Gothic fiction Essays & Research Papers

Best Gothic fiction Essays

  • gothic fiction - 8235 Words
    Gothic fiction, sometimes referred to as Gothic horror, is a genre or mode of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. Gothicism's origin is attributed to English authorHorace Walpole, with his 1764 novel The Castle of Otranto, subtitled "A Gothic Story". The effect of Gothic fiction feeds on a pleasing sort of terror, an extension of Romantic literary pleasures that were relatively new at the time of Walpole's novel. Melodrama and parody (including self-parody) were other...
    8,235 Words | 23 Pages
  • Gothic Fiction - 404 Words
    Gothic fiction combines the elements of Horror and Romance. This genre consists of fear, darkness, heroes, villains, and love. If you ask me those are very contrasting subjects. The name “Gothic Fiction” comes from medieval architecture. That is why this style of writing took place mostly in the medieval era. The writing style puts emphasis on atmosphere, using its surrounds to build suspense in the reader. Horace Walpole is believed to be the inventor of the genre. His...
    404 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Fiction and Gothic in Alias Grace Fiction
    Encyclopedia of Gothic Literature Encyclopedia of Gothic Literature MARY ELLEN SNODGRASS Encyclopedia of Gothic Literature Copyright © 2005 by Mary Ellen Snodgrass All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any information storage or retrieval systems, without permission in writing from the publisher. For information contact: Facts On File, Inc. 132...
    300,442 Words | 1262 Pages
  • American Gothic Fiction - 808 Words
    American Gothic Fiction From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Url: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Gothic_Fiction American Gothic Fiction is a subgenre of Gothic Fiction. Elements specific to American Gothic include: rational vs irrational, puritanism, guilt, Das Unheimliche (strangeness within the familiar as defined by Sigmund Freud), abhumans, ghosts, monsters, and domestic abjection. The roots of these concepts lay in a past riddled with slavery, a fear of racial mixing...
    808 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Gothic fiction Essays

  • Gothic Fiction and Geraldine - 1267 Words
    A Unique Analysis of “Christabel” In the year 1797 economic troubles filled the land and society of England. An era previously known for romantic/traditional literature, writers such as Samuel Taylor Coleridge, began entertaining other forms. Samuel Taylor Coleridge took to the innovative gothic genre with his poem “Christabel”. The poem “Christabel” is a two part poem containing numerous gothic elements, paired with various literary devices to convey a vampire-esque theme. These gothic...
    1,267 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ambiguity of American Gothic Fiction
    Julie Fallows 6423747 Sean Moreland November 27, 2012 Ambiguity of American Gothic Anxieties Since the 19h century, American Gothic fiction started to exist independently from the British type. In fact, the latter was marked by its use of fantastic, externalized and metaphysical elements as opposed to the boundaries of American Gothic fiction in which were expressed by historical, internalized, racial and psychological characteristics. (Edwards, XVII) In Edgar Allan Poe’s The...
    1,779 Words | 5 Pages
  • Gothic and Horror Fiction - 1718 Words
    In this final assignment I will talk about the patriarchal fear of female sexuality. I will also be dealing with a brief summary of the female figure in the gothic novel. To begin with, I will give a brief summary of the changes that experimented the topics of the nineteenth century novel; then I will comment on the description which some scholars give about the woman of the nineteenth century. I will also exemplify the patriarchal fear of female sexuality by using two of the texts studied in...
    1,718 Words | 5 Pages
  • Southern Gothic Fiction - 990 Words
    Sean Tinsley Eng 151C-33 3/08/2013 Southern Gothic Fiction is a genre of literature unique to the American south. Major influences of the genre itself were the culture, religion, and economic standing of the south at the beginning of the 20th century. Many who read southern gothic are transported into a grotesque fantasy world where ideas of death, good versus bad, and god are all prevalent. Many American authors were greatly influenced by the ideas of southern gothic literature such as...
    990 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic - 1592 Words
    Oates short stories usually follow young characters through their struggles in life. There are many family imperfections in Oates stories that mostly tend to have a disturbing image in the readers head. While it seemed that Joyce Carol Oates experienced dark childhood experiences, she seems to explore her thoughts according to similar events that had happened in her life. Written by Joyce Carol Oates, “Spider Boy” is an example that highly defines gothic horror. Many of her works deal with...
    1,592 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Or Not? - 1621 Words
    Gothic literature is one of the most gruesome type of literature that exists in the world. Anything that falls into gothic literature explores taboo subjects such as murder, suicide, lost loves, haunting settings and grotesque characters. Stories or poems that are classified as Gothic Literature are put into that category because their dark and mysterious nature is actually designed to appeal to the trepidation and alarm in the reader. We see that clearly in William Faulkner's "A Rose...
    1,621 Words | 4 Pages
  • American Gothic Fiction: the Roots of Modern Horror Genre
     AMERICAN GOTHIC FICTION: THE ROOTS OF MODERN HORROR GENRE University of Szczecin American Literature Seminar January 8, 2014, Szczecin What is American Gothic Fiction? Gothic fiction is a literary genre originated in the second half of the 18th century in the Great Britain and is often counted as a feature of Romanticism and the Victorian era. Horace Walpole and William Beckford are amongst the best known English authors of the dawn of the century....
    2,922 Words | 9 Pages
  • Atmosphere of the Tell-Tale Heart: Analysis of Gothic Fiction
    Discuss atmosphere of “The Tell-Tale Heart” The story “The Tell-Tale Heart” is well known as a classic of Gothic fiction genre. It incorporates a mysterious and suspenseful atmosphere and overwrought emotions, however, the story does not create suspense and tension straight away. It builds a mysterious, horrific atmosphere and creates suspense with the use of first-person, vivid imagery and the change pace. The use of the first person in this story greatly contributes to the creation of...
    693 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Essay - 866 Words
    Joanna Hua Ms Royse Ap English 12-13-12 Gothic Essay Over the centuries, the American fascination for the grotesque and mysterious elements of Gothic literature never died off since its beginnings with Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto in 1764. The novel was a success; its creative usage of a remote and obscure setting, the supernatural and medieval motifs were found so attractive that its imitations began rapidly publishing across America. Very soon, the Gothic genre was an...
    866 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Gothic Villain - 927 Words
    The Gothic Villain Who is the Gothic Villain? Is he a villain/hero? Is he a dangerous lover? The villain is usually dark and handsome, though he might have some tell-tell sign that warns he is wicked. The villains ranged from dark priests to mysterious bandits. Some start out as heroes but turn into villains. The Gothic villain has several identifying characteristics. They are shifty, cunning and can mold their behavior to match the need of the circumstance. Villains will utilize...
    927 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Class - 875 Words
     1. What does he ask for? Is this rational? Why or why not? Justified? What evidence does he offer for the legitimacy of his request? Analyze Victor’s reaction to him. When Victor has his first encounter with the creature he is very shocked and scared at the same time. “Devil, do you dare approach me? And do not you fear the fierce vengeance of my arm wreaked on your miserable head? Begone, vile insect! or rather, stay, that I may trample you to dust! And, on! That I could with the...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic literature - 887 Words
    Do you know what is the strongest and the oldest emotion known to the mankind? That is fear. And gothic literature can be explained as fear-literature. But the true gothic tale has something more than secret murder, bloody bones, or clanking chains . So, let me explain how to know what is the real gothic book. First of all, i will give you some backround. Gothic fiction began as a joke.In 1764 author Horace Walpole first applied the word ‘Gothic’ to a novel in the subtitle – ‘A Gothic Story’ –...
    887 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic in Frankenstein - 1584 Words
    The ‘Gothic’ elements in Frankenstein One of the first novels to be recognized as a Gothic novel was Horace Walpole's Castle of Otranto (1765). This text as well as others such as Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796) was seen as being linked with what were traditionally considered Gothic traits: the emphasis on fear and terror, the presence of the supernatural, the placement of events within a distant time and unfamiliar setting, and the use of highly stereotyped characters/villains/fallen hero/...
    1,584 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Literature - 1066 Words
    The gothic style originated in Europe during the 12th to the 18th century. It applied to medieval styles of art and architecture, particularly buildings such as cathedrals and other churches. Gothic literature began in England with the novel the ‘Castle of Oranto’ by Horace Walpole. From this novel, gothic fiction developed and flourished, becoming a significant literary genre that inspired famous works such as Frankenstein, Dracula and Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Gothic texts share the central...
    1,066 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Literature - 481 Words
    Charlie Blue Freeman English I Pre- Ap; 1114 20 April 2012 The origins and characteristics of Gothic Literature came in 1764 with the publication of Horace Walpole’s Castle of Otranto (“Zittaw”). Ever since then, Gothic Literature has become more popular and is being used in numerous works of great literature. Gothic Literature has had a remarkable impact in the world of English literature and is currently still evolving from its original roots. Gothic Literature is a genre of...
    481 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Novel - 359 Words
     GOTHIC NOVEL The word "Gothic" has ben variously defined and interpreteted by various writer. Leslie Fielder says that Gothic shoddy mystery-mongerine, whereas F. Gunworth Fields defines the Gothic tradition, as a literary exploration of avenues to death. The editions of "The Reader's Companion to World Literature" consider the Gothic novel as a novel of horror based on supernatural. Montague summers maintains; Gothic was the essence of romanticism, and romanticism was the literary...
    359 Words | 1 Page
  • Gothic Literature - 1049 Words
    Gothic Literature "We make up horrors to help us cope with the real ones" (Stephen King). This quote could explain why humans have a fascination with horror and the frightening, which are present in many Gothic novels. Since the 18th century, Gothic Fiction has become a famous genre. Gothic Literature is unique and has certain elements that it consists of. It uses a combination of the supernatural, scary, and the frightening to deliver its point to the reader. From the beginning of the...
    1,049 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Literature - 1288 Words
    Frankenstein: Mood Set by Romantic and Gothic Literature The creature’s deformed figure stands alone, lit up by a bolt of lightning, against the backdrop of a country sky. In this light, he is both a Romantic and Gothic figure. Authors use elements of Romantic and Gothic literature to convey the mood of a story. Romantic literature mainly focuses on intense emotions, the individual imagination, and the image of nature. In contrast, Gothic literature put a twist on Romantic literature and...
    1,288 Words | 4 Pages
  • Southern Gothic - 877 Words
    Southern Gothic literature has many of the same aspects as Gothic literature; Southern Gothic literature, which is a sub-genre of the Gothic writing style, is unique to the American South. It focuses on topics such as death, madness, and the super natural as well has having many mystical, bizarre, violent, and grotesque aspects. Gothic literature has left a deep impression to the people. Influenced by Edgar Allan Poe and Flannery O'Connor wrote stories filled with grotesque characters, violence,...
    877 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Lit - 1467 Words
    Outlining The Castle of Otranto Prompt: Taking The Castle of Otranto as your example, outline the main conventions of the Gothic novel, and show how your knowledge of these conventions affects your reading of Northanger Abbey. Is Northanger Abbey most accurately described as parody of the Gothic genre, or is there a more complicated relationship going on? Answer: Gothic novels purport to revive old stories and beliefs, exploring personal and psychical encounters with the taboo (Williams,...
    1,467 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Literature - 776 Words
    Gothic Literature Ann Radcliffe Name: Arunima Sircar Grade: 9 IGCSE A English Project- 1 Gothic Literature Gothic literature of gothic fiction is a genre of writing that merges elements of horror as well as romance. It has been believed to be first introduced by the famous English author, Horace Walpole. The many elements of Gothic Literature help make this genre successful and pleasing to the readers. Elements of Gothic Literature The many elements of a Gothic Novel help make the novel much...
    776 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Coursework - 3173 Words
    The Women in Black, Wuthering Heights and The Bloody Chamber are texts that challenge and conform to dominant ideas concerning the female role and femininity. In The Women in Black Jennet Humphrey challenged female role conventions before and after death. Before death she challenged it by having a child outside marriage which was not approved in the Victorian age and was not allowed however she challenged it after death by coming back as ghost asresult of her grief’s and pain that she suffered...
    3,173 Words | 8 Pages
  • Gothic Essay - 644 Words
    Gothic Essay Gothic literature can be described in various ways. There are numerous elements such as death, tragedy and corruption that make up this genre, however there is a lot more to it. Accidents of life and the inevitability of fate are commonly seen in many gothic texts and most themes are mutual throughout plays, novels and poems. The dark element intrigues us and back in the 1900's, when gothic literature was very common, it no doubt scared people. Historically, people around the...
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Literature - 508 Words
    Dale Cook Ms. Tinord Honors English IV 1 August 2013 Gothic Literature at Its Finest To a gothic literature buff it would seem to be the greatest sight of all time; Two of arguably the greatest gothic poets of all time, Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, side by side. This, however, is not the case. Fortunately for poets their personality is still embodied throughout their works of literature. Seeing as they are both gothic poets that would in essence make their literary works very...
    508 Words | 2 Pages
  • female gothic - 436 Words
    Ellen Moers defines female gothic as the “work that women writers have done in the literary mode that, since the eighteenth century” (317). Gothic writings are fake fear; fear to stimulate what you might feel if this were actually to happen. But, gothic is not tragedy, tragedy is more terror and horror. Ellen Moers’ essay is about the evolution of different gothic writings and writers. As she states in her essay, “For Frankenstein is a birth myth, and one that was lodged in the novelist’s...
    436 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Theme - 1840 Words
    Conflict within One' Self Personal internal battles exist every day whether it is mentally, emotionally, spiritually or even physically. Within each person, typical temptations dwell deep inside. Some of these temptations can be very active or remain dormant until precise events trigger them. The intricacy of a person’s inner struggle fights between a moral and corrupt side. Naturally, undesirable temptations ascend from the lower qualities of people and bare individuals to develop even more...
    1,840 Words | 5 Pages
  • Uncertainty and the Gothic - 2209 Words
    Uncertainty and the Gothic Aristotle was convinced that in any drama, the critical element was suspense. In his definition, in order for it to have any chance of being a successful method, there had to be distinct components of real danger but also a glimmer of hope. Once the character in the narrative is consumed by the danger, the audience feels fear, despair, empathy. Once the hope prevails, the audience is driven to joy, with the contrast between the two emotions heightening the...
    2,209 Words | 6 Pages
  • Gothic in Frankenstein - 385 Words
    The Gothic in Frankenstein “I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel...” In Frankenstein, Mary Shelley uses various mysterious situations for Victor Frankenstein to come across his creation of the monster. Shelley employs the supernatural elements of literature from where Frankenstein gathers body parts for the monster to where the monster kills everyone. She also makes sure that the setting of this gothic/horror novel takes place in Europe so that the readers are not all that...
    385 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discuss How Robert Louis Stevenson Explores the Topic of Duality in His Gothic Fiction Novel 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'
    English Coursework The Gothic fiction novel “Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde”, written by Robert Louis Stevenson in 1886, is a novel about a man torn by the desire to separate the good and evil inside people. The plot beholds a scientist who finds a way to literally separate his good from his evil by drinking a potion. The plot picks up on the Victorian hypocrisy that crippled people into being society’s idea of ‘good’ and the shallow nature of the Victorians and how they judged character by...
    2,570 Words | 7 Pages
  • English on Gothic Stories - 835 Words
    How do authors of gothic stories create tension in their opening to engage the reader? Gothic horror is a gender of literature that uses very descriptive words to make the reader imagine the setting or place it is describing. The reason that gothic horror stories were so popular is because there wasn’t much to entertain the Victorians back then. They didn’t have any TV or games consoles so they had to use their imagination. Therefore the setting was very important in a story because they...
    835 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Gothic Theme in Frankenstein - 1388 Words
    The term Gothic refers to a genre that came about in the late eighteenth century. It can be a type of story, clothing, or music nowadays. In this paper it will refer to a style of literature. A very good example of this type of literature is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. There is a sense of foreboding throughout the whole novel, which is one of the basic necessities of the Gothic. This theme of the Gothic has different characteristics that all fit into the story of Victor Frankenstein and...
    1,388 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Influence and Meaning of Gothic Literature
    The Influence and Meaning of Gothic Literature Gothic is termed in the dictionary with crude and barbaric, this definition coincides with gothic literature. Gothic literature was said to be born in 1764 when Horace Walpole published The Castle of Otranto, which is considered to be the first gothic novel ever written. Gothic literature explores the aggression between what we fear and what we lust. The setting of these gothic stories were usually in some kind of castle or old building that...
    1,385 Words | 4 Pages
  • H.P. Lovecraft and Gothic Literature
    H.P. Lovecraft Gothic fiction has never been lacking in prolificacy. From Edgar Allen Poe to Stephen King, this haunting literary class has yielded innumerable works of timeless creativity and imagination. Just as works from all genres exploit some emotion of the reader, Gothic fiction utilizes horror and shock. Many writings of the genre play on substantial, concrete fears, like murder; however, the works of one agent of this dark literary philosophy go beyond specific, rationalizable phobias....
    669 Words | 2 Pages
  • Elements of the Gothic Genre - 3952 Words
    GOTHIC LITERATURE The gothic novel was invented almost single-handedly by Horace Walpole, whose The Castle of Otranto (1764) contains essentially all the elements that constitute the genre. Walpole's novel was imitated not only in the eighteenth century and not only in the novel form, but it has influenced writing, poetry, and even film making up to the present day. It introduced the term "gothic romance" to the literary world. Due to its inherently supernatural, surreal and sublime...
    3,952 Words | 14 Pages
  • notes on gothic horror - 444 Words
    Gothic novels often were set in Gothic-style castles and churches. Gothic fiction, which reached the height of its popularity in the late 18th to mid-19th centuries, was a genre of fiction that focused on the darker, irrational and more terrifying aspects of life. The Gothic novel was a reaction against the Enlightenment, which saw the world and humans as ordered and logical. Gothic conventions have remained popular and are still found in novels, music and film. 1. Conventions of Setting o...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Literature Essay - 834 Words
    Gothic Literature Comparative Essay In the movie ‘Coraline ‘ and the texts ‘The Red Room’, ‘The Yellow Wallpaper”’ and ‘Northanger Abbey’, there are many aspects of gothic literature present, gothic literature is used to create mystery and a sense of something odd to come. Coraline is a movie about a young girl who discovers a parallel universe in the new house she moved into, The Red Room is about a supposedly haunted room, Northanger Abbey is about a girl who is spending some time in an old...
    834 Words | 2 Pages
  • Wuthering Heights Gothic Genre
    What is Gothic genre? “The idea of a gothic novel was invented almost single-handedly by Horace Walpole, whose ‘The Castle of Otranto’ (1764) contains essentially all the elements that constitute the genre. Walpole's novel has greatly influenced novels not only written from that period of time but also until this date, he has also had great influence upon the short stories, poetry, and even in gothic genre film making up to this present day” Emily Bronte was influence by 'The Bridegroom of...
    1,484 Words | 4 Pages
  • Carrie and Columbine: American Gothic
    Carrie, by Stephen King, and the Columbine High School Incident; looked at separately, they are to things that have nothing to do with each other. Carrie was Stephen King's first major novel and a New York Times bestseller. Columbine was and incident in Colorado that happened in 1999, where two high school seniors orchestrated a bloody massacre at their high school. The two events occurred over twenty-five years apart, but when juxtaposed we can see many similarities between the book ant the...
    1,854 Words | 5 Pages
  • Southern Gothic Themes - 351 Words
    A Streetcar Named Desire: Final Essay Tennessee William’s play a Streetcar Named Desire broke new ground in American theater. Both Streetcar Named Desired and “A Good Man Is Hard to Find” are considered Southern Gothic stories. They’re considered Southern Gothic because it comments on the state of humankind following the death of the gentile, agrarian south aid and the rise of industrialization. Also in each story the characters are reimagined Gothic genre archetypes. Quotes:...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • Gothic Literature Essay - 492 Words
    American Gothic Literature is a chance to experience the bizarre and scary natures of an individual. Authors such as Hawthorne, Faulkner and O’conner use the written word to paint these gothic images in the minds of their readers. Supernatural appearances and motifs such as ghosts and monsters, are embodiments of people’s deepest fears and longings. Authors often use creepy settings because it is what revolves around the event. For example, In The Cask of Amontillado it creates a...
    492 Words | 2 Pages
  • Conventions of the Gothic Genre - 1684 Words
    Conventions of Gothic here are a number of techniques, devices and conventions common to a great deal of Gothic literature: WEATHER: used in a number of ways and forms, some of these being: Mist - This convention in Gothic Literature is often used to obscure objects (this can be related to the sublime) by reducing visibility or to prelude the insertion of a terrifying person or thing; Storms - These frequently accompany important events. Flashes of lightening accompany revelation;...
    1,684 Words | 6 Pages
  • Characteristics of Gothic Literature - 1988 Words
    The Gothic In 1798 an anonymous author published a commentary that revealed exactly how some writers received the Gothic during this time: “ Take—An old castle, half of it ruinous A long gallery, with a great many doors, some secret ones. Three murdered bodies, quite fresh. As many skeletons, in chests and presses. An old woman hanging by the neck; with her throat cut. Assassins and desperadoes, quant. suff. Noises,...
    1,988 Words | 6 Pages
  • American Gothic Lit - 633 Words
    American Gothic American gothic literature became popular in the 19th century when writers started to captivate reader’s attention with stories of mystery and tragedy. This literary scheme was most effective due to it being able to compare real society in a more bizarre sense. In all great Gothic stories, the writer is proving a point on what society needs to realize. In Hawthorne’s “Young Goodman Brown” (553), Hawthorne shows the journey of a young man who is slowly being corrupted and...
    633 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Castle of Otranto – a Gothic Novel
    The Castle of Otranto – A Gothic Novel Picture of the Title Page of the Second Edition A Dossier by Luisa Hiller, Johannes Klein, Benjamin Priebst, and Claudia Haack Table of Contents: 1. Introduction – The Gothic Novel 2. Horace Walpole 2.1. The Life of Horace Walpole 2.2. The Works of Horace Walpole 3. “The Castle of Otranto - A Gothic Novel“ 3.1. Introduction 3.2. Index of Characters 3.3. Summary of the Plot 3.4. The Characters' Appearance 3.5. The Character...
    3,135 Words | 10 Pages
  • the use of gothic in jane eyre
    Melanie Konzett London, 2006 BA English Literature with History How and why has the Gothic been of importance in writing by and for women? The Gothic genre arose with the publication of Walpole’s Castle of Otranto in 1764, and achieved instantly a high popularity. It was particularly associated with female writers and readers (Markman 2003: 48). The Gothic novels of the first wave consist often of a formulaic plot around a hidden crime that feature stereotypical characters in a...
    3,839 Words | 16 Pages
  • Gothic Elements in "The Telltale Heart"
    Gothic Elements in the “The Tell Tale Heart” The classic short story of “The Tell-Tale Heart”, written by one of the all time masters of horror, Edgar Allen Poe, has always been used as an excellent example of Gothic fiction. Edgar Allen Poe specialized in the art of gothic writing and wrote many stories that portrayed disturbing events and delved deeply into the minds of its characters. In "The Tell-Tale Heart," Poe revolves the plot around a raving individual who, insisting that he is sane,...
    1,074 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Literature and Jekyll and Hyde
    My Super-sweet Evil Twin Gothic literature explores the mind, supernatural, and more. The term ‘gothic' came to be applied to this genre of literature due to the fierce emotional ties and vastly dark themes. The settings of the novels and novellas add to the mysteriousness typical of a gothic story. Typical characteristics include: ghosts, terror, castles, darkness, death, doppelgangers or doubles, madness, and/or secrets. Horace Walpole, author of The Castle of Otranto, created Gothic...
    302 Words | 1 Page
  • What is meant by the term gothic
    What is meant by the term ‘gothic’? How far and in what ways is ‘Frankenstein’ a gothic text? Gothic literature, which is sometimes referred to as Gothic horror, is a genre that links horror and romance into one tale of ‘transgressing the boundaries’. Gothicism was unheard of until the late 1700’s, this movement into a new genre of literature. This was pioneered by the English author Horace Walpole, in his famous fictional book ‘The Castle of Otranto’, or as Walpole alternatively titled it...
    1,187 Words | 3 Pages
  • Romantic and Gothic Literature - 1667 Words
    Romantic and Gothic Literature The gothic literary movement is a part of the larger Romantic Movement. Gothic literature shares many of the traits of romanticism, such as the emphasis on emotions and the imagination. Gothic literature goes beyond the melancholy evident in most romantic works, however, and enters into the areas of horror and decay, becoming preoccupied with death. “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allan Poe is a powerful example of gothic fiction, whereas James Fenimore...
    1,667 Words | 5 Pages
  • Portrayal of Gothic Images - 539 Words
    Portrayal of Gothic Images When the topic of Gothic literature is discussed most readers immediately think of vampire stories, tales of horror, terror and supernatural tales, but the use of Gothic in poetry also has enhanced the images within works of poetry such as "The Poor Singing Dame" and "The Lady of Shallot". While the longer stories can elaborate upon the defining characteristics of the genre, the poet can create the same chilling fantasies with limited words as seen in the Gothic...
    539 Words | 2 Pages
  • Research Paper on Gothic Elements
    Cambria Rightful Inheritance of Otranto The Castle of Otranto written by Horace Walpole is considered to be the first gothic novel. Horace Walpole is said to have written the novel after he had a nightmarish dream, which might explain the darkness of the novel. In this novel through the use of the supernatural, the setting of a castle, and women threatened by a tyrannical male, Walpole reflects the thought of a hero’s identity being revealed thus expressing the idea of rightful inheritance,...
    1,365 Words | 4 Pages
  • Female Characters in Gothic Texts
    Female Characters in Gothic Texts Gothic fiction has become a popular area for feminist studies. Many commentators have noticed how females in Gothic fiction often fall into one of two categories: the trembling and innocent victim or the shameless and dangerous predator. However, others have noticed how women writers have often used the Gothic to explore aspects of femininity and sexuality. The mad woman in the attic in Jane Eyre has become a key symbol of Gothic feminism. The persecuted...
    1,016 Words | 3 Pages
  • Different Types of Gothic Horror
    In “The Judge’s House” written by Bram Stoker, the story takes place at an evil judge’s house that has hanged people, and a student named Malcomson is just staying there for a few days despite being warned not to. Strange occurrences begin with rats disturbing Malcomson while he is staying there but particularly a rat with red eyes sticks out to him. The rat with the red eyes would be in a hole behind a painting of the judge that is hung in the house, and sit in the same position as the judge...
    2,477 Words | 6 Pages
  • Southern Gothic Literary Tradition
    Southern Gothic Literary Tradition Jamie Friend South University Online Miss Emily Grierson fits the description of Southern Gothic tradition in “A Rose for Emily” due to the fact that she is portrayed as a character with symptoms of mental illness that cause her to do horrific things. She is also a symbol of respect in the town and considered a “fallen monument” (Faulkner, 1930, p. 543). The community of Jefferson never thought Miss Emily was “crazy”, but that she was an ill person....
    603 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Horror Essay - 1590 Words
    How does Algernon Blackwood use the conventions of Gothic Horror to create a sense of fear and horror in “The Kit Bag”? INTRODUCTION Gothic Horror is a genre which tries to create a sense of fear and horror in the reader. Writers of gothic horror use a number of conventions to achieve this. Some of these include setting, the supernatural, isolated hero, the climax and sound. In 'The Kit Bag,' Blackwood uses a number of these conventions to create a sense of horror. PEE 1 The setting in...
    1,590 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Literature Informaiton - 2504 Words
    Aspects of Gothic Literature December 2012 Contents Gothic elements in some pre-eighteenth century literature……………………….page 3 The Gothic in Literature of the 20th/21st Century……………………………………...page 6 Transgression and Excess………………………………………………………………………..page 9 Structure of Gothic Literature………………………………………………………………..page 11 GOTHIC ELEMENTS IN SOME PRE-EIGHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATURE Horace Walpole The Castle of Otranto (1764) 21st century gothic style * Originate from a...
    2,504 Words | 11 Pages
  • American Gothic Literature Mevlida
     American Gothic Literature Directions Please save this document before you begin working on the assignment. Type your answers directly in the document. _________________________________________________________________________ Part 1 Answer the following questions in complete sentences. (Each question is worth two points) 1. Why is Fortunato's name ironic in "The Cask of Amontillado"? Type your response here: His name means ‘fortunate’ or ‘lucky’ and he wasn’t neither. He got tricked...
    422 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic elements in Angela Carter
    what use does Carter make of gothic elements in ‘The Bloody Chamber’ The term ‘Gothic’ was first used to describe a style of art and architecture in medieval Europe. It was said that gothic was an “attempt to incorporate the power of wild nature within the structures of civilization” writers later started using this idea in their literature, Angela Carter was was of these writers, using many gothic elements in her stories to evoke certain emotion from her readers. One of the main gothic...
    999 Words | 3 Pages
  • northanger abbey gothic - 1719 Words
    Northanger Abbey essay 1. How far does Northanger Abbey fulfil and/or challenge some of the conventions of the gothic? Jane Austen’s novel Northanger Abbey, is regarded by many as a light-hearted parody of the gothic genre. The term 'gothic' is defined in the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Literary terms “as a story of terror, suspense usually set in a gloomy old castle or monastery [hence gothic, a term applied to medieval architecture and thus associated in the 18th century” (page 106). In...
    1,719 Words | 5 Pages
  • Gothic Elements in the Cask of Amontillado
    Gothic Elements in The Cask of Amontillado By: Harshul Jain The Cask of Amontillado is a short story written by Edgar Allan Poe. Poe is known for using Gothic conventions in his stories which mostly includes the atmosphere of mystery, oppressiveness to create terror but interestingly he subverts the Gothic conventions by having having human beings, instead of a supernatural element, create most horrible deeds. Poe tries to achieve that horror via the capabilities of the humans. Poe uses...
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  • Poe as a Gothic Writer - 1249 Words
    Early horror literature came out of a mix of the upcoming of romanticism, the decline of the enlightenment, and most of all from early gothic traditions themselves. Neo-gothic interests greatly sparked the minds of many 18th century writers, Edgar Allen Poe being one of them. Poe is classified as an American Horror author of the romanticism era who wrote many short stories and poems of weird, gloomy, and haunting concepts. The ideas behind many of his stories relate to the minds of many people...
    1,249 Words | 3 Pages
  • Dracula - Gothic Response - 556 Words
    The gothic novel, Dracula, is based on Count Dracula who is a centuries-old vampire and inhabits a decaying castle in Transylvania. The novel begins with our storyteller Jonathan Harker travelling to Dracula’s castle in Transylvania. He soon discovers he is a prisoner of the castle and narrowly escapes with his life. The rest of the novel revolves around Harker and other characters trying to catch and destroy Dracula. The novel concludes with Harker and Holmwood driving their knives through...
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gothic Elements in Jane Eyre
    Gothic is a literary genre that is connected to the dark and horrific. It became popular in the late Victorian Era, following the success of Horace Walpole's The Castle of Otranto, in 1764. Since that time, gothic literature has become a widespread influence. Some elements that are typically gothic include ancient prophecies, mystery and suspense, supernatural events, dreams and visions, violence, and a gloomy and desolate setting. Charlotte Bronte, the author of Jane Eyre, was greatly...
    1,450 Words | 4 Pages
  • Frankenstein, Gothic Literature - 908 Words
    Progressive Destruction through Isolation Mary Shelly depicted destruction commencing due to gothic isolation in the novel, Frankenstein. She placed Victor Frankenstein inside a living space cohesive to harmony and unhindered development from a young age; it lent itself to self-exploration and a lack or emotional pain. The author used the youth as support towards the display of darker isolation. Victor’s choice of scientific exploration and gothic isolation securely left coherence, as he...
    908 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic, a Revival of Culture
    “The Gothic, through the motif of the double explores the struggle between the good and evil within man” To what extent are Poe’s short stories, Coleridge’s Christabel and R.L Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde explorations of the duality of man. The gothic, as a fictional genre, came about as a result of cultural changes in the eighteenth century; these cultural changes began to form through the renaissance. This transitional period between the Medieval Era and the modern world changed the...
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  • Fears and Insecurities in the Gothic - 1649 Words
    Nick Kavo A critical response to the following question: “The gothic tradition that began with the castle of Otranto reflects our fears and insecurities and thus continues to be appropriated into a range of cultures and contexts”. Nick Kavo A critical response to the following question: “The gothic tradition that began with the castle of Otranto reflects our fears and insecurities and thus continues to be appropriated into a range of cultures and contexts”. Assessment task 4: Gothic Fears...
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  • The Gothic and supernatural in Wuthering Heights
    The Gothic and supernatural in Wuthering Heights One of the most outstanding themes on Wuthering Heights is the gothic characterization of the setting and the strange events which occurs in its surroundings. The aim in this work is study the characterization of ghost and the gothic during the Victorian Era and, in specific Wuthering Heights. The ghost and spiritualism themes appeal both men and women in the nineteen century and we should consider the fact that more than half gothic stories...
    1,073 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic Qualities in the Works of Poe
    Gothic Qualities in the Works of Poe What makes the work of Poe gothic? Gothic fiction, particularly that written by Edgar Allan Poe has a number of common themes, motifs and structures that make his work easily recognizable and more importantly, fits his stories into the classification of the gothic. Among these elements of the gothic that run throughout the works of Edgar Allan Poe include the pervasive theme of death and decay, which is almost always a staple in Gothic fiction, the theme or...
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  • american Gothic introduction - 435 Words
    American Gothic as a distinctive American literature provides substantive insights into the history and culture of the United States. Its roots trace back to 18th century when in 1781 a highly religious farmer ritually murdered his wife and four kids after religious voices told him to. Beyond comprehension and strange story caught the attention of a lawyer Charles Brockden Brown, who later used motives of this bloody murder in his book Wieland (1798). The book is a story of conversion of mature...
    435 Words | 2 Pages
  • Impact of Gothic Literature - 1869 Words
     Impact of Gothic Literature Gothic Literature is a well-known genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. Gothic writing has impacted the literature and art of today by influencing writers and artists over time. It was able to do so with its interesting storylines, ability to hold suspense, and the way it held interests of many people through the ages. Understanding this unique genre can help a person to truly appreciate literature as a whole. The word “Goth”...
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  • Women in Gothic Literature - 865 Words
    Women in gothic literature are presented as either evil or victims how far do you agree? The Gothic genre is an increasingly popular area for feminist studies, showing contrasts in society at the time and the expectations of women within it. In pre industrial times, women were expected to play a subservient role to men, they were expected to marry young and bare children, they would simply care for their husbands and support the family, they were denied the right to vote or own property and...
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gothic conventions in 'The Others'
    Gothic Conventions used in The Others: The film ‘The Others’ made by Alejandro Amenabar in 2011 is a film about a woman who lives with her two photosensitive children in their large, old home which she believes is haunted by ghosts. This film uses a large range of techniques and ideas to emphasise and contribute to its gothic themes. These techniques include dark and light imagery, symbolism and setting. The Others also uses traditional gothic ideas to develop these themes throughout the movie,...
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  • Gothic elements in Frankenstein and Christabel
    Analysis of gothic elements in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein and S.T.Coleridge's Christabel Romantic writers commonly used gothic elements to describe supernatural events that included a dark setting and gloomy atmosphere, usually followed by a dreadful crime. Many writers took interest in the gothic, and in this essay I will try to analyze and discuss the use of those elements in Frankenstein written by Mary Shelley and Christabel by S.T.Coleridge. “The Gothic novel could be seen as a...
    1,480 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Literature: the Fascination with Terror
    Traci L. Pugh Dr. Amber Reagan-Kendrick ENG 45023-SU-2012-OA Seminar in American Literature 8 August 2012 Gothic Literature: The Fascination with Terror People have an intrinsic fear of the dark and the unknown. While each person’s level of anxiety and object of terror are different, the fascination to reveal them has inspired Gothic authors such as Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Stephen King, and Stephenie Meyer for three centuries. Subjects of these classic tales include vampires,...
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  • southern gothic tales - 878 Words
     Southern Gothic Tales William Faulkner was born in New Albany, Mississippi, in 1897. On July 6, 1962, coincidentally the same date as the Old Colonel's birthday, William Faulkner died of a heart attack. One of the twentieth century’s greatest writers, Faulkner earned his fame from a series of novels that explore the South’s historical legacy. Faulkner was awarded the 1949 Nobel Prize in Literature and ultimately won two Pulitzers and two National Book Awards as well. Faulkner...
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  • Frankenstein gothic elements - 1499 Words
    Frankenstein Literary Essay What would you do if you were in a position to act as god? That is what the gothic book Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein focuses on. Frankenstein incorporates many aspects of a classic gothic novel such as themes that play out throughout the book. The characters in the novel have become archetypes for many gothic novels. The setting reflects the chilling themes as it is the background for the characters plummet into despair. Frankenstein is an...
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  • The Influence of Genre Gothic Novel in Romantic Period to the Gothic Style in Indonesia Today
    The Influence of Genre Gothic Novel in Romantic Period to The Gothic Style in Indonesia Today ‘Gothic’ came from the word ‘Goths’ which is the name of one of Germanic tribes. According to Jordenes, the writer from Romantic period, the Goths came from the southern Sweden and then moved to the southern shore of the Baltic Sea. In recent years, Gothic has meant several things. It can be a particular style of arts, novels, paintings, architectures and even in the form of music style....
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  • The Yellow Wallpaper Gothic Elements Essay
    English The Yellow Wallpaper Essay By Jon Karkafiris The Wallpaper is a well-written novel by Charlotte Gilman. It portrays a young married woman who is trapped in a home due to her sickness and follows the development of her intolerance to the wallpaper in her room. The narrator generates fear and intrigue in the reader with a variety of different language patterns used throughout the text. The intense vocabulary leaves the reader in awe and with a feeling of uncertainty as to what will...
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  • The Gothic Elements in the Picture of Dorian Gray
    Abstract In an attempt to find out the purposes of the gothic elements in The Picture of Dorian Gray, this essay takes a close look at the three most prevailing gothic elements in the novel: the portrait, decadence, and the gothic villain by first exploring their presence and development throughout, and then examining their contributions to the characters, the plot development and the themes. First of all, the unique properties and symbolic meanings of the portrait in this novel are discussed....
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  • Texts in Time Essay, Gothic Literature
    “Compare and contrast the presentation of female protagonists in Gothic Literature, in order to determine the validity of Gothic as a serious genre rather than the merely macabre” The three texts; Bram Stoker’s Dracula, The Bloody Chamber by Angela Carter and Selected poems by John Keats project images of female characters in very different ways. Much of the portrayal of females is in correlation to the attitudes and position of women within society at the time of writing. The preconception...
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  • Gothic, Not Ideal Form in the Hound of the Baskervilles
    In this essay, I will do a close analysis of the genre The Hound of the Baskervilles belongs to and how it undermines the ideal detective novel. Tales of mystery are classified into two types. One is the ideal detective story which is a fantasy of social order. The narrative pattern basically involves a struggle between the detective and criminal, triumph of the detective, punishment of criminal and hence a restoration of law and order in society. One would automatically...
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  • Humanity, Monstrosity, Gothic Literature & Death
    Humanity, Monstrosity, Gothic Literature & Death by J. Williams The Gothic genre delves into the depths of humanity, where the presence of the horrible and the macabre represent ‘the dark side’ of human nature. Indeed, according to M. H. Abrams, Gothic novelists invited “fiction to the realm of the irrational and of the perverse impulses and nightmarish terrors that lie beneath the orderly surface of the civilized mind” (111). In such works, unnatural desires and forbidden excesses that...
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  • Gothic - Turn of the Screw and Shutter Island
    A value common in many gothic texts is that of the role of women, who are generally demonstrated as weak and incapable, especially in difficult and unfamiliar circumstances. In “The Turn of the Screw,” for example, the governess and even Mrs Grose are determined to protect and mother the children yet; ironically, they cannot even go as far as to protect themselves mentally. Correspondingly, in “Shutter Island,” it is implied that Teddy’s psychological insecurity is only there due to the trauma...
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  • Jane Eyre and Gothic Elements in the Book
    In the novel “Jane Eyre” written by Charlotte Bronte the gothic style of writing is used to help bring out the different themes. There are gothic qualities within the novel such as the usage of masks, the atmosphere in many of the scenes, and a heroin being the main character and living “happily ever after”. This essay will analyze how the gothic style is used within the novel. First and foremost the reader is introduced to the narrator and main character of the novel: Jane Eyre. It is...
    1,542 Words | 4 Pages
  • Gothic Genre Essay- American Physco
    "Parodied to Death: The Postmodern Gothic of American Psycho" Critic: Ruth Helyer Source: Modern Fiction Studies 46, no. 3 (fall 2000): 725-46. Year of Source Publication: 2000 Critical Essay Title: "Parodied to Death: The Postmodern Gothic of American Psycho" Critic Name: Ruth Helyer Source Publication Title: Modern Fiction Studies [(essay date fall 2000) In the following essay, Helyer probes elements of Gothic excess and postmodern self-awareness in American Psycho, noting the novel's emphasis...
    8,322 Words | 21 Pages
  • Gothic and Vampiric Themes in Wuthering Heights
    From its inception, Gothic fiction has been a literature of resistance, defying tradition and transgressing boundaries. At a time when the Enlightenment lauded reason and clarity, the Gothic persistently emphasized the presence of darkness and despair, of ambiguity and uncertainty amidst seemingly definite surroundings. With early authors such as Walpole, Radcliffe, and Matthew “Monk” Lewis, the bizarre and uncanny emerged as elements of the everyday. Lewis’ The Monk portrayed sexual perversion,...
    6,018 Words | 16 Pages
  • Frankenstein: What Makes It a Gothic Novel?
    Frankenstein: What Makes it a Gothic Novel? One of the most important aspects of any gothic novel is setting. Mary Shelly's Frankenstein is an innovative and disturbing work that weaves a tale of passion, misery, dread, and remorse. Shelly reveals the story of a man's thirst for knowledge which leads to a monstrous creation that goes against the laws of nature and natural order. The man, Victor Frankenstein, in utter disgust, abandons his creation who is shunned by all of mankind yet still...
    718 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of “Dark Shadows” as a Gothic Masterpiece
    Analysis of “Dark Shadows” as a Gothic Masterpiece To most, when asked to define what Gothic is, they will state that it is similar to any other story, just with more “darkness.” This is because Gothic stories all have a classic story line. First, there is the main character’s back story, if any is then told. Next, there are events that lead up to a horrible incident that is the climax of the story. Lastly, the character finds some way to fix the situation or free him- or herself...
    2,157 Words | 5 Pages
  • How far is the pardoners tale gothic?
    How far is the pardoners tale gothic? The gothic genre, thought to be introduced in 1769 by Horace Walpole’s noel The Castle of Otranto, was remembered for its crude, grotesque, exaggerated nature. Although in medieval times the Gothic movement had not commenced, Chaucer’s can be considered a forerunner to this movement as many aspects in the pardoners tale are clear gothic, however Chaucer did not perceive his writing as Gothic, he did not intentional write a Gothic tale like later authors...
    1,219 Words | 3 Pages
  • ‘The Bloody Chamber', the characters and elements of gothic
    The genre of gothic literature contains both elements of horror and romance, with an innocent female, a powerful male (usually the quintessential villain), as well as themes to do with the supernatural as key features included in the novel. In this chapter, elements of the gothic begin in the very title of the book: the ‘bloody’ in ‘The Bloody Chamber’ associates the idea of death and gore, a more horrific element of the gothic genre; the ‘Chamber’ itself now sounds more claustrophobic and...
    1,148 Words | 3 Pages
  • Dorian Gray Benig Characterised as Gothic
    The notion of the Gothic novel, also known as the “Gothic romance”, was a genre initiated by Horace Warpol’s Castle of Otranto, a Gothic Story (1764). The Gothic genre of fictional prose spread over the 19th century. The idea of a gothic themed story is not simply characterized as a gloomy, horror story; there is more to the notion than simply this. The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only published novel by Oscar Wilde. Having first appeared in 1890 it was edited by Wilde and published in 1891....
    1,683 Words | 5 Pages
  • Edgar Allan Poe, Gothic Writter
    Would you consider Edgar Allan Poe a gothic writer? Is the short story, “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe, the narrator kills an old man and hides his body parts under the floor boards of the old man’s house due to the narrator believing the old man’s eye is evil. Police investigate the old man’s house, when the narrator hears the heartbeat of the old man’s heart and confesses to the murder. “The Tell-Tale Heart” depicts the gothic element of highly charged emotion and a spooky...
    306 Words | 1 Page
  • Jasper Jones Southern Gothic Genre
    Jasper Jones Essay (Southern Gothic Genre) There are points in a person’s life when they must grow, drop their naïve illusions about the world and step into the shoes of an adult and accept the harsh reality of life. Jasper Jones is a ‘coming of age’ novel written by Craig Silvey set in small town Corrogan. With the main theme being right of passage or coming of age. Jasper Jones has been compared to a Southern Gothic Genre story. Using the narrative conventions of characterisation, setting...
    1,097 Words | 3 Pages
  • Summary of Gothic Horror and Edgar Allen Poe
    Summary Of gothic horror What is horror? People find different things scary, so different people have different ideas about what horror actually is. A lot of people enjoy the feeling of being scared, reasons being that it gives them a thrill, lets them take a break from things in their life they may be bored of, they are trying to conquer something the really do have a fear of, or just because that’s who they are. Horror stories include things like suspense, surprise, a setting that gives...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • Edgar Allan Poe and Gothic Imagery in "The Cask of Amontillado"
    ENG 341-Studies in Literary Genres | The Significance of Imagery | In Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Cask of Amontillado” | Lauren Grilli 6/7/2010 | Imagery is described as the ‘mental pictures’ one interprets from reading any type of literature; this can be done using any of the five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and sound. Edgar Allan Poe is notorious for his use of dramatic imagery in the gothic genre. “Gothic literature has a number of conventions, including evocations of...
    2,298 Words | 6 Pages
  • Gothic Essay: Dracula vs. the Lady in the House of Love
    Gothic literature originated in the late 19th century and was a branch of the larger Romantic Movement. Like the Romantics, Gothic writers also endeavoured to provoke deep emotions in their readers, however their motive was to access the darker side of humanity and create an atmosphere of mystery, apprehension and extreme fear through the use of the genre’s conventions. Authors employ secluded and grotesque settings, supernatural beings and events, combines horror and romance as well as...
    890 Words | 3 Pages


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