.[1] Extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains during the previous decade had displaced the native, deep-rooted grasses that normally trapped soil and moisture even...
    330 Words | 1 Page
  • Apush Notes: Conquering a Continent 1861-1877
    Cheyanne Ervin APUSH, Period: 2 Ms. Check 14 January 2013 Chapter 16: Conquering a Continent, 1861-1877: * Essential Question: What factors helped advance the integration of the national economy after the Civil War? Section 1: The Republican Vision: * Integrating the National Economy: * Reshaping the former Confederacy after the Civil War supplemented a Republican drive to strengthen the national economy to overcome limitations of market variations that took place under previous...
    2,527 Words | 8 Pages


All Great Plains Essays